Hawke’s Bay Photo News September 1961

Hawke’s Bay PHOTO NEWS
September 1961
34th Issue
HAWKE’S BAY’S OWN PHOTO MAGAZINE
2/6

[Cover photo – The gorgeous tresses displayed on our front cover this month belong to 14-year-old Jennifer Anderson of Napier. Jennifer attends the Napier Girls’ High School.]

ROTHMANS KING SIZE REALLY SATISFIES
Extra length…finer filter…and the best of all is the tobacco.

Page 1

PHOTO NEWS
HAWKE‘S BAY’S OWN PICTORIAL PHOTO MAGAZINE
Vol. 3
No. 10
SEPTEMBER 1961

Editor Arch. Barclay

Photographer Phil Moore

Enquiries
Telephone 39-047, Napier

Postal Address
P.O. Box 169, Napier

Published monthly by The Hawke’s Bay Publishing Co. Ltd. on the 4th Thursday of every month

MAIL ORDER SERVICE
“Photo News” mailed to you on receipt of 12-issue sub. of 32/-

DISTRIBUTORS
Batchelor Studios
231 Heretaunga Street W., Hastings
Phone 88-766
Tennyson St., Napier – Phone 7413

Printed photo-litho for the Publishers by Swailes, Hurst and Co. Ltd, Napier

Photographs in “H.B. Photo News” may be obtained through –
The Editor, H.B. Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 169, Napier

State clearly page number on which photo appears, and a full description of photograph.

Enclose Postal Note to value of –
5/- for 6 x 4
7/6  ”  8 x 6
10/- ” 10 x 8
(Above prices include Postage)

OUR COVER PICTURES

Front cover. The gorgeous tresses displayed on our front cover this month belong to 14-year-old Jennifer Anderson of Napier, Jennifer attends the Napier Girls, High School. She and her family came to New Zealand only a year ago from Somerset.

Back Cover. Our feline friend with the appealing eyes is no relation in the aristocrat on pages 50-51. She is just an ordinary well-fed alley cat, but my! . . what character.

Photos Phil Moore

The slim, elegant figure of a bather, 5 feet 7 inches tall, clad in a brief bikini, is the figure who greets you when you enter the Hawke‘s Bay Museum in Napier. She is officially “Grande Bagnante III” but we’ll setttle for the “The Bather”. She was fashioned by Amelio Greco, one of Italy’s leading sculptors, who teaches sculpture at the Academy of Naples. Her two predecessors, also created by Greco, now stand in the National Gallery, Rome and the Tait Gallery, London.

The Bather was acquired by the Hawke‘s Bay Museum as a memorial to the late Leo Bestall, a former director of the museum and art gallery, whose efforts were undoubtedly the mainspring of the active group which has made our own museum so very much “alive”.

Page 2

There’s really nothing to it!

[In this series … we have pictured Judith Yanko, a pre-school child, as she makes one of her regular visits to her nearest school dental clinic.]

Page 3

In this series opposite we have pictured Judith Yanko, a pre-school child, as she makes one of her regular visits to her nearest school dental clinic, notice how relaxed she is and how she obviously enjoys the experience. Her mother attends too, and brings baby brother Stephen to get him accustomed to visiting the dental nurse. Nurse Zohrab at Maraenui School clinic, like all other dental nurses, is trained to handle small children  to make them feel at ease and enjoy visits to her clinic.

At the end of her visit, Judith knows to expect a fairy made from a cottonwool tuft (9).

The informality of the visit is much of the attraction. Judith leaves with her fairy, ready to come again.

Glenys Golds attends the school to which this dental clinic is attached. Here she is having a tooth drilled.

Another child at the school, Graham King, has his teeth examined, Examinations are made every six months.

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Page 4

LIONS CLUB VENTURE

This stack of logs, was only part of 2000 24-feet tree trunks left at the breakwater, Napier, when the log trade with Japan fell through. The Napier Lions Club came to an arrangement with the Fletcher Timber Organisation which will enable them to dispose of these logs for firewood thereby helping Fletchers, the Club and the community.

This was the scene after a few weeks a tremendous pile of pinus rounds gradually dwindling as they were sold round the district. The Lions Club, a group of businessmen pledged to give service to the community, intends to use the funds realised for community projects. In fact, the community will get the lions’ share.

Page 5

Gisborne Intermediate School Visit

Children of Gisborne Intermediate School are greeted at Napier station by pupils of Napier Intermediate when they arrived for the annual sports visit to the school. Ever since 1947 this tournament has alternated between the two schools. Gisborne retained the Tournament Shield, winning five of seven matches.

In girls’ and boys’ hockey both schools won a game.

Page 6

Basketball – Gisborne two wins, Napier one

Light entertainment.

Old friends

Gisborne won the rugby. .

Page 7

. . . . and the soccer

“Busy doin’ nothin’ ” (Gisborne goalie)

Pastures greener?

Recumbent posture

New friends

Page 8

Napier Weddings

WATSON – FISHER

At St. Augustine‘s, Napier, Annabell Elaine Fisher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Fisher, Waterhouse Street, Taradale, to Alan Harman Watson, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Watson, Huxley, Street, Pahiatua.
Batchelors Studios Photo

GREENE – SINGLE

At St. Columba’s Presbyterian Church, Taradale, Margaret Dorothy Single, daughter of Mrs. C. Single, Taradale, to David Henry Greene, son of Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Greene, Auckland Road, Greenmeadows.
Technique Studios Photo

CHRISTISON – WATSON

At St. Angustine’s, Napier: Noeleen Watson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. Watson, Battery Road, Napier, to Gary Christison, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Christison, “Brooklands”. From left Peter Everett, Ellen Arden, Peter Smale, the groom and bride, Janis Christison, Lois Watson and Walter Watson. Future home, Mangatutu Station, Patoka.
Batchelors Studios Photo

Page 9

GR-R-R-R- – –

Like prehistoric monsters three huge earthmovers recently thundered through Napier on their way north, from river work near Foxton to opencast coal mining at Huntly. The Taupo Road (believe it or not) is the only route which can cope with the 28-ton gargantuans.

Des Rouse and Doug Peat, Napier, inspect the out-size  6-cylinder engine, while the beast refuels with a 100 gallons of dieselene. The tubeless tyre beside them costs £1800.

Thundering down Douglas McLean Avenue.

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Page 10

Wise People

A “patient” being treated for a fractured pelvis at one of the first aid classes run by the Hastings St. John Ambulance for the public. Many people have taken this opportunity to learn of first aid treatment. The course cover fratures, haemorrhaging, concussion, burns and scalds and other injuries and their treatment in a ten-weeks course. Pupils are then entitled to sit the oral and practical examinations held on the final night.

Superintendent D. R. Burfield demonstrates the bandaging of a factured jaw…

then Mrs Ericksen, one of the members of the class does her “practical” on her husband. The lectures and demonstrations are given by St. John surgeons and officers.

Mrs. Howlett assists while Mrs. Smith bandages up Mrs. Lynskey “suffering” from a fractured clavicle, or collar bone.

We could all do with this sort of training!

Page 11

INDOOR BASKETBALL

On this page are random shots taken in the Centennial Hall, Napier, during the women‘s North Island B Grade Indoor Basketball Championships. The matches were played day and nighttime over a weekend.

High Wind

Basketballet

Stern Reality

Telescopic

Page 12

NEW ADJUTANT

After five years as as adjutant of the Wellington-East coast regiment, Captain Jim Brown has relinquished his post. He is seen at his farewell in Hastings, handing over his regimental collar badges to his successor, Lieutenant George Bennett. Captain Brown has been transferred to Waiouru as adjutant of Queen Alexandra‘s Own.

[Cartoon]
“BOY, WHAT A DAY – AM I GLAD TO GET HOME.”
Clive Hudson

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Page 13

Art EXHIBITION

The Annual Exhibition of the Hawke‘s Bay and East Coast Art Society was on display in the Art Gallery, Napier, recently. Photo News has taken a broad coverage of the works submitted to give some idea of the diversity of art work in the province.

These attractive screen-printed fabrics were entered by Colenso High School pupils Linda Devine (top Left), Pat Thomsen and Diana Rutherford (top right), Susan White (lower left) and Alison Grant.

Four studies in watercolour and indian ink on thin ricepaper are the work of June Sang, Napier. They are “Lichees”  “Loquats”, “Bamboo Shoot“ and “Wild Poppy”.

“Ocean Island Family” was painted by Bettie Williams, Havelock North, who accompanied her husband, a director of the East Coast Fertiliser Co. on a trip to the phosphate island.

C. F. Shepherd, lighthouse keeper at Portland Island, gets close to home with this watercolour “M. V. Daily Bread”. Actually the supply launch calls at Portland once a fortnight and then only if the weather is kind.

Page 14

This gently humorous picture in oils, “The Wedding Breakfast”, was exhibited by a young Hastings artist, B. E. Dew – obviously a family affair.

Page 15

The exhibition caters not only for artists but for potters, woodcarvers and other craftsmen.

This woodcarving was done by Nancy A. Naylor.

There were few nude studies in the exhibition. This was one of two submitted by Margaret B. Gorton, Napier, a, student at Canterbury Art School.

This realistic painting, “Circus Ponies”, was entered by C. T. Laugeson of Wellington, well known for his horse studies.

Page 16

L. M. Theakstone, well known for his floral art, is also no mean painter as this work in oils “Stone Crusher, Fernhill” shows.

Out of four paintings submitted by Joan Trollope we chose “Boy With a Guitar”.

Three paintings on the left of this group were entered by an old Napier identity, R. L. Tingey. Top centre is a watercolour “Valley of a Thousand Hills” by F. Burton, Napier. The other three are the fine brushwork of H. W. Burge, Haumoana, who paints in the close style of earlier schools.

Page 17

21st Birthdays

Barrie Dennehy, Seddon Crescent, Napier, is watched by his mother as he cuts his cake at the Orange Hall, Napier.

Norah Glew, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. Glew, Fitzroy Ave., Hastings, a well-known dancer in the city.

Photos by Bachelors Studios

Olive Saunders, daughter of Mrs. A. Saunders, Vigor Brown St., Napier celebrated at the Methodist Church hall.
MacConnells Photo Service

Travelling

Heather Cameron, Wellesley Road, Napier, at a “send off” party before sailing on the “Southern Cross“ for three years’ nursing experience and travel overseas.

Mrs Lily Millar, Napier, and Miss Edith Hanks at a farewell party given them in Liberty Hall, Napier, before they left on a 12-months’ working holiday in Australia.

Page 18

THEN & NOW

Back in that 1920s Napier had a small reserve in the centre of town called Clive Square. Those who planned it had the foresight to plant many palms – trees which seem to thrive in our equable Hawke’s Bay climate.

Today those palms and the gardens they tower over are an attractive oasis in the centre of a busy city.  St. Patrick’s Church is hidden by the foliage. The bandstand was moved to the parade to make room for the present fish pond.

Page 19

Masonic Ball Debutantes

Debutantes at the Masonic Ball in Napier curtsy to the Provincial Grand Master for H.B., Rt. Wor. Brother V. Neill, and Mrs. Neill.

The official party, Mrs. Presling, R. W. Brother and Mrs. Neill, and W. Brother E. F. Presling Master of Napier Lodge, seen with the debs. From left: Marie Clark, Napier; Jeanine Apperley, Napier; Celia Edmonds, Bay View; Gillian Shooter, Hastings; Barbara Conaghan, Waipukurau; Christine Pain, Napier; and Jean Campbell, Napier.

Page 20

New Grinding Machine for Napier Firm

This solid three and a half ton precision grinding machine is seen in the yard of Engine Rebuilders as it is manoevred towards the door. Just arrived in August, it is the biggest of its kind in the country and the first to come from the Danish A.M.C. firm.

It’s a precision surface grinder capable of handling an area 67 inches by 20 inches, and accurate to 10,000ths of an inch. Engine Rebuilders are using it mainly for grinding cylinder blocks and heads.

Under construction now, in preparation for the next mardi gras season in Napier is this substantial Information Bureau on the road side of the putting greens. It will be manned by Napier Jaycees who make this service to visitors one of their regular chores.

Page 21

HAVE A BIT…

Council bought brand new mole.
Brand new mole bored hole
For usual power pole.

Oh what shame.
Struck drain,
Wonder who mayor’ll blame.

Outer Space

ASTRONAUTS ALL?

These exotic characters in the Heath Robinson suits are not confreres of Major Titov. They are camponauts – representatives of Presbyterian Bible Classes from Napier to Woodville who have launched a campaign to raise £1100 towards their permanent campsite on the Tukituki River. At a function in Napier each camponaut was given his flying instructions, official diplomas and progress charts. The 16 Bible classes represented will compete to raise the highest funds. The ingenuity of the space suits suggests that the 700 members involved in the campaign will easily reach their target by count-down on the 16th of September.

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Page 22

Hastings Weddings

COOPER – TAYLOR

At St. Matthew‘s Church, Hastings, Kay Brigham, eldest daughter of Mrs. E. L. Taylor, to Frank Cooper, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Cooper. The group from left: Carol Brigham, Jim Cooper, Maylene Cameron, the groom and bride, Ken McKeown, Robyn Skittrup and Colin Reid.
Stuart Johnson Photo

BARTLETT – CORBY

At Nelson Street Hall, Hastings, Maureen Corby of Hastings, to David Bartlett, Gisborne.
Photo by Batchelors Studios

Page 23

They’re At It Again

Every year stalwarts of greater Hastings turn out in force to make the hundreds of thousands of blossoms to decorate the city on blossom day. Hospitals, institutions, clubs, all band together in a community spirit to make Hastings Blossom Day something to remember.

Don Clark, son of Mr. and Mrs. J Clark, Coote Road, Napier, recently returned to settle in the city with his South African wife Martha. She, however, is no stranger to Napier as she has lived and worked here before while on holiday.

Napier Wedding

HIBBERD – GOODLAD

At St Paul’s Presbyterian Church, Napier, Catherine Goodlad, daughter of Mrs. M. Halpin, Napier, to Allen Hibberd, son of Mr. and Mrs T. E. Hibberd, Norsewood.
Technique Studios Taradale

ENGAGED

June Temple to Barry Pritchard

June is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs H. Temple, Chaucer Road, Napier. Barry’s parents are Mr. and Mrs C. Pritchard of Kennedy Park Motor Camp Napier.
Photo by N. Browne

Page 24

Pirates’ Seventy-Fifth Jubilee

These are only some of the many who turned out in force to honour their old club in its seventy-fifth year – the Napier Pirate Rugby Football Club. Over the years the Pirate Club has built a formidable record on the rugby fields of Hawke’s Bay. They have many times won the senior and junior championships and have produced many prominent players such as Les Dine, Bob Keeble, Gordon Yates, Norman Kivell, Jack Swain, Arthur Thomas, Harry Frazer, and Wattie Barclay, to mention only a few. Over the years Pirates have contributed regularly to the Hawke‘s Bay representative sides, especially from the 1880’s to 1930. In 1896 the Pirate Club fielded eleven of the Hawke’s Bay side.

This was the wreath laid on thhe Napier Cenotaph to honour members who died in the wars.

This strong force of past and present Pirate members paraded on the morning of the Maori v’s France match at the cenotaph – on the very ground where the first Pirate teams played their matches in 1886.

Page 25

HAWKE’S BAY TABLE TENNIS

Mrs R. Hinton and Mrs. Bond playing off in the women’s doubles at the Hawke’s Bay Table Tennis Championships held in Hastings.

They were opposed by Mrs. I. Robinson and Mrs E. Rees of Napier.

H. Wong, Hastings, and D. Keighley, playing off in the men’s open singles.

Page 26

[…the Catchment Board is completing the scheme which should protect the Heretaunga Plains from any further floods, such as… the 1935 flood pictured opposite.  At that time hundreds of acres were inundated when the Tutaekuri flooded in the lower reaches.  At that time there was no overflow channel for the adjoining Ngaruroro River.]

Page 27

Heretaunga Plains Rivers Scheme

Right up to recent years the Heretaunga Plains of Hawke’s Bay have been subject to flooding – not just surface water from local rains, but major flooding from three of the six main rivers that enter the bay – the Tutaekuri, Ngaruroro and Tukituki Rivers.  Although two of the worst floods occurred in 1867 and 1897 before back-country hills were entirely denuded of bush, the clearing of land for grazing has certainly not helped the plains area with its flood problems.  However, since the Rivers Board, and later the Catchment Board, have been formed, the control of these three rivers has been less a matter of chance.

Now, the Catchment Board is completing the scheme which should protect the Heretaunga Plains from any further floods, such as… the 1935 flood pictured opposite. At that time hundreds of acres were inundated when the Tutaekuri flooded in the lower reaches.  At that time there was no overflow channel for the adjoining Ngaruroro River.

In the diagram below, the Catchment Board has outlined the changes to be made.

1.  Redesign Tutaekuri banks to take 100,000 cusec. flood.

2.  Divert Tutaekuri to form common mouth with Ngaruroro.

3.  Redesign overflow banks to take full flood flow of Ngaruroro of 160,000 cusec.

4.  Divert Ngaruroro completely into its overflow channel.

5.  By double banks, discharge flood waters of Tutaekuri Waimate into system by gravity.

6.  Extend road and railway bridges by approximately 400 feet.

7.  Construct new bridge at Pakowhai over Ngaruroro, 1100 feet.

8.  Retain existing channel of discharge for free discharge of Karamu and Raupare streams, draining 200 square miles.

9.   Install pump station to drain 2600 acres of Pakowhai – Waiohiki area.

10.  Install pump station to drain 2300 acres of Brookfield – Awatoto area.

11.  Karamu Stream floodgates to be removed.

12.  Remove bank between Tutaekuri and overflow to use existing Tutaekuri bridges as outlet for excess floodwaters.

The reasons for making these sweeping and costly changes in our river system are also made clear by the board. At present neither the Tutaekuri nor the Ngaruroro is capable at maintaining an open mouth to the sea, on its own. The re-alignmemt of the two rivers so that they combine about three-quarters of a mile inland will give a much stronger flow aimed more directly at the beach. The Tutaekuri, from Brookfields to the sea, loses flood capacity through silting up; the Pakowhai area becomes flooded when floodgates are closed on the Tutaekuri – Waimate;  the Ngaruroro also tends to silt up from Pakowhai to the sea;  the area served by the Karamu Stream and its tributaries – an area of 200 square miles including Hastings and Havelock North – becomes flooded when floodgates are closed at the junction with the Ngaruroro.  This latter area will benefit greatly from the proposed scheme. Not only will the Karamu Stream have free outflow into the existing Ngaruroro riverbed but £160,000 will also be spent on improving the Karamu and its tributaries.

The whole scheme spread over four years will cost in the vicinity of £620,000, of which local ratepayers will have to find approximately £180,000.

Pages 28 and 29

MAJOR FLOODS ON THE HERETAUNGA PLAINS

1847 (20 years)

1867 (30 years)

1897 (14 years)

1911 (13 years)

1924 (14 years)

1938 (11 years)

1949 (? years)

TUTAEKURI RIVER AND NGARURORO RIVER AND OVERFLOW.  8/3/1944

Page 30

In May 1933, two years after the earthquake, the old Tutaekuri River stopbanks broke, causing this flood.  Although the river still flowed through Napier at this time it was showing a tendency to flow more directly to the sea. Work was therefore started in 1934 on a new outlet channel which carried the Tutaekuri out to its present outflow at Clive.

Page 31

The raging waters of the Tutaekuri in the 1938 flood surging under the railway bridge at Awatoto. This photo was taken from the new concrete road bridge which caved in during this flood, but was later re-placed in position.

The main street of Clive under water presents a sorry sight. This township will also benefit from the completed scheme.

Page 32

THEY SUFFERED THIS . . .

So epidemic is rugby fever when it grips normally normal New Zealanders that they will go to  these lenghts – sitting out on a cold winter’s night – to be sure of a seat. These photos were taken in Napier and Hastings where rugby fans started queueing for seats at 2 p.m. on a Friday afternoon. The booking office opened at 7 a.m. next morning.

Page 33

. . . TO WITNESS  THIS

Unfortunately, these are the best pictures Hawke’s Bay Photo News was able to get of the Maoris v’s France match played on McLean Park, Napier.  Refused a field pass on our home ground, our photographer was forced to take these shots from amongst the crowd, using a powerful telephoto lens.  However we were pleased to display these and other shots in Napier and Hastings shop windows during the week following the match, for the benefit of our many readers.

This was the big moment for the Maoris when winger K.S. Ransley went over in the corner immediately after being tackled.  Some maintained the ball was “rabbited” – that is wriggled forward after a tackle – when it should have been played with the foot.  Whatever the personal views the referee allowed the try and Walters converted it to give the Maoris their 5-3 win over France.

A slight difference of opinion in a scrummage seems to have little relation to play of the ball.

Page 34

Sardines

An aerial view of McLean Park, Napier, during The Maoris v France match.  Twenty-six thousand rugby fans (equal to the population of Napier) crammed the stands while schoolchildren spilled over onto the edge of the playing field.

Page 35

Meynard takes a fair catch but goes down heavily to Maniopoto’s tackle as the whistle blows. The referee awarded Meynard a free kick when he was able to take it.

“Get off my back!”

Page 36

Scotsmen‘s backyard grandstand.

On the morning of the big match Photo News took a survey of the grounds. The expected large crowd of non-ticket holders did not materialise although there were several hundred who did get in by the skin of their teeth. No-one was turned away.

“We’ve got our seats anyway!”

Tuck bag.

Chance encounter

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Page 37

THEY CALL IT A DYNAMOMETER

This photograph was taken a few weeks back when the electrical engineering firm of John Hill Ltd., Hastings, was installing the floor mechanism of a Clayton Dynamometer – an American invention which allows accurate shop-testing of a vehicle to measure the power developed by the motor under normal road conditions. The driving wheels of a car are run onto the rollers in the floor.  As the speed of the engine and wheels increases, a contrary load can be placed on the rollers to simulate hill-climbing.

In this way the car engine can be tested at any point to see whether it is developing full power. If it is not, adjustments are made and the engine re-tested.  If no improvement shows on the meters further tests can rapidly isolate the loss of power.

The wheels of a car seen at speed on the dynamometer. In this case the vehicle showed a distinct loss of power, which, with other equipment was quickly isolated to the number 6 cylinder.  This machine promises to cut out many weary hours of hit and miss testing.  The technicians handling tihe equipment are always aiming at the rated horsepower of the car and can normally get very close to it.

Coupled to the distributor circuit of a car on the dynamometer, the screen of this electronic engine tester immediately shows any malfunctioning in cylinders or ignition system. The lower graph line, or trace, represents the functioning of the sixth cylinder and shows a distinct variation from the other five on the screen. (The speed of the camera has momentarily cut some of the graph lines which appear constant to the naked eye.)

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Page 38

Squash Rackets

Looking over the balcony into one of the Napier Squash Club’s courts in the old reservoir in Cameron Road;  Skelley, Masterton, and B. McKay, Henderson, playing off in the Cousen’s Shield and Mitchell Cup, North Island play, Championships,

It is not only difficult or almost impossible to photograph the whole of a squash court – it is very difficult even to catch the faces of the players, as the balcony is above the back wall of the court.  This was another shot from the same game.

Mrs. S. Curran, Auckland, and Miss L. Sarah, Hawke’s Bay, during their match. The game must be seen to appreciate its speed.

H.B. player Doug Hogg, seen from the front wall during warm-up.

Page 39

If the last player unintentionally obstructs the ball the point is replayed. After hitting the ball a player must try to give his opponent clear court; not always easy in a fast game.

Players traverse the whole court rapidly during play. The small black rubber ball can strike the floor only once between players’ strokes, but any number of times on front, side and back walls.

CYGNETS in TRAINING

Young Linda Green, a Grade 5 pupil of Miss Lilian Swann, poses gracefully for our camera.

With Rhonda Spiller, Jennifer Faulknor and Sharon Uren she performs ballet exercises at the practice bar in the Higgins St. Hall, Napier.

Page 40

THE SECRET TENT

Christopher Martyn (Trevor Cardo), a normally balanced man, tries to strangle his wife, Ruth (Myra Bisson) when he discovers her unsavoury past.

Ruth in a distracted state of mind.

“The Secret Tent” by Elizabeth Addyman is a play which drew big audiences in Britain and the United States. It played recently in the Napier Repertory Little Theatre to some rather scant houses – what is wrong with the New Zealand theatre public?  Have they been fed for so long on film fare they don‘t appreciate live theatre any more?  Here was a good play, ably presented in a relatively warm, intimate theatre, yet not one thousand people were interested in attending.  It seems they just didn‘t know what they were missing – a play with a good plot, a murder, a disappearance, real characters, and above all tension which sweeps the audience along with it.

Producer David Monrad deep in thought at a rehearsal as

Miss Mitchum-Brown (Jean Ash) does her best to eavesdrop on Naomi Martyn (Jo White), Christopher’s mother.

Page 41
 

John Macdonald played an excellent part as Ernie Briggs, a rather pathetic local simpleton.

Mrs. Martyn opens the door to Inspector Thornton ( John Boswell ) investigating the murder. Miss Pearce (Janice Macdonald) looks on.

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Page 42 

Hastings Wedding

GRIFFITHS – CHRISTOPHERSEN

At the Methodist Church, Hastings: Edith Francis Christophersen, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L.  Christophersen, Hastings, to Larry Athol Griffiths, only son of Mrs. O. Griffiths, Hastings.  From left:  Bryan Barker, Diana Griffiths, the groom and bride, Ron Butwell, Caryl Christophersen, and flowergirl Jocelyn Hewald. Future home – Hamilton.
Lovell-Smith Photo

Napier Wedding

WHALE – FOX

At the L. D. S. Chapel, Napier: Phyllis Muriel Fox, Napier, to Harold Gordon Whale, Clive. From left: Mrs. Matilda Jenson, the groom and bride, and George Whale. Future home – Napier.
Photo by A. B. Hurst & Son

Page 43

21sts

These dimpled darlings were just a few of the girls who flocked to Norman Speers’ twenty-first birthday to wish him well.  From left; Bri-anne Holdsworth, Rona Coleman, Mal-colmly Crawford, Geoffie Pell, Graham (Clare) and Warrenna Toms.

Norman himself, seen with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. H Speers, Longlands, Hastings.

Photos by Batchelors Studios Photo

Master of Ceremonies, Kevin Morris, took his job rather seriously.

When mother and son celebrate birthdays the same day it’s a special occasion, and Mr. E. J. Munson of Motel Mayfair, Hastings, took the opportunity of wishing his son Tony, well in life, and of giving his wife her birthday gift.

Page 44

Savages’ Hot Reception

A Hastings Orphans’ welcoming committee waits expectanty at Stortford lodge for raiding Masterton Savages.

The immaculate guard-of-honour de-composed of Sid Skilleter, Percy Lee and Lofty Grant.

A little D.D.T. dust administered by Orphan Ah Foo Compton ensured protection from local maladies.

Visiting Savage George Bates goes through the footrot bath – a necessary precaution with outside stock. We are not sure whether it was intented to prevent or ensure footrot, but obviously they all enjoyed it.  Masterton rangatira, Jack Guppy did get his feet dried afterwards.

Page 45

DEERSTALKERS DINNER

The prize for the best Sika stag antlers and for the supreme champion head was awarded this year to T. Porter of Napier at the annual dinner of the Hawke’s Bay Deerstalkers.  Presenting the trophy is Mrs. J. F. Rippon.

Beauty and the beast did not seem incongruous in the midst of horns and antlers, pork and venison.

M. Simmonds of Tutira was the proud winner of the red stag antlers competition under twenty-one.

Les Turfrey of Hastings, an old hand at the game, won the goat‘s horns trophy with this magnificent set.

Page 46

COUNCIL SKYHOOK

The versatile Napier City Council truck normally used for servicing street lights shows its paces as workmen in the extended cage drill holes in the wall of the T. & G. Building.

PUGLY BEAUTY

These four worried little pug dogs are a litter sired by Champion Goldjim Silvio, imported from Victoria and owned by Jack Charters of Hastings, who bred them.

BEAUTY BLOT

Once a popular swimming hole, this reach of the old Tutaekuri Riverbed near Ellison Street, Napier, is rapidly becoming choked with weeds. The flow is negligible.

Page 47

Wairoa Reflects

This blaze of lights on the Wairoa bridge was part of recent celebrations in the town.

BAY VIEW HALL JUBILEE

The present-day committee and former members of the King George V Hall, Bay View, which has just celebrated its golden jubilee. The hall is still the centre of community activity in this settlement five miles north of Napier.

Page 48

Faces BEHIND THE Masks

The Majestic Ballroom in Napier saw more fencing activtiy recently with the Wellington provincial championships held there.

Doug Millar, Napier, lands one where it counts on Peter Chambers, Taradale, in the final of the men’s intermediates sabre event.

Finalists in the Junior Ladies’ Foil – Sue Allen, Wellington Swords Club, first, and Margaret Williamson, Victoria University, second.

Janette Davis, Wellington Swords Club, and Mrs. Eva Gerbault, Taradale, first and second in the intermediate ladies’ foils.

Roger Pigott, Napier, winner of the men’s intermediate foils.

Page 49

JUNIOR PIPING

Pipe Major Doug Thoresen tuning Kenny Lusher’s pipes before he competed in the solo events at the Heretaunga Thistle Club’s Miniature Band Competition in Hastings.  Kenny won two events.

Judith Low and Joy Mansfield, two contestants from the Napier and District Ladies Pipe Band.

W. Menzies of Lindisfarne College competing in the under-18 class.

Roland McKenzie, Dannevirke, piping judge, seated at table.

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Page 50

Hastings CAT SHOW

The Hastings Cat Club’s annual show held in the Buffalo Hall, Warren Street, attracted the usual large entries and large crowds.  In fact, there wasn’t room to swing . . .oh, no!

Kristine Rattray with her kitten “Sparky” which gained a place . . . in her affections.

The best kitten in the show, with the resounding name of “Panorama Princess Mali”, is owned by Mrs. L. Slater of Tauranga.

Carol Ann Smith with her “Lady”.  Some cats just don’t know when to retire from the unequal struggle.

“Lavender Mist”, owned by Mrs. J. Harvey, had no time for the camera – there were other cats.

Page 51

Mrs. V. Wurm’s kitten “Princess” looks slightly surprised as she gazes in awe over the seething mass of humanity and felinity.

First prize in a Special Limit Male class went to this smoky-grey sphinx, “Tiger”, owned by Kristine Rattray.

There is never a shortage of exhibitors or visitors at the Hastings Cat Show. In fact, indoor traffic control would probably ease the congestion at peak periods.

Page 52

ENGAGEMENTS

Patricia Francis McLean to Malcolm Richard Nash

Patricia’s parents live in Massey Crescent, Napier.  Malcolm is a son of Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Nash, Ellison Street, Napier.

Taffy Wawatai to James Banks

Taffy is youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. Wawatai of Tikitiki. Jim is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Bank’s, Plassey St., Hastings.

Eileen McMann to Alan Leslie Wilson

Eileen comes from Levin.  Alan’s home is in Lister Place, Maraenui, Napier.

June Margaret Ansin to Robert Glyn Roy

June is youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Ansin, Nelson Crescent, Napier.  Robert’s parents live in Bowling Road, Greenmeadows.

Judy Opie to Laurie Gibson.

Judy’s parents live in Waipuna Street, Hastings.  Laurie‘s home is in Willowpark Road, Hastings.
Photo by Batchelors Studios

Page 53

Hastings Wedding

CLARK – KEYS

At Nelson Street, Hastings, Beverley Ruth Keys, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Keys, Murdoch Road, Hastings, to Stuart Edward Clark, second son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Clark, Mona Street, Hastings.
Stuart Johnson Photo

Takapau Wedding

MITCHELL – JOHNSON

At Takapau, Priscilla Jean Johnson, eldest daughter of Mrs. and the late Mr.  L. Johnson, Takapau, to John Mitchell, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. Mitchell, Cromwell, C. Otago.  The group from left, Lucinda Johnson, Christina Partridge, Brian Cosgrove, the groom and bride, and Jennifer Johnson. Flower girls Rebecca and Deborah Partridge and Nickalo Mullin.
Wendy studios Photo

Page 54

BUILT IT MYSELF

During the past winter the Napier Sailing Club embarked on an ambitious programme of boatbuilding. They turned their clubhouse by the boat harbour into a workshop and there members have built 12 P-class yachts – the small type suitable for young admirals.  In many cases it has been a father and son project.

Lyall Wiig and son Graham, working on the hull of their craft.

Wayne Fisher sanding down the stern of his boat.

Sailing club instructor, Gordon Dine, gives Donald Syme a hand.

Page 55

Ken Oliver is another father helping his son to build his yacht for the summer under the club plan.

Noel Martin, Hastings, seems to be telling Club Commodore, Tony Wayne, about a fishing trip rather than the boat he’s building.

Bill Pendlebury and Syd Fisher working on Bill Junior‘s boat.  It is very much a co-operative project with everyone learning something from the others and helping out with their new-found skills.

Bill Pendlebury Junior glueing the frame of his boat with dad, caretaker of the club, holding the timber.

Page 56

Daryl Smith seen working under his boat in that awkward position adopted by boatbuilders and mechanics.

Les Workman with assistance, cutting a hull skin on the bandsaw.

Fourteen-year-old Linda Devine, watching work on the boat being built for her by two members of the club – Les Workman and his son, John.

John Workman driving copper nails into the plywood bottom of Linda’s boat ready for fixing.

Page 57

Graham Wiig clearing the opening for the centre case in the middle of the hull.

Another instance of co-operation as W. Haskell and John Workman. “fair” Linda Devine‘s boat. Fairing is the term for levelling all contact surfaces to the same plane so that the ply makes full contact.

Sailing a lonely sea, the Harbour Board dredge “Whakarire”, gives little indication of her mission – dumping her dredgings out in the bay.

Back cover

Next Issue
Sept. 28th

[Back cover photo – Our feline friend with the appealing eyes is no relation in the aristocrat on pages 50-51.  She is just an ordinary well-fed alley cat, but my! . . what character.]

Original digital file

PN034Sep1961.pdf

Date published

September 1961

Format of the original

Magazine

Accession number

967/968/35443

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