Hawke’s Bay Photo News May 1961

Hawke’s Bay PHOTO NEWS
May 1961
30th Issue
HAWKE’S BAY’S OWN PHOTO MAGAZINE
2/6

[Cover photo – Lenore Livingstone, an 11-year-old contestant in the Hastings Highland Games, reflects the true Highland Spirit that pervades the gathering.]

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Page 1

Concours d’Elegance

Looking truly elegant Diane Murray receives the trophy for the winner of the Concours d’Elegance, the rather unusual competition which was the daily feature of the International Motor Show during its week’s run in Napier recently.

Mayor Peter Tait is seen presenting the prize while Diane’s driver and escort, Des McDonagh, stands in the background. The competition required the women entrants to appear in different attire suitable for various occasions on each of the appearances they made throughout the week. Simple backing and garaging tests for the drivers were also included in the points total as well as the appearance and style of the car.

Gail Bishop, our last month’s “Cover Girl” was placed second. Her driver George Harris looks on.

Third prize went to: Marie Grieve of Hastings and her driver, John Blake.

These three girls were all named as runners-up to the first three.

Margaret Kersey of Napier,

Julie Sparks of Hastings and

Jocelyn Yanko of Napier.

Page 2

PHOTO NEWS
HAWKE’S BAY’S OWN PICTORIAL PHOTO MAGAZINE
MAY 1961
Volume 3
No. 5

Editor Arch. Barclay

Editorial Enquiries
Telephone 39-047, Napier

Postal Address
P.O. Box 169, Napier

Published monthly by The Hawke’s Bay Publishing Co. Ltd. on the 4th Thursday of every month.

MAIL ORDER SERVICE
“Photo News” mailed to you on receipt of 12 issue sub. of 32/ –

PHOTOGRAPHERS & DISTRIBUTORS
Batchelor Studios
231 Heretaunga. Street W., Hastings
Phone 88-766
Tennyson St., Napier – Phone 7413

Printed photo-litho for the Publishers by Swailes, Hurst & Co. Ltd. Napier

OUR COVER PICTURES

Front Cover. Lenore Livingstone, an 11-year-old contestant in the Hastings Highland Games, reflects the true Highland Spirit that pervades the gathering. She was not a winner, but she was a worthy contender.
Photo by Roy Batchelor

Back Cover. “Will Mummy scold me?” Our photographer Phil Moore couldn’t resist when his small daughter Marney Rose, 22 months, headed for the doorstep. He loaded his camera and fired off a dozen shots. This was our pick of them. Marney Rose has won two baby shows and seems well on the way to becoming a front cover girl – some day.
Phil Moore Photo

CLOSING – MAY 10th

HAWKE’S BAY PHOTO NEWS

SUNSHINE GIRL CONTEST

WITH PRIZES TO THE VALUE or £104/5/-

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CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

Send to “Photo News”, Box 169, Napier, a glossy print, – size 6″ x 3″ – of yourself in a bathing suit, shorts and top, playsuit, etc.

IMPORTANT – With your entry send name, address, occupation, age, and photographer‘s name. (Top prize-winning amateur photographer will receive £3 of film from Batchelors Studios.)

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Page 3

They arrived in sporting style . . . . and stepped out ready for the beach.

This contestant came complete with poodle to match her snowy-white hat.

Gail Bishop looking cooly casual.

Margaret Kersey and her driver, John Calnan, struck a casual match.

Page 4

The Bridge and Beyond

It didn’t take the young fishermen of Napier long to discover the advantages of a new bridge across a tidal lagoon. Some day the main purpose of the new Westshore Bridge could even be superceded.

And for those who pass on over there may still be a little chilly autumn bathing. This view of Westshore beach was taken in the summer – remember the day?

Page 5

A RECORD FOR “THE ECHOES”

An up-and-coming group at young Hawke’s Bay entertainers have just placed a feather in their caps with the release last month of their first commercial recording. Des Gibson and The Echoes first got together two years ago through a youth club in Napier. Since then the members of the group have changed a bit but now seem to be fairly stable. As always, there are no artificial barriers in the world of music – four come from Napier, two from Hastings.

The group is, in front row: Kevin McElroy (bass player), Des Gibson (vocalist and guitarist), Jim Paxie (drummer). Behind: Laurie Tassell (pianist), Michael Angland (guitarist), and Paul Gitmans (tenor saxophonist).

The boys’ release on a Pacific label features a revival of an old song “Corrina Corrina” on one side and “There She Goes” on the other.

The boys relax a bit in lighter mood. “Photo News” wishes them all the best on the hard road to the top.

Page 6

H.G.H.S. SPORTS

The excitement was intense on the Hastings Girls’ High School grounds the day they held their fortieth Annual School Sports. En masse our schoolgirls can display far more emotions than they ever do after they leave – the sort of excitement which adult flew Zealanders shun.

Their exuberance is just as plain here as the girls urge competitors in the sack relay.

J. Cartwright was first with B. Williams close behind in the 150 yards Intermediate Championship.

Entrants in one of the novelty events, “the bottle and ball race”, listen intently to starting instructions from Mr. Fuller.

Great jumping kangaroos! It’s in the bag.

Page 7

The champions keep up to date with the “state of the nation”. From left: Junior Champion, M. Cummins; Intermediate Dual Champions, M. Skinner and J. Cartwright; and Senior Champion S. Haden.

With the same alacrity they show in clearing the table at home, these willing hands make light work of clearing away the jumping “pit”.

V. Hatherall, House Captain of “Purple” receives congratulations from the other captains, I. Kani, Blue; A. Izatt, Green; and M. Wang, Gold.

Page 8

HE WENT THATAWAY

£22,000 worth of perspex cockpit, vertical 6-cylinder motor and apparently flimsy tailplane hang suspended over McLean Park, Napier, from the two rotating blades of this helicopter – oh yes – and one pilot. He is Michael Alexander who brought the aircraft over from Aerial Applicators, Wanganui, to perform on the last two days of the Motor Show at Napier. Seldom do we, in the provinces, get a close look at these strange machines that defy all the normal rules of aerodynamics and not only stay aloft by sheer willpower but can perform all sorts of intricate dance steps on thin air. Contrary to popular belief, changes of direction are not made by changing the angle of the two rotor blades, but by changing the angle of two control paddles plainly seen in this photo. The pilot explained it would be quite impossible to mechanically change the set of the blades in flight. At normal revolutions the tips of the blades are travelling just below the speed of sound. Temperatures in the sun-trap cockpit rise as high as 130 degrees. Pilots must have extensive experience of conventional aircraft and must take a 60-flying-hours conversion course before flying solo.

Michael Alexander inspects the open engine before taking off in his “souped-up eggbeater”.

Page 9

ODDSHOTS

Instead of the usual seagull on this Napier flag pole we were fortunate to catch one of the rarer birds that visit our shores – polaris sedentari – a featherlass bird which gains altitude through sheer willpower. And if you’re concerned about his welfare see the S.P.C.A., or turn the page – the answer will be there this time!

Last month we featured the interior of this Whare Runanga at Nuhaka which, at the time was destined for the L.D.S. Pacific Museum at Hawaii. The Mormon authorities have since decided not to shift it. This meeting house is well worth a visit. It’s undoubtedly one of the best examples of the deep carving of the Ngati Kahungunu.

How to get there: At Nuhaka, travelling north, turn right towards the sea for 300 yards then left. The meeting house is then in view.

Last month we published this photograph full page but somehow buried the answer to a “where is it” question elsewhere in the issue. However, we received an interesting letter from Mrs R. I. Ramlose of Wairoa who spent her younger days round Barracks Hill as it was then called. She tells us the building at top left was the first hospital and the one behind it the first nurses’ home. The flagpole, at right, was erected by a Mr. Coker who was a steward on the S.S. Tangaroa. Captain Anderson of the Tangaroa lived in the top house on the right of Goldsmith Road with, next door, the skipper of the old suction dredge “J.D.O.”, Captain McAllister, who later died when the coaster “Ripple” went down on a trip from Wellington.

Apparently flagstaffs were as common then as barbecue pits today. Mr. Fenwick, whose stevedoring company is still operating, lived on the other side of Goldsmith Road, and the elaborate Coker pole was partly designed to outdo the Fenwick flagstaff. The glasshouse, long since removed to the Riverbend Road Loop, and still standing, belonged to the Cokers. Mrs Ramlose, then Miss Laws, recalls being sent as a child to buy grapes and the precision with which Mrs Coker cut the bunches to get the right weight. Mrs Ramlose, then Miss Laws, passed the sixth standard at Ahuriri School in 1902 when Mr. Wolstenholme was headmaster. Thank you Mrs. Ramlose

This wee fellow played “Tom Thumb” at a Port Ahuriri School Concert in the 1890s. His mother made the costume and Dr. Milne Thompson, supplied the “Bell Topper”. He is Mr. H. V. Laws, now in his seventies, and retired at Tokoroa.

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Page 10

HIGH SCHOOLS SWIMMING SPORTS

The finish of a middle distance freestyle event at the Colenso High School swimming sports held in the Napier Municipal Baths, and …

…..the start of a handicap relay event for the girls.

This is the bird from the previous page in the throes of a one-and-a-half somersault off the board at the Boys’ High School sports.

…. AND NELSON PARK PRIMARY

Youngsters enter the water a little more diffidently than their older brothers and sisters, while ……..

. . . this happy crowd of young Nelson Parkers (no relation to Nosy) looks on.

Page 11

Napier Weddings

BOUND – DIDCOTT

At Napier Baptist Church, Rosalie Didcott, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Didcott, Bedford Road, Napier, to Brian Bound, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Bound, Gisborne.
Batchelors Studios Photo

BROUGH – MILNE

At St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church, Napier, Dorothy Mary Milne, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Milne, Corry Avenue, Napier, to Ian Brough son of Mrs. H. and the late Mr. G. Brough, Hataitai, Wellington.
Batchelors Studios Photo

Dannevirke Wedding

EAGLE – WONNOCOTT

At St. John’s Anglican Church, Dannevirke, Elaine Ngaire Wonnocott, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wonnocott, Te Rehunga, Dannevirke, to Maurice Mason Eagle, elder son of Mr. and Mrs, M. P. Eagle, Tipapakuku, Dannevirke.
Reader’s Picture.

Page 12

R.S.A.

Kitchen fatigues were a real pleasure for this trio as they prepared and no doubt sampled the crayfish for supper at the first combined social evening held in the newly-expanded games room of the Hastings R.S.A Club. J. Scott, A. Taylor and R. Spargo tear them apart with relish.

Besides carrying on a brisk bartering business, “Wog” Len Symes managed to recapture a touch of the nostalgic East with the inevitable . .

“Indian Rope Trick” – or was it originally Egyptian. No matter, he was still very convincing.

This Herald Tribune trio obviously enjoyed the evening. From left: leader-writer, Geoff Long; company secretary, Stan Andrews; and agricultural writer, Alan Purdie.

Page 13

Social

More than 320 wives and members attended the gathering and enjoyed the evening, among them Mr. and Mrs. Alan Gray and, Mrs. and Mr. N. L. Cavaney.

Also enjoying themselves were Mrs. L. Dorwood, Mrs. L. Dixon and Mrs. G. Nealy,

This might almost be entitled “Story Without Words”. From left: Mrs. P. Goldfinch, Mrs. S. Rouse, Mrs. J. Hill and the Mayoress and wife of the R.S.A. President, Mrs. R. Giorgi.

And looking immaculate for the occasion were the club staff, Joe Langley, E. Wall and W. Sant.

Page 14

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Page 15

Sunshine GIRLS

Betty Symons of White Street, Taradale.

Diane Malcouronne, aged 20, a student nurse at Napier Hospital.

Janice Matthews is a 17-year-old student of Latham Street, Napier.

Photos by Batchelors Studios

Page 16

Margaret Looks Back

Twenty-one year old Margaret Gillespie of Hastings had an opportunity given few girls when she saw herself in retrospect at her party. Tom Dillon obliged as Margaret sans teeth [Right] Margaret’s first day at school – coy and preoccupied with an all-day-sucker – Peter Brown

Ron Parker took the progression one stage further to Intermediate.

Maury Hunter considered Margaret was well on the downward path by the time she reached high school.

However, as a sporting girl – Tom McKay – Margaret appears to have pulled her socks up or is that hemline dropping.

And to prove she’s an all-rounder Bryan Hutchinson somehow found his way into this get-up . . . or is it “Get out?”

Page 17

21st Birthdays

And Margaret Gillespie herself who took it all in good part . . . we’re inclined to think she had no option.

And the boys are quite determined that now she’s 21 she should be married off as quickly as possible. The blushing bride – Archie Packer.

Terry Wild of Te Awa Avenue, Napier held his 21st at home. He’s seen with his sister, Margaret, and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. Wild.
Photo by Batchelors Studios

Irene and Don Dunnett’s oldest son, Ivan, celebrated his 21st at the Ex Navalmen’s Hall, Onekawa. Their home is in Vigor Brown St, Napier.
Batchelors Studio Photo

Working Holiday

These three young Napier men were given a farewell before they set off for an Australian working holiday. From left they are Graham Prebble, Barry Smart, and Dave McDonald.

Page 18

MARITIME CARNIVAL

A portion only of the tremendous crowd that flocked to the Napier wharves for a gala arranged by the supporters of the Maritime Personality candidate, Dorothy Hewitt. The lovely day brought people out in their thousands, almost to the point of embarrassing the organisers.

There were plenty willing hands to shove off this small launch.

Starters in the half-mile harbour race taking a running header into the “drink” when their handicap is called.

Page 19

The boy who came out first, Peter Robertson, Meeanee, aged 13, who won the harbour swim.

Spray flew in all directions as some top-notch water skiers went through their routines to the delight of the crowd.

This one just about grounded on the beach as he swept past in a magnificent curve of flying foam.

Maritime Personality Girl, Dorothy Hewitt accompanied by her maids took around “the tarpaulin“ to support their appeal for an Olympic swimming pool at Napier. Dorothy works for the Harbour Board.

Amidst all the attractions of the day, the children were not forgotten. This tractor train from the Marine Parade boating pool took youngsters all round the wharves – even beneath the phosphate hoppers.

Page 20

Engaged

Diane, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alan Murray, Nelson Crescent, Napier, to Tony Poscano of Wellington.
Phil Moore Photo

Isabell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.S. Gay, Taradale, to Noel Lawrence.
Batchelors Studios Photo

Marcia Goodacre, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.P. Carrington, Heretaunga Street, Hastings, to Peter, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. G. Caccioppoli of Longlands.
Batchelors Studios Photo

CHRISTENING

Mrs. Harbord holding her great-grandchild, Deborah Jo Ann Elsworth, after her christening. On the left her grandmother, Mrs. Sparling and on the right, her mother, Mrs. M. Elsworth of Russell Road, Marewa, Napier.

GOLDEN WEDDING

Mr and Mrs P.J.D. Oliver of Latham Street, Napier, who recently celebrated their golden wedding.
Photo by Batchelors Studios

Page 21

21sts

Colleen Bickerstaff and her mother, Mrs. J. Bickerstaff, Frederick Street, Hastings. Colleen and her friends dined and danced at the Casablanca.

Ian Keith Finlayson with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. K. Finlayson, Douglas McLean Avenue, Napier.

Photos by Batchelors Studios

Arthur Blair was another young man who recently turned 21. He’s a son of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Blair, Eskdale.
Photo by Batchelors Studios

Graham Ronald Harris, Seddon Crescent, Napier, celebrated his 21st at the Old Folks’ Hall, Dalton Street. His parents are Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Harris.
Photo by Batchelors Studios

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Page 22

MOTOR SHOW

Though the International Motor Show was not as crowded as this all the time it did receive reasonable patronage from the people of the Bay.

It must have been extremely frustrating for motor dealers to have vehicles on display yet few, if any, to sell on the spot. For most visitors it was merely luxury window-shopping.

Page 23

The “Lohtas” – father and son on their high-flying pole – were undoubtedly a star attraction of the Motor Show. Here Clive Lohta demonstrates a one arm balance 75 feet above the ground – with no safety net. It was the short extension on top which slipped during one performance just as Clive was returning his feet to the grid. Fortunately he suffered nothing worse than a bruising on the chest, and went on to finish the act.

A perfect hand-stand on the swaying pole,

Another attraction at the Motor Show was the model aircraft display on the open park, complete with aerobatics and dogfights. Dave Bradley of Woodville warms up his control-line model before sending it aloft

The Walker Bulldog tank on the Army allotment attracted hoards of small and not-so-small boys to crane into the interior and marvel.

Page 24

Miss Personality

The moment she knew, Raewyn Fairbrother smiles with joy as she realises she has won the six-weeks-long contest in aid of Napier’s Olympic Pool, and won herself a new car. She is being hugged by her campaign chairman, Mr. R. T. Johnston. The sports bodies that backed her raised £3131.

At the final countdown committee members and supporters wait for the last payments. Standing against the table is Mr. John Woolf, of Wairoa, the campaign organiser.

Reg, McAneny makes the last payment on behalf of the Motor Trades.

Page 25

Arthur Richards and Doug Shearer clown with the prizes for the winners of the Baby Box contest – a doll’s pram for Linda Taylor, a tricycle for Bruce Butson. Mrs. Young is in the pram.

The crowd of 1200 gathers round as Raewyn gets the feel of it. She was crowned “Miss Personality” in an impressive ceremony in the Centennial Hall on April 15th.

Page 26

HIGHLAND GAMES

This year’s Hastings Highland Games was not without incident. “Photo News” Cameraman Phil Moore was on hand when three cyclists crashed in a spectacular spill during a heat of the Windsor Park Handicap on the last day. Luckily they escaped with no more than a shaking and some buckled wheels. Following cyclists swing wide to avoid them, as the three – John Pothan (Taradale), L. Gowan (Otaki), and D. Goodley (Wairoa) – lie sprawled on the ground, arms clutched round heads for protection.

There was a pregnant pause before the crowd nearby sprang to life and dragged them clear of the track.

After a glorious opening day, spirits were dampened temporarily by a heavy shower at midday on Easter Monday. However, the ground soon dried and the games continued as scheduled.

Page 27

Dale McKenzie, Hastings, in her track suit, studies the programme for her 100 yards, 75 yards and hurdles events.

With a big smile, Norman Pierce of Taihape, crosses the line to win the 32-mile Highland Games Marathon from Waipukurau to Hastings. Pierce has competed every year since 1956 and this is the first time he has done better than fifth. There was a field of 13 from all over the North Island.

What can happen to a flimsy cycle wheel in a collision. Bruce Ball and Barry Timms, both of Gisborne, examine Bernard Parker’s back wheel with more than passing interest. Parker, Pahiatua, was only shaken.

Kathleen Thomas, Gisborne and Pam Burnett, Putaruru, runner-up in the N.Z. High Jump Championship, relax between events.

Page 28

How would you like to run 32 miles at the age of 58 and come third into the bargain. That’s just what wiry Arthur Lord of Palmerston North did at the Games. Just for the record, Arthur won the H.B.-Poverty Bay cross-country title in 1934.

And in 1961 Mrs. Lord was still at the finishing line to welcome her husband.

The face that launched . . . ? No – just Jim Rutherford of Tucker’s team taking the strain against Ashburton in the tug-o-war.

And with the rest of the team, R. Dean, W. Schroeder, P. Mananui and C. Tasker, he pulled to good avail. The result is clear on the indicator on the next page.

Page 29

A competitor in the caber event treats the fine telegraph pole like a tooth-pick. “It’s a’ in the balance ye ken, but it’s no’ as easy as it looks” – as this kiwi discovered.

D. Brown, Te Pohue, nearest camera, won this first heat of the 12 inch open standing chop but failed to make the grade in the final. Chopping and sawing events have been re-introduced to the Games after a lapse of some years.

And this is the machine Greater Hastings invested in to make quite sure the tug-o-war events were accurately decided. The meter is hard over on the left.

Page 30

Eric Churton, a braw Scots lad from Raetihi took an active part in the sheaf and caber tossing. He watches his “sheaf” sail over the bar at 20 feet. The highest was 29 feet.

This wee bairn thought a crust of bread would help Hugh Harrison of Havelock North to blow just that little bit harder.

Soon after the midday shower folk were lunching happily in the sun. From left: Helen Burnett, Hastings; Caroline Walker, Wellington; Brian Wilkinson, Hastings; Carole Bell, Wellington; Barbara Burnett, and in front, Jill Bentley, Hastings. The dog was purely a lunchtime friend.

Page 31

Pam Burnett, Putaruru, using the western roll, clears the bar with ease. She won the event.

Mrs. A. McIntosh, Auckland (formerly Avis Brain) won the premier women’s athletic event, the “Scottish 75” and also the 80 metres hurdles of which she is National Champion. She was unplaced in the open high jump.

Judith Low, Napier, practises in a corner of the grounds before facing the judges.

Joan Meehan of the Richmondvale Archery Club draws a bead on the target. The large number of entries in this section came from as far as Whangarei and Wellington to compete.

Page 32

Graeme Tweedie of Hastings won the New Zealand Championship Drumming at the Highland Games. He’s seen with his No. 1 supporter and wife, Dierdre, who will be remembered by many as Dierdre French, Blossom Queen, 1958.

Moira McKenzie of Taradale, a competitor in the Highland dancing holds her mascot, non-competitor “Annie”.

Robin and Sherrill Suckling of Palmerston, made it difficult for Scotsmen who’d been takin’ a wee drappie. They thought they were suffering from “pluralcy”. The twins took part in piping competitions.

Another attractive, Palmerston North lass, Robin Kerr, awaiting her call for the “C” Grade piping in her full regalia.

Page 33

As always, the Scottish Country Dancers came forward with some attractive displays of their art in the centre of the arena.

Bonny Anne McKay of Hastings, hair blowing in the wind, trips it lightly to the lilt o’ the music.

Rodney Seymour, Hastings, competing in the A Grade Slow March Championship.

Page 34

LIKE OLD Wine

The dedication and devotion to their hobby apparent when Vintage and Veteran Car enthusiasts congregate is unlikely to be surpassed by followers of any other pastime. It has to be seen and felt to be understood.

This was just one – an arbitrary choice – of the many attractive cars which attended the Castrol National Rally for Vintage and Veteran vehicles held on Easter Saturday, at the Tomoana Showgrounds. It’s a 1912 Regal (American) driven under its own power from Dunedin and entered by Mrs. R. E. N. Oakley. It has an unusual underslung chassis.

Just for contrast, the latest model Aston Martin which was also present.

A line-up of some of the old faithfuls in all their shining glory.

Page 35

This 1909 Clement Talbot two-seater came from Hutt City with Reg. Southward. Its 4 cylinders develop 15 horsepower.

A 1913 four-cylinder Austin entered by Mrs. C. Maxwell of Hutt City. Herbert Austin, later Lord Austin, designed his first car for the Wolseley Company in 1893 but started making his own at Longbridge in 1905.

Piet Van Asch of Havelock North, reveals the single-cylinder, rear engine of his 1898 Benz. Karl Benz built his first three-wheeled car in 1885. The horizontal cylinder develops 3 1/2 horsepower in this vehicle.

“Hey Dad, what makes it go?” This youngster and his father seek for the answer beneath this 1902 Crestmobile (American) which was known as a cycle-car. The driver is starting the engine with a pullcord similar to that used on a motor mower. The machine came from Wellington with E. M. Delany.

Jean Scarrott looked charming as she adorned R. Porter’s 1907 de Dion Bouton from Carterton. Notice the shining brass and deep, quilted upholstery on this French model.

Page 36

Ken Rieper of Napier, ready to go in his 1909 Argyll manufactured by a Scottish firm which once had the largest private car output in Europe.

“Fly with me Lucille, in my merry aut’mobile”. Actually not Lucille but Lorraine Lane of Napier looking nonchalantly at ease in the Cavalcade of Vintage Motoring Fashions. She rode in Mr. G. Brotherston’s 1918 Model T Ford. It came from Wanganui.

Mrs. Nan Northey suitably clad, takes the air in the oldest car at the rally – an 1895 Benz, brought from Hamilton by G. V. Hughes.

Self starter!

“Gee, they even have vintage fire engines!”

Flat battery!

Page 37
 

WOMEN’S SOFTBALL – H.B. v Wanganui

Women’s softball in Hawke’s Bay got a boost recently when the home team beat a visiting Wanganui team 8 – 7 only by finishing with a terrific whirlwind of batting in the last two innings.

Lois Leonard, formerly of Hastings, batted for Wanganui.

H.B. hard hitter, Pam Black takes her stance far left, and also Lois Smith Wanganui.

Rona Whatarau makes first base comfortably.

Lower left: Another attractive visitor makes first base.

Pam Black, H.B. Captain, receives the trophy for the match from Mr. Cook, President of the Hawke’s Bay Softball Association.

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Pages 38

FOUNDERS’ DAY

Page 39

The annual Founder’s Day and Thinking Day of the Boy Scout Movement in Napier were combined this year in a ceremony held in the lovely setting of the Botanical Gardens.

A general view of the ceremony with insets – left: Some Napier South Cubs and Scouts assembling with their Scout-master “Kea”, R. N. Angove; and right: Presenting Troop Colours to District Commissioner, Brian Oulaghan, Hastings, St. Augustine’s Scoutmaster, Max Hartshorn and D. C. “Mac” MacIndoe, Northern Napier.

Scinde Cub Pack with their Cubmaster, Ray Thompson.

Some of the guide contingents marching up to the natural bowl of the gardens far the service.

Scinde Troop march by with Greendale Scouters Norm Bitters, Alec Roy and Robin Bren behind.

Ron Cook, D.C. for Taradale and Napier South, and Charlie Lee, D.C. for Napier Central, take the salute in the background as the colours are lowered at the end of the service. At the flagstaff are Jim Howell of Clive, Colin McKenzie of Trinity Troop, and Guider Mrs Holtham.

Page 40

CATCH ‘EM YOUNG

 These junior junior members of Napier Surf Life-saving Clubs, all under 14, took part in a competition staged on the Napier beach. The Westshore team is seen in action in what is now called the “expired air method” of resuscitation – C. Williams, M. Lyons, T. Johnson, D. Irons, A. Martin and K. Caney. There was only half a point difference in the final count between the two teams.

The Pacific team competing in release drill. They are I. Gabites, D. D. Gempton, V. Hull, A. Hull, J. Brown and P. Harris,

Part of the crowd which watched the competition. Standing second from left is Dr. A. Russell, honorary surgeon to the Life-saving Association. Mrs. Russell donated the Maud Russell Cup for which the boys competed.

Page 41

NURSES’ RUGBY

Although our nursing sorority work harder than most sections of the community, they also know how to relax and enjoy their fun. When a gala sports meeting was held at Brooklands Station, Puketapu, in aid of the Nurses’ Personality Girl and the Hohepa Home, the girls were quite prepared to tackle a male rugby team at their own game. Bare feet was the order of the day.

“Rearguard action”

Football jerseys or shortie nighties?

“Late tackle” – but who wouldn’t?”

“Where’s my support?”

Page 42

Chiller BEEF

Like guardsmen on parade, the entries in the A. and P. Society’s Chiller Beef Competition hang at the Tomoana Freezing Works awaiting the judges’ inspection.

Mr. F. T. Kelly of Te Rotopai Station, whose beasts took first prize in the lightweight chiller section up to 600 lbs. Judges C. H. Williamson and K. Botherway said the bruising in many of the animals offered for competition was the worst they had ever seen.

Mr. C. Edgecombe and Mr. E. D. Holt cast a critical eye over the carcases. The top six carcases in the lightweights are sent to London for inter-district competition. Many of the entries lost points through carrying excess fat, attributed to the difficult rainy season and lush pasture.

Page 43

Mr. C. Williamson, Senior Meat Board Supervising Grader gives comments on the winning entries.

Messrs. Bruce and Douglas Smith of Otane, and Mr. R. Greenwood were keenly interested in the remarks.

Mr. J. W. Guerin of Mangatahi on behalf of his son, B. J. Guerin, receives the trophy for first prize in the Heavyweight section, from Mrs. L. M. Pattullo, wife of the President of the Hawke’s Bay A. and P. Society. Mr. Pattullo is obscured. Secretary of the Society, Mr. Ray Arnold, is on the left.

Page 44

If It’s a
News Picture
then
Ring Our Photographers
BATCHELOR’S STUDIOS
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or
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NAPIER – 39-047
EVEN YOU COULD GET A SCOOP!

ODD SHOTS

It was all part of a sales gimmick. A Napier paint firm used an artist in their window to advertise their wares. When this young man was offered a finished work of art he told them they could keep it in no uncertain terms.

Jeni Wells, daughter of “Bomba” Wells of Napier, appeared as cover girl on our 6th Issue. She is seen backstage at the Royal Hayman Hotel, Great Barrier Reef, Australia, where she is starred as a cabaret solo attraction and a mannequin in “Festivals of the Islands” in which she was a recent diving championship winner. Before leaving Napier Jeni was a member of the Frivolity Minstrels and also entertained at Cabaret Cabana.
Reader’s Photo

A unique distinction – two in one family wearing the New Zealand blazer. Mr. Os. Tong, Hastings, a bowler, recently toured Australia with the NZ. Bowling Team, and his daughter, Mrs. Rona McCarthy, represented New Zealand at the British Empire Games, winning a bronze medal. She has also represented this country at basketball.
Stuart Johnson photo

Page 45

B.P. BARBECUE

This gorgeous array of masculine shanks was displayed at a B.P. Social Club barbecue held on the Westshore Beach. The result was the discovery of the knobbliest knees on R. Cunningham, a rank outsider from Europa.

From left: E. Dorrington, D. Law, J. Clark, D. Collow, R. Cunningham, D. Tyson, B. Ramsay, N. McGregor, and H. Whale. The success of the barbecue seems to have been assured through everyone taking part in the fun and games.

The girls found the sack race quite gruelling on the shingly sand of the beach. N. Law, V. Horseman and N. Cunningham. LOWER LEFT: Alexander Jane Law shows the elders how it should be done in beauty competitions.

“Mick” Dorrington was the only one who felt it was a good time it take it easy. “After dark a thoroughbred samoyed finds no cause for strenuous exercise.”

B. Ramsay, on left, won the Men’s Sack Race. Leap-frogging beside him is H. Whale with J. Clark on right. Behind: N. McGregor, D. Law, D. Tyson, E. Dorrington, and R. Cunningham.

Page 46

THEN & NOW

In the early part of the century Napier was lucky to have a swimming pool as well appointed as this. It was built in 1908 and survived the earthquake with only a few cracks to be plastered. Horace Cottrell took this photo at the High School sports in the early 1920s when the school in Clyde Road was still co-educational.

Now, in 1961, there is another co-ed school in the city. Colenso High School pupils, better disciplined than their parents, remain seated while their sports are in progress, but the noise level remains much the same – deafening. Besides alterations to dressing rooms round the pool and the introduction of filtration about ten years ago, there have been changes in the background. The curve of the Memorial Hall dominates the south-east corner while the Norfolk pines seem to have grown somewhat in the past 35 years.

Page 47

AND SOON?

Reproduced here is an artist’s impression of one of the proposed designs for Napier’s new Olympic Swimming Pool. The Miss Personality Contest to raise the necessary funds has just ended.

POOLS
Olympic 165′ X 63′
Diving 60′ X 30′
Learners 50′ X 50′
Toddlers ~

Page 48

READERS PICTURES

Sonia and Kathleen Ross of Waipukurau found their third birthday present a little overwhelming. It would certainly be rather difficult to cuddle that fellow in bed.

Since photographers are not turned out these days with telescopic legs it was necessary to adopt this unorthodox pose to operate “daddy-longlegs” on a Hastings Camera Club field night. Elevated: Burton Hammond; Depressed: Merv Green; In support: Reed Duncan; Taken by: Erwin McLeod.

R. F. Garnett sent us this view from the partially-built assembly hall, of 600 or 700 pupils of the Hastings Girls’ High School around their new baths for their first official swimming sports.

Page 49

…. R.S.A. BOWLERS …..

Eighteen teams and 64 players took part in Napier’s R.S.A. Bowling Tournament held at the Wairere Greens at Whitmore Park.

This team won the Canteen Cup and a trip to the New Zealand R.S.A. Tournament at Timaru. From left: H. Beach, J. Lawrie, Les Donnelly, Napier R.S.A. President who presented the cup, S. Stevens and Skip Bill Knell.

A general view of the greens with the tournament in progress.

A NEW GREEN AT WAIRERE

Salt still present in the once marshy Napier suburb of Marewa, has continued to work to the surface in suficient quantities to affect the turf on one of the Wairere Club’s greens – even after 25 years drainage. To replace the patchy turf the club has resorted to cotula weed, a spreading plant from Invercargill and the West Coast which thrives on salt and gradually covers the ground with a fine fernlike leaf ideal for bowling.

Eddie Jenkins and Bill Quarrie place cotula plugs in the holes cut by George Thomas [right] using a special plug-cutting tool. Placed six inches to a foot apart, they’ll cover the ground by next season.

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Page 50

YOGA

SIR PAUL DUKES LECTURES….
Lectures on yoga delivered in Hawke’s Bay late last year by devotee, Sir Paul Dukes, K.B.E., and Lady Dukes seem to have borne fruit in the district. These photos show Sir Paul lecturing in the Memorial Hall, Napier, while his wife demonstrates some of the health-giving exercises of “Hatha Yoga”. But yoga is more than just exercises. It’s a philosophy of living. Hatha yoga is the branch devoted to building strong, healthy bodies under full control.

The audience listened and watched intently while Sir Paul expounded the theories of yoga. In this ancient system which has proved to be the answer to many of the demands of present-day life, there are special exercises for movement, relaxation and breathing. There are gentle, relaxing exercises for the weak and ill, exercises for women who wish to keep trim figures in their youth or later life, and exercises for men in sedentary jobs and others suitable for athletes, footballers and those needing to build up strength agility.

Page 51

……..AND CLASSES FOLLOW

The serpent posture, an excellent exercise for spine and back muscles. From left: Mesdames Burnell, Hawkins, Jackson, Frame, Lockman, Foster, V. Bullock and J. Bullock. In background: Barbara Allen and Caroline Young.

Classes at the Greendale Gymnasium, Greenmeadows, practise some of the simpler exercises of yoga.

Strenuous movement known as the “locust posture” is demonstrated by Paul, Malcolm, and Chris Cooper and Mr. and Mrs. Foldesi.

Sitting in the “lotus posture” are Mesdames Hambley, Lookman, Foster and Bullock.

An informal group with Andrea Hislop, Mrs. Woods and Mrs. Riddell in the foreground practise the plough posture – or more euphemistically “halasana”.

Mesdames Lookman, Foster and V. Bullock demonstrate the single foot-head head-knee posture.

Barbara Allen and instructor Ray Frederikson practise the difficult scorpion posture. Mr. Frederikson is the only Black-belt judo instructor in Hawke’s Bay. His gym specialises in judo and yoga.

Page 52

PETROL SCARE AT AHURIRI

Police, firemen and oil company workers took up “panic stations” at Ahuriri, when 52,000 gallons of petrol escaped from an installation in the Caltex Company’s yard. The air was filled with the pungent reek of petrol fumes as the liquid evaporated in the hot sun next day. Road blocks were set up and every precaution taken to prevent what could have easily been a serious conflagration.

The Caltex storage tanks floodlit the following night.

Firemen and helpers dredging in the lake of petrol for floating objects before pumping operations began to return some of the fuel to its rightful place. The nearest houses and St. Mary’s School can be seen in the background.

The view the morning after the leakage showing the lake of petrol that had escaped overnight. The nearest building outside the compound is the wool store to the left. The nearest houses are about 100 yards from the tanks on Coronation Street. The accident occurred when confusion arose over turning off a draincock used to remove water from the tanks when petrol is to be pumped in.

Page 53

Mr. E. L. Sellens, Chief Explosives Inspector for NZ. was quickly on the scene next day with special instruments to measure the explosive content of the air. Watching him from left are: Station Officer Spit Brigade, D. Downing; Subofficer, G. Coldicutt; and Senior Officer Ford from the Fire Service Training School, Wellington.

The chiefs in conference. From left City Clerk, L. P. Ryan; Sgt G. P. Dwan; Constable J. C. Brodie, Dominion Chief Fire Officer, T.A. Varley; Napier Ch Fire Officer, T. L. Turner; Mayor Peter Tait, and Ron Spriggs, both members of the Napier Fire Board and Sgt. Pender.

Prompt action by the army, airways and other organisations ensured a minimum risk of serious fire in the emergency. Fireman next afternoon were unloading drums of foam flown to Napier post haste. Police Inspector I. Graham is by the truck. The fire danger had abated considerably in 48 hours.

Page 54

H.B.H.S. SPORTS

This young man airborne and raising the dust of the jumping pit is Les Kennedy, a competitor in the hop, step and jump at the Hastings Boys’ High School Annual Sports. Like the girls’ sports pictured elsewhere in this issue, this was the fortieth official athletic sports the school has staged.

John Palmer cleared the bar at four feet ten inches to win the junior high jump title.

The mass start of the Junior One Mile interhouse event.

Page 55

In typical fashion these boys get down to it as they watch one of the events.

Colin Monk lunges for the tape to win the 100 yards Senior final in 10.6 seconds. The record of 10 secs. was set by I. S. MacDonald in 1949.

Hamish Morrison, winner of the Mile Championship, created a new record of four minutes 44.3 seconds.

Taking the hurdles in the 120 yards final are Taylor, Thomas, second; Mill, third; and Monk, first. His time was 17.5 seconds, well outside the record 16 seconds set in 1936 and 1954.

Page 56

GRADUATION

Graduate nurses of the Hastings Memorial Hospital join together in cutting their graduation cake after receiving their medals and certificates. From left they are: J. Andrews, N. Wasley, R. Gooch, A. Jones, J. Spotswood, J. Daniel, C. Tahau and J. Watts.

JET BOAT

This is a Hamilton Turbocraft – a water-jet boat similar to those which recently navigated the Grand Canyon on the Colorado River. This one was displayed at the International Motor Show at Napier where it attracted much interest in its polythene pool. In the eight days of the Show it travelled 216 miles at 4 m.p.h. round its centre peg 19,446 times. The pool – black plastic stitched together and held in a wooden frame – contained 16,000 gallons of water. It was refilled three times and 107 patches applied to it because of ignorant vandals who stuck pins in the plastic “just for laughs”.

NOTICE

We would like to state that our photographer Phil Moore, of 8 Maxwell Street, Napier, has no connection with Home Life Portraits, also of Maxwell Street, Napier.

Page 57

Treasure Trove

The shot “H.B. Photo News” has been asking for for the past year!

Julie and Marcia Sparks, daughters of Hastings Public Relations Officer Ken Sparks, stand knee-deep in the trophies they have won for their highland dancing over recent years. The chain-mail frontispieces are quite weighty affairs carrying about 200 medallions each. At the Games this Easter Julie was placed first in the New Zealand Championship Sword Dance and the Highland Games Championship Highland Fling. She gained three other firsts, ones second and one third, and won the Hastings Master Bakers’ Challenge Cup for most points in open competition. Younger sister Marcia was first in the NZ. Championship Seann Truibhas under 18, She also had two other firsts, and four seconds, to win the the Spurdle Bros. Challenge Cup for 16- to 18-year-old dancers, and the Symonds Challenge Cup for the Hastings competitor gaining the most points in his or her own class.

the Gracious DANCE

The grace of the Scottish Country Dance is epitomized here by Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Laing of Auckland, who were visitors to the Highland Games.

Back cover

“Will Mummy scold me?”

[Back cover photo – Our photographer Phil Moore couldn’t resist when his small daughter Marney Rose, 22 months, headed for the doorstep. He loaded his camera and fired off a dozen sheds. This was our pick of them. Marney Rose has won two baby shows and seems well on the way to becoming a front cover girl – some day.]

Original digital file

PN030May1961.pdf

Date published

May 1961

Format of the original

Magazine

Publisher

The Hawke's Bay Publishing Company

Accession number

967/968/35434

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