Cyclopedia of New Zealand, The

TARANAKI & HAWKE’S BAY   FREE PART.   Section 1.

The Cyclopedia of New Zealand.

Industrial
Descriptive, Historical, Biographical.
Facts, Figures, Illustrations.

Weeks, Printer, Manchester St., Christchurch.

HAWKE’S BAY.

NAPIER.

NAPIER, the chief city of the provincial district of Hawke’s Bay, is built on a high peninsula originally known as Scinde Island, jutting into an open roadstead, into which a breakwater is run out from one of the points. It was called after Sir Edward Hawke by Cook, who sighted it on the 12th of October, 1769. The anchorage is good and the roadstead sheltered from all but easterly gales. The town is built on a succession of rounded hills. Its shipping centres at the point of the peninsula known as the Spit and formerly called Port Ahuriri. Inside the Spit there is a fine basin for vessels of moderate size formed in the estuary of the rivers Esk and Tutaekuri, to which access is obtained by a channel enclosed within a long groyne running into the bay. Napier is connected with Wellington by rail over the Rimutaka, and by the Manawatu Company’s western line. The district of Hawke’s Bay is largely of limestone formation, and one of the best agricultural and pastoral areas in New Zealand. There are many extensive meat-preserving and other factories connected with that industry, but Napier itself is the commercial centre and  has few factories of any consequence in the town. It is a diocesan city, the residence of the Bishop of Waiapu and has many fine buildings and private residences. The principal hotels are, the Masonic, Criterion, Clarendon, and others. There are several local journals of which the “Hawke’s Bay Herald,” “Telegraph,” ‘‘Courier,” “News,”’ and “Monthly Church Herald,” are the chief ones. Banking institutions are well represented, there being six branches of well-known corporations. The churches are also numerous and there are several public and private schools, public hall, various lodges and societies, hospital, theatre, and museum. Surrounded by some of the finest country in the North Island, Napier is more of a genuine show-place for its flocks, wool, and produce generally, than for its scenery. There are, however, several pleasant walks or drives round about, such as to the Botanical Gardens, the summit of Scinde Island on which the principal residences are built, and along the Shakespeare Road. Petane, seven miles northward, makes a pleasant outing; an excursion can be made to Taradale, and a good idea gained of the quality of the land in this province. Cape Kidnappers is seven miles to the southward  in the Wairoa district, and there are several other attractions for tourists.

Mr. ROBERT DONALD DOUGLAS McLEAN, Member of the House of Representatives for Napier, is the son of the late Sir Donald McLean, was born in Wellington in 1852 and was educated at the Auckland Grammar School and Clifton College, England. It was intended he should proceed to Cambridge University, but an unfortunate break-down in his health necessitated his return to the Colony, and he was articled to Messrs. Hart and Buckley, a prominent legal firm in Wellington. Returning to England he was called to the Bar of the Middle Temple in 1882, passing tenth on a long list, but Mr. McLean did not enter into the practice of his profession, preferring the freer life of a large run holder. Mr. McLean is now and has been a member of the Hawke’s Bay County Council, Hospital and Charitable Aid Boards, Hawke’s Bay Harbour Board, Education Board, and Napier High School Board of Governors.

Mr. SAMUEL CARNELL, J.P., late Member of the House of Representatives, was born in Nottingham, England, in 1833, and brought up to the lace trade. He turned his attention to photography and after the discovery of the collodion process in 1852 left for the Colonies, arriving in Auckland by the “Caduceus” in 1862 and was employed as operator by Messrs.

Photo captions –
MR. S. CARNELL.
ESPLANADE AND BLUFF HILL, NAPIER.

(J)

114   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Crombie and Webster, photographers of that city. On the outbreak of the Hokitika gold “rush” in 1865 Mr. Carnell left for the Coast to try his luck at the diggings, but not meeting with his anticipated success he went to Nelson, where he opened a photographic studio for six months, then returned to Auckland and ultimately came to Napier in 1869 where he established a studio. Mr. Carnell always took great interest in public matters and supported the Liberal party. In 1894 he was induced to stand for the Napier seat and defeated his opponent, Mr. Swan, by 520 votes. He represented the district for three years in the Liberal interest. He holds very advanced views on the “Land Question,” believing that the only way to prevent the possession of large estates is to limit by law the amount of land one man can hold. He has always been opposed to the totalisator and in the session of 1895 carried a motion in favour of its abolition, and in the session of 1896, he drafted a Bill to give effect to that resolution. The Bill passed its second reading by a majority of nine votes, but was blocked in committee and slaughtered with the ‘‘innocents.’’ For many years he has been a member of the Napier Hospital Board, is a member of the Napier Harbour Board, and till lately a member of the Land Board. He is a member of the Masonic body.

Mr. F. SUTTON, Ex-Member of the House of Representatives for Napier, was born in Cambridgeshire, England, educated at Royston school and came to Napier in 1857. Shortly after arrival he started in business which he carried on successfully for a number of years. In or about the year 1867 he was elected a member of the Provincial Council as representative for Napier, which position he continued to hold till the abolition of provinces in 1877. Sir Donald McLean, then representative in the General Assembly for Napier, having died in January, 1877, Mr. Sutton was asked to stand for the vacancy, and although he was opposed to men of the calibre of the late Mr. Henry Stokes Tiffen and Mr. John Buchanan he was returned. At the general election in 1879, there being then two members of the Napier district, instead of, as at present, one for Napier and one for Hawke’s Bay, Mr. Sutton and Capt. Russell contested the seats against Mr. Buchanan and the late Mr. A. D. Meney. In this contest Mr. Sutton and Capt. Russell headed the poll. In 1881 there was a division of the districts, and principally through an inconvenient arrangement not quite within parliamentary proprieties, Mr. Sutton contested the Hawke’s Bay seat with Capt. Russell, the leader of the opposition, on his own ground. The election of 1884 was also contested, but on this occasion, the convenient third man was brought into the field and Mr. Sutton had in consequence to take a back seat. During the years 1877 to 1879 Mr. Sutton was chairman of the County Council, and during that time he was so efficient a president that the council presented him with a service of plate in recognition of his services. He claims that during his tenure of office the council surveyed, laid out, formed and completed a new road 100 miles long from Napier to Patea. He has also been a member of the education board since the passing of the Education Act, and although from various causes there does not appear to be much chance in the meantime of his being again in Parliament, more unlikely things have happened than his being yet called upon to assist in the government of the country.

BOROUGH OF NAPIER.

THE BOROUGH OF NAPIER is a progressive town. Its population numbers over 9250, within an area of 879 acres. The ratable [rateable] value of property is £83,058, on which there are levied general and special rates yielding a revenue of £11,200. There is a funded debt of £105,000 borrowed for public works. Napier is lighted with gas and has over twenty-eight miles of formed streets.

HIS WORSHIP Mr. George Henry Swan, Mayor of Napier, is a native of Sunderland, England, and was trained as a chemist at Newcastle-on-Tyne, where he also gained a knowledge of photography. He came out to Australia in 1854, went to the Victorian goldfields, and afterwards entered into business at Dunolly. In 1857 he came to New Zealand and began business as a photographer in Wellington with Mr. Wrigglesworth. In 1864 Mr. Swan went to Napier, where he opened and carried on a branch studio for himself and his partner, who traded in both Wellington and Napier under the style of Swan and Wrigglesworth. The partnership was dissolved in about two years, but Mr. Swan carried on the Napier business till 1870, when he sold out to his assistant, Mr. Samuel Carnell. Prior to this Mr. Swan had entered into the hotel trade, and in 1866 he became a large shareholder and managing director in the Hawke’s Bay Brewing Company. In 1869 he purchased the White Swan Brewery, which he has carried  on ever since, though his sons have latterly assisted him in the management. As a municipal administrator Mr. Swan has had a remarkable record. He was elected to the Borough Council of Napier in 1874, and he has been mayor of the town continuously since 1885. No other mayor in any similar town in the Colony has a record which can be compared with Mr. Swan’s in this respect, and he has rendered to his borough services commensurate with the honour which it has conferred upon him. It was he who inaugurated the public saltwater swimming baths, and the sea wall which protects the town and forms the esplanade; and the Marine Parade, which is a mile and a half in length, and gives distinction to Napier, is largely the outcome of his public spirit and intelligent persistency. Mr. Swan has been chairman of the Napier Hospital Board and of the Hawke’s Bay United Charitable Aid Board for some years, and he is, ex officio, a member of the Napier Harbour Board. He represented Napier in the House of Representatives from 1890 to 1893, and favoured a policy of moderation and steady, as opposed to precipitate, progress.

Councillor HYMAN PHINEAS COHEN, Member of the Napier Borough Council and a well-known auctioneer, was born in London in 1837 and is the son of the late Mr. Phineas Cohen, merchant, of London. He was educated in that city and entered his father’s office, where he remained until 1859, when he came to this Colony, landing at Auckland. After working in a saw-mill for a few months he went to Melbourne and proceeded to the goldfields at Inglewood and Navarre. In 1862 when the Otago gold “rush’’ set in, Mr. Cohen joined in that migration and entered into business as a storekeeper in Tuapeka, where he did fairly well. In 1867 he went to the Thames and spent three years in that district. After a further period of three years in Auckland, Mr. Cohen settled in Napier and opened a

Photo captions –
HIS WORSHIP THE MAYOR.
COUNCILLOR H. P. COHEN.

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fancy goods store, to which he afterwards added a furniture warehouse, and subsequently auctioneering, conducting sales in Hastings Street. Councillor Cohen takes a great interest in all public matters with political leanings on the Liberal side, and in Mr. Ballance’s days frequently took the chair at his meetings. He is a member of the Hawke’s Bay Hospital and Charitable Aid Boards, and was for many years chairman of those bodies. He is a school commissioner and takes much interest in educational matters generally. For the past sixteen or seventeen years Mr. Cohen has been captain of the Fire Police and Salvage Corps, and for a similar period has, without intermission, been a member of the Borough Council. In 1870 he married Miss Moss, of Dunedin, and has an only daughter.

Councillor JOHN C. McVAY, Chairman of the Public Works Committee of the Napier Borough Council, has been more or less prominent in Napier for upwards of thirty years. He was born in Auckland and is the second son of the late Mr. John McVay, one of Auckland’s early settlers, who arrived from New South Wales in 1841. The subject of this sketch was educated at the Rev. John Gorrie’s Academy, and was subsequently apprenticed to the saddlery trade. In 1873 he started the business which is now so extensively known and in which he employs thirty hands. Mr. McVay has been a borough councillor for over seventeen years, and is a member of all the standing committees of the council and chairman of those  on which the mayor does not sit. For some eight or ten years he was an active member of the Napier Harbour Board, but press of private business compelled his retirement from that body. Mr. McVay has been vice-president of the Napier Park Racing Club almost since its inception, about fourteen years ago. He is a director of the Hawke’s say Permanent Building Society of the Napier Savings Bank. Few movements for the advancement of the town and district have been inaugurated in which his ready assistance has not been available. He is a Mason of many years’ standing. In 1871 Mr. McVay was married to Miss Craig, of Belfast.

Councillor WILLIAM PLOWMAN, Member of the Napier Borough Council, is a partner in the well-known firm of Gifford, Plowman and Co, cordial manufacturers. Councillor Plowman was born in Manchester, England, in 1850, and is the son of Mr. James Plowman, machine broker. He was educated in his native city and apprenticed to Sir Joseph Whitworth and Co., Ltd., engineers. On the completion of his time he went to London, where for two years he was engaged in the wax and tallow chandlery business. In 1871 he came to this Colony per ship ‘‘St. Leonards,” and on arrival in Napier was engaged in the aerated water factory of Mr. George Bowman. Three years later he entered the employment of Messrs. H. C. Robjohns and Son, with whom he remained for eighteen years, rising to the position of brewer and manager. He then, in 1894, joined his present partner in the purchase of the business of Messrs. Thomson, Gifford and Co., as described in the business notice of the present firm. Mr. Plowman is a Master Mason and a member of Lodge Scinde. He is now in his second term as a councillor and takes an active interest in the affairs of the borough. He was married in 1877 to a daughter of Mr. Pand, of Falmouth, England, and has four children.

COUNCILLOR FREDERICK GEORGE SMITH, who has occupied a seat in the Borough Council of Napier for about twelve years, is a well-known shipping and forwarding agent. He was born in 1850 in the seaport of Hayle, Cornwall, and is a son of Mr. John Pearce Smith, cooper and woodware manufacturer. He was educated at the Hayle Grammar School and in due course was apprenticed to the sea with a West of England Company. After attaining the rank of second mate during a period of nine years in the Valparaiso, Indian and China trade, Mr. Smith gave up seafaring life and embraced an opportunity of coming to New Zealand. Settling in Napier in 1875 he obtained employment in the establishment of Messrs. Margoliouth and Banner, grocers and wine and spirit merchants, and remained with that firm seven years, having charge of the Spit branch and wool dumping works. Councillor Smith then entered into business on his own account, in which he has made himself prominent and successful. He has been a volunteer for over twenty years and was in command of the Napier Naval Artillery from 1885 until 1897, when the corps was disbanded and he was placed on the reserve staff with the rank of captain. Councillor Smith is a past worshipful master Mason and took his Mark and Royal Arch degree while on a visit to the Old Country in 1893. He was married in 1879 to a daughter of Mr. Edward Newbigin, of Ryton, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and has four daughters and two sons. Further reference to Mr. Smith will be found in these pages in the shipping agency section.

Councillor JOHN STENTIFORD WELSMAN, who has been a member of the Borough Council of Napier for more than eleven years, is well known and highly respected, not only in the town where for the past twenty-two years he has resided, but also in Auckland, where as a young man he did valuable pioneer work. Mr. Welsman was born in Devonshire, England, in 1848, and is a son of Mr. Thomas Welsman, who came with his family to Auckland in 1858 per ship ‘“Egmont.’’ He was educated partly in a public school in England and partly by private tuition in Auckland, was apprenticed to the late Mr. H. Potter, chemist and druggist in Auckland, and set up in business on

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR W. PLOWMAN.
MESSRS. F. G. SMITH & CO.’S BUSINESS PREMISES.

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his own account in 1864 in Queen Street. The humidity of the Auckland climate, however, proved so dangerous to the health of Mrs. Welsman, that the doctors ordered an immediate change, and recommended Napier. Mr. Welsman, therefore, sold out in 1877 and established himself in Napier, where he soon became a very popular chemist. In fairness to the Napier climate, it should be mentioned that Mrs. Welsman, who was given three months to live in Auckland, is now, after twenty-one years, in the enjoyment of robust health. For the past thirty-six years Mr. Welsman has been a hard worker in connection with Sunday schools, to which he has been attached. On his arrival in Napier he was elected superintendent of the Wesleyan school, a position to which he has been periodically elected ever since. The Napier Gas Company has for many years claimed him as one of its directors. In 1870 Mr. Welsman was married to Miss Allen, of Gloucester, England, and has three sons and two daughters living.

Captain MAURICE NORMAN BOWER, the popular Town Clerk of Napier, has filled that post for nearly a quarter of a century, and prior to his appointment had seen a good deal of military service. Capt. Bower was born in Caen, Normandy, in 1834, and is a son of the late Mr. George Edmund Bower of the old Ordnance Department at the Tower of London. Educated at St. Paul’s school, London, the subject of this sketch was a scholar there when New Zealand’s present Chief Justice, Sir James Prendergast, was the senior monitor. On leaving this school, Capt. Bower went as a cadet to the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, where he remained two years. He subsequently served with the 13th Light Dragoons and the 10th Hussars in the Crimea. Returning to England after the peace, he purchased his discharge and sailed  for New Zealand. On arriving in Auckland in 1857, he joined the Military Stores Department, remaining there until the outbreak of the Waikato War in 1863 when he received a commission as sub-inspector in the Colonial Defence Force, then under the command of the late Col. Nixon. On the death of that officer, who died from wounds received in action at Rangiaowhia, he was promoted to be inspector, serving in all the operations against the Natives in the Waikato until the corps was disbanded. He then joined the 1st Waikato Regiment as captain and served with it at Tauranga, Opotiki, and the East Coast until it was disbanded. He proceeded to Napier and was employed as district adjutant and quartermaster at Wairoa, Poverty Bay, after the massacre, Waikaremona [Waikaremoana] expedition, Taupo, etc., etc., in 1868 to 1873. In March, 1874, he was appointed town clerk and treasurer of the Borough of Napier and in this capacity he is still serving. In 1857 he married a daughter of the late Mr. John Mason, of Auckland, and has a daughter and two sons living.

Mr. WILLIAM HODGSON, Receiver of Rates for the Napier Borough Council, was born at Norwich, Norfolk, in 1844, is the son of Mr. Thomas Hodgson, coach-painter of that city, and was educated at the private school of Mr. Samuel Gidney. He was apprenticed to the grocery trade, but in early youth, through taking part in amateur performances, he became infatuated with stage life, and joined the dramatic profession at the age of eighteen years. For nearly fourteen years he was a member of various stock companies in provincial theatres, notably the Queen’s Theatre, Manchester, Theatre Royal, Dublin, Theatre Royal, Hanley, Princes Theatre, Edinburgh, and at Bolton, Blackburn, Preston, Belfast, Leeds, Bradford, Aberdeen, Greenock, and other places.   Mr. Hodgson arrived in New Zealand in the ship “Mataura’’ (Capt. Brown) in 1877 and for seven years was book-keeper for a Napier merchant. He was appointed to his present position in 1884. Mr. Hodgson’s reminiscences of his dramatic days have been often pleasantly recalled by meeting travelling members of the profession with whom he had been previously acquainted, such as Messrs. J. L. Toole, Harry Paulton, F. Maccabe, T. B. Appleby, and Harry Taylor. His engagements were generally in juvenile lead and light comedy business. Mr. Hodgson has on many occasions in Napier rendered valuable assistance in amateur performances for charitable purposes and was for many years secretary to the Napier School Committee. He acts as returning-officer in local and general elections and is secretary to the Napier Bowling Club. Mr. Hodgson was married at Edinburgh in 1866 to a daughter of Mr. W. H. Weir, scenic-artist at the Theatre Royal, Dublin, and has a son and daughter living; the latter was recently married to Mr. J. Geenty, of the Wallingford Hotel and store.

Mr. HENRY CHARLES ADOLPHUS WUNDRAM, Valuer and Inspector of Buildings for the Borough of Napier, was born in 1838 in Hanover, Germany, where his father was a builder. Educated at the technical schools of Hanover, Mr. Wundram began his career in a lawyer’s office, but gave that up for the life of a sailor, at which he spent some nine years, chiefly coasting out of Hartlepool. In 1862 he went to New South Wales by the ship “Royal Bride”’ and left the vessel at Sydney without either leave or license and as the “Royal Bride” was wrecked in Hawke’s Bay a year later he had no cause to regret his act of desertion. After fourteen years of ups and downs on the Australian and New Zealand goldfields he came to Napier in 1876 and

Photo captions –
CAPTAIN M. N. BOWER.
MR. W. HODGSON.
MR. H. C. A. WUNDRAM.

CITY CORPORATION.   117

started as a sign-writer. He next set up as an architect and soon made a name for himself in that capacity, and many of the finest shops of Napier have been erected from his plans. In 1890 Mr. Wundram was appointed borough valuer, and some two years later, was appointed inspector of buildings. He also does a good deal of inside office work and is architect for all buildings erected under the auspices of the Borough Council. The pumping station, fire brigade station, and other buildings were erected from his plans and under his supervision. As an illuminator of addresses, etc., Mr. Wundram has done a great deal of work in excellent style. He is a past grand deacon in the Masonic Order, secretary of Victoria Lodge, a member of Scinde Lodge, and was for four years master of Charlton Kilwinning, No. 487 S.C. Mr. Wundram worked hard to secure the Grand Lodge of New Zealand and attended the meeting held in Wellington in 1876 on that behalf under the presidency of the late Mr. Vincent Pyke. For this and many other services, he was the recipient of a presentation from Charlton and Victoria Lodges. He was president for a term of the Working Men’s Club, and has been treasurer for the past fifteen years. He is also a member of the Napier Bowling Club and secretary to the Loyal United Friends Benefit Society.

Mr. TOM WATERWORTH, Overseer of Roads, Sanitary Inspector, Fire Inspector, etc., for the Borough of Napier, was born in Sherburn, Yorkshire, in 1834, and is the son of Mr. John Waterworth, a farmer of that place, where the subject of this sketch went to school. After learning the trade of a monumental mason he came to this Colony in 1859 by the ship “Robert Small.” Landing in Lyttelton, he stayed there for two years, then went to New South Wales and  visited the diggings at Lambing Flat, but was back in New Zealand in the following year and remained in Lyttelton until 1864 when he went to the West Coast goldfields, but soon returned to Lyttelton where he was employed as foreman of works for Mr. E. G. Wright, now Member for Ashburton. Staying in this occupation until 1868, Mr. Waterworth in that year went to the Thames and for about six years was mine manager and afterwards was foreman for Mr. John Taylor, contractor. Leaving for Hawke’s Bay in 1874, he became manager for the harbour contractor and carried out the first works at the Spit which lasted between two and three years. Mr. Waterworth then started in business in Napier as a monumental mason. About ten years later he left the business to his son, who still carries it on successfully, and took the Provincial Hotel. He, however, soon tired of hotel life and in 1892 was appointed by the Borough Council to his present position. Mr. Waterworth takes a very keen interest in the work of his department. He has invented a patent sewer-trap, which possesses special sanitary advantages, and the Waterworth Patent Asphalt needs but to be known to supersede all others. It has the great advantage of setting immediately it is put down for the requisite thickness and yet it will keep soft and workable in heaps for months. This is the result of important changes effected in the tar by means of a retort. Other advantages of the system are that very valuable by-products are obtained from the tar in the process of preparing it for the patent asphalt. For thirty-two years in various places, Mr. Waterworth was a member of fire brigades and he has only recently resigned on account of ill-health, the superintendency of the Napier brigade. He has been present at all Fire Brigade Conferences and competitions, is president of the Fire Brigade Association, and trustee of the Fire Brigades’ Accident Insurance Society for the Colony. He is a member of the committee of the Napier Bowling Club, an active member of the Masonic Lodge Victoria, and takes an interest generally in all local objects. He is an ex-president of the Working Men’s Club and a prominent member of the committee. Mr. Waterworth married in 1858 a daughter of the late Mr. Jonas Batey, of Offerton, near Sunderland, and has four daughters and two sons.

EX-COUNCILLORS.

Mr. JOHN DINWIDDIE, Ex-Councillor of the Borough of Napier, who is enjoying a well-merited retirement, is an old and highly respected resident of Napier. He was born in 1834 in Manchester where also he was educated. Leaving the Old Land in 1859 by the ship ‘‘Caduceus,” he landed in Auckland during the first half of that year. In January of the following year he removed to Napier and having a knowledge of carpentry, obtained employment on the old Government Buildings, near the present post office. Developing into a builder and furniture manufacturer, Mr. Dinwiddie soon had a very fine business in those lines and during his first fifteen years in the district gained a good competence. In 1876 he took a trip Home,  via the United States, returning by way of Suez. Mr. Dinwiddie chose the life of a farmer and settled in Patangata County. In this, however, he was not particularly successful; therefore, selling his farm he returned to Napier and assisted his brother, Mr. Peter Dinwiddie, of the “Hawke’s Bay Herald,” for some two or three years prior to his final retirement. Mr. Dinwiddie now finds sufficient employment in looking after his city properties, and being an enthusiastic bowler, his recreation is mainly sought on the green of the Napier Bowling Club, of which he was one of the most active promoters. During the time of the Maori troubles, Mr. Dinwiddie saw active service and was at the engagement at Omaranui [Omarunui]. He took great interest in volunteer matters for about seven years, and was one of the first to start the movement in Hawke’s Bay, and holds the New Zealand war medal. He is married and has a son and three daughters.

Mr. JAMES STANSTREET LARGE, who occupied a seat in the Napier Borough Council about the year 1883, is a well-known and highly respected resident of Hawke’s Bay. He was born and educated in Manchester, where he learned the cabinet-making trade. In his early years he emigrated to New Zealand, landing at Dunedin in 1862 from the ship ‘‘Commodore Perry.’’ Shortly afterwards continuing his journey to Napier he established himself in business. In 1867 he took Mr. Townley into partnership and started a branch at Gisborne. The business assumed extensive proportions and became one of the largest in Hawke’s Bay. In 1885 the partnership was dissolved, Mr. Large retaining the principal Napier business and Mr. Townley the Gisborne branch. In 1896 Mr. Large retired with an ample fortune. He was an active and useful member of the Borough Council for nearly three years, member of

Photo captions –
MR. T. WATERWORTH.
MR. J. DINWIDDIE.

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the Napier School Committee for a considerable period, and is still a member of the Chamber of Commerce. In 1863 he was married to a daughter of Mr. James Ferguson, of Manchester, and has two daughters and a son. The elder daughter, Lillie, is a well-known vocalist of superior cultivation. The second daughter, Amy, is at present studying in England, and his only son, Harold, B.A. of Caius College, Cambridge, has already made his mark in the journalistic world.

Mr. JOHN WAINHOUSE NEAL, who was almost continuously a member of the Borough Council of Napier from its formation until his death on the 7th of January, 1898, was one of that town’s best friends and most respected business men. To write his complete biography would be to give the history of Napier, with whose progress he was so intimately connected. Mr. Neal was born near Leeds, Yorkshire, in 1839, and was educated in his native county. Coming to the Colony early in 1861 he spent about three years in Auckland, after which he settled in Napier and was in partnership with Mr. John Close for nearly thirty-four years, few firms being better known throughout the Colony than that of Neal and Close. As a public man Mr. Neal carried into his work that punctilious attention and  integrity which were his chief characteristics. He was chairman of the public works and waterworks committee and member of the finance committee, where his business abilities were of great service, and he was a painstaking member of the Napier Harbour Board, to which he was elected on seven consecutive occasions. On the Hawke’s Bay Charitable Aid Board, the Napier Hospital Trust, and the Napier High School Board of Governors, Mr. Neal also rendered valuable services, and it is but fair to say that his innumerable acts of private and public charity were marked by his usual absence of ostentation. In 1870 he married Miss Close, a sister of his partner, who is left with three daughters to mourn their loss.

NAPIER HARBOUR BOARD.

NAPIER HARBOUR BOARD. This important body has carried out some very large harbour works in creating an artificial port, affording safe anchorage for large ships and steamers. An extensive mole has been constructed and the shipping advantages thus obtained have very greatly benefited the province. The sum of £500,000 was borrowed by the board, whose annual income is £20,000. Vessels drawing 13 feet 6 inches of water can generally enter the inner harbour and be berthed at the wharves.

Mr. J. VIGOR BROWN, who was elected by the ratepayers to a seat on the Napier Harbour Board on the death of Mr. J. W. Neal, in February, 1898, is a Scotchman [Scotsman] by birth, and was educated at the Church of England Grammar School, Melbourne. His father held a responsible position in the Bank of England, and Mr. Brown is generally accredited with possessing a fair measure of his father’s abilities as an expert financier. On this and other grounds much is expected from Mr. Brown in his capacity as member of the harbour board. For three years he was president of the Napier Chamber of Commerce, he is a member of the Borough Council, a member of the council of the Free Trade Association, president of the Caledonian Society, a director of the Napier Park Recreation Company, chairman of the Napier Land Building and Investment Society, and a director Napier Gas Company. In commercial matters, Mr. Brown has had a long experience. Brought up in Melbourne, he was apprenticed to Messrs. Sargood, King  and Sargood, now the well-known firm of Sargood, Son and Ewen. Leaving for this Colony in 1875, he was engaged by Messrs. A. P. Stuart and Co., of Wellington, for whom he travelled for a period of two years. In 1877 he accepted the appointment of manager of Messrs. Archibald Clark and Sons’ Napier branch, which position he held for twenty years, and there is no doubt that much of that firm’s success was due to his energy and exceptional tact. In May, 1898; he resigned his position with Messrs. Clark and Sons to undertake the management of the extensive business of Messrs. Neal and Close, in connection with which further mention of Mr. Brown is made.

Mr. JOHN HELIER VAUTIER, Napier’s second mayor, and a member of the Harbour Board, has been a very prominent figure in the district for upwards of forty years. Born in Jersey in 1834 and a son of the late Mr. John Vautier, farmer, of St. Martin’s, the subject of this sketch was educated and brought up to the building trade in his native isle. In 1854 he went to Liverpool and sailed in the ship “Lightning” for Victoria. After a smart run of seventy-six days, the ‘‘Lightning” arrived in Melbourne, and there Mr. Vautier remained until 1855 when he left for Wellington in the brig “Onkaparinga,” reaching that port at the time of the disastrous earthquake which occurred about three hours later, and was very palpable even afloat. Mr. Vautier has very lively recollections of the effect produced on shore by the great shock. The late Hon. Mr. Brandon was the first one he met on landing, and that gentleman, like many others, was in no very serene condition of mind. Towards the end of 1857, Mr. Vautier went to Nelson and tried gold-mining at Collingwood, but soon after removed to Napier. Hawke’s Bay was then a very sparsely settled district,

Photo captions –
MR. J. S. LARGE.
THE LATE MR. J. W. NEAL.
MR. J. H. VAUTIER.

NAPIER HARBOUR BOARD.   119

and when Mr. Vautier arrived, the hill, or collection of hills, which is now the pride of the borough, was covered with ferns. There was only one hotel in the town, and as the demand for houses and stores was great the advent of a builder was mutually satisfactory. As this demand slackened, Mr. Vautier entered into business as a coal and general merchant, and from this gradually became a shipowner on a fairly large and remunerative scale. In 1885 he sold out his vessels, and since then has spent his time in looking after his landed properties, and serving the public in a variety of ways. On the occasion of the first borough council election, Mr. Vautier was returned at the head of the poll, and he was chairman of the public works committee until he was elected mayor. As a member of the Napier Harbour Board he was first placed in that position on a life appointment from the Governor, but on the repeal of the Act under which the appointment was made, he became a member by virtue of his office as mayor, and on the expiry of his ex-officio term, was re-appointed by the Government and has since been re-nominated to the board from time to time. With the exception of a few months, therefore, Mr. Vautier has been a member of the Harbour Board continuously since its inception. He was one of the trustees of the Napier Savings Bank throughout its entire existence of thirty-six years. He has often been asked to stand for Parliament. On the Queen’s Birthday, 1861, Mr. Vautier was married to a daughter of Mr. Edward Touet, a well-known and successful Nelson colonist. Mrs. Vautier died on the 15th November, 1893, leaving her husband with a daughter and three sons.

Mr. WILLIAM KINROSS WHITE, of the Napier Harbour Board representing the  Wairoa County Council is a well-known and highly-respected Napier merchant and manager of public companies. Mr. White was born in Glasgow and is a son of Mr. Joseph White, of that city. He was educated at the Glasgow University, and after a twelve months’ pleasure trip on the Continent and a few years’ experience of the West India trade, sailed for Melbourne, en route for Napier, in the steamship “Lusitania” in 1879. On his arrival in Napier he was appointed to a responsible position in the mercantile firm of Kinross and Co., which he held until 1886, when he established himself in business on his own account. Mr. White is manager of the North British and New Zealand Investment Company, Ltd., and of the North British and Hawke’s Bay Freezing Company, Ltd., both of which he himself promoted. He is attorney for the London and Lancashire Insurance Company, and agent for the United Marine Insurance Company, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, and for J. and E. Hall, Ltd., manufacturers of refrigerating and icemaking machinery, besides representing many other important enterprises. He has been active in public affairs and a member of the Harbour Board for six years. He was married in 1887 to a daughter of the late Dr. Moore, of Christchurch, one of the earliest Canterbury settlers, and has three sons.

Mr. FREDERICK WAMKLYN [WANKLYN] WILLIAMS, who for many years has represented the Borough Council on the Napier Harbour Board, was born in Poverty Bay in 1854, and is the eldest son of the Bishop of Waiapu. Mr. Williams was educated at St. John’s College, Auckland, and the Church of England Grammar School, Parnell. In 1873 he entered the mercantile house of Messrs. Kinross and Co., general merchants, Napier, and remained with that  firm until 1880, when he established himself in the business from which has sprung the important concern of Williams and Kettle, Ltd., and of which he is the senior managing director.  Mr. Williams is chairman of the Hawke’s Bay Permanent Building Society, has been a member of the Education Board for some years, and is vice-president of the Napier Chamber of Commerce. In 1883 he was married to the daughter of Mr. J. B. Brathwaite, of Napier, late manager of the Union Bank of Australia, and has an only son.

Mr. HENRY WILLIAMS, J.P., Member of the Napier Harbour Board, has been a resident of Hawke’s Bay for over a third of a century. He was born at Bath, Somerset, England, in 1848, and is a son of the late Mr. Isaac Williams, painter and decorator of that town. After receiving his education in his native city he was apprenticed to various branches of the hardware trade, and in 1862 came to this Colony per ship “Arabella,” landing in Wellington, in which port the ship was soon afterwards partially destroyed by fire. Napier was in those days a small but rapidly extending town, and the branch of Mr. Williams’ business mostly in demand was that of tinsmithing and plumbing. From the first he did exceedingly well and in a few years found himself in possession of one of the finest and most complete hardware establishments in the province. Besides the splendid ironmongery warehouse in Napier, there are branches at Hastings and Dunneville, whilst the American Coach Factory and the Vulcan Foundry, Napier, are further developments of the same business. Mr. Williams has taken an active part for several years in all public movements, was a member of the Borough Council for some years, twice represented the ratepayers of Napier on the Harbour Board,

Photo captions –
NAPIER, FROM THE HILL.
MR. H. WILLIAMS.

120   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

and now represents the Government by nomination. For a considerable period he was visiting justice to the gaol, and he has been a member of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board almost from its inception. Mr. Williams’ house and grounds, ‘‘Ashridge,’’ Taradale, are among the finest in the district. His two sons assist him in the business.

Mr. JOHN THOMAS CARR, C.E., Secretary, Treasurer, and Engineer to the Napier Harbour Board, has had an extensive English, Continental, and Colonial professional experience. He was born in 1850 at Blackheath, Kent, England, is a son of Mr. Mark William Carr, C.B., M.I.C.E., of Newcastle-on-Tyne, was educated primarily at Eltham, at the Western College, Brighton, and professionally at King’s College, London, and Stuttgart Polytechnic in Germany. After passing the necessary examination Mr. Carr had several years’ engineering experience with the East Hungarian Railway, and in 1875 came to this Colony per ship ‘‘Durham” under engagement to the Government as resident engineer of the Public Works Department for Hawke’s Bay. Mr. Carr’s first work in the Colony was the laying out of the railway line from Takapau south as far as the Manawatu Gorge. This occupied a year and he then went to the Bay of Islands as resident engineer to lay out the line to Kawakawa, and when that was completed, he was sent to the Waikato to lay out the line to Te Aroha through the great Piako Swamp. That this was a work of very great difficulty all who know anything of the country are well aware. On the completion of the work in December, 1877, Mr. Carr was re transferred to Hawke’s Bay as district engineer, and superintended the construction of the railway from Kopua to Tahoraite. Leaving the Government service in 1885, he entered  into private practice in Napier, as a civil engineer, and designed and constructed numerous works, including the Napier Marine Parade and the famous Wairoa Bridge, which is 700 feet long in three spans of 120 feet each, five spans of 60 feet each and a draw span. In January, 1890, on the resignation of Mr. Goodall as engineer to the Napier Harbour Board, he was appointed to the vacancy and in June, 1897, the duties of secretary and treasurer were added. When Mr. Carr’s connection with the Harbour Board commenced the breakwater was well advanced, but he has made great improvements in the protective works. He is a past master of the Irish Constitution of Masons, and is an old cricketer and footballer. Mr. Carr was married in 1881 to a daughter of Mr. F. Sutton, ex-member of the House of Representatives for Hawke’s Bay, and has two daughters and a son.

Captain HENRY KRAEFT, Harbour-Master and Pilot to the Napier Harbour Board, is a native of Prussia and was brought up to sea-faring life from a very early age. He came to New Zealand in 1857, made various trips to Melbourne and sailed for the Chatham Islands in the brig ‘‘Adelaide,” commanded by Captain Weatherhall, when she was wrecked. The shipwrecked crew returned to Wellington by the schooner “Esther” and he joined the ‘‘Wangia,’’ a well-known steamer on the coastal trade. In 1860 he entered the pilot service at Napier and was made assistant pilot in 1864, and ten years later was appointed harbour-master. During his long service he has been instrumental in saving a number of valuable lives, amongst them being Capt. Setton, of the ship ‘‘Pleiades’’ and two of the crew, who were rescued through the heroic exertions of Capt. Kraeft and his men, a heavy gale blowing at the time accompanied by a tremendous sea. For his gallantry on that occasion a beautiful clock with a suitably inscribed gold plate was presented to him by Captain Setton’s friends. On many other occasions he has been the means of saving life, often at the risk of his own. During his long connection with Napier he has won the respect and esteem of all classes, both in public and private life. Capt. Kraeft is a member of the Masonic body and an Oddfellow of long standing. He is married, and his only daughter is the wife of Mr. Trimmer, master of the Spit district school.

Mr. FRANCIS EMANUEL SAUNDERS, Chief Wharfinger to the Napier Harbour Board, was born in London and learned the profession of civil engineer, after practising which for a number of years he came to Auckland by the ship “Ida Zeigler” in 1868. He proceeded to the Thames goldfields and for two years did a large amount of surveying there. After practising in the Bay of Plenty Mr. Saunders came to Napier in 1870 where he filled several positions and eventually joined the Harbour Board in 1876 as assistant to the engineer, Mr. C. H. Webber. On the retirement of that gentleman in 1879 Mr. Saunders assumed the duties of engineer, and in 1882 received the further appointment of secretary carrying out the  combined duties until the commencement of the breakwater in 1885, when Mr. Goodall was appointed engineer to the board with Mr. Saunders as assistant together with the secretaryship. These appointments he held until 1897 when owing to retrenchment, Mr. Carr, the engineer who succeeded Mr. Goodall in 1890, received the further appointment of secretary, and Mr. Saunders became chief wharfinger. He was for many years secretary of the Port Ahuriri School Committee, and at his death was chairman of that body. In local movements for the benefit of Napier and the port Mr. Saunders took a foremost part. He was a Mason of many years’ standing, having passed the principal chairs of the Victoria Lodge, and also a Forester for over twenty-five years. He died on the 1st of July, 1898, deeply regretted by his numerous friends, and left a widow with seven children.

HAWKE’S BAY COUNTY COUNCIL.

HAWKE’S BAY COUNTY has an area of 3232 square miles and a population of about 7000. The total value of real property is estimated at £3,752,000 on which a general rate of five-eighths of a penny in the £ is levied. The total annual revenue from all sources is over £12,300, and the expenditure over £11,300. There is an indebtedness of £12,581. The County Council which meets monthly at the offices in Tennyson Street, Napier, consists of Messrs. J. N. Williams (chairman), John Bennett, George Bee, E. Conroy, R. D. D. McLean, M.H.R., M. Chambers, W. Shrimpton, F. Waterhouse and C. Villers. Mr. G. T. Fannin is county clerk and Mr. C. D. Kennedy, consulting engineer.

Councillor JOHN BENNETT has been a Member of the Hawke’s Bay County Council since its inception, and was chairman of that body for six years during which time

Photo captions –
MR. J. T. CARR.
THE LATE MR. F. E. SAUNDERS.

COUNTY COUNCIL AND MILITARY.   121

many important works such as roads and bridges were carried out. Mr. Bennett has been closely identified with public affairs for many years. He was a member of the old Provincial Government, is also on the Napier Harbour Board, was a useful member of the Redclyffe, Clive, and Puketapu Road Boards, and was for several years chairman of the school committee. Mr. Bennett was born in Tuxford, Nottinghamshire, England, and came to the Colony in 1859 by the “Spray of the Ocean,” landing in Auckland. He shortly afterwards came to Napier and obtained an appointment in the Provincial Government, supervising public works, for eleven years, and eventually settled on his property, ‘‘Newstead,’’ which consists of 7500 acres and carries about 15,000 sheep and 300 head of cattle. Mr. Bennett also has a farm at Omaranui which is leased to one of his sons. During the native troubles he saw active service with the Hawke’s Bay militia and has received the New Zealand war medal. He married a daughter of the late Mr. M. Shirley, and has three sons and four daughters.

Mr. CHARLES DUGALD KENNEDY, Engineer to the Hawke’s Bay County Council, is also a practising solicitor. He was born in Napier in 1858, a son of the late Mr. Alex. Kennedy, merchant, of Napier, and captain of No. 2 Company Napier Militia, who was wounded at the memorable Omaranui fight. Mr. Kennedy was educated at the Napier Grammar School and at the late Rev. D’Arcy Irvine’s school at Waipukurau. He passed the junior and senior civil service examinations in 1873 and joined the Public Works Department, in which he remained four years. In 1877 he entered the Survey Department and was in the King Country when the surveyors were stopped by a party of eighty armed natives under the late  Major Kemp. He was placed in charge of an expedition with sixty armed native volunteers and saw a good deal of rough work. In 1881 the Hawke’s Bay County Council asked Mr. Kennedy to undertake the road and bridge engineering work of the county; since that time he has acted for the council in that capacity, and is consulting engineer for the Patangata, Heretaunga, and Maraekakako [Maraekakaho] Road Boards, Clive and Pukuhau River Boards, the Wairoa County Council and Harbour Board. In 1885 he decided to study law and passed the final examination in 1889. Mr. Kennedy is lieutenant in the F Battery Artillery Volunteers and has a high reputation as a marksman. When in England in 1893 he won several prizes at the Bisley meeting, being included in the prize list of the “Queen’s Prize” and also gained a place in the following competitions:- “Alexandra,” “The Armourers,” ‘‘Wantage,’’ ‘‘City of London,” and “Extra Prizes.’’ Mr. Kennedy was made an honorary member of the Savage Club and elected a Fellow of the Colonial Institute. He is a good footballer, polo and tennis player, and bowler. Though now unattached he is a Master Mason and a past master of the Irish Constitution.

MILITARY.

THE EAST COAST BATTALION, formed of the various volunteer corps in the provincial district of Hawke’s Bay, has its headquarters in Napier.

Major JOHN CHICKEN, Commanding the East Coast Battalion of New Zealand Volunteers, was born in Sunderland, England, in 1847, is the son of the late Mr. Joseph Chicken of Bishop-Wearmouth, and was educated partly in his native town and partly in Auckland, where he arrived with his parents in 1859 per ship ‘‘William Watson,’’ Capt. Macfarlane. On leaving school  he entered the employment of the late Mr. John Andrews, builder and timber merchant, and three years later removed to Napier, where he went into the service of Mr. R. Hold, sawmiller and timber merchant, with whom he has been for the past thirty years, for a considerable portion of which time he was manager of the Napier Mill. In 1866, when he joined the Napier Militia, he took part in the ensuing campaign, including the great fight at Omaranui, where both his immediate comrades were shot down beside him. He was band-sergeant and bandmaster in the Napier Rifles until the corps was disbanded in 1874. In 1885 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, three years later obtained his captaincy, and his majority in 1878. He took part in the expedition after Te Kooti, holds the New Zealand war medal and the long service medal and is entitled to the Imperial decoration. He is a successful marksman and was a representative of Hawke’s Bay in 1871 and carried off the principal gold medal competed for. In 1880 Major Chicken was married to the daughter of the late Mr. J. R. McAlpine and has a son and two daughters.

Captain JOHN GETHIN HUGHES (also Adjutant) of the 3rd (East Coast) Battalion of Volunteers, Wellington District, was born at the Bluff in 1866 and is a son of the late Mr. John Gethin Hughes who came to the Colonies as an officer of the “Great Britain’’ forty years ago and settled in Southland and later in South Canterbury and Banks’ Peninsula where he died in 1874. Capt. Hughes was educated at Mr. C. L. Wiggins’ academy, Akaroa, and entered the office of Mr. A. Ormsby, solicitor, Timaru. In 1887 he removed to Napier to take a position in the “Evening News” (now defunct), where he was for some two years book-keeper. Since that time he has been with Mr. H. A. Cornford, solicitor. He joined the Volunteers at Timaru in 1885 as a gunner in C Battery of New Zealand Artillery, and on resigning in 1887 had a corporal’s rank. In 1891 he joined the F Battery, Napier, and rose to the rank of lieutenant in 1895, and captain in 1897. The battery was merged into an infantry company in 1897 and is now known as the Napier Guards. On the formation of the above battalion in 1898, Capt. Hughes received the appointment of adjutant. Captain Hughes has always taken a keen interest in athletics and has played for the province at football, has rowed in the Napier Rowing Club’s representative crew several times besides holding the Gollan Challenge Sculls. He is also a cricketer, polo, golf, and tennis player, and occasionally turns out with the Hawke’s Bay hounds. In amateur theatricals he has taken many leading parts with credit, and is generally active in all public movements.

NAPIER RIFLE VOLUNTEERS. This Company was formed on the 5th of March, 1878, and took the place of the Napier Engineer Corps, which had disbanded. It at once took a leading place among the companies in the North Island as a strong and well-drilled force, and it has maintained that reputation. In fact, though it has seen many ups and downs and met with many discouragements, it is now in

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR J. BENNETT.
MAJOR J. CHICKEN.

122   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

a better position than ever. The company’s uniform has been repeatedly varied, the last time in 1898, when it was changed to blue cloth tunic, Norfolk shape, with scarlet facings; bugle badge on collar, with piping of yellow braid round the collar; trousers, zouave shape, cut very full, with brown leggings, and field service cap with bugle badge and the letters N.Z. The uniform of the officers corresponds to that of the men, with gold braid instead of worsted, and with peaked cap with bugle in front, and with the same brown equipment. The arms are, sword and a revolver, and the .303 Martini-Enfield rifle. The shooting of the company in individual scores and in team matches has always been of a high average. A handsome silver shield, presented by Mr. J. H. Coleman for team shooting among the companies of the Hawke’s Bay district, has been won on two occasions, and at the Wanganui Rifle Association Meeting this year (1899), members of the company, and especially Lieutenant Millner and Private Storkey, made excellent scores. A feature in the history of the company is that the majority of officers, past and present, have risen from the ranks. The late Captain (now Major) Chicken in command of the East Coast 3rd Battalion (Wellington Volunteers), has been associated with the company since its inception, and, joining as a bugler, he has risen through all the ranks to his present position; and the present captain and first lieutenant have also risen from the ranks. The present officers are: – Captain Thomson, Lieutenants Millner and Hudson, and the strength is – one colour-sergeant, four sergeants, four corporals, two buglers, and fifty-one rank and file; total, sixty-five. For field service each man is supplied with an overcoat, haversack and water bottle, and is always ready to take the field at very short notice. The company’s services may never be needed to meet an invading force, but should it happen otherwise, the members, with the rest of the volunteers of New Zealand, will assuredly show that the old martial spirit of the Anglo-Saxon race is neither dead nor decadent.

CAPTAIN JAMES PORTEOUS THOMSON, of the Napier Rifles, is a well-known and popular business man. He was born in Dalkeith, Scotland, in 1859, is the son of Mr. James Thomson, draper, and was educated in his native town, where also he was apprenticed to his father. Mr. Thomson went to London and was for six years in the old-established drapery house of Messrs. John Lewis and Co., in Oxford Street, where he became buyer for the fancy department. Leaving England for this Colony in 1885 via Melbourne per s.s. “Garonne,” Mr. Thomson spent his first year of colonial life at Dunedin, as manager of the fancy department of Messrs. S. H. Carter and Co. He then removed to Timaru to commence business with his brother under the style of T. and J. Thomson. Selling out his interest to his brother two years later he opened his present business in Napier, particulars of which are given elsewhere. Captain Thomson’s military career began in 1878, when he joined the volunteers in Dalkeith. He joined the Napier Rifles in 1888, obtained a lieutenant’s commission in 1895, passed for a captain’s certificate and received his present rank in August, 1898. As a member of the council of the Highland Society since its inception, he takes an interest in Caledonian sports, and is a director  of the Starr-Bowkett Building Society. Capt. Thomson was married in 1885 to a daughter of Mr. William Newman, of Wincanton, Somerset, England, and has a son and daughter.

Capt. EDMUND TUKE, of the New Zealand Militia, arrived in New Zealand by the ship “Cornwall” in 1851. He took up land in the Hawke’s Bay district for a sheep run in 1863. When the Maori war broke out Capt. Tuke was appointed by Sir George Grey as second in command under the late Col. J. Fraser of the Military Settlers and saw active service on the East  Coast, for which he received the New Zealand war medal. He was also for eighteen months in command of the guard over the native prisoners, numbering 340, at the Chatham Islands, but was not there when they escaped, the guard having been removed. In Gudgeon’s ‘‘Heroes of New Zealand,” a long report appears, written by Capt. Tuke, on the state of the prisoners at that date and before their escape. Capt. Tuke was also one of the founders of the Masonic Scinde Lodge in Napier, and has been a Justice of the Peace since 1864.

GENERAL GOVERNMENT OFFICERS.

THE CHIEF POST OFFICE, Napier, occupies one of the most prominent sites in the Borough. It has frontages to Hastings Street and Shakespeare Road, and has an imposing appearance, with a clock tower. The staff consists of Mr. S. J. Jago (chief postmaster), Mr. Cameron (chief clerk), two Money Order clerks, two counter clerks, and four mail clerks, train agent, six letter carriers, and a messenger.

Mr. SIDNEY JAMES JAGO, the Chief Postmaster for Hawke’s Bay, and Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages, has filled these positions since 1885. He was born in Glasgow in 1841, is the son of Mr. Joseph Jago, of Cornwall, and was educated in his native city.

Mr. EDWARD RHAINES COURTENAY BOWEN, Collector of Customs at Napier, has been connected with the Customs Department for a third of a century. He was born in the West of Ireland in 1844, is a son of the late Mr. Robert Bowen, was educated in Dublin, and came to this Colony when about twenty years of age. Two years later, after being a short time in the Canterbury Public Works Office, Mr. Bowen joined the Customs at Hokitika. Since then he has held various positions at Greymouth, Westport, Invercargill, Auckland, Wellington,

Photo captions –
CAPTAIN J. P. THOMSON.
MR. S. J. JAGO.
MR. E. R. C. BOWEN

GENERAL GOVERNMENT OFFICERS.   123

and Dunedin, and in February, 1892, was appointed collector at Napier.  Mr. Bowen has faithfully served the department and his well-merited promotion has given general satisfaction.  He was married in 1889 to a daughter of the late Mr. William Seed, formerly inspector of customs, Wellington, and has two daughters and a son.

Mr. ERIC CHARLES GOLD-SMITH, Commissioner of Crown Lands and Chief Surveyor for Hawke’s Bay, has had an extended colonial experience and proved himself a most efficient officer. He was born in Camberwell, Surrey, England, in 1848 and is a son of the late Capt. Henry Gold-Smith, who came to New Zealand per ‘‘Star of India’’ in 1862 in command of No. 5 Company of the 1st Waikato Regiment. Educated at Matthew’s Denmark Hill Grammar School, Camberwell, Mr. Gold-Smith came to this Colony in 1864 per barque ‘‘Bosphoros” and soon after his arrival joined the first Waikato survey party under Mr. Lowe, and after assisting in the survey of the lands set apart for the military settlers at Pukerimu, went with Capt. Turner’s party to survey the confiscated boundary and the military settlements near Tauranga. In 1867 he volunteered for active service at Tauranga, joining the engineers under Capt. Skeet and Lieut. Gundley, and was soon under fire. Old residents of Mahurangi, North Auckland, still remember Volunteer Tom Jordan, and they will be glad to know that the comrade still lives in whose arms that brave young soldier died. Two stalwart lads, each standing over six feet and who had been acquainted but a few days, were taking cover behind the trunk of a large tree from the deadly fire of rebels who surrounded them. One was fatally hit and the other, disregarding all further cover, supported the dying man till his life’s blood ebbed away and then  carried the body out of the bush. The brave survivor is the present Commissioner of Crown Lands for Hawke’s Bay, who when interviewed appeared to have forgotten for the moment that he had ever taken part in the war. This was early in 1867 and before the end of that year Mr. Gold-Smith had passed unhurt through the Tauranga and Opotiki operations and as sergeant in Gundry’s engineers accompanied Major Fraser’s expedition to Waimana. For these services he has been granted the New Zealand medal. Soon after the outbreak of the Thames goldfields Mr. Gold-Smith went there surveying and engineering with his father, who was a civil engineer.  Joining Mr. Percy Smith’s survey party for the Kaipara triangulations, he was, in 1870, appointed to the survey staff of the General Government as assistant surveyor under Capt. Heale. He was promoted to his present position in January in 1897. In 1873 he married a daughter of the late Mr. C. J. Kensington, of Auckland and Port Chalmers, and has a daughter and three sons.

Mr. FREDERICK BULL, Receiver of Land Revenue for Hawke’s Bay, has had an extended Colonial experience and is well known in many parts of New Zealand. Like many of the early colonists Mr. Bull left for the Antipodes from a love of adventure and change. His father, Mr. Thomas Love Bull, was the senior partner of the firm of Druce and Bull, coal merchants in a large way of business and employing many hands both on land and water, but who will be better remembered as the founder of the National school at Christchurch, Chelsea, and fellow-worker of Sir Wentworth Dilke, father of the present baronet, in the establishment of the literary and scientific institute of West London, within the walls of which his portrait, by Edgar Williams, A.R.A., may still be seen.  Born in Yalding, Kent, in 1841, and educated at Ramsgate, the subject of this sketch entered the office of one of the large copper firms in London, but left that employment to come to New Zealand per ship ‘‘Zealandia,’’ Captain Foster, in 1863. Landing in Canterbury he signed articles to Mr. Charles French Pemberton, district surveyor for the Provincial Government of Canterbury.  On completion of his articles, Mr. Bull was surveying in the Kowai district and was subsequently appointed engineer to the Kowai Road Board, and in that capacity constructed roads in that district, building most of the bridges and rebuilding many of them after the destructive flood and tidal wave of 1868. Tempted by the prospects of the flax industry Mr. Bull resigned his position and embarked in flax-dressing, employing about fifty hands. The enterprise proved disastrous and Mr. Bull realised his assets and in 1872 removed to Wellington, where he joined the Public Works Department of the General Government and some three years later was transferred to the Survey Department under Mr. J. W. A. Marchant, now commissioner of Crown lands. On the abolition of the provinces and the formation of the present Lands and Survey Department, Mr. Bull was appointed chief accountant, which position he held until 1893, when transferred to Napier as receiver of land revenue. Mr. Bull is a Master Mason, though unattached for many years past, his spare time being mainly devoted to music and the management of musical societies. For over twenty years he was a prominent member of the managing committee of the Wellington Orchestral Society and wrote a number of operettas and burlesques which were performed by the still well-remembered Wellington Christy Minstrels.  As a “celloist’’ he has been particularly successful and  enjoys the unique reputation of being the only left-handed player known. He has been a member of the Wellington Philosophical Society for many years and is an active member of the management committee of the Napier Horticultural Society and well-known grower of prize chrysanthemums. Mr. Bull also has ability as a poet; his “Jubilee Poem” was and still is very widely appreciated and his Jubilee version of ‘‘God Save the Queen” was enthusiastically sung at the Napier Cathedral special services by about 1500 voices. As one of the earliest members of the Star Boating Club of Wellington – the premier club of the Colony –  Mr. Bull was the designer and originator of the club’s crest and motto “Semper Refulgens.” As recently as 1890 he patented an improved flax-dresser and spent much time and money in endeavouring to improve the quality of the manufactured article. He was examined in that connection before the Royal Commission in the published report of which Sir James Hector mentioned Mr. Bull’s invention as one of the only two real improvements produced during the preceding twenty-five years. In 1876 he married the youngest daughter of the late Mr. A. B. Sheath, accountant of the Post and Telegraph Department, who with his brother, Mr. Alfred Sheath, initiated the telegraph system of the Colony at Christchurch.

Photo captions –
MR. E. C. GOLD-SMITH
MR. F. BULL.

124   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Mr. JOHN EMERSON, ex-Inspector of Police, Napier, was born in Ireland and joined the Irish Constabulary at the time of the Crimean war, obtained an ensign’s commission  and was appointed to the staff of Commissary-General Adams. He served in the trenches through the terrible winter of 1855, exposed to the hottest fire. His left hand was shattered by a shell and he was also wounded in the mouth. He was promoted to the rank of lieutenant with captain’s pay and was attached to the Land Transport Corps under General McMurdoch. He received the Turkish medal and has since obtained the New Zealand medal and the medal of the Royal Humane Society for saving life at Picton. In 1858 he resigned his commission and proceeded to Victoria, where he joined the mounted police, and was actively employed for four years on escort service. In 1862 Mr. Emerson came to New Zealand and joined Brannigan’s Mounted Police at Dunedin and was stationed at Queenstown. In 1868 he was made inspector of the Marlborough district, was transferred to Tauranga in 1882 and rendered excellent service there during troubles with the natives. Mr. Emerson was married in 1857 and has five sons and five daughters living. (He died at Napier on the 3rd April, 1899.)

THE NAPIER DISTRICT GAOL occupies one of the best residential sites in the borough, facing the Marine Parade and Coote Road. The hill on which it stands, though very steep, is planted with trees and the gaoler’s house commands a splendid view of the town and harbour. The prison enclosure is about five acres in extent and is surrounded by very substantial stone walls. There is a good library, to which the prisoners have access. Everything about the gaol is scrupulously clean and the sanitary provisions for the health of the inmates are of the latest design. Prisoners are kept occupied at various outdoor and indoor occupations, all under adequate discipline and classification. Every requisite for the use of the gaol is, as far as possible, made in the prison workrooms.

Mr. FRANCIS EGERTON SEVERNE, the Governor of the Napier Gaol and Probation Officer for the Napier District, was born in Derby, England, in 1841, and is the son of Mr. Francis Severne, barrister-at-law of that city. Educated by private tuition in Pembrokeshire, Wales, the subject of this sketch came to this Colony in 1864 per “Queen of the Deep,” landing at Auckland. Early in 1865 he went to Hokitika and for a time tried farming at Mangowai. Returning to Auckland Mr. Severne ultimately joined the prison service as warder in 1872 and until 1883 was a clerk in the Auckland prison. Receiving the appointment of governor of Nelson gaol, Mr. Severne remained at that post for eight years, when he was transferred to his present position. He was married in 1866 to the daughter of Mr. J. J. Robinson, an English solicitor, and has a daughter and four sons. The eldest son, Mr. F. L. Severne, is in the office of the chief inspector of schools in Wellington; the second, Mr. G. E. Severne, is in the office of the inspector or telegraphs, Auckland; the third is in the Bank of New Zealand at Napier; and the youngest is fourth master at the Napier High school.

Mr. LUKE DRYDEN BROWETT, Inspector of Factories, Labour Agent, and Registrar of Electors, Provincial Buildings, Napier, was born in 1862 at Northampton, England, where he was educated and afterwards learned the boot and shoe trade. About 1880 he emigrated to the Cape of Good Hope where he remained for five years, but owing  to ill-health was compelled to leave for the more salubrious climate of New Zealand and landed at Lyttelton in 1885. Mr. Browett worked for some time at his trade in Christchurch and Wellington. About 1891, owing to a dispute, a strike was declared in the boot trade and Mr. Browett was appointed by the Bootmakers’ Federal Council to take charge of the strike in Auckland, a responsible position which he held to the termination of the strike to the credit of himself and satisfaction of the trade. After the strike which had unsettled the boot trade, Mr. Browett left for Australia where he remained six months. On returning to New Zealand he worked at his trade in Christchurch till 1895 when he was appointed to the Labour Bureau in Lyttelton and remained there till it was closed in 1896 when he was appointed Inspector of Factories, and in 1898 received the appointment of Registrar of Electors. Mr. Browett has always taken a great interest in social and other matters pertaining to the welfare of the public. He was the first president of the Bootmakers’ Federal Council in New Zealand wherein he gave every satisfaction by his dignified and urbane conduct. He was married in 1888 and has three children.

Mr. WILLIAM WOOF, Rabbit Inspector of the Hawke’s Bay District, is a son of a farmer near Penrith, was born in 1867 in Westmorland, England, and educated at St. Bee’s Grammar School, Cumberland. He was articled to his brother, but after passing the preliminary and intermediate examinations he left Home in 1885 and came by the s.s. ‘‘Aorangi” to Wellington, continued his journey to Christchurch, and was engaged there for three years in the wool trade. Sometime afterwards he received an appointment on Messrs. Beetham’s station, Wairarapa, where he remained six years. In 1894 Mr. Woof received his present appointment. He is a steward of the Waipawa Racing Club and Hawke’s Bay Hunt Club.

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

THE WAIPAWA AND HAWKE’S BAY UNITED CHARITABLE AID BOARD manages the charitable finances of an extensive district. It levies contributions on the counties of Hawke’s Bay, Waipawa, Wairoa, and Patangata, and on the boroughs of Napier, Hastings, Woodville and Dannevirke. Its office is in Napier and the board’s secretary is Captain Thomas Baker.

CAPTAIN THOMAS BAKER, Secretary of the Hawke’s Bay Charitable Aid Board, Napier Hospital Trustees and District Hospital Board, was born in Shropshire, England, in 1835, his father of the same name being a merchant and farmer of Shrewsbury. Educated at the famous Blue Coat School, he left his native land for Victoria in 1857 per Messrs. Money, Wigram and Co.’s ship “Suffolk.” After mining at Ballarat and Egerton, and a considerable experience as a stockman on the Western plains, Mr. Baker came to New Zealand in 1861, settling in the infant town of Invercargill, where he entered the service of Messrs. Robertson and Co., auctioneers. Shortly after this the Southland Provincial Government needed a gaoler and Capt. Baker was appointed to the

Photo captions –
THE LATE INSPECTOR EMERSON
MR. F. E. SEVERNE.

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.   125

position. Twelve months later he took charge of the gold escort at Lake Wakatipu and in 1865 went to Canterbury, where he joined the provincial police force. Joining the Armed Constabulary at Wellington in 1869 under Commissioner Brannigan, Constable Baker was promoted to sergeant during his first month’s service, four years later he attained the rank of sergeant-major, and in 1879 was appointed sub-inspector. He was promoted to be captain in the Permanent Militia in September, 1886, and retired from the force in 1888. In the beginning of 1890 he accepted the positions he now holds. Capt. Baker was initiated into Masonry in Lodge Unanimity, Christchurch, in 1865. He married in 1872 Miss Carleton, of Hawke’s Bay, and a year later was left a widower with one daughter. His second wife, a daughter of Mr. Eyre, of Whangarei, to whom he was married in 1875, died ten years later, leaving a son and a daughter.

THE NAPIER HOSPITAL occupies a prominent site on “Old Barrack Hill’ overlooking the inner harbour, or Port Ahuriri, and near the western extremity of the group of hills known as Scinde Island. The appearance and utility of the buildings have been greatly improved by the addition of a storey to the central portion, in which are situated the quarters of the resident medical officer. The wards are all lofty, well-lighted, and well-ventilated, and there is an air of cleanliness and comfort about the whole establishment which is very pleasing. The average number of patients is thirty-five. The regular staff consists of the medical superintendent, Dr. Leahy, the matron, Miss Tutin, and eleven nurses. The honorary staff includes:- Dr. Milne-Thomson, Dr. Moore, Dr. de Lisle, and Dr. P. Menzies. The Napier Hospital has an excellent name among the residents and in official quarters.

Dr. JOHN PATRICK DAUNT LEAHY, B.A., M.B., Ch.M., Medical Superintendent of the Napier Hospital, came to Hawke’s Bay in 1896.

NAPIER CHILDREN’S HOME. This excellent institution is located in a building in Burlington Road, off Napier Terrace, Napier, and is under the parental care of Mr. and Mrs. Hardy.

Mr. and Mrs. HARDY are the Father and Mother of the Napier Children’s Home. Mr. Hardy obtains the best possible returns from the large piece of cultivated ground surrounding the Home, which supplies considerable quantities of vegetables. He has made all the improvements in the property, attends to all the outdoor work, mends all the boots and shoes, and takes part in the training of the children. Mrs. Hardy is not only a trained nurse, but is in every way admirably fitted for the position she fills. She was born in Cambridge, England, is the daughter of Mr. John Miller, was educated in her native town, and became a nurse at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, and afterwards matron to the Royal Fortrose Prevention Home, St. Michael’s Hill, Bristol, where for a period of six years she gave such complete satisfaction that, on breaking down through over-work, the

Photo captions –
CAPTAIN T. BAKER.
AND MRS. HARDY AND A FEW OF THE ELDER GIRLS, NAPIER CHILDREN’S HOME.
THE FATHER AND MOTHER AND A FEW OF THE CHILDREN, NAPIER CHILDREN’S HOME.

126   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

ladies connected with the institution subscribed a sum sufficient to defray the expenses of her journey to New Zealand. On her arrival in Napier she rapidly improved in health and in a few months was able to accept a temporary appointment at the Napier Asylum. In 1878 she was married to Mr. Hardy. In 1894 Mrs. Hardy succeeded Miss Nelson in the Home and with no other assistance than that of the elder girls, does all the work of the establishment. That she is thoroughly alive to the great responsibilities of her position, there is no room to doubt, and the most casual observer can see that the foster parents of the Napier Children’s Home are loved by the children under their charge. Mr. and Mrs. Hardy’s only son has a small farm at Taradale.

EDUCATIONAL.

BOYS’ HIGH SCHOOL, Clyde Road, Napier. Board of Governors: – Messrs. J. W. Carlile, M.A. (chairman), H. A. Cornford, J. Crosse, J. Moore, M.D., J. W. Neal, S. Johnston, G. H. Swan, Captain Russell, M.H.R., Rev. D. Sidey, D.D. (secretary). Mr W. Wood, A.C.P., F.R.G.S. (headmaster), Messrs. A.S.M. Polson, B.A. (N.Z.), and J. P. Dakin, B.A. (Lond.) (assistant masters); and District Staff Sergeant-Major E. H. Severne (drill instructor). This fine school is situated on Clyde Road, one of the best sites in Napier. The building is a large three-storey structure, well ventilated, and with drainage and sanitary arrangements upon the most improved modern system. The dormitories and dining-rooms are large and comfortable and are under the supervision of Mrs. Wood. The school is surrounded by spacious grounds, which include tennis and fives courts, and the governors have secured the use of the public recreation grounds for cricket and football. There is a splendid gymnasium where systematic instruction is given. The cadet company is under the command of the masters. The course of study is similar to that of the best English schools and pupils are specially prepared for University and other examinations. Of candidates for the senior and junior civil service examinations, nine per cent. have been successful. The ordinary curriculum includes English in all its branches, Latin, French, mathematics (including arithmetic, geometry, algebra, trigonometry, and mechanics), science, writing, drawing, gymnastics, and drill. By arrangement and without extra charge, boys may take Greek, German, book-keeping, and shorthand. When there is a sufficient number of suitable voices, singing classes are also formed. Reports of work and conduct are sent to parents at the end of each term. Particular attention is paid to moral and physical training of the pupils. The following scholarships are open to pupils of one and two years’ study in the school: – One biennially of the value of £50 4s. per annum for boys under sixteen, two annually of the value of £10 4s. per annum for boys under sixteen, one annually of the value of £10 4s, per annum for boys under fourteen, all tenable for two years. The school year is divided into three terms of about fourteen weeks each. Fees are payable per term in advance, as follows: – Tuition, upper school,  £3 3s. per term; lower school, £2 16s.; stationery, upper school, 5s. per term; lower school, 2s. 6d. per term; board and residence, £13 6s. 8d. per term. A term’s notice is required previous to the removal of a pupil.

Mr. WILLIAM WOOD, the Headmaster, is a native of Kent, England, and completed his education at Edinburgh University. His first appointment was as master of the Forrest school, Walthamstow, England, and he remained in that position for three years, when he was appointed headmaster of the Dulwich school, Norwood, where he remained for ten years. He came to New Zealand in 1883 and was appointed second master of the Girls’ High School, Auckland. About 1888 he came to Napier as second master of the High School and in 1888 received his present appointment. Mr. Wood has always taken a very active part in Volunteer movements, held the rank of major in the Napier Volunteers from 1888 till 1896, and now holds the honorary rank of lieutenant-colonel of the Wellington Battalion.

Mr. ANGUS SUTHERLAND MURRAY POLSON, B.A., Second Master of the Napier Boys’ High School, was born in Oamaru in 1869, and is a son of Mr. Angus Polson of ‘‘Balruddery,” Enfield. He was educated at the Teaneraki Public School, Oamaru District High School, Otago High School, and Otago University, gaining his B.A. degree in 1889. When twelve years of age he passed the sixth standard examination with 100 per cent. of marks and took first prize. Two months later he won the Otago Education Board’s Junior Scholarship of £80; six months after this the Oamaru Caledonian Society’s Bursary of £60 was awarded him; in December, 1883, he won the Otago Senior Scholarship of £120, and three years later

Photo captions –
ONE OF THE DORMITORIES IN THE CHILDREN’S HOME.
LIEUT.- COL. W. WOOD.

EDUCATIONAL.   127

he won the New Zealand University scholarship of £135, making a total of £395. Of first prizes the following were won:- Four for English, three for French, and one each for composition, mapping, Latin, Euclid, algebra, and general excellence. He received also a silver medal for best in drill, dux medal of the Oamaru District High School, and the reward of excellence and a souvenir of the school. The first-class certificates gained at the University include those for Mathematics, Mechanics, English, French, and Mental Science. Other examinations passed with much credit by him were the junior and senior Civil Service examinations in the former of which he was first of 211 candidates. While studying at the University, Mr. Polson was also assistant master at the Otago High School and in 1890 was appointed second master of the Waimate District High School. In 1894 he was selected from seventeen graduates for the position of assistant master of the Timaru High School; and in January, 1896, he was appointed to his present post out of fourteen graduates who applied. The testimonials held by Mr. Polson are of the highest order, bearing evidences of his character, scholarship, and scholastic experiences. That Mr. Polson has not neglected physical training in favour of mental, is attested in many ways. He is an excellent swimmer, cyclist, and footballer, and has been long known as a successful sprinter. He still holds the Otago High School records of eleven seconds for 100 yards, and 55 2-5ths seconds for the quarter mile. These records were made in 1886 when Mr. Polson was a scholar, and he has since reduced them to 10 3-5ths and 54 seconds respectively. For five years he was captain of football clubs, first at Waimate and afterwards at Timaru. In volunteer matters, Mr. Polson has taken a prominent part, having been lieutenant in the Dunedin High School Cadets, captain of the cadets in Timaru and also at Napier, which latter rank he still holds. He has been president or secretary of recreation clubs, debating and Christian Endeavour societies, and for many years he has been either manager or on the staff of educational journals. The “Scindian,’’ the periodical of the Napier Boys’ High School, is now in his charge. Mr. Polson is an elder of St. Paul’s Church, and leader of Bible classes for boys and young men. Active, energetic, and generous in all useful undertakings, the second master of the Napier Boys’ High School is, like his principal, Colonel Wood, a credit to the profession. He was married in 1897 to a daughter of the late Mr. W. Strachan, of Dunedin, and has one daughter.

THE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL, Clyde Road, Napier. Miss Matthews, LL.A. (St.Andrews), Principal; Miss Spencer, B.A. (N.Z.), First Assistant; and several other lady teachers. The school is situated on one of the finest and most healthy positions in Napier and surrounded by pleasant grounds. The building is a very handsome two-storey structure containing a number of large well furnished class-rooms, dining-room, music-room, and a number of single bedrooms, each pupil occupying her own room. Pupils are prepared for the practical and theoretical examinations of Trinity College, Civil Service, matriculation, and college examinations. In proof of the success of Miss Matthews’ teaching it may be stated that there have been only two failures in these examinations during the last six years.

Miss MATTHEWS, the Principal of the Napier Girls’ High School, was born in England, and gained her degree at St. Andrew’s University. In 1887 she came to Auckland where she conducted with great success the Mount Eden Collegiate School, and in 1892 received her present appointment.

THE NAPIER GRAMMAR SCHOOL (William Gray, B.A., St. John’s College, Cambridge, Headmaster), Napier Terrace, Napier. Established by Mr. Monckton, M.A., in 1894. This fine educational establishment is situated on one of the most charming sites on Scinde Island, and commands beautiful views of mountain and sea. The building is rather pretentious and is surrounded by three acres of

Photo captions –
MR A.S.M. POLSON.
MISS MATTHEWS.
ENTRANCE OF THE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL , NAPIER.  PRINCIPAL AND STAFF.

128   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

grounds. Attached is a fine gymnasium, with tennis, cricket, and football fields. The higher branches of education are taught, namely: Classics, mathematics, modern languages, painting, drawing, and shorthand. Pupils are also prepared for the University and civil service examinations in which this school has been so successful. There is accommodation for about twelve boarders and the domestic arrangements are under the immediate supervision of Mrs. Gray.

Mr. WILLIAM GRAY, Headmaster of the Napier Grammar School, is a native of London, was educated at Cambridge and took his B.A. degree in 1887. He was assistant in several large schools preparing higher class pupils for the Army and University examinations. He came in 1894 to Napier and was associated with Mr. Monckton in establishing the school. In 1897, Mr. Monckton retired leaving the school entirely to Mr. Gray. Mr. Gray is married to a daughter of the Rev. J. L. Carrick, principal of Spring Hill school, Southampton, England.

THE HAWKE’S BAY EDUCATION DISTRICT embraces Cook, Hawke’s Bay, Wairoa, Waipawa, and Patangata Counties. The schools of the district number sixty-eight, and the number of children on the roll is 7600 with an average attendance of about 6500. There are in all 201 teachers, of whom 129 are certificated. The Education Board consists of: – Rev. Dr. Sidey (chairman), Dr. Moore, and Messrs. C. A. Fitzroy, T. G. Gilberd, K. L. Knight, S. McLernon, Thos. Tanner, Fred. Sutton, and F. Williams; Mr. Henry Hill (inspector) and Mr. G. T. Fannin (secretary).

THE REVEREND D. SIDEY, D.D. Tennyson Street, Napier, Chairman of the Education Board, Secretary to the High School Board of Governors, and Clerk and Treasurer to the Presbyterian General Assembly of New Zealand, was born at Pitcairn Green, near Perth, Scotland, educated at Redgorton parish school and Perth Academy and graduated at Edinburgh University. Dr. Sidey entered the church in 1857 and had charge of a parish at Auchtermuchty for about eight years. He was then translated to West Calder, ministering there for six years after which he came to New Zealand by the ship ‘‘Caduceus,’’ landing at Auckland in 1872. Proceeding to Napier he took charge of the Presbyterian church to which he had been appointed previous to his departure from Scotland. In 1884, when Mr. Patterson succeeded him in his charge Dr. Sidey became clerk and treasurer to the General Assembly, but still occasionally officiated at religious services. He has always taken a prominent part in educational and ecclesiastical matters. On his arrival in Hawke’s Bay there were only two Presbyterian ministers in the province, now there are nine in charges besides one in Poverty Bay and a home missionary. This result is a monument to the indefatigable efforts put forth by him and his associates in the ministry. Dr. Sidey lost his wife in 1894, leaving him with three sons and two daughters.

Mr. GEORGE THOMAS FANNIN, Secretary of the Hawke’s Bay Education Board, was born in Westmeath, Ireland, in 1830, and is the son of Mr. William Fannin, who came to this Colony in 1853 per ship ‘‘William Scott,’’ settling on a run on the Ruataniwha Plains. Educated in England and at Trinity College, Dublin, the subject of this sketch came to the Colony with his parents and settled in Hawke’s Bay where the white population then consisted of some half-dozen families. In 1858 Mr. Fannin was appointed clerk to the New Provincial  Council of Hawke’s Bay, and retained that position till the abolition of the provinces in 1876. During a portion of that period, when the Maori war was in progress, he acted as secretary to Sir Donald McLean and the Hon. J. D. Ormond, who represented the General Government in the conduct of the war. On the abolition of the provinces, Mr. Fannin was appointed clerk and treasurer to the Hawke’s Bay County Council and secretary to the Education Board, which latter position he now holds.

Mr. HENRY HILL, B.A., F.G.S. (Lond.), Inspector of Schools under the Hawke’s Bay Board of Education, is the son of Mr. B. Hill, iron and nail factor, and was born at Lye, near Stourbridge, Worcester, England, in 1849, and trained as a pupil-teacher in his native town. He was educated at Cheltenham College, where he completed his training for the profession of a schoolmaster. He was afterwards appointed to organise St. Mark’s school, Nottingham, and when the Canterbury Provincial Government were organising their schools (Hon. W. Rolleston being the superintendent), Mr. Hill was selected with several others for the work and he came to the Colony in 1873 in the “Merope.” Whilst in Christchurch he acted for some time as science master of Christ’s College and mathematical master at Miss Lohse’s young ladies’ school. He started the New Zealand ‘‘Schoolmaster’’ and edited that journal for several years; he was the prime mover in the agitation which resulted in the formation of the first Teachers’ Association in New Zealand, a general conference of teachers being held in Christchurch in 1876. In 1878 he was appointed inspector and secretary to the Napier Education Board, and for thirteen years held the dual position. He was, however, obliged to relinquish the secretaryship on account of the

Photo captions –
MR. W. GRAY.
REV. DR. SIDEY.
MR. G.T. FANNIN

EDUCATIONAL.   129

rapid increase in the volume of examining work. Mr. Hill is an enthusiastic geologist and his large district, extending from Cape Runaway to Cape Turnagain, provides him with an excellent field for observation. He has greatly assisted the people of Wanganui in the discovery of an artesian water supply, and in gratitude for the services rendered, the Council of that borough presented him with a specially engraved and valuable gold watch. He was made a Fellow of the Royal Geological Society about twelve years ago on the recommendation of Sir James Hector and Professor Hutton. An earnest believer in mutual improvement societies, Mr. Hill started the Napier Young Men’s Club, and has done much to assist its progress. He is a Mason, but unattached. He was married in 1873 to a daughter of Mr. John Knowles, of Worcestershire, and has four daughters and three sons.

THE NAPIER DISTRICT SCHOOL, which is situated in Tennyson Street, is said to be the largest in the North Island. More than a thousand pupils are under regular instruction. Mr. Morgan, the headmaster, has a staff of four assistant masters, five mistresses, and ten pupil-teachers. That the scholars are well taught is amply proved annually, both by the very large percentage of passes and by the fact that on an average no fewer than ten scholarships are won every year by this school. Drill instruction is given regularly to all the classes.

Mr. THOMAS MORGAN, Headmaster of the Napier District School, has gained a high reputation as a teacher, having been most successful wherever he has been located. He was educated at Cheltenham College and entered upon his scholastic career in London. From there he removed to the Welsh manufacturing town of Llanelly, but his health failing, he left the Old Country for New Zealand in 1879 by the ship “Wanganui”.  After a year in charge of a suburban school near Christchurch, Mr. Morgan was appointed headmaster of the principal school at Gisborne where he remained some eleven years; he received his present appointment in 1892. He takes a keen interest in his work and many of his scholars have reflected great credit on their master. One of his old Gisborne pupils took first place a the Crystal Palace engineering examination in 1898. Mr. Morgan is a Mason of thirty years standing and was one of the founder of Lodge Abercorn in Gisborne.

THE HASTINGS STREET JUNIOR SCHOOL, or NAPIER SIDE SCHOOL, has been erected about eleven years and all the rooms are large and well arranged. The roll number is 234 and the average attendance about 210. The kindergarten system is partially adopted, and drill and singing are taught. The staff consists of the head-mistress, Miss Goulding, two lady assistants, and three pupil-teachers.

Miss JANE ELIZABETH MARION GOULDING, Head-mistress of the Hastings Street School, is a daughter of the late Mr. Richard Goulding who was private secretary to Sir Charles Darling, Governor of New South Wales. She was born in Sydney, New South Wales, and was educated in Limerick, Ireland, returned to the Colonies and was trained as a teacher in Melbourne. Coming to New Zealand, Miss Goulding had charge for six years of the school at Kawarau Gorge, Otago, and was afterwards at the North Oamaru school. She then came to Napier and, after a short time as assistant, was appointed to her present position in 1891. Besides being closely engaged in teaching all the week, Miss Goulding has taken a most active part in Sunday school and other work in connection with St, Paul’s  Presbyterian church, though an Episcopalian by birth and training. She is a cousin of the late Dr. Hannington, the first Bishop of Mast Equatorial Africa, who was murdered a few years ago.

THE NAPIER INFANTS SCHOOL occupies the corner of Clive Square and Carlyle Street. The head-mistress, Mrs. Barnett, has one assistant mistress and eight pupil-teachers. The number of scholars on the roll for the winter quarter of 1898 was 362, with an average attendance of about 320. The school contains five good class-rooms. The kindergarten system is partially taught and military drill and singing are included in the syllabus.

Mrs. BARNETT, the Head-mistress, has been connected with the principal Napier school since the institution was opened over twenty years ago. During the first half of that time she was scholar, pupil-teacher, and assistant teacher, and throughout the whole of the latter half has been head mistress. She was born in Napier, is the daughter of the late Mr. William Robottom, who came to this Colony as schoolmaster-sergeant of the 58th regiment, landing in the Bay of Islands in 1845, and was educated as stated above. Mrs. Barnett takes a good deal of interest in music and was a member of the Cathedral Choir for many years. She was married in 1896 to Mr. A. H. Barnett, of the Railway Department, who is referred to in this volume as clerk in charge of the goods-shed.

ECCLESIASTICAL.

THE DIOCESE OF WAIAPU, of which Napier is the Cathedral City, was founded in the year 1859. It is divided, ecclesiastically, into three Archdeaconries of Tauranga, Waiapu, and Hawke’s Bay. There are nearly fifty licensed clergy and about 120 lay-readers,

Photo captions –
MR. T. MORGAN.
MISS GOULDING.
MRS. BARNETT.

(K)

130   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

the majority of the latter being of the native race. The Cathedral chapter consists of the Bishop (the Right Rev. W. L. Williams, D.D.), the Very Rev. Dean De Berdt Hovell, the Venerable Archdeacon S. Williams, the Rev. Canon J. Elliott Fox, M.A., the Rev. Canon Harry Woodford St. Hill, and the Rev. Canon A.S. Webb, M.A. The previous bishops were the Right Rev. William Williams, D.C.L., and the Right Rev. E. C. Stuart, D.D. There are between sixty and seventy churches open for divine worship in the diocese, while services are held in school-rooms and other public buildings in about one hundred additional centres. The churches in Napier are in charge of the following clergymen: – The Cathedral, the Very Rev. Dean Hovell; St. Augustine’s, the Rev. H. E. Taylor; St. Andrew’s, the Rev. Oliver Dean.

The Right Reverend WILLIAM LEONARD WILLIAMS, Anglican Bishop of Waiapu, was born at the Bay of Islands in 1829. His late father was the first bishop of Waiapu and one of New Zealand’s most prominent missionaries. He was at St. John’s College, Auckland, proceeded to England and graduated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, taking the B.A. degree with third-class honours in Literis Humanioribus in 1852. In the following year he returned to the land of his birth as a missionary and was engaged with his father, who in 1839 removed his headquarters to Poverty Bay. In 1862, Mr. Williams was installed Archdeacon of Waiapu and continued to labour among the Maoris until 1863 when the Poverty Bay Mission was broken up in consequence of the incursions of the Hauhaus. The Archdeacon took his family to Auckland, but notwithstanding the very unsettled condition of the natives, he himself spent most of his time in the neighbourhood of Poverty Bay in spite of many obstacles and warnings. He was there with a portion of his family when the Chatham Island prisoners led by Te Kooti landed at Whareongaonga and was within a few miles of the scene of the massacre on the 10th of November, 1868. In 1877 he made Gisborne his headquarters, where in 1863, the Maori Theological College was placed under his charge as principal. He continued in this position until the resignation by Bishop Stuart of the Waiapu See and he was elected to fill the vacancy in 1894 and consecrated in the following year at Napier Cathedral by the Primate, assisted by the Bishops of Christchurch, Nelson, and Melanesia. In Maori literature, His Lordship has done much useful work. He has re-edited the “Dictionary of the Maori Language’’ compiled by his father and is the author of “First Lessons in Maori,’’ published by Messrs. Upton and Co., of Auckland. Some of Bishop Williams’ papers have been published in the proceedings of the New Zealand Institute, notably one on “Cook’s Landing at Poverty Bay,’’ and one exposing the falsehood of the story of John Rutherford. As head of the Church in the Diocese of Waiapu, Bishop Williams is very greatly loved and revered, and under his guidance and influence the churches of the diocese are a power for good and the advancement of religion. After an absence of forty-four years from the land of his forefathers, Bishop Williams revisited England and the scenes of his university career during the Record Reign celebrations and sitting of the Lambeth Conference. He was enthusiastically welcomed by his old college which conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity. Dr. Williams spent four or five months in England and speaks very highly of the unvarying kindness with which he was everywhere received as a New Zealand Bishop and the eldest son of one who had more than seventy years before placed his life at the disposal of the Church Missionary Society as a volunteer for missionary work in what was then one of the wildest, most savage, and least-known countries on the face of the earth. Bishop Williams was married in 1853 to the daughter of Mr. John Bradshaw Wamklyn of Witherslack, Westmorland, and has four daughters and five sons. The eldest son, Mr. F. W. Williams, is well known as the senior managing director of Messrs. Williams and Kettle, Ltd., the second, the Rev. Herbert W. Williams, is the principal of the Maori Theological College at Gisborne; the third, Mr. Alfred Williams, is a surgeon at Harrow, Middlesex, England; the fourth, Mr. Frank W. Williams, is a sheep farmer on the East Coast, south of Gisborne; and the fifth, Mr. Arthur Williams, is an engineer in England. Three daughters are married, the eldest to Mr. Charles Gray of Gisborne, the second to Mr. McLean, manager of the Bank of New Zealand, Palmerston North, and the third to the Rev. A. F. Gardiner, late of Waipawa.

Mr. JOHN BECKETT FIELDER, Secretary, Treasurer, and Registrar of the Diocese of Waiapu, was born in Finsbury Square, London, in 1839, was educated at Dalston Academy, London, and after serving  as a clerk in various offices, he left England for India, joining the 70th Surrey Regiment at Rawulpindee in 1858 and two years later came with the regiment to Auckland. Mr. Fielder was in the detachment sent to Dunedin on the outbreak of the goldfields in Otago and was appointed clerk to the deputy-assistant commissary-general. In 1863 the detachment left for the scene of the Tataraimaka massacre in Taranaki and a few months later was ordered to Auckland, its headquarters. He was next appointed district clerk at Otahuhu and subsequently moved to Papakura in the same capacity. Mr. Fielder saw active service in the Waikato under General Cameron. In 1865 the regiment was ordered Home and Mr. Fielder, then holding the position of paymaster sergeant, took his discharge and entered the civil service as assistant clerk in the Napier resident magistrate’s court, was afterwards appointed clerk to the bench and deputy-registrar of the Supreme Court, and two or three years later entered the Deeds Department and became deputy-registrar of deeds and deputy-commissioner of stamps, which offices he held till his retirement from the service in 1879. He then accepted the secretaryship of the Napier Gas Company, and the management of the Hawke’s Bay Permanent Building Society, having since 1867 also held the secretaryship of the Napier Building Societies, Nos. 1 and 2. Mr. Fielder has taken an active part in Church matters for many years. He is also provincial corresponding secretary of the Hawke’s Bay District I.O.O.F.M.U., secretary of the Napier Park Company and Napier Recreation Ground Company and Cemetery Trust. When the native troubles arose, Mr. Fielder joined the Napier Rifle Volunteers and was sergeant-major. He was present at Omaranui and holds the New Zealand war medal.

Photo captions –
RIGHT REV. BISHOP WILLIAMS.
MR. J.B. FIELDER.

ECCLESIASTICAL.   131

Mr. Fielder was married in 1864 and has a son and two daughters living.

NAPIER CATHEDRAL. This fine building, the largest ecclesiastical edifice yet constructed in New Zealand, may be said to owe its existence to the untiring energy and zeal of the Very Rev. De Berdt Hovell, Dean of Waiapu. The scheme for its erection was inaugurated in the year 1885. In the month of September, 1886, the foundation stone was laid, and the Cathedral was consecrated and formally opened for divine worship in December, 1888. There being no building stone of a suitable character obtainable in Hawke’s Bay, full use has been made in the fabric of the excellent bright red bricks, which can be procured in any quantity in the vicinity of Napier. The task of designing the Cathedral was placed in the competent hands of the late Mr. B. W. Mountfort, architect, of Christchurch, and there can be no question that Napier Cathedral is one of his very best creations. From the somewhat retired position occupied by the edifice it does not shew externally, at present, to very great advantage, but this fault will be remedied later on, when the building is completed by the erection of the chapel and tower. From a description supplied by an expert the following particulars are given: – “The plan of the Cathedral may shortly be described as nave, chancel, and transepts, with morning chapel north of chancel, and organ chamber on the south. At the west end of nave are spacious vestries, in two stories, for clergy and choir, while a very magnificent tower is arranged for on the north side opposite the vestries. The nave and chancel are under one continuous roof into which the transept roofs join at a somewhat lower elevation, so that the ridge is unbroken, save where the cross shows outwardly the commencement of the chancel  inside. The roof is covered with slates of two colours, arranged in patterns, and from its great size, forms a conspicuous feature in the view. It finishes at the skyline with a perforated tile ridge. The main walls shew a series of buttresses on each side connected together by bold arches forming recesses, each of which contains a window of a couplet of lancets with diamond perforations above and between them. The brickwork of the walls is relieved by stone string courses and flat bands of stone and is crowned by a handsome and massive cornice. Great use has been made of moulded bricks, both within and without the building. The north and south transepts are entirely different in their component parts, that on the north shewing three deep lofty recesses, the centre containing a triplet and each side a couplet of lancets, also a porch of entrance below; while the south transept over a pent porch shews a large rectangular window supported by a single lancet on each side, and high up in the gable a series of four equal lancets. The great west front towers up in fine grand massive style, with its three large recessed arches containing windows, and the western porch below; while the lower vestry building with its varied windows and dormer gives great scale to this front. On entering the building by the west porch, the striking nature of the interior at once proclaims itself. In one wide span the lofty roof soars away for one hundred and seventy feet in a long solemn stately perspective to the great five-light eastern window. This interior is unlike anything yet attempted in this Colony, and by its spacious effect reminds

Photo captions –
VERY REV. DEAN HOVELL.
NAPIER CATHEDRAL CHOIR.

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the spectator of a wide basilica. The roof is without the beam and of course would exert an enormous thrust on the walls, but this pressure is amply provided for by abutments of more than ten feet projection, which however, save for a suitable proportion, do not shew themselves outside; in fact the buttresses are three-fourths internal, and their counter-butting effect is still further increased by boldly projecting the internal face of the abutments, at a suitable height, on massive moulded stone corbels. Each internal buttress is pierced on the ground floor by a narrow pointed arch, which forms a passage on each side of the Cathedral for access to the seats. Very striking and varied effects can be obtained from different points on looking down and across this many arched cloister as it might be termed. Each principal of the roof is framed double, and in all directions run bands of circular perforated cusped quatre foils. All this pierced work, repeated again and again down the length of roof, gives great lightness and play to the appearance of the perspective. The chancel has an ascent of three steps from the nave, from which it is separated by a fine screen of open work with gates. The floor of the chancel eastward of the choir stalls continues to rise until the Holy Table stands nine steps above the floor of the nave. A handsome credence of stone and tiles is arranged in the south wall. The eastern window, of great size, has been filled with very beautiful stained glass, and is in memory of the late Hon. Robert Stokes, M.L.C.; another richly stained window has been erected to commemorate the first bishop of the diocese, Dr. Williams; while a third, in memory of the wife of the late Mr. H. Stokes Tiffen, has been placed in the north transept. Other memorials have been erected to Captain Carr, of the Royal Artillery, and Mr. Davis  Canning, who were killed in action during the Maori war; while, under an Agnus Dei window, in the south transept, appears a very touching inscription, on white marble, in commemoration of the eldest son of the Dean, Hugh de St. Croix Hovell, who died under singularly sad circumstances several years ago. On the south side of the nave, opposite the north entrance, a wide arch leads to the vestries, underneath a picturesque projecting minstrels’ gallery, which is entered from the upper vestry. In the sacristy admirable paintings of Bishop Selwyn, Bishop William Williams, Bishop Stuart, Bishop W. L. Williams, Dean Hovell, and Archdeacon S. Williams, have been placed. They are from the brush of Herr Lindauer, and the credit of haying secured them for the diocese is due to the Rev. J. C. Eccles, vicar of Woodville. The following are a few of the statistics relative to the Cathedral: – Total length over all, 177 feet 6 inches; breadth over all, 57 feet 3 inches; clear internal breadth, 49 feet 3 inches; breadth of transepts, 85 feet 9 inches; length of nave, 115 feet 6 inches; length of chancel, 48 feet 6 inches; chapel, 38 feet 6 inches by 17 feet 6 inches; height, internal, 58 feet; cubic yards concrete foundation, 466; cubic feet of white stone, 3500; bricks, 452,000; timber, 109,000 feet.’’

The Very Reverend DE BERDT HOVELL, Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of the Diocese of Waiapu and of Napier Cathedral, is a scion of the ancient and knightly Suffolk family of Hovell, which is declared to be an offshoot of the Royal House of Hautville, ‘‘one of the most historically interesting families in Europe,’’ which gave Norman Kings to Naples, Sicily, Cyprus, and Jerusalem (vide The Norman People, pp. 280, 290). The present representative of the senior line of the Hovell family is Lord Thurlow (vide Burke’s Peerage and Burke’s Royal Descents). The branch to which Dean Hovell belongs left the County of Suffolk about a hundred years ago and is now seated at Boreham Holt, near Elstree, in Hertfordshire. The Dean was born in 1850, being the eldest son of the late Dr. Charles H. J. Hovell, formerly surgeon of the 3rd Waikato Regt. and Brigade-Surgeon- Lieutenant-Colonel. He was educated at the King’s School, Rochester, under that prince of headmasters, the Rev. Robert Whiston, M.A., and succeeded in gaining, by competitive examination in 1868, one of the valuable scholarships pertaining to the school, a similar one having been obtained some time previously by Sir Edwin Arnold, K.C.S.I., author of “The Light of Asia.” It was originally intended that Mr. Hovell should enter the English Civil Service, but he decided to take Holy Orders, and, with that object in view entered, in 1868, St. Boniface College, Warminster, and, in 1869, St. Augustine’s College, Canterbury. At this latter seat of learning, Mr. Hovell secured in 1870, the Whytehead Greek Testament Prize, one of the blue ribbons of the college. He was also, at the same time, a prominent athlete, being captain of his college cricket eleven and football fifteen, In 1873, together with several

Photo caption – NAPIER CATHEDRAL.

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other candidates, he was ordained deacon in Bombay Cathedral by Bishop Douglas. After his ordination he was stationed at Kolapore, but was resident in Bombay during the Parsee-Mohammedan disturbances in the latter city in 1874. He came to New Zealand (whither his father had preceded him) in 1875, having been appointed a member of the staff of the Pro-Cathedral Church of St. Michael and All Angels in Christchurch. In the following year he was unanimously nominated to the incumbency of the united parishes of All Saints’, Prebbleton, St. Saviour’s, Templeton, and St. Mary’s, Halswell, where he remained for a little over two years. During the time that he held this charge the church at Prebbleton was considerably enlarged and two new bells were added to the peal. In 1878, upon the strong recommendation of the late Primate of New Zealand, Mr. Hovell was offered and accepted the incumbency of St. John’s, Napier, the old Pro-Cathedral church of the diocese of Waiapu. Before leaving Prebbleton, his parishioners presented him with a richly illuminated address on vellum, and a purse of nearly a hundred sovereigns, while his Masonic friends gave him an exceedingly handsome silver salver, elaborately chased and suitably inscribed, “as a token of their affection and esteem.”’ On taking charge of the Napier parish, Mr. Hovell found matters in a most discouraging and disorganised condition. The only existing Church of England buildings in the town were an exceedingly ugly wooden church which stood where the present deanery lawn now extends, and a damp unsuitable house which had been used as a residence by the previous incumbent. There were only thirty persons registered as communicants for the whole of Napier, and there was not even a building for Sunday school purposes. On the other hand a debt of £1300 was in existence. Ten years passed away, and how great a change had been effected was stated by Dr. Stuart, Bishop of the Diocese in an address to his Diocesan Synod delivered in Napier on Tuesday, 27th of September, 1887, in which he referred in gratifying terms to the outward and material progress of the church in Napier and the untiring energy and sound judgement of the incumbent of St. John’s, which had contributed so greatly to the marked improvement visible on all sides. Napier Cathedral, referred to by Bishop Stuart as Dean Hovell’s magnum opus, was consecrated in the presence of an immense congregation in December, 1888; and, when the Cathedral Chapter was formed in 1889, and the Bishop announced that he intended to appoint Mr. Hovell to the high office of Dean, the statement was received in the Diocesan Synod with loud cheers. As an example of the Dean’s influence with his people it may be mentioned that on Sunday, 21st July, 1895, he asked the Cathedral congregation to forward him, during the following week, a sum of £1000 for the purpose of clearing off a liability which still remained upon the Cathedral. All through the intervening days contributions flowed in, and, on the succeeding Sunday, the Dean carried into the Cathedral, upon the brazen alms dish, a sum of  £1230 in cheques, notes, gold, silver, and copper, and placed it upon the altar, while the congregation rose as one man and sang the Doxology with thrilling effect. The Dean has also, upon occasion, brought his influence to bear in the direction of making for peace in the community. It was largely through his influence and that of Father Grogan, that the strike of the Napier Breakwater labourers was brought to an end in October, 1896. He has been a prominent Freemason for many years, and is past grand chaplain of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand, past district grand chaplain of the English Constitution, and also a past master. He at present holds office as chaplain of Lodges Scinde and Victoria in Napier. He is, further, a  past master of the Society of Loyal United Friends, and a past chief ruler of the Order of Rechabites. For twenty years he has acted as chaplain of the Napier Garrison, was appointed chaplain of the Wellington Battalion upon its formation several years ago, and has lately been appointed chaplain of the East Coast Battalion. He has been a member of the General Synod of the Church of the Province of New Zealand for many years, and is also a member of the Standing Committee of the Diocese of Waiapu, a diocesan nominator, and an assessor of the Bishop’s Court. He married, in 1876, Emily, younger daughter of the late Mr. George Ffitch of Woodstock Station, Canterbury, New Zealand, and formerly of Felsted in the County of Essex, who was

Photo caption – INTERIOR OF NAPIER CATHEDRAL – LOOKING EAST.

134   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

one of the original land purchasers under the Canterbury Association; by her he has had four children, three of whom survive. In 1896 his portrait, painted by Herr Lindauer of Woodville, was presented to him at the annual session of the Diocesan Synod. As a lecturer and preacher he is widely known. A writer, who had attended one of the Cathedral services, thus describes him in the columns of the Napier “Evening News” of 20th February, 1893: – ‘‘The Very Rev. the Dean, habited in his surplice, is in the pulpit, in full view of the congregation and just in front of the Sanctuary screen, and there stands before us here kindly, cultured gentleman of refinement and sensibility, a typical Englishman of the educated class. The sermon is an admirable one, splendidly delivered and deeply interesting, scholarly but telling, spiritual but sparkling, full of homely illustration as well as logic and eloquence, and breathing throughout a spirit of devotion. Looking at him as he stands preaching in the noble building which has been erected chiefly through his energy and power one is reminded of the words applied to Sir Christopher Wren, the designer of St. Paul’s “si monumentum requiris, circumspice.”

Mr. WILLIAM THOMAS SHARP, Organist of Napier Cathedral, is a professor of music with a high colonial reputation. He was born in Launceston, Tasmania, in 1863, and is the son of Mr. Thomas Sharp, for many years organist of St. John’s church in that town, and formerly organist of St. George’s, Ramsgate, England. The subject of this sketch received from his father his earliest musical instruction and made so much progress that at the age of ten years he played in Launceston, during the temporary absence of his father, his first full choral service. His ordinary education was received at the Sydney Grammar School, and at the  age of thirteen he was appointed organist of St. John’s, Bishopthorpe, Sydney, where he had charge for a year of a full pipe organ. He then accepted an appointment at St. David’s, Surrey Hills, Sydney, which he successfully held for four years. After a period of two years at St. Matthias, Paddington, Mr. Sharp was appointed organist of St. John’s, Ashfield, Sydney. Here he remained till 1894 and in January, 1895, arrived in Napier, where he took up his present position. Mr. Sharp was fortunate in having an opportunity of taking coaching lessons from the late Mr. W. T. Best, the old Liverpool organist, who for many years enjoyed the title of “the Prince of Organists.’’ In later years when Mr. Sharp applied for the post of city organist at the Sydney Town Hall Mr. Best warmly recommended his old pupil; but while Mr. Sharp stood first on the list of colonial applicants, the coveted position was awarded to an organist from the Old World. He has, however, occasionally played on that grandest of organs and speaks of it in high terms of praise. Wherever Mr. Sharp has carried on the duties of his profession he has won golden opinions and on the occasion of his departure from Ashfield was the recipient of an illuminated address and purse of sovereigns. In various parts of the Australasian Colonies, he has given in all over two hundred organ recitals, and the “Sydney Morning Herald” and other leading papers speak of his performances in no ordinary terms of commendation. Since his arrival in Napier, Mr. Sharp has been very successful with his recitals and musical people are looking forward to a new organ for the Cathedral which will enable him to prove what can be produced from a first-class instrument. In 1885 he was married to a-daughter of Mr. Edwin Wilkinson Harbron, of Sydney, and has six children. Further reference to Mr. Sharp as a teacher  of music is made in the musical section of this volume.

ST. AUGUSTINE’S CHURCH, Napier occupies a picturesque site in Bower Street and was erected in 1882. The choir is under the conductorship of Mr. C. P. Lound.

THE REV. HENRY EDWARD TAYLOR the Vicar of St. Augustine’s Church, Napier had a long clerical experience in England, and came to this Colony with the object of retiring. His health, however, so greatly improved with the favourable climate that we [he] was pressed into active service again. Mr. Taylor was born in Manchester, England, in 1853, and is a son of the late Mr. Francis Taylor, J.P., of that city, a prominent member of the Manchester Reform and Cobden Clubs, of both of which he was one of the founders. Mr. Taylor, the elder, was also associated with the late Right Hon. W. E. Forster in the cause of education. He was also a prime mover in the agitation which found its expression in the passing of the first Ballot Act; and in this connection he was appointed to manage the test ballot held in Manchester in 1869, when Messrs. Ernest Jones and Milner Gibson were the candidates, and the valuable evidence he gave before a committee of the House of Commons on the successful working of the system, had much influence in hastening the reform. His suggestions on the bankruptcy laws were very valuable, and led to useful reforms also in that connection. As a partner of Mr. T. B. Potter, M.P. for Rochdale, Mr. Taylor, senior, was a warm personal friend and supporter of the late Mr. John Bright. The Rev. Mr. Taylor was educated at St. Andrew’s College, Bradfield, Berkshire, and at Somersetshire College, Bath. He was intended for an engineer, and engaged in that calling for some time with the celebrated firm of Mather and Platt, of Salford, engineers to the Czar of Russia. It was intended that Mr. Taylor should go to

Photo captions –
MR. W.T. SHARP.
REV. H.E. TAYLOR.
MR. C.P. LOUND

ECCLESIASTICAL.   135

Russia, but at the age of eighteen he was so severely injured by a boiler explosion that his life was despaired of, and, being unable to walk for more than five years, he was obliged to give up all thought of continuing in that profession. When sufficiently recovered to think of further employment, Mr. Taylor decided upon entering the medical profession, and he studied medicine and walked the hospitals of Liverpool. On the recommendation of his brother, the Rev. R. Hunsley Taylor, he, however, decided to take Holy Orders, and in 1878 he was ordained deacon at Worcester to the curacy of All Saints’, Coventry. In 1882 he was appointed to the curacy of Dartmouth in Devonshire, and while labouring there was ordained priest by Bishop Temple, then Bishop of Exeter. His next move was to Stalbridge, in Dorset, where he took the place of Canon Fox, now of Gisborne. Mr. Taylor laboured also at St. Decuman’s in Somersetshire, at Hastings in Sussex, where he was chaplain at the Fisherman’s Church, and at Great Woolston, Salop, of which place he was vicar from 1890 to 1895. In the latter year Mr. Taylor came to this Colony, per “Ruahine,” and settled at Havelock. While  residing there he officiated occasionally at Te Aute, Waipawa and other places, until 1898, when he accepted his present charge. He was married in 1880 and has four sons.

Mr. CHARLES PHILIP LOUND, the energetic Choirmaster of St. Augustine’s Church, and the popular Secretary and Librarian of the Napier Working Men’s Club, has had a varied and interesting career. Born in London in 1850, the son of the late Mr. Thomas Lound, he was educated partly in London and partly in Auckland, where, with his parents, he landed in 1859, from the ship ‘‘Harwood.” Joining the Colonial forces, Mr. Lound served under Colonel Whitmore on both coasts of the North Island and took part in the memorable yet fruitless hunt after Te Kooti. For some twelve or eighteen months he was sergeant in charge of the field hospital in the Patea district. A lover of music, Mr. Lound has been throughout his life more or less connected with bands and musical societies. Beginning as a member of the band of the Napier Rifles, he rose to be bandmaster, and has filled similar posts in the artillery and other bands. His spare time is now  almost wholly devoted to St. Augustine’s choir, of which he is choirmaster. He is, however, a member of the orchestra of the Working Men’s Club, his instrument being the flute. Mr. Lound is a member of Masonic Lodge Scinde, and he is both district secretary of the Ancient Order of Foresters and secretary of Court Sir Charles Napier. For upwards of fifteen years he has been secretary of the Working Men’s Club, but it was some years later that his entire services were needed. Now, however, he is in attendance all day and on three evenings each week. The success of the club, which has been almost phenomenal, is largely due to the assiduity of the secretary; too much praise can hardly be bestowed upon him for the care and attention which have marked the execution of his many duties. Mr. Lound was married in 1877 to a daughter of the late Mr. R. Lawrence, of Taranaki, and has a son and daughter, both of whom are members of St. Augustine’s choir.

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, Napier. The foundation of the Catholic Mission in Napier dates as far back as 1859,

Photo caption – ST PATRICK’S (R.C.) CHURCH, NAPIER.

136   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

when Father Regnier [Reignier], S.M., built the first church, which is still in an excellent state of preservation and is now used by the Marist Brothers as a school. It was in the same year, owing to the large number of Roman Catholics amongst the soldiers, that Napier was first separated from Meanee [Meeanee], and Father Forest was appointed the first resident priest. Through the liberality of Mr. Thomas Fitzgerald (first superintendent of Hawke’s Bay), who gave a grant of land to the new mission, Father Forest was soon able to build a presbytery on one of the most beautiful sites in Napier, known as “Holy Mount.’’ Father Forest’s most important work was the erection of the convent and schools for girls in 1863, with the introduction of the Sisters of ‘‘Our Lady of the Missions” in 1865. About the same time Father Regnier, who still had charge of the Meanee mission, erected in the Napier Convent grounds a native school for half-caste girls and other poor children, an institution which has since under the able care of the Sisters acquired an excellent reputation. This school is subsidised by the Government and visited twice a year by the Government inspector for Native schools. At present there are at the school over sixty Maori and half-caste pupils, many of whom are sent from other parts of New Zealand by the Government to take out their scholarships under the Sisters. Father Forest next set himself to erect St. Mary’s Church, a handsome structure of kauri timber with fine slated roof, beautiful stained glass windows, and a handsome marble altar, the whole costing £2300. St. Mary’s is capable of seating 450 persons. The last work of Father Forest was the introduction of the Marist Brothers, the first branch in the Colonies of the teaching order founded in 1837 by Father Champagnat at St. Genis, near Lyons, France. The present Catholic population of Napier is about 1400, and the number of children attending the convent, including boarders and Marist Brothers’ school, is over 380 in all. These schools are undoubtedly amongst the most efficient in the Colony. This progress required more school accommodation as well as a residence for the Brothers, which cost £1200. Father Forest, after twenty-six years’ missionary labours in Napier, died in 1884 in his eightieth year. Shortly after the arrival in Napier of the present incumbent, Father Grogan, he saw that St. Mary’s church was neither large nor central enough for the requirements of his numerous congregation. His first step was to purchase a site for a new edifice in the heart of the city, and 1894 saw his labours crowned with success in the completion of St. Patrick’s church, usually called St. Patrick’s Cathedral, which is a fine structure of kauri, of pure Gothic style throughout, and is capable of seating about 700 people. It was built at a cost of £3500. The beautiful stained glass windows were imported from Lyons, and the bell, which weighs half a ton, was cast by the well-known firm of Bourdon and Co., of that city. The tall elegant spire of St. Patrick’s is the first object to attract the eye on approaching Napier by train. Besides two pretty cottages adjoining the church which  Father Grogan can use as a presbytery when it may suit him, he has purchased another site adjoining the church for a new presbytery, the erection of which is to be taken in hand at once after the new convent is completed.

The Rev. FATHER GROGAN, S.M., who was appointed in 1884, is a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, was educated partly in France and partly at St. Mary’s College, Dundalk, where he received priest’s orders, and arrived in New Zealand in 1897, commencing his missionary career as curate with Father Forest in Napier. Twelve months later he was appointed to the parish of Hawera, where he built two churches and a presbytery and worked with great energy for four years. Besides the Napier parish, Father Grogan had formerly charge of Wairoa, a small but rising station about sixty miles from Napier, in which he also did much good work, and when giving up its charge was able to hand over £219 towards the building of the new presbytery to his successor, Father Lepetre. Associated with Father Grogan in the parish of Napier is Father Bell, who came out from London some six years ago.

THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, Napier. The erection of a new building is contemplated. Services are now held in the Foresters’ Hall.

The Rev. HENRY WILLIAM JOHN MILLER, Minister of the Congregational Church in Napier, was born in Soho, London, in 1858 and is the son of the late Mr. Henry Miller, of Yorkshire. He was educated at the Congregational College, Nottingham, and also attended Glasgow University for one session, filling at the same time the pastorate of the Hutchesontown Congregational Church, Glasgow. He was ordained in 1882.  In consequence of ill-health, Mr. Miller was recommended to try a more equable climate and came to this Colony by the ship ‘‘Wairoa,” arriving in Wellington. Mr. Miller accepted a call to the pastorate of the Onehunga Congregational Church in 1883 and laboured there for a little over eleven years, purchasing a fine church property and largely increasing the church membership. He became the first district secretary for the Auckland district and was twice elected chairman, and  in 1893 was elected chairman of the Congregational Union of New Zealand. In the following year the Congregational Union asked Mr. Miller to inaugurate services in Napier and he at once entered upon the work in which he is now so busily engaged. He is secretary of the Prohibition League and the Hawke’s Bay Auxiliary of the Bible Society. For the past three years he has been representing the Napier electorate in the Prohibition Council of the Wellington, Hawke’s Bay, and Taranaki provincial convention. He was married in 1882 to the daughter of Mr. Daniel Jones, of Normanton, Yorkshire, and has two daughters and three sons.

SOCIAL.

THE NAPIER CLUB, which occupies a special suite of rooms at the Clarendon Club Hotel, has a membership of about sixty. Messrs John McVay (president), Vigor Brown (vice-president), F. Bee, R. J. Duncan, C. B. Hoodley, S.J. Jago, and A. A. Kennedy committee), and Mr. S. S. Revans (secretary). The social room is very large and comfortably furnished and the library and card-rooms are pleasant and cosy. The billiard-room is large and well appointed. Visitors introduced by members are placed upon the honorary list.

Mr. SAMUEL STEBBING REVANS, Secretary of the Napier Club, is well and favourably known in commercial and banking circles and

Photo captions –
REV. FATHER GROGAN.
REV. H. W. J. MILLER

SOCIAL AND MUSICAL.   137

has been in the Colony over a third of a century. He was born near Montreal, Canada, in 1833, and is a son of the late Dr. Stebbing Revans of Canada and nephew of the late Mr. Samuel Revans, whose name figured prominently in the early history of Wellington as secretary of the first New Zealand Association and as proprietor and printer of the first newspaper published in the province of Wellington, or indeed in the Colony. Educated in Canada, Mr. S. S. Revans was engaged there in commercial and banking pursuits and came to New Zealand via London in 1862, landing in Auckland from the ship “Africa” in August of that year. He joined the Bank of New Zealand at Auckland and remained in its service until 1895, when he retired on a pension, after having been either accountant or manager at Christchurch, Wellington, Hokitika, Ashburton, Waimate, Nelson, and Napier. Mr. Revans has since been engaged in commercial pursuits in Napier. Mr. Revans is captain of the Napier Boating Club, of which he is also a life member, and he is a member of the Napier Rowing Club.

THE NAPIER PARK RACING CLUB’S COURSE is situated at Taradale, three miles from Napier, and is a block of beautifully laid out grounds, containing about eighty-two acres. The original cost of the land was £4000 but since its acquisition over £10,009 has been spent in improvements, it being the aim of the club to make Napier Park one of the finest recreation grounds in the Colony. Extensive planting operations have been carried out, the beautiful belts of trees giving a grateful shade on summer days. The grand stand is one of the finest in New Zealand, and the only similar structure which can claim a superiority is that of the Auckland Metropolitan Club. There is a second stand outside the enclosure capable of accommodating five hundred people. In front of the stand, which is built on a rise, is a beautiful terrace leading to the lawn.   Below the stand and approached from the terrace by two wide flights of massive stone steps of easy grade, are the luncheon rooms, retiring rooms, stewards’ room, telegraph office,and press room, and all other necessary offices. There are large saddling paddocks, ranges of loose boxes and stabling to accommodate thirty horses. The race meetings are very popular and always draw very large attendances. The following are the officers of the club: – Messrs. John Close (president), J. McVay (vice-president), John Bennett (judge), E. W. Knowles (treasurer), A. T. Danvers (secretary and handicapper). The stewards are Messrs. G. H. Swan, I. Bicknell, W. Heslop, F. Moeller, F. Ormond, J. G. Swan, R. Sweetapple and F. G. Smith.

Mr. A. T. DANVERS, the popular and capable Secretary and Handicapper, who has filled those positions since the beginning of the club, is a native of Surrey, England, and a descendant of one of the oldest and most prominent English families, the founder of which, Rolande D’Envers, came over with William the Conquerer [Conqueror] in 1066 and was endowed by that grateful monarch with large estates at Calvert. His father, Mr. Frederick Samuel Danvers, belonged to the old East India Company’s service, and his brother, Mr. Frederick Charles Danvers, is resident general in the Indian service. The subject of this sketch was educated for the Royal Navy, but having a great desire to see New Zealand he came to Auckland in 1853 where he was engaged in farming for about five years and removed to Hawke’s Bay in 1858 before it was declared a province. In 1852 he went Home for a trip and returned to Hawke’s Bay in 1864, since which time he has practised as a veterinary surgeon. In addition to his position with the Napier Park Club, Mr. Danvers is handicapper and referee for the Gun Club and handicapper for a number of country racing clubs. He also saw active service in 1866 during the    Maori wars in the Hawke’s Bay militia, was at the battle of Omaranui and has received the New Zealand medal. Mr. Danvers, who resides at Hastings, is married and has three sons and two daughters.

MUSICAL.

HOBEN, SYDNEY FRANCIS, Teacher of Music, Napier. Mr. Hoben is one of a small band of musicians upon whom the ‘‘Review of Reviews” recently declared the future of New Zealand music rested. Born in Sydney in 1866 of New Zealand parents, he came to this Colony as a child and early evinced decided talents as a musician, making the pianoforte his instrument. After appearing as a juvenile phenomenon of a healthy type and going on tour he was finally sent to the famous Royal Conservatorium of Leipsic. Here, so thoroughly had he been grounded by his mother, who so far had been his only teacher, that he at once began a brilliant career and was appearing at the ‘‘Abends” within three months of his arrival – an unprecedented thing in a new pupil. He had as masters in pianoforte vortrag so famous a man as Dr. Carl Reinecke, for technique, the great Professor Zwintscher, for theory, the eminent contra-puntalist Professor Gustay Schreck, and for voice production, violin, languages, etc., other eminent members of the professorial staff. After a time the young colonial became affected with over study and acquired a form of nervous disorder of the arms which afflicts many of the most distinguished pianists and from which he still suffers. After treatment in Europe he apparently recovered, but just as the artist was about to accept a starring engagement in England, his health completely broke down and he was ordered back to the Colony in the hope of restoration. He settled in Napier where his brother then was, and where his general health was largely regained. After a successful concert tour of the Colony he returned to Napier teaching successfully till his health became sufficiently restored to permit of his departure for Sydney in January, 1896. During his stay in Europe, Mr. Hoben contributed to the press a brilliant series of articles upon “Student Life in Leipsic,’’ which attracted wide attention, and has done much other literary work. His compositions are of a high order, and his songs are sung by artists like Mesdames Sapio and Belle Cole and Mr. A.H. Gee, and his compositions performed by Madame Camilla Urso and artists of like calibre.

SHARP, WILLIAM THOMAS, Professor of Music, Clyde Road, Napier. Mr. Sharp, to whom reference is made in connection with the Napier Cathedral, of which he is the popular organist, has been teaching the pianoforte and singing in Napier for the past four years and his numerous pupils have been very successful with the Trinity College examinations. Before his teaching connection became so extensive, he was organist for the Masonic lodge, but that position he was reluctantly compelled to relinquish through pressure of time. For additional particulars of his career readers are referred to the Napier Ecclesiastical section of this volume.

Photo caption – NAPIER PARK GRAND STAND.

138   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

WINDER, WILHELM RICHARDS (late of the Conservatoire of Prague), Professor of Violin and Singing, Napier. Herr Winder was born in Austria in 1864 and is the son of the eminent violinist and conductor of that name. His early musical training was received under good masters in his native town and he entered the Celebrated Conservatoire of Prague. Herr Winder then joined one of the Austrian Infantry Regimental Bands, under the conductorship of Kral and the celebrated Cibulka. After leaving the army, he practised his profession in Vienna, Italy, and Russia, finally emigrating to America, where he carried on his practice in New York and Boston. Owing to ill-health he returned to his native land and after visiting the great musical centres of the Continent came to New Zealand in 1898, landing at Wellington. Shortly afterwards he received an invitation from the musical people of Napier and Hastings and proceeded there where his undoubted abilities have procured him a large and increasing number of pupils from amongst the principal families of Hawke’s Bay.

NEWSPAPER PRESS.

“THE HAWKE’S BAY HERALD” is one of the oldest journals in the Colony, having been founded while the district was still part of the province of Wellington. The rich lands surrounding the Bay and for many miles inland were being sold and the revenue was being expended in Wellington, while Hawke’s Bay was left practically roadless. This was, of course, most unsatisfactory to the settlers and a movement for separation was inaugurated, the promoters of which keenly felt the need of a newspaper to assist them, and Mr. James Wood, an Auckland journalist, was induced to start the ‘‘Herald,” the first number of which appeared on the 24th of September, 1857. It was a very  small sheet, issued weekly at first, but soon afterwards was published twice a week. Early in 1871 Mr. Wood ventured to issue a daily half-sheet, Mr. W. W. Carlile being appointed editor. On the 1st of April of that year the business was purchased from Mr. Wood by Mr. P. Dinwiddie (who had been for some time accountant to Mr. Wood), Mr. Carlile and Mr. Morrison, head of the printing department. In 1878 Mr. Carlile sold out his interest to his partners, in the following year Mr. Morrison sold his share to Mr. Walker and the style of the firm was then changed to Dinwiddie, Walker and Co. The concern was in 1886 turned into a limited liability company, Messrs. Dinwiddie and Walker retaining large interests together with their respective positions of business manager and editor. In December of the same year a disastrous fire occurred in Napier and the ‘‘Herald’s” premises and plant were, with many other properties in the neighbourhood, completely destroyed. The present handsome brick and stone premises were then erected at a cost of about £5000. The “Herald” is not a violent party organ, but takes a strong anti-socialistic stand. It is par excellence the paper of the country settlers and devotes much attention to pastoral and agricultural matters. As an exponent of public opinion, the ‘‘Hawke’s Bay Herald” is consistent in its policy. Its leading columns are always readable, the subjects treated, especially political subjects, are not done to death, and a great deal of information is disseminated in an interesting and agreeable form. As a commercial enterprise the “Herald’’ is a flourishing concern. Its plant is on a comprehensive scale, suitable to all the requirements of the town and district. The quality of lithographic, job- printing, and book-binding work issued from the ‘‘Herald” office will compare favourably with that executed in much larger towns.

Mr. PETER DINWIDDIE was born in Manchester in 1838, is the fourth son of Mr. John Dinwiddie, contractor and builder of that city, and served an apprenticeship in the well-known export warehouse of John Pender and Co., the head of which firm was afterwards knighted for his services in connection with the establishment of the Eastern Cable Company. Mr. Dinwiddie left Home on account of ill-health and came out to New Zealand in 1863 to join a brother who had been in business for some time in the Colony. After he arrived in Napier in October, 1863, he for a short time assisted his brother, Mr. John Dinwiddie, as accountant and was for a period with Mr. Vautier Janisch, auctioneer and shipping agent. Subsequently he became accountant to Mr. Wood, proprietor of the ‘‘Herald,’’ which position he retained until 1871, when, in conjunction with Messrs. Carlile and Morrison, he bought the property with which he has ever since been connected. During the native troubles Mr. Dinwiddie saw a good deal of service as a volunteer and holds the New Zealand war medal. Mr. Dinwiddie is chairman of directors of the Starr-Bowkett Building Society, a member of the Napier Borough Council and Harbour Board, and takes a general interest in commercial matters. He is an ex-president of the North Island Bowling Association and of the Napier Bowling Club, and still takes a great interest in bowling matters. He was married in 1872 to the second daughter of Mr. John McKinnon, of Arapawanui [Arapaoanui], and has four sons and four daughters.

Mr. RICHARD THOMAS WALKER, Editor of the ‘‘Hawke’s Bay Herald,’’ was born in Manchester in 1854 and educated at Turton Hall, Yorkshire, his father, Dr. Richard Walker, of Manchester, having died before the subject under notice was two

Photo captions –

MR. J. WOOD
(The first Proprietor of the “Herald”).

MR. MORRISON
(One of the early Proprietors).

MR. P. DINWIDDIE.

NEWSPAPER PRESS.   139

years old. Mr. Walker served an apprenticeship on the ‘‘Harwich Newsman,” subsequently acting as reporter on the “Surrey Advertiser” and the “Richmond and Twickenham Times.’’ He came to New Zealand in 1876 per ship ‘‘Piako’’ landing at Lyttelton en route for Napier and joined the staff of the “Wellington Evening Post,’’ of which he became sub-editor and where he remained until his removal to Napier in 1879. In 1886 Mr. Walker was married to a daughter of Mr. A. J. Allom, who arrived in Wellington in 1842 as a member of the survey staff in Auckland, an interesting account of whose career appears in the Auckland volume of this work. Mrs. Walker died on the 23rd of October, 1898, leaving two daughters.

“THE NAPIER DAILY TELEGRAPH” came into existence in February, 1871, projected by a company for the purpose of providing an independent newspaper, untrammelled by party or sect. The company did not live long as its shareholders failed to realise the difficulty of the task they had undertaken. Before a year had expired Messrs. Alex. Kennedy, T. K. Newton, G. B. Lee, and E. W. Knowles became the proprietors of the journal, which they determined to carry on as an exponent of the Liberal policy originally announced on its first issue. In 1880 the present proprietor, Mr. E. W. Knowles, became sole owner, and since that time it has been managed by him. At the commencement of its career the “Daily Telegraph” was under the management of Mr. R. Halkett Lord, the editorial chair being filled by Mr. Hayes, who was shortly afterwards succeeded by Mr. Robert Price, who ably edited the paper until 1893 when he resigned his position to enter into pastoral pursuits. Mr. Price was succeeded by Mr. R. Martin, a capable journalist well known in Otago and Southland, whose connection with the “Daily Telegraph” was cut  short by sudden death from heart disease, and he was succeeded by Mr. John W. McDougall, the present editor. The “Telegraph’’ is a well-written and outspoken paper, of decidedly democratic principles.

Mr. E. W. KNOWLES, the Proprietor of the “Daily Telegraph,’’ comes of an old English family settled for many generations in Kent. He was born at Maidstone, in that county, in 1833, where he was also educated. Deciding to try his fortunes in a new country, he left England for New Zealand, arriving in Auckland early in 1856 and commencing business in that city, but in the  following year he proceeded to Hawke’s Bay and from then till 1886 carried on in Napier a wine and spirit and grocery business. This he relinquished in the latter year and he has since given his whole attention to the management of the ‘‘Daily Telegraph,’’ now in the twenty-ninth year of a flourishing existence. Mr. Knowles is an excellent an active business man, and his beautiful home and grounds on the hill overlooking the town and bay are well-known in the district. He is married to a daughter of the late Dr. J. J Brown, of London, and has one daughter living.

Photo captions –
MR. R. T. WALKER.
MR. E.W. KNOWLES.
MR. J. W. MCDOUGALL   See Page 140.
MR. KNOWLES’ RESIDENCE.

140   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Mr. JOHN W. McDOUGALL, Editor of the ‘Daily Telegraph,’’ was born at Peterborough, Northamptonshire, in 1849. He is of Scotch descent, his father belonging to an old Argyleshire family, several of whose members have served the Empire with distinction in Canada and India. Mr. McDougall was educated in London, where he also married. Leaving England with his wife very shortly afterwards, he first touched New Zealand soil at Port Chalmers. For a few years he led the life of a settler, and was engaged in various contracts in Canterbury. During this period he was a contributor to various newspapers, principally on political and social subjects. Coming to Napier in 1877 he for some time combined building operations with literary work, but his writings having brought him into notice, he was in 1880 offered the position of editor of the ‘‘Waipawa Mail,’’ which he accepted and since that time has been engaged solely in journalistic pursuits. In 1881 he unsuccessfully contested the Napier seat in the House of Representatives. In the following year he joined the literary staff of the “Hawke’s Bay Herald” and continued his connection with that journal till 1894, when he became editor of the “Daily Telegraph.’’ He married a daughter of Mr. Edward Downey, of Stepney, London, and has six sons.

LEGAL.

LAW SOCIETY, Hawke’s Bay Branch. The Law Society of New Zealand has a branch in each judicial district of the Colony, and that of Hawke’s Bay, with its head-quarters in Napier, judiciously guards the interests of the profession.

Mr. EDWARD HEATHCOTE WILLIAMS, President of the Hawke’s Bay District Law Society, for 1898, practises his profession at Napier and Hastings. He was born in 1859 at the Bay of Islands, is a son of Mr. John  William Williams, of Napier, and therefore grandson of the late Archdeacon Henry Williams. Educated at the Church of England Grammar School, Parnell, Auckland, under Dr. Kinder and Mr. Adams, Mr. Williams joined the staff of the Colonial Bank at Wellington, and after three years’ experience was in 1879 articled to Mr. H. D. Bell, of Wellington, and admitted a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court in 1883. He commenced practice in Hastings in 1884, and in 1888 opened his Napier office. Mr. Williams is solicitor to the Hastings Borough Council, Hastings Building Society, Bank of New Zealand, Hastings, Bank of Australasia, Napier, and many other corporations. He is a keen supporter of the game of cricket and holds the presidency of the Hawke’s Bay Cricket Association. On the formation of the New Zealand Cricket Council he was unanimously elected the council’s first president and is now vice-president of that body.

COTTERILL AND HUMPHRIES (Arthur James Cotterill and Herbert Humphries), Barristers, Solicitors, and Notaries Public, Shakespeare Road, Napier. Telephone 27; P.O. Box 50. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. The firm act as solicitors for the Bank of New Zealand, Bank of New South Wales, the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, The New Zealand Shipping Company, The Tyser Line Limited, the Tollemache Estate, Messrs. Nelson Bros., Ltd., Messrs. Dalgety and Company, Ltd., and many others.

Mr. ARTHUR JAMES COTTERILL, the Senior Partner, is Crown Solicitor at Napier. He was born in Colney, Norfolk, England, in 1848, and is the son of the Rev. Canon Cotterill, of Christchurch. Mr. Cotterill was educated at Christ’s College and studied for the law under Messrs. Hanmer and Harper, of Christchurch, and was admitted in 18738 by Mr. Justice Gresson. Mr. Cotterill was appointed Crown Solicitor in 1877.

Mr. HERBERT HUMPHRIES was born at Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England, in 1857, and is the son of Mr. John Humphries, a carpet manufacturer. He was educated at Brighton College and studied law mainly with Messrs. Wilson and Cotterill, of Napier, and was admitted in 1885 by Chief Justice Sir James Prendergast.

CRESSWELL, JOSEPH, Barrister and Solicitor, Tennyson Street, Napier. P.O. Box 43. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Cresswell was born at St. Kilda, near Melbourne, in 1860, and is the son of the late Mr. Hurdman Charles Cresswell, solicitor of that city. He was educated at the Wesley College, Melbourne, and admitted a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand in 1884 by the late Mr. Justice Gillies. Mr. Cresswell has been established in Napier since 1887, is solicitor for the Licensed Trades’ Association and has formed a very valuable connection. He is a commissioner of the Supreme Court of Victoria. As a Mason Mr. Cresswell belongs to Lodge Scinde, and he has held the high office of principal sojourner of the Victoria Royal Arch Chapter for about ten years. He is an old member of the Druids, and was for some years lieutenant Bat tery of Artillery Volunteers. Mr. Cresswell was married in 1880 to Miss Forbes, of Gisborne, and has five daughters and two sons.

DINWIDDIE, WILLIAM, Barrister and Solicitor, Browning Street, Napier. P.O. Box 93. Bankers, National Bank of New Zealand. Wellington agent, Mr. Henry Hall. Mr. William Dinwiddie is a son of the late Rev. William Dinwiddie, B.A.. LL.B., of London, who died there in 1887, but who was for a few years a resident in Napier. Mr. Dinwiddie was born in London in 1863, educated at the London University College School and came to this Colony with his parents in 1882. On arrival he went into the office of Messrs. Carlile and McLean, of Napier, and was afterwards with Messrs. Duncan, Cotterill, and Martin, of Christchurch. Passing his examinations in 1889, Mr. Dinwiddie was admitted a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court by the late Mr. Justice Richmond at Wellington, and immediately commenced practice in Napier. He is secretary of the Napier branch of the National Association and of the Napier Athenaeum.

KENNEDY AND LUSK (Charles Dugald Kennedy and Hugh Butler Lusk), Barristers and Solicitors, Herschell Street, Napier. P.O. Box 104; Telephone 280. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Charles Kennedy, the senior partner, is also the senior partner of the firm of Messrs. Kennedy Bros., civil engineers and surveyors, and particulars of his career are given in connection with the Hawke’s Bay County Council, of which he is the engineer. Mr. Kennedy takes an active part in both concerns, but the court work is all undertaken by Mr. Lusk. Mr. Hugh Butler Lusk was born in Mongonui [Mangonui], North Auckland, in 1866, and is a son of Mr. Hugh Hart Lusk, barrister and Solicitor. Educated at  the Auckland College

Photo captions –
MR. E. H. WILLIAMS
MR. W. DINWIDDIE.

LEGAL AND MEDICAL.   141

and Grammar School, the subject under notice was articled to the late Mr. J. B. Russell, of Messrs. Russell and Campbell, Auckland. Passing his examination in 1889, he was admitted to the Supreme Court early in the following year by Mr. Justice Conolly, and became a partner with Mr. W. L. Rees, the well-known barrister and ex-member of the House of Representatives, under the style of Rees and Lusk. This partnership was, however, dissolved in 1894, when Mr. Rees left Napier. Mr. Lusk then carried on alone until September, 1896, when he joined Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Lusk is an exceedingly popular lawyer. As a cricketer, he stands in the front rank as one of New Zealand’s representatives and the holder of the batting record of the Colony. During the season 1895, his total score in first-class cricket was 1111, being the only one to exceed three figures. Though batting is his strong point he is a good change bowler. He is also a fair tennis and golf-player. He was married in 1891 to a daughter of Mr. W. L. Rees, and has two daughters.

WILLIAMS, EDWARD HEATHCOTE, Barrister and Solicitor, Browning Street, Napier. P.O. Box 78; Telephone 203. Branch at Hastings.

MEDICAL.

CARO, JACOB SELIG, M.D., Berlin and Melbourne, Tennyson Street, Napier. Dr. Caro is a native of Prussia, was educated at the Berlin University and gained his diploma in 1862. After practising in Germany for a short time he came to Brisbane in 1863 by the ship ‘‘La Rochelle” and practised there a few months, then proceeded to Melbourne where he took the degree of Doctor of Medicine. He came to New Zealand and for twelve months practised his profesion [profession] in Dunedin. He then removed to the Nelson province for some years, and  afterwards to Geraldine in 1866 remaining there until 1870, when he was induced to go to the West Coast of the Middle Island, practising for some years at Staffordtown, near Hokitika. In 1877 he removed to Napier and soon established a reputation as a specialist in children’s diseases. His literary contributions to the ‘‘Australasian Medical Gazette” are well known to his medical brethren. Dr. Caro was the first to introduce the anti-toxin treatment in New Zealand. About 1894 he took a trip Home, visiting the principal hospitals in England and Europe. He has taken no part in public affairs since leaving Marlborough, where he was a member of the County Council. In 1864 he married Miss Malcolm of Richmond, Nelson. Mrs. Caro is the first of the very few qualified lady dentists and has been in successful practice for years.

DE LISLE, FREDERIC IRVING, L.R.C.P. (Edin.), L.M., L.S.A.L., Physician, Tennyson Street, Napier. Dr. de Lisle was born in Guernsey, and educated at Elizabeth College. He entered the Navy as a midshipman and served several years, but retired to pursue medical studies in Guy’s Hospital, and obtained his first diploma in 1871. During the siege of Paris he was dresser to the English Ambulance Corps. He obtained his final diploma in 1871 when he received the appointment of surgeon to St. Peter’s Hospital, Guernsey, a position he held for four years. He came to the Colony in 1877 by the ship “Himalaya’’ and commenced the practice of his profession immediately afterwards at Napier. Dr. de Lisle was a member of the Napier Borough Council for two years. He was also medical officer to several of the friendly societies, but in 1892 he severed his connection with those bodies owing to his increasing private practice. He is surgeon to the hospital, medical referee to the Australian Mutual Provident Society, and health officer for the Borough and quarantine officer to the port.

JARVIS, J. H. E., M.R.C.S. (Eng), L.R.C.P. (Lond.), Physician and Surgeon, Marine Parade, Napier. Dr. Jarvis came to New Zealand in 1890 and shortly after started practice at Hawke’s Bay.

LOCKING, BENJAMIN, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., L.S.A. (Lond.), Physician and Surgeon, Tennyson Street, Napier. Dr. Locking, after practising a number of years in England, came to Nelson, where he practised several years, and then removed to Napier in 1894. He is medical referee to the National Mutual, Citizens, Australian Widows, and Provident and Industrial Life Insurance companies; medical officer to the Oddfellows and United Friends’ Lodges, and a member of the honorary medical staff of Napier Hospital. He is also surgeon-captain to the East Coast Battalion of Rifle Volunteers and a member of the Masonic body, first of the Victory Lodge, Nelson, and subsequently of the Victoria Lodge, Napier.

MENZIES, EDWARD, M.R.C.S.L. (London), Physician and Surgeon, Napier. Dr. Menzies, who is Medical Officer of the Napier Old Men’s Refuge, has had a most interesting career, and now at the ripe age of seventy-eight years is still in the enjoyment of re markably good health. Dr. Menzies was born at Kingston, Jamaica, in 1820, his father, Mr. Edward Menzies, being a chemist and druggist in that island. He was educated at Hall Place School, Baxley, Kent, and studied for his profession at Guy’s Hospital, London, where he took his degree of M.R.C.S.L. in 1841. He entered the army and was all through the Crimean war. Dr. Menzies, during his thirty years’ connection with the Army spent nearly twenty years of that period in the various provinces of India, two years in Turkey, four in China, and a few months in Canada, and retired on a pension in 1872 with the rank of inspector-general of army hospitals. He then went to Buenos Ayres, where he practised until 1874, when on the death of his wife he left for England. After six years spent in Bath, Dr. Menzies came to this Colony, entered into practice in Napier and was appointed to the charge of the Napier Hospital and the Old Men’s Refuge, retiring from the former position in 1896. He has taken a general interest in all public matters and is a member of the Philosophical Society.

MENZIES, PERCY WILLIAM, L.R.C.P. and L.R.C.S. (Edin.), and L.F.P. and S. (Glas.), Herschell Street, Napier. Dr. Menzies, who established his present practice in Napier in 1893, is honorary visiting surgeon to the Napier Hospital, and medical officer to several of the Friendly Societies.

MILNE-THOMSON, A., Physician and Surgeon, Napier. Dr. Milne-Thomson arrived in New Zealand in 1893. He is surgeon to Court Captain Cook, Ancient Order of Foresters, senior honorary surgeon to Napier Hospital, and medical referee for the Australian Mutual Life Association.

MOORE, THOMAS CHARLES, B.A., M.B., Ch.B., and M.D., Physician and Surgeon, Tennyson Street, Napier. Telephone

Photo captions –
DR. F. I. DE LISLE.
DR. E. MENZIES.

142   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

115.   Dr Moore is a son of the Rev. Dr Moore, late headmaster of Middleton College County Cork. He was born in Liverpool, and studied his profession at Trinity College, Dublin, where he gained honours and prizes in both classic and English literature. For some time he had charge of the midwifery department of the Rotunda Hospital. On obtaining his diploma he received the appointment of surgeon in the P. and O. Company, and afterwards surgeon in the New Zealand Government Emigration Service. He came to New Zealand in 1884, and settled in Napier. Dr. Moore is medical examiner to the Government Life Insurance Department, surgeon to the Napier Gaol, and a Justice of the Peace. He is also a member of the Education Board and a governor of the High schools.

FROST, HAROLD WILLIAM, Surgeon-Dentist, Emerson Street, Napier. Telephone 269. Mr. Frost’s surgery is situated in Mr. Hoadley’s large building, the waiting and operating rooms and others, which are very spacious, being furnished-in luxurious style with all the newest appliances of the dental profession. Mr. Frost is a native of Liverpool. His favourite pastimes are bowls, cricket, and golf. He is a member of the Masonic body.

WILSON AND DAVIES (H.C. Wilson and H. Davies), Dentists, Tennyson Street, Napier. Telephone 83. Private address, Bluff Hill. Branch establishment, Eccles’ chemist shop, Heretaunga Road, Hastings. This firm was founded by Mr. Wilson in 1867. Mr. H. C. Wilson, the senior partner, is a native of Berkshire, England, and studied for his profession under Sir Edward Saunders, dentist to Her Majesty the Queen. In 1863 he came to Auckland by the ship ‘‘War Sprite” at the time of the Waikato war. He immediately joined Captain Kreptner’s German Company, 3rd Waikato Regiment, commanded by Col. Lyon and received an ensign’s commission. He served all through the campaign and holds the New Zealand medal. On the disbandment of the troops, he came to Napier and established his present large practice and in 1893 took Mr. Davies into partnership. Mr. Wilson in an enthusiastic bowler, tennis and golf player. He was connected with the Masonic Body for a number of years. His eldest son is at present studying medicine in London  where he has had a distinguished college career.

Dr. NEIL’S BOTANIC DISPENSARY (J. R. Gillespie, manager), Emerson Street, Napier. Bankers, Bank of Australasia. This is a branch of Dr. Neil’s well-known Dunedin business and was opened ten or twelve years ago. The shop is large and very attractive, evidence of the manager’s care and attention being noticeable in the well-dressed window and many other directions. Like his principal, Mr. Gillespie is a pharmaceutical chemist as well as a herbalist. Homoeopathic and allopathic medicines are largely stocked and physicians’ prescriptions of all kinds carefully dispensed. The preparation of Dr. Neil’s numerous proprietary articles is partly carried on at the Napier establishment.

Mr. JAMES ROBERT GILLESPIE, the Manager of Dr. Neil’s Napier business, is a son of Mr. John Gillespie, contractor of Palmerston, Otago, where the subject of this notice was born in 1873. Educated at the George Street school, Dunedin, Mr. Gillespie entered the wholesale drug store of Messrs. Sainsbury, Ellesden and Co., of Rattray Street. From there he went to the retail establishment of Mr. E. S. Ellesden in Princes Street, where he remained some five years, and gained a thorough knowledge of the trade. When Mr. Ellesden sold out to Mr. J. A. Corrighan, Mr. Gillespie continued as assistant and on the death of his principal he carried on the business for the executors for about a year. After a short engagement with Mr. Dutton, chemist of Dunedin, he took a trip round the Colony and finally accepted his present position in 1896. Mr. Gillespie is very popular both in business and social circles. As a cricketer, he is a member of the Scinde Club and is included in the senior team.

ECCLES, ALEXANDER, Chemist and Druggist, Hastings Street, Napier. Branches, Emerson Street, and at Hastings. P.O. Box 143. Telephones: Head establishment, Hastings Street, 93; Branch, Emerson Street, 75; Branch, Hastings, 24; Private residence, 108. Bankers, National Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Eccles’ Masonic Pharmacy occupies the ground floor of the new brick part of the Masonic Hotel, and is without question one of the finest chemists’ shops of which the Colony can boast. Its frontage to Hastings Street is forty-five feet, the whole of which is covered by a double plate-glass window, artistically decorated and beautifully dressed, the whole making a striking show. The entrance is through a pair of massive cedar doors, panelled with embossed plate glass and the visitor is struck with the spacious appearance and elegant design of the main shop, which has a depth of forty-five feet. On the left hand side is a handsome cedar counter of full length, protected by a massive silver plated rail and adorned with a variety of ornamental glass cases for the display of the stock. At the end stands a chastely designed cedar and plate-glass case filled with every variety of perfumery. On the right of the entrance are the consulting-room and surgery divided by elaborately

Photo captions –
DR. T. C. MOORE.
MR. H. W. FROST.
MR. H. C. WILSON

MEDICAL.  143

ornamented partitions, which are used also for the display of Mr. Eccles’ own leading specialties. The manufacturing department is in the rear of the shop, and underneath is a concrete cellar, where the bulk stock is stored. On all sides there is an abundant evidence that an exceptionally large business is carried on. As may reasonably be  supposed of any establishment conducted on such an elaborate scale every recognized medicine of note is kept in stock, and the variety of surgical instruments is probably not excelled anywhere in the Colony. Among Mr. Eccles’ own proprietary articles, which meet with the readiest sale, may be mentioned his “Cherry and Arecanut Tooth Paste,” “Tonic Hypophosphates’’ and “Glycerine and Spirits of Roses.” In all there are twenty employees. For the accommodation of the stock of photographic appliances –  which is the most complete in Hawke’s Bay – a special room is set apart. The Hastings shop, which is also very handsomely fitted up, is described in the section devoted to that town. The Emerson Street branch is ably managed by Mr. J. W. Reid. Mr. Alexander Eccles, the proprietor of this large and flourishing business, is a native of Londonderry, Ireland, and studied his profession under Messrs. James and George McCaul, wholesale and retail manufacturing chemists and druggists of that city. Coming to this Colony in 1882, he in the following year established the principal business. The greatest credit is due to Mr. Eccles for the very excellent style which he has introduced in the ornamentation of a first-class pharmacy.

Mr. JOHN WILLIAM REID, Manager of Mr. Eccles’ branch business in Emerson Street, Napier, has had considerable experience as consulting and dispensing chemist. He was educated in Dunedin, where he was born in 1865 and is the son of the late Mr. George Reid, builder of that city. After serving an apprenticeship with Messrs. B. Bagley and Son, well-known chemists in George Street,  Mr. Reid went in 1888 as assistant to Mr. J. W. Bridge, a chemist at Riverton, but now a well-known dentist in Wellington. Two years later Mr. Reid returned to Dunedin and was for some three or four years with Messrs. Marshall and Sons. He next went to Adelaide, where he was with the late Mr. Joseph Parker of King William Street South. Returning to the Colony he acted as locum tenens for various chemists and in 1889 entered the employ of Mr. Eccles, as above. Mr. Reid has probably the best homoeopathic connection in the town, having acquired much knowledge in that branch of medicine while with Messrs. Marshall and Sons. He was married in 1892 to the daughter of the late Mr. James Laurie, of Castle Street, Dunedin, and has two sons.

HAWKE’S BAY UNITED FRIENDLY SOCIETIES’ DISPENSARY (Peter Drummond, manager), Hastings Street, Napier. Telephone 167. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. This dispensary, which is the only one of its kind in the North Island, was established in 1892 and has been managed by Mr. Drummond since 1896. Its business is by no means confined to those on the books of the societies, nor to those medicines which are supplied free to the members. All kinds of sundries are kept in stock, and by bestowing their patronage for general requirements on their own dispensary the members, of course, add greatly to the utility and benefit accruing from the enterprise. Drugs are imported direct, and as the result of careful management, the dispensary is now paying good dividends.

Mr. PETER DRUMMOND, Manager of the Hawke’s Bay United Friendly Societies’ Dispensary, though but a young man, has the reputation of being a careful and painstaking chemist and holds testimonials of a very high character. He was born at Ross

Photo captions –
MR. A. ECCLES.
INTERIOR OF MR. ECCLES’ PREMISES, HASTINGS STREET.
MR. P. DRUMMOND.

144   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

on the West Coast of the South Island in 1871, is a son of Mr. Peter Drummond, the well-known contractor, Wellington, and was educated in the Empire City, where he was apprenticed to Messrs. Turner and Co., chemists. Mr. Drummond completed his apprenticeship in 1892, but remained with the firm until the following year. In 1893 Mr. Drummond passed his examination with such credit that when Mr. Ridd, chemist of Pahiatua, needed a locum tenens during his absence on a trip to England, he secured Mr. Drummond for that responsible position. Subsequently, Mr. Drummond acted in a similar capacity for Mr. A. A. Lissaman, of Palmerston North, and more recently for Mr. J. A. H. Nash, at Woodville. Returning to Wellington, Mr. Drummond found employment as assistant to Mr. W. E. Woods, and in August, 1896, was offered and accepted his present position. On the return of Mr. Ridd, being then at liberty to take a holiday, Mr. Drummond toured New Zealand and visited Sydney, Melbourne, Launceston, and Hobart, gaining some insight into the methods of the profession generally. In the “Chemist and Druggist of Australasia,” he has more than once received special complimentary mention, and in the “Pahiatua Herald” and “Woodville Examiner’’ excellent press notices of him have appeared. He has been twice thanked by his present board for careful and excellent management, and it is worthy of remark that since Mr Drummond’s advent not a complaint has been heard from any of the 700 members on the books of the association

WILLIAMS, ALEXANDER JAMES, Chemist and Optician, Hastings Street, Napier. Telephone 79; Private 219. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Private residence, Sealy Road, Napier. Mr. Williams is a son of the late Mr. Nathaniel Williams,  one of Napier’s most respected townsmen, was born in Napier and educated at the Boys’ High School. After studying his profession in Napier, he went to Wellington to gain experience, and spent some time with Mr. Barraud, the well-known chemist. A year after successfully passing his pharmaceutical examination he returned to Napier and purchased the old established business of Mr. Owen. He has furnished a special room for sight testing, which is complete with all the newest appliances, a large stock of optical goods is kept on hand, and special attention is paid to this department. Mr. Williams takes great interest in all sports and is chief consul for the New Zealand Cyclist Touring Club for Hawke’s Bay, and is a member of different sporting committees.

BANKING.

THE BANK OF NEW SOUTH WALES, Napier, occupies a most central position in Hastings Street, and is one of the handsomest buildings in the province. The manager, Mr. Oscar Lines, has a staff of nine. A short history of this corporation is given at length in the Wellington volume of the “Cyclopedia,” to which readers are referred.

Mr. OSCAR LINES, Manager of the Bank of New South Wales, Napier, was born in Adelaide in 1861, and is the son of the late Mr. Oscar Lines, an English gentleman well-known at Rio and in Australia. Educated in Adelaide, Mr. Lines in 1878 joined the staff of the Bank of New South Wales in that city, where he remained some ten years and rose to the position of accountant. After two or three years as manager at Broken Hill he was transferred to the inspectors’ staff in Sydney, but for some four or five years prior to his coming to Napier in 1897 he was manager of the branch of the bank at South Sydney. A few years ago Mr. Lines made the most of a twelve months’ holiday, during which he visited the principal places of interest in the United States, Great Britain, France, Germany, Switzerland, Belgium and other countries, returning via the Suez Canal. Though but recently settled in Napier, Mr. Lines takes an active interest in the welfare of the district, and is a member of the Napier Chamber of Commerce. In 1887 he was married to the daughter of the late Capt. Ferguson, of  Williamstown, near Melbourne, and has a son and a daughter.

THE BANK OF AUSTRALASIA at Napier which occupies a site in Hastings Street, near the corner of Emerson Street, was opened in 1874. The manager, Mr. R. B. Smith, is assisted by a staff of five. The Waipawa agency which is under Mr. Smith’s direction, is in charge of Mr. D. H. Graham.

Mr. ROBERT BIFIELD SMITH, Manager of the Napier branch of the Bank of Australasia, has been connected with the institution for a quarter of a century. He was born at Milton, Otago, in 1857, is a son of the late Mr. Edmund Smith, of Dunedin, and was educated at the Dunedin High School. Joining his bank in Dunedin in 1873, Mr. Smith’s first move was to Christchurch,  and his second to Waipawa, as manager. He was then accountant at the Wellington branch and afterwards manager at Palmerston North, which position he held until April, 1894, when he took up his present position in Napier. He was married in 1891 to a daughter of Mr. A. S. Aldrich, Consul for Japan, and has an only daughter.

THE BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, Napier, occupies a prominent corner in Hastings Street, being separated from the Post Office by Browning Street. The building presents a good appearance, its interior being particularly handsome. The bank has an excellent connection, the amalgamation with the Colonial Bank having brought a very valuable addition to the volume of business. The manager, Mr. Fenwick, is assisted by a staff of fifteen.

Mr. FAIRFAX FREDERICK FENWICK, Manager of the Bank of New Zealand at Napier, is a popular banker, and is one of the few who were connected with the Colonial Bank throughout its entire existence. He is a son of the late Mr. C. L. C. Fenwick, sheepfarmer of Otago, was born at Elsinore, Denmark, in 1852, and educated at Clifton College, Gloucestershire, England, and Christ College, Canterbury, having arrived in the Colony with his parents in 1868 by the ship “Celoeno.” Joining the Bank of New Zealand at Oamaru in 1873, Mr. Fenwick remained in that institution until the opening of the Colonial Bank in which he obtained an appointment. During his twenty-one years’ connection with the latter, Mr. Fenwick was principally at Dunedin, Oamaru, Christchurch, and Napier, at which last mentioned place he held the post of manager from the year 1885 until the incorporation by the Bank of New Zealand, when he was retained in his present position. Mr. Fenwick is a member of the Chamber

Photo captions –
MR. A. J. WILLIAMS.
MR. F. F. FENWICK.

BANKING.   145

of Commerce, and takes an interest in all matters concerning the town and district. In his days of greater leisure he was a cricketer of no mean order, and was a representative of Otago. In 1887 he was married to a daughter of Dr. Wilkins, a well-known Auckland practitioner.

THE UNION BANK OF AUSTRALIA, Napier, occupies a corner site in Hastings Street at the intersection of Emerson Street. The manager, Mr. H. W. Antill, is assisted by a staff of nine. The Union Bank is fully described in the Wellington volume of the “Cyclopedia,’’ the head office for New Zealand being at the capital.

Mr. HENRY WILLIAM ANTILL, Manager of the Union Bank of Australia, is the son of a former manager of the same bank in Nelson and was born at Crow’s Nest, North Shore, Sydney, in 1855, educated at Geelong and matriculated at Melbourne University at the age of sixteen. In 1872 he entered the service of the Bank and was at Geelong, Deniliquin, and Hay. He was secretary to the inspector in Melbourne for some two years when he was appointed manager of the bank’s branch at Mackay in Queensland, where he stayed some four or five years, then was removed  to Daylesford in Victoria. In 1891 after a twelve months trip to the Old Country. Mr. Antill was appointed manager of the bank at Timaru and in 1895 took up his present position. He was married in Queensland in 1885 to Nita, daughter of the late Mr. Robert Campbell Macrae, of England, and has three daughters and a son.

THE NATIONAL BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, Napier, is situated at the corner of Hastings and Emerson Streets. It was opened in 1874 by Mr. Glegg and for the past ten years has been managed by Mr. James McLean, who is assisted by a staff of four.

Mr. JAMES McLEAN, Manager of the Napier branch of the National Bank of New Zealand, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America, in 1855, and was educated in Scotland. After a short experience in a legal office, Mr. McLean came to this Colony in 1873 by the ship “Jessie Readman” and joined the National Bank at Dunedin. A few years later he was promoted to be accountant at Invercargill, and prior to his appointment in 1888 as manager at Napier, he had been five or six years at the Wanganui branch, and before that at Tapanui for two or three years. Mr. McLean is popular and takes an interest in the social

Photo captions –
MR. H. W. ANTILL.
UNION BANK OF AUSTRALIA, NAPIER.

146   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

functions of the town in which his lot is cast. For several years he has been treasurer of the Caledonian Society, and he is an ex-president of the Napier Athenaeum. In 1884 he married Miss Excell, a Melbourne lady, and has two daughters.

INSURANCE.

THE ALLIANCE ASSURANCE COMPANY, Napier, occupying offices in the Australian Mutual Provident Society’s Buildings in Browning Street. In 1892 the Alliance purchased the Napier business of the Union Insurance Company. The head office for New Zealand is in Christchurch, and is described in the Canterbury volume of this work.

Mr. GEORGE MARSHALL, Manager at Napier of the Alliance Assurance Company, was born in Greenock, Scotland, in 1863, and was educated partly in Scotland and partly in Germany. He came to the Colony by the “St. Leonard’s” in 1881 and joined the head office staff of the Union Fire and Marine Insurance Company. In 1892 he was appointed to his present position. Mr. Marshall is a cricketer and footballer. In 1894, he was married to the daughter of Mr. John Coles, of Christchurch, and has a son.

THE CITIZENS’ LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY, LTD., Tennyson Street, Napier. Mr. John Couper, District Agent.

Mr. JOHN COUPER, District Agent of the Citizens’ Life Assurance Company, Ltd., is also a prosperous land and estate agent. He is the second son of the late Mr. William Couper, sheepfarmer, of Kahuranaki and Havelock North, was born at Porirua, near Wellington, in 1854, and educated Havelock north and Napier.  On leaving school he remained two years on his father’s Havelock farm of 200 acres and Kahuranaki sheep run of 13,000 acres and entered enthusiastically  into every detail of farming and sheep grazing. He then proceeded to Wellington and was over a year in the office of Mr. W. Waring Taylor.  After this he was managing the Glengarry Station for his father till December, 1874, when he went to Frasertown, Wairoa, and engaged in sheepfarming on his own account, which he continued with success until 1895, when unfortunately he entered into a trading speculation, running his own steamer between Napier and Wairoa. The venture not proving remunerative, together with the unproductiveness in sheep-farming owing to great mortality amongst his flock, obliged Mr. Couper to relinquish the whole of these connections and make a fresh start in the business he now carries on so successfully. Being so well and favourably known throughout the district, Mr. Couper is rapidly acquiring a good connection. He has numerous valuable sheep runs for sale and is open to undertake all kinds of financial and commission business, and may be called upon to give his best attention to all matters placed in his hands.

THE GOVERNMENT LIFE ASSURANCE BRANCH OFFICE, Napier, was opened in 1886 in Hastings Street, in a building standing between the Union Steamship Company’s office and the Clarendon Hotel. Mr. J. H. Dean is agent for the district, which extends from East Cape to Woodville, with fourteen sub-branches.

Mr. JOHN HOLMES DEAN, Resident Agent at Napier for the New Zealand Government Life Insurance Department, was born in Brompton, Canada, in 1856, and is the eldest son of the Rev. W. J. Dean, then a missionary amongst the pioneer settlers, North American Indians, but now of Wellington, and whose portrait appears in the ecclesiastical section of the Wellington volume of the ‘‘Cyclopedia.’’ He was educated in Auckland at the Wesley College, Mr.  Farquhar Macrae’s High School, and later at the Wellington College, passing the junior and senior civil service examinations and entered the Government Stores Department in Wellington. A few months later, having in the meantime exhibited special mathematical ability, he was offered by Mr. Godfrey Knight, then actuary, a situation in the Life Assurance Department, entering the head office in January, 1874, when the staff numbered but half-a-dozen all told. Mr. Dean is now the longest service officer in the department. Remaining in Wellington until 1892, having risen to the position of assistant accountant, he was promoted to his present responsible position and has had the satisfaction of seeing the business of his district increase very largely. In social and especially in musical matters, Mr. Dean has taken an active interest for many years. Prior to leaving Wellington he acted as organist at one of the churches for over twelve years, and since coming to Napier, has occasionally played at St. Paul’s. He is one of the managers of the Presbyterian church and established the Napier branch of the St. John Ambulance Association, of which he is the local secretary. As a member of the Napier Bowling Club he ranks among the champion fours and has represented the club at various tournaments in the Colony. In 1881 he married the daughter of the late Rev. J. D. Whittaker, of Wellington, and has two daughters.

THE MUTUAL LIFE ASSOCIATION OF AUSTRALASIA, LTD., Tennyson Street, Napier. This branch, which was opened in 1892, is under the management of Mr. A. B. Gibson. Prior to that date the company was represented by agents and since the opening of the branch there has been a steady increase in the district business. The association is described in the Wellington volume of this work and it need only be said here that the reserve funds amount to

Photo captions –
MR. J. COUPER.
MR. J. H. DEAN.
MUTUAL LIFE ASSOCIATION’S OFFICES.

INSURANCE.   147

£29 8s. for every £100 assured and that the rate of interest earned, £5 7s. 3d., is said to be the record rate. These facts are ascertained from the Insurance Blue Book for 1897-8.

Mr. ARTHUR BROCKETT GIBSON, Manager at Napier of the Mutual Life Association for the Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne districts, was born at Darlington, Durham, England, in 1867 and is a son of the late Mr. J. J. Gibson of Messrs. Gibson Bros., merchants, of Leadenhall Street, Darlington. Educated at the Darlington Grammar School, Mr. Gibson came to this Colony in 1880 in the ship ‘‘Wairoa,” finished his education at the Port Ahuriri district school and eventually joined the Government Life Insurance office at Napier. Nine years after, having in the meantime gained a good insight into the business of life insurance, Mr. Gibson accepted an appointment as agent for the Colonial Mutual Life office. Two years later he was appointed resident agent at Palmerston North for the Mutual Life Association of Australasia, and in October, 1895, received his present appointment. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge Scinde in which he holds the position of V.G., is a past chief ranger of Court Sir Charles Napier, A.O.O.F., and is again occupying the chair. He is a delegate to the Friendly Societies Dispensary Committee, senior circuit steward of the Wesley Church and secretary to the trustees, and was a delegate to the Wesleyan Conference at Dunedin in 1898. Among a number of other offices held by him may be mentioned the treasurership of the Athenaeum Club. He is an ardent cyclist and was the winner of a second prize at Masterton in 1895, is a member of the local bowling green and honorary Secretary of the Reliance Cricket Club. Mr. Gibson was married in 1896 to the eldest daughter of the late Mr. James Robinson, contractor, of  Dunedin and Port Chalmers, and has one daughter and one son.

THE NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY’S Napier business is carried on in a substantial brick building in Tennyson Street, opposite the Masonic Hotel, and is under the management of Mr. G. N. Pierce. An extended notice of the company appears in the Auckland volume of the Cyclopedia, the head office being in the northern capital.

Mr. GEORGE NELSON PIERCE, Manager of the New Zealand Insurance Company’s Napier branch, is the eldest son of the late Mr. George Patrick Pierce, the first general manager of the company, whose life was mainly spent in the service and whose career is given in the Auckland volume of this work. Born in Auckland in 1859 and educated mainly at the Parnell Grammar School, Mr. G. N. Pierce entered the service of the New Zealand Insurance Company in 1873 at the head office, Auckland. After being in Wellington he was appointed  manager at Oamaru, and subsequently at Perth, Western Australia. In 1890, Mr. Pierce was appointed to his present position.

THE SOUTH BRITISH INSURANCE COMPANY, NAPIER BRANCH, is situated in a handsome brick building at the corner of Byron and Browning Streets. Though only about thirteen years have elapsed since this branch was opened, it is claimed that it controls the largest fire and marine insurance connection in Hawke’s Bay. The district management is in the hands of Mr. Thomas Whitelaw, who is assisted by an efficient staff.

Mr. THOMAS WHITELAW, Manager for the Hawke’s Bay District of the South British Insurance Company, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, is a son of Mr. George  Whitelaw, late inspector’s accountant of the Bank of New Zealand, and was educated at Glasgow, Edinburgh, Perth, and, latterly, at the Auckland College and Grammar School. Mr. Whitelaw entered the service of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, and after a few years’ experience joined the South British in 1891. He also conducts an extensive mercantile business in Dannevirke, which is referred to in connection with that town. As a Mason, he is the immediate past master of Scinde Lodge. He was married in 1892 to a daughter of Mr. Thomas Peacock, ex-member of the House of Representatives for Auckland, and has a son and a daughter.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.

BALFOUR, THOMAS WAITT, Land and Commission Agent, Shakespeare Road, Napier. Agent for the Royal Insurance Company, and for the China Traders’ Marine Insurance Company; auditor for the Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Association, Napier Gas Company, and other large private institutions in Napier. Mr. Balfour was born in 1842 in Roxburghshire, Scotland, where he was educated. He began his career in the Banking Corporation of the British Linen Company and at the age of nineteen came to this Colony in the ship “Chrysolite.” Landing in Lyttelton, he obtained a situation on a station at Lyndon in Canterbury. In 1863 Mr. Balfour entered the service of the Bank of New Zealand in Christchurch, became accountant at Lyttelton, and after fulfilling the duties of relieving officer, he was sent north to open the bank’s branches in the Wairarapa, making Greytown his head-quarters. In 1877 he was appointed manager at Napier, which position he held until the amalgamation with the Colonial Bank, when he retired on a pension. In his younger days, Mr. Balfour

Photo captions –
MR. A. T. DANVERS.   See page 137.
MR. G. N. PIERCE.
MR. T. W. BALFOUR.

148   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

took an active interest in athletics; he was in the representative football teams at Lyttelton and Christchurch, and at both cricket and golf was a good average player. Bowling is now better suited to his taste, and he is a popular member of the Napier Bowling Club. He was married in 1876 to the second daughter of the late Mr. C. R. Bidwill, of Pihautea, Wairarapa, near Featherston, and has two daughters and four sons.

COHEN, HYMAN PHINEAS, Auctioneer and Furniture Warehouseman, Hastings Street, Napier. P.O. Box 191; Telephone 88. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Cohen being a member of the Napier Borough Council, particulars concerning his career will be found elsewhere in that connection.

CROWLEY, EDWARD, General Commission and Insurance Agent, Tennyson Street, Napier. Telephones: office, 123; private address, 273. Private address, Thompson Street. Mr. Crowley is the son of the late Mr. F. Crowley, one of Napier’s oldest colonists, and was born and educated at Christchurch. He joined the South British Insurance Company and after six years severed his connection for an appointment in the Union Insurance Company as chief clerk. Two years later he left the Union Company to enter into business on his own account. Mr. Crowley is local agent for the Phoenix and United Insurance Companies, secretary of the Napier Land Building and Investment Society and agent for Mr. John Griffin, contractor. He is an Oddfellow of some years standing.

GRINDELL, JAMES STEPHEN, Native Interpreter, Napier. Mr. Grindell is the son of the late Sergt. Robert Grindell, of the 9th Lancers, who served through the Peninsula War, and was born at Kittering, Northamptonshire, England, in 1823 where  he was educated. He went to sea as an apprentice in the ship ‘‘St. Vincent” and sailed to Sydney where he deserted and after a number of adventures, made his way to Newcastle and joined the brig ‘‘Look In.” In 1840 he came to Wellington and there joined a whaling expedition, on which occasion he nearly lost his life by a whale smashing the boat of which he was one of the crew. After this he went to the West Coast and lived amongst the natives for a considerable time and thus acquired a thorough knowledge of the Maori language and customs. Some time afterwards he received employment on the roads under construction in Canterbury and took 100 natives with him. Mr. Grindell’s next move was to Hawke’s Bay where he was employed in a store by Messrs. Alexander and Gollan. He then received the appointments of clerk to the resident magistrate court, administrator of intestate estates, clerk of the district court, and registrar of the Supreme Court. Some years later Mr. (afterwards Sir Donald) McLean asked Mr. Grindell to start the ‘‘Waka Maori,” a newspaper printed solely in Maori for the natives and which was carried on by him for some time. Later, when the paper was published both in English and Maori under the auspices of the Native Department, he filled the position of editor. He also acted as native land purchase agent and in recognition of his services Sir William Fitzherbert, the Superintendent of Wellington, presented him with a cheque for 100 guineas. With a change of Ministry, his services were dispensed with and he returned to Napier. He started a Maori newspaper at Gisborne which was discontinued after two years’ existence, and he entered into practice as a native interpreter. In many ways Mr. Grindell was of great service to the Government in dealing with the natives, especially in the construction of the overland telegraph lines. Mr. Grindell married a daughter of Mr. William Villers, a well-known old colonist, and has two sons and two daughters.

HOADLEY, C. B., AND CO., Auctioneers, Stock and Station Agents, Wool and Land Brokers, Emerson Street, Napier. This well-known firm was established in 1874 but in smaller quarters than those now occupied. The present premises are large and commodious, consisting of a handsome two-storey building built in 1887 of Oamaru stone, the upper storey is let as offices, etc., and the lower portion is devoted to the business. There is a very handsome suite of offices in addition to a large and well-lighted auction-room, which is used exclusively for all the local wool sales and the firm’s land operations, the latter being among the most important held in New Zealand. Mr. Hoadley originated the wool sales in Hawke’s Bay in 1880, which have since developed into colonial importance. He is a son of Mr. Joseph Sawyer Hoadley, a descendant of the distinguished divine Dr. Benjamin Hoadley, Bishop of Salisbury and afterwards of Winchester in the reign of George I., and was born at his father’s estate in Kent in 1847. He was educated at private schools and entered the service of the London and County Bank in 1864, with which institution he remained until 1872 when owing to ill health he came to New Zealand by the ship “Merope”, landing at Lyttelton. He became  associated in the same year with the railway contractors, Messrs. Brogden and Sons, who had extensive works in the Colony, on completion of which he was engaged to go to Germany for the same firm, but decided to remain in Napier where he established his present successful business. He was the first secretary of the Napier Harbour Board for five years, when he resigned that he might devote the whole of his attention to his firm’s undertakings. Mr. Hoadley has been a prominent member of the Scinde Masonic Lodge, of which he is a past master, and was one of the early promoters of the local Chamber of Commerce.

KELLY, GEORGE, Native Interpreter, Napier. Mr. Kelly, who holds the positions of Native Interpreter to the Supreme and Stipendiary Magistrate’s Courts and Native Land Purchase Officer, is the son of the late Captain Kelly, 83rd Regiment, and Registrar of Deeds, Auckland. He was born in Halifax, North America, and arrived in Wellington with his parents in 1848 in the ship “Indian,” was educated at St. John’s College, Auckland, and in 1859 received an appointment at Mongonui in the Native Department, remaining there for over twenty-two years. Mr. Kelly has acted as clerk of the court and licensing bench, registrar of births, deaths and marriages, meteorological observer, officer-in-charge of the Customs, superintendent inspector of Native schools, native interpreter and judge of Assessment Courts. In 1882 he was removed to Napier to take up his present position and in 1893 was also appointed Native land purchase officer. Mr. Kelly has always taken a keen interest in athletic sports and is vice-president of the Caledonian Football Club and president of the Napier Sailing Club. He was chairman of the Mongonui School Committee for a number

Photo captions –

MR. J. S. GRINDELL.
(at 48 Years of Age).

MR. C. B. HOADLEY

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   149

of years. Mr. Kelly is married and has seven children. Mrs Kelly was born in 1884 on Sunday Island , the largest of the Kermadec Group, where her father, Mr. Daniel Baker,  and his wife had gone to reside in 1835, and where he remained until 1847, when he became alarmed at the severity of earthquakes which occurred there about that time. He, therefore, left with his wife and four children (all born on the island) in a whaler for the Bay of Islands, and subsequently settled in Mongonui. Mrs. Kelly died in 1897.

KENNEDY BROS. (Charles Dugald Kennedy and Arthur Angus Kennedy), Civil Engineers and Surveyors, Herschell Street, Napier. P.O. Box 104. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. The business of the firm, which is the largest of the kind in Hawke’s Bay, was established by the senior partner in 1878. In 1890 Mr. A. A. Kennedy joined his brother, when the firm assumed the present style. He undertakes the field work, and Mr. C. D. Kennedy, who is also senior partner in the firm of Kennedy and Lusk, barristers and solicitors, acts as the consulting member of both firms. Messrs. Kennedy Bros. are engineers for many of the local bodies. Particulars of the career of Mr. C. D. Kennedy are given in connection with the Hawke’s Bay County Council. Mr. A. A. Kennedy is the second son of the late Capt. Alexander Kennedy, was born in Napier in 1865, educated at the Napier Grammar School, and in 1881 was articled to his brother. He is an amateur photographer, footballer, and golfer. In 1894 he married the daughter of the late Mr. J. P. Hamlyn, of Napier, and has two sons.

ROBJOHNS AND SON, Brewers, Wellesley Road, Napier.  Messrs. Robjohns’ brewery, which is considered one of the best in the  Colony, occupies nearly two acres of ground, and was established about a quarter of a century ago by the late Mr. H. C. Robjohns, in company with Mr. Ellis, now of Hastings. The capacity of the brewery is upwards of eighty hogsheads per week. About a dozen hands are employed, as well as two delivery carts. The cellars are large and the malthouse is said to be one of the very finest in New Zealand. Mr. Stevens, the head brewer, keeps everything in first-class order. For the past three years, Messrs. Robjohns and Son have been the principal prize-winners of the district.

Mr. JOHN ASCOT STEVENS, the Head Brewer for Messrs. Robjohns and Son, Napier, has had over twenty years’ experience in his special line. He was born in Invercargill, in 1861, and is the son of Mr. C. T. Stevens, draughtsman in the Land Transfer Department, Wellington. Mr. Stevens was educated at Invercargill and at Christ College, Christchurch, and learned his trade as a brewer with Mr. Surman of Invercargill. Mr. Stevens obtained the situation of assistant brewer with Messrs. Robjohns and Son in 1884, and about nine years later became chief brewer. Mr. Stevens is a violinceolloist and a baritone singer, and was for some time a member of the choir of St. Augustine’s Church. He is a successful breeder of prize poultry, which he has exhibited at Auckland, Gisborne, Napier, Wellington, Christchurch, and Dunedin. Mr. Stevens was married in 1886 to the daughter of Mr. Robert Skipage, of Kent, England, and has four sons and a daughter.

GRIFFIN, JOHN, Contractor, Brick and Tile Manufacturer, Napier. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Havelock Road. The works are situated on North Street, off Hyderabad Road, and contain a Hoffman’s kiln of the latest design, capable of an output of 20,000 bricks daily. These bricks, which are of a bright cherry colour,  are of a uniform quality and held in the highest estimation by builders. 500,000 were used in the erection of the Masonic Hotel, Napier. Adjoining the brick-yards, Mr. Griffin owns a freehold property of eight acres with unlimited beds of clay. He produces a lime of a very superior quality which took the second prize in the London Exhibition against all comers, and was placed next to the Blue Lids, which are the finest in Great Britain. The qualities of both the brick and lime are well known in the North Island and the principal buildings in Hawke’s Bay are erected of these materials. Mr. Griffin was born at Maybole, Ayrshire, Scotland, where he learned the trade and was engaged in contracting previous to his departure for the Colony in the “Staad Haarlem” in 1878. He obtained employment on the Wellington corporation works in the manufacture of concrete blocks and attending to the drainage. On his arrival at Napier he soon became one of the leading contractors of the place. The concrete wall outside the Marine Esplanade for one and a half miles in length was built by Mr. Griffin. In road work he has been very successful and has lately completed a road of eleven and a half miles from Kuripapongo Bridge to the Rangitikei, a very important and successful undertaking. In connection with the Napier harbour works he did a large amount of quarrying; one of his blasts took two tons of powder and brought down 100,000 cubic yards of debris. The cylinder bridge across the Rangitikei river which he constructed will always remain a credit to him. It has two spans of 127 feet each and two of seventy-five feet and well constructed in every detail. At the present time he is engaged in building the Omaha bridge, and in connection with his various works he employs about seventy men. Mr. Griffin has been a member of the Napier School Committee for five years, and of the Scinde Lodge of Masons for a considerable period. He is also a director of the Napier Starr-Bowkett Company.

SELLAR, JAMES, Contractor, Napier. Mr. Sellar, who is the son of the late Captain Sellar of Peterhead, Scotland, was born in 1839 and learned his trade of a ship carpenter with Messrs. Hall and Co., the well-known shipbuilders of Aberdeen. After serving his apprenticeship he went to sea and made several voyages to this Colony, and finally settled in Hawke’s Bay in 1873. After his arrival he was engaged in a number of subcontracts and in 1882 took the contract to build the Karamu Bridge between Napier and Hastings. His knowledge of bridge building became recognised and some of the largest contracts in Hawke’s Bay have been carried out by him, amongst them being the Kaiteratahi and Motu bridges at Gisborne. The Wairoa bridge, one of the finest in the province and which cost about £12,000, reflects the greatest credit on Mr. Sellar, the contractor. He also built the Rissington and Matapiro bridges. Mr. Sellar has in addition to bridge-building undertaken large wharf contracts. He constructed the Glasgow wharf at Napier and completed several other large contracts in connection with the Gisborne harbour works. He also superintended

Photo captions –
MR. G. KELLY
MR. J. GRIFFIN

150   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

the building of, and afterwards commanded for two and a half years, the steamer, ‘‘Victoria’’ owned by Messrs. Watt Bros., of Napier, which ran on Lake Taupo. Mr. Sellar is married and has five sons and four daughters.

CROWTHER AND McCAULEY, Coach Proprietors, Napier. This firm run a line of mail coaches between Napier, Lake Taupo, and Tokaanu, via Tarawera, leaving Napier every Monday morning at 6.30 a.m. and reaching Taupo on the following day. The return coach leaves Taupo every Thursday at 7.30 and arrives at Napier on Friday at 5 p.m. The coach for Tokaanu leaves Taupo during the summer months every Sunday and Wednesday, arriving at its destination the same day and returns on Mondays and Fridays. The Pipiriki coach runs twice a week during the summer, leaving Wednesdays and Saturdays for Tokaanu, returns to Pipiriki on Tuesdays and Fridays and connects with the Wanganui river boat service. For the winter months a weekly coach service is run leaving Pipiriki every Wednesday and arriving at Tokaanu every Thursday, returning from Tokaanu on Monday and arriving at Pipiriki on Tuesday, connecting with the Wanganui river boat on Wednesday. Mr. Crowther has an hotel at Rangitikei on the Napier Taupo Road, where the coach stops for about two hours. It is a fine comfortable hostelry where tourists can break their journey and enjoy a few days shooting and fishing in the district. The rivers and streams in the neighbourhood abound in fish, and game is plentiful. The hotel is admirably kept and visitors receive every attention.

Mr. SAMUEL CROWTHER, one of the partners, was born in Wellington, his father, the late Mr. Samuel Crowther, being one of the earliest settlers in that province. Mr. Wellington in 1868, joined the colonial forces, and went through the campaign of 1868. He left the force in 1878 and started an hotel and store at Taupo, which he personally carried on for five years, since which time he has resided in Napier, managing the line of coaches.

WILLIAMS BROS. (George and Fred. Williams), Oil and Colour Merchants, Emerson Street, Napier. Telephone 56; private residence of partners, Millar and Sealy Roads. This firm’s extensive business was established in 1860 by the late Mr. Nathaniel Williams, who was succeeded by his sons the present proprietors in 1894. The premises occupy a good block of buildings and are lighted by fine plate-glass windows. A large stock is kept of the newest styles in paperhangings, oilmen’s stores, and paints. Painting and lettering is a specialty and a large staff is constantly employed in the various branches. The present proprietors were born and educated in Napier.

Mr. NATHANIEL WILLIAMS, the Founder of the business, came to the Colony with his brother, the well-known Mr. Henry Williams. He was an exceedingly popular citizen and up to his death in 1884 had a prosperous career. He is still well and affectionately remembered by a very large circle of friends.

PARKER, T., AND CO. (Thomas Parker), General Outfitters, Hat and Cap Manufacturers and Government Contractors, Masonic Corner, Hastings Street, Napier. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. The premises consist of a handsome two-storey wooden building, the lower portion of which is used for a shop and the upper floor as a hat manufactory and tailoring establishment. The shop portion measures some 40 feet by 50 feet, and is fitted up with a splendid stock of gentlemen’s mercery, etc.  Most of the stock is imported from Home, Mr. Parker being agent for the London mercery firm of Messrs. Lloyd, Attree, and Smith, J. E. Mill’s hats, and Messrs. Arthur and Co., Stuart and McDonald’s and Eadie, Ireland and Co.’s tweeds, coatings, etc., also Hobson and Sons and S. Hess and Son for hatters’ material. The business was originally established about ten years ago by Messrs. W. Burnett and Co., in Emerson Street, and was taken over by Mr. Parker two and a half years ago, and shortly after removed to the present commodious premises, where he has made considerable alterations. The firm hold contracts for the supply of caps for railway officials throughout the Colony, and a dozen hands are kept constantly employed. Mr. Thomas Parker, the proprietor, is from Ayrshire, where he was born in 1867, was educated in the local school at Beith and joined the service of the Clydesdale Bank. Five years later he was transferred to the head office at Glasgow, where he remained seven years. The close confinement of the bank proving injurious to his health, he left for New Zealand in 1894 and eventually established himself as above in Napier. Mr. Parker is a staunch supporter of the Highland Society of Hawke’s Bay, of which he is the secretary. He is also secretary of the kennel club and a prominent member of the local gun and rifle clubs.

THOMSON, JAMES PORTEOUS, Draper, Clothier, Fancy Goods Importer, etc., Emerson Street, Napier. P.O. Box 39; Telephone 220. Bankers, Union Bank of Australia. Branch at Hastings. Private residence, Cameron Road, Napier. Mr. Thomson’s thriving business was established in 1888 and grew so rapidly that it became necessary to take a second shop in Hastings Street and open a branch at Hastings. The latter is under the management of Mr. Thomson’s brother; but since the erection recently of the brick premises in Emerson

Photo captions –
THE LATE MR. N. WILLIAMS.
MESSRS. T. PARKER AND CO’S PREMISES.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   151

Street, the Hastings Street shop has been closed. Mr. Thomson’s new premises are very creditable, both the drapery and clothing departments being exceedingly well lighted and attractive. The fine stock is displayed advantageously in the windows, and throughout there is a go-ahead aspect of active business. Particulars of the proprietor’s career are given in connection with the Napier Rifles, of which he is the popular captain.

DODDS, WILLIAM, Tailor, Emerson Street, Napier; Branch, Hastings (J. Kean, manager). Mr. Dodds’ well-known business was established by him in 1892 Hastings branch being opened in in 1896. A large stock of the latest tweeds is kept at both establishments, most of which is imported direct from the manufacturers. Mr. Dodds caters chiefly for the working-classes, turns out first-class work at prices within the reach of all, and has a wide circle of customers throughout the district. Born in Whitehaven in the North of England, he was brought up to his trade there, and came to Napier in 1886. He has worked in several of the leading establishments of Wellington, Napier, Wanganui, etc., eventually starting on his own account as above.   As a Mason he has held office as junior warden in Lodge Victoria, Napier, and takes a great interest in all athletic matters.

MARTIN, JOHN, Merchant Tailor, Tennyson Street, Napier. Established 1873. Private address, Lucy Road. Mr. Martin, who claims to be the oldest established tailor in Napier, was born in Kent, England, and in 1838 came with his parents to Tasmania, where he learned his trade with Mr.  H. Cook, at that time a leading tailor in Hobart. He came to New Zealand in 1862, landing at Auckland, where he remained a short time, then continued his journey to Napier, where he obtained employment as cutter with Messrs. Newton and Irvine. In 1873 he started his present business and soon established for himself a deservedly good name for the cut and finish of his work. A specialty of his establishment is that no machine work or girl labour is employed, none but good workmen who have learned their trade being engaged. His business connection includes all the principal people about Hawke’s Bay. Mr. Martin is married and his sons assist him in carrying on a legitimate tailoring trade.

LAND AND LOAN COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. Ltd. This company’s headquarters are in Tennyson Street, Napier. The company was inaugurated about sixteen years ago in England, which was specially visited for the purpose by Mr. F. C. Fulton, who has been from the first the company’s managing director.

Mr. FRANCIS CROSSLEY FULTON, Managing Director of the Land and Loan Company of New Zealand, Ltd., is a well-known colonist who has been prominent in colonial commercial circles for nearly half a century. He was born in 1836 at Fatehgar, Bengal, India, is a son of the late Major Robert Bell Fulton,

Photo captions –
MR. J. P. THOMSON’S PREMISES.
MR. W. DODDS’ PREMISES.
MR. W. DODDS.
MR. J. MARTIN.

152   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

and was educated at Blackheath Proprietary School. Mr Fulton then entered the service  of Messrs. Bryan, Donkin and Co., engineers of Bermondsey, London, and a year later sailed for Port Chalmers in the ship “Slains Castle.” He arrived in Dunedin in 1852, his brothers Mr. (afterwards the Hon.) James Fulton and Mr Robert Fulton having settled there in 1849. Shortly after his arrival he took up a small farm at Outram, near Dunedin, but relinquished this to take a run at Waitaki, as one of three partners. In 1856 he went to Sydney and for two years received a good commercial training. Before his return to New Zealand he married the youngest daughter of Mr. Edmund Smith Hall (whose portrait appears in the Wellington volume of this work). Mr. Fulton again entered into farming pursuits in Otago, but three or four years later established a shipping and general agency business in Dunedin, which developed into a large concern. Going Home in 1872, he purchased a steamer for the Sydney and New Zealand trade, but unfortunately this vessel was lost on her way out. Undeterred by this misfortune, he in the following year went Home again, purchased and brought out the “Easby,” a steamer of about 1800 tons, which he successfully ran until 1879, when the vessel was bought by a Melbourne firm. In May, 1878, Mr. Fulton suffered a very severe accident, from which he has never thoroughly recovered. He was a passenger by the coach from Dunedin to Oamaru on the last trip prior to the opening of the railway. The coach capsized as it was descending the north side of the “Horse Range,” between Palmerston South and Hampden. Two of the passengers were killed, and others, including Mr. Fulton, were severely injured. He continued his agency business in Dunedin until 1883, when he went to England for a third visit, this time with the object of starting the Land and Loan Company of New Zealand, with the head office for the Colony  at Napier. In this he was successful, and he has held the position of managing director from the date of the incorporation of the company. He still has a pastoral property in Otago, which is in charge of a trustworthy manager. Mr. Fulton is highly esteemed, and his long career in these islands has been marked by ability, great energy and integrity. His family consists of one son and four daughters.

ALLEN, CHARLES RICHARD, Cabinetmaker and Upholsterer, Emerson Street, Napier. Telephone 89. Bankers, Bank of Australasia. Mr. Allen’s fine premises have a frontage of about sixty feet, with two large plate-glass windows containing a splendid assortment of high class furniture, carpetings and linoleums. A large business is also done in wire-woven mattresses, which are manufactured on the premises, and in the upholstering department about nine men are actively employed. Mr. Allen was born in London and came with his parents to Napier in 1874, learned his trade with Mr. Newman and after acting as his foreman for over six years, established his own present business in 1895. He is an expert musician, is leader of the Napier Orchestra, and sole tenor in the choir of St. Patrick’s Cathedral. He is also an Oddfellow.

ALLEN, EDWARD THOMAS, Carver, Gilder, Picture Dealer and Framer, etc., Tennyson Street, Napier. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Carlyle Street. Mr. Allen has been in Napier since 1882, but prior to that time he was in business in Wellington, where he established himself in 1874. Being the only man in the district who was brought up to the picture trade in the Old Country, Mr. Allen had the patronage of all the principal residents of Napier and surrounding districts. He imports his pictures and mouldings from the best markets and always has a large assortment of the finest obtainable plates. He  was born in London and is the son of the late Mr. William Allen, of that city, where he was educated and apprenticed to Messrs. Lloyd Bros. and Co., of Gracechurch Street. Remaining with that firm for a period of twelve years, he left London for this Colony in 1874 by the ship “Douglas.” Soon after his arrival in Wellington, Mr. Allen went into business in Cuba Street and subsequently took a shop in Lambton Quay. Leaving Wellington for Napier, as above mentioned, in 1882, he has had every reason to be satisfied with the change. He was married in London in 1874 to a daughter of the late Mr. James Cross, of Camberwell, and has a daughter and two sons.

ASHTON, SAMUEL EDWARD, Cabinetmaker, Upholsterer and Undertaker, Hastings Street, Napier. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Ashton occupies fine premises in the principal business street in Napier. The building consists of two stories and the main shop has a frontage of 33 feet by a depth of 60 feet. The windows are handsome and the display of stock is attractive. Mr. Ashton was born in Manchester, England, in 1856, and was educated there and at Liverpool. In both of those towns he had considerable experience of the business to which he was apprenticed and in 1882 came to the Colony under engagement to Mr. J. S. Large, the well-known cabinet-maker of Napier, with whom he remained until that gentleman retired in 1897. Mr. Ashton then entered into business on his own account,

ROSS, J. R., AND CO., Hairdressers, Tobacconists, and Importers of Sporting Requisites, Hastings Street, Napier. Mr. J. R. Ross, the popular proprietor of the

Photo captions –
MR. F. C. FULTON.
MR. C. R. ALLEN.
MR. E.T. ALLEN.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   153

extensive business, is evidently determined to keep in the front rank in his own line, and few saloons in the Colony are more attractive than his, which is situated in a portion of the Masonic Block. Large plate-glass windows with ornamental margins of beautiful tints, contain a great display of golf, tennis, cricket, football, boxing, and other sporting requisites, and massive double glass doors open into the artistically fitted and dressed shop. At night especially, when the whole is brilliantly lighted with incandescent lamps of great power, it presents a very striking appearance. The walls of the shop are ornamented with large and very handsome glass cases filled with goods arranged with business-like taste. From the shop, access to the gentlemen’s saloon is gained through a pair of fine plate-glass doors. This room is 32 feet by 14 feet, elaborately appointed with all the most recent improvements of the tonsorial art, combined with comfort and ease. Four of the latest Archer patent chairs, handsome shampooing basins and large and numerous mirrors, are among the many features of the saloon. An adjacent room, beautifully furnished, is used as a ladies’ hairdressing saloon, and behind that again is a place for storing the surplus stock and the tobacco- cutting machinery. Mr. Ross is a son of the late Mr. W. F. Ross, who will be remembered by all old ‘‘West Coasters” and ‘‘Wellingtonians,’’ and who died a few years ago while on a visit with his wife to the Chicago Exhibition. Mr. Ross takes a keen interest in all local sports; he is one of the executive of the Napier Rowing Club, and one of the committee of the Scinde Cricket Club, vice- president of the Alliance Cricket Club and Tradesmen’s Football Club, a prominent member of the Wanderers’ Bicycle and Napier Swimming Clubs and member of the Hawke’s Bay Acclimatisation Society.

ALBION HOTEL (Mrs. McCartney, proprietress), Hastings Street, Napier. This comfortable hotel, which is situated on the main thoroughfare within an easy distance of the principal public buildings, is a fine substantial structure containing about twenty-four rooms, including sitting, commercial, and dining rooms. The front has a handsome balcony and the back entrance leads to the Marine Parade.

Mrs. McCARTNEY, Proprietress, is the widow of the late Captain McCartney, who was drowned in the Napier floods of 1897  with other brave men in their endeavours to save the lives of their fellow-creatures.

Captain McCARTNEY was born in Manchester in 1848 and came to the Colony by the ship “Montmorency.” He was one of the pioneers of the country and took an active part in the Maori wars as a member of the No. 1 division of the Mounted Armed Constabulary in which he was a non commissioned officer and orderly to the late Sir Donald McLean, Defence Minister. Mr. McCartney was stationed at the Spit as sergeant-in-charge. He joined the F Battery of Volunteers in 1885 with the rank of lieutenant, was elected captain in 1887 and placed on the district reserve list in 1896. Capt. McCartney first took the Greenmeadows Hotel, then the “Caledonian,” and finally the “Albion” in 1896. He left a widow and four children to mourn their loss.

THE CLARENDON CLUB HOTEL (Thomas Peddie, proprietor), Napier. Established 1860 and rebuilt in 1882. Telephone 90; P.O. Box 113. The hotel, which is a fine commodious building, stands opposite the post office and within a short distance of the chief business places and banks. It contains thirty-five well-furnished rooms, including dining, commercial and ladies’ dining-rooms, besides a number of private parlours, hot, cold, and shower baths, and every other convenience and comfort.

Mr. THOMAS PEDDIE, the popular Proprietor, was born in North Leith, Scotland, in 1838, and at the age of seventeen went to sea which he followed for a number of years as steward. His last ship was the “Blue Jacket,” which he left in 1867 to settle in Napier. He received employment as storeman with Messrs. Kinross and Co., with whom he remained three years. In 1870 he purchased the Taradale Hotel and after doing very well for about six years he

Photo captions –
MESSRS. ROSS AND CO.’S PREMISES.
THE LATE CAPTAIN MCCARTNEY.
MR. T. PEDDIE.

154   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

sold the property. A year later he purchased the lease of the Clarendon Club Hotel and acquired the freehold in 1881. Part of the present building has been leased by the Napier Club. During his long career as hotelkeeper Mr. Peddie has made a host of friends by his sterling qualities and the “Clarendon” is much frequented by squatters, tourists, and the general travelling public. In 1870 he married Miss C. Dunbar, of Forres, Morayshire, and has two sons and three daughters.

THE CRITERION HOTEL (Samuel Charlton, proprietor), Emerson and Hastings Streets, Napier. Telephone 57; P.O. Box 29, Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. This is one of the finest hotels in Hawke’s Bay and contains about fifty-three rooms. The building has a handsome front with a spacious balcony. On the ground floor are the commercial-room where all the New Zealand, Australian, and Home papers are filed, a number of sitting and club rooms, and a billiard-room furnished in excellent style with two fine tables, and also a social hall. On the second floor are comfortably furnished dining and double bedrooms and four large drawing-rooms, opening on to the balcony, from which a fine view of the sea is obtained. The dining-room, capable of accommodating about eighty guests, is also upstairs. The hotel has been newly decorated and furnished throughout by the present proprietor, and offers every inducement to squatters, travellers, and tourists. Notice boards of the Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club, Napier Park Racing Club, and Hawke’s Bay Union are fixed in a conspicuous position in the entrance halls.

Mr. SAMUEL CHARLTON, the popular Proprietor, is a native of Omagh, County Tyrone, Ireland, and came to the Colony in 1872, landing with his parents in Hawke’s Bay. He first learned the saddlery business with Mr. John McVay, of Napier, with whom he remained fourteen years. In 1886 he left Mr. McVay and started business at Kaikora North where he remained four years, after which he purchased the Te Aute Hotel, remaining in it two years, when he took over the Railway Hotel, Hastings, and  remained in possession five years, making a handsome competence during that time. It was in May, 1898, that Mr. Charlton took over the “Criterion,” where by his courtesy and attention he has added not a little to the established reputation of that popular hostelry. Mr. Charlton owns a small farm at Hastings from which he obtains supplies of poultry, fruit, and vegetables for the hotel. Mr. Charlton is a member of the Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club, Napier Park Club, and other local clubs.

THE MARINE PARADE HOTEL (John Charles Mason, proprietor), Marine Parade, Napier. Telephone 283. This hotel is built on one of the most charming sites in Napier, within a short distance of the Court House, Post Office, Union Steamship Company’s offices, and banks. It overlooks the sea, which is only a few yards from the hotel, and from its spacious balcony a most  unequalled view is to be had, embracing the Kidnappers on the one hand and the Mahia Peninsula on the other. The hotel is a fine two-storey building, with a broad balcony running round the whole front and into which a number of sitting-rooms open. On the ground floor are the social hall, a large luxuriously-furnished room, a dining-room, capable of accommodating sixty guests, commercial, reading, and-other parlours. On the first floor are about eighteen well-furnished rooms, also a number of sitting-rooms overlooking the sea. A few yards from the hotel, sea-bathing can be indulged in. This hotel is strongly recommended to visitors desirous of recruiting their health.

Mr. J. C. MASON, the Proprietor, is a native of South Wales and came to the Colony in 1875. His first hotel experience was at the Club Hotel, Masterton, where he remained for nine years, being manager for a considerable part of that time. He next went to Wellington and was for eighteen months in the Empire Hotel. In 1898 he came to Napier and took possession of the Marine Parade Hotel. Mr. Mason is assisted by Mrs. Mason who looks after all the domestic arrangements and has had great experience in hotel management.

Photo captions –
CLARENDON CLUB HOTEL, NAPIER.
MR. S. CHARLTON.
MR. J. C. MASON.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   155

MASONIC HOTEL (Frank Moeller, proprietor), Marine Parade and Tennyson and Hastings Streets, Napier. P.O. Box 89. Bankers, National Bank of New Zealand. “The Masonic” of Napier may be shortly described as an hotel without a rival. Other good hotels there are in the town and province but none can vie with the “Masonic.” In the matter of site it is absolutely unique in this Colony, if not in the Southern Hemisphere. With its noble double balcony fronting the finest marine promenade south of the Line, and entrance on the busiest part of the principal thoroughfare of the town, it would be very hard to beat it for position. But this is by no means the only excellent advantage by which the hotel gains general favour. The house is very large, and the general style of the establishment needs but to be seen to call forth the admiration of even the most fastidious. In all there are over a hundred rooms, the bedrooms alone numbering eighty. In the basement are extensive wine-cellars, a splendid billiard-room and a “Dive.” On the ground floor is the main entrance from Tennyson Street,  the manager’s office, a delightful commercial room, library and music room, splendid writing-room with about a dozen writing desks, card-rooms, elaborately-fitted private bar, and the magnificent public dining-room in which two hundred guests can find ample accommodation. The kitchen, also on this floor, is one of which any proprietor may be proud, and it is not too much to say that a visit to this admirably conducted department increases the edge of one’s appetite. The main feature of the first floor is the ladies’ drawing-room, where perfect comfort is accompanied by taste in decoration. Here, also, are music and writing rooms and pleasantly-furnished private apartments. The second floor is composed of bedrooms with fine bath-rooms and lavatories. The flight of steps to the principal entrance is constructed of marble. “The Masonic” is, as it deserves to be, patronised by distinguished visitors to the district. The view from the balconies embraces the whole coast of the Bay from Cape Kidnappers on the south to Mahia Peninsula on the north, and the sight of the restless sea is a perennial source of interest to all beholders. The ornamental band rotunda presented by Messrs. Mee and Clarke to the citizens of Napier, is situated in the Marine Parade in front of the “Masonic,” and on warm summer evenings the town bands frequently perform there. To all classes of visitors the “Masonic” certainly offers superlative attractions.  Commercial travellers meet their best customers at the “Masonic” and the twelve fine sample-rooms provided by the thoughtful proprietor prove an additional advantage to them. Tourists are attracted in large numbers, every care being taken to meet their special wants. Coaches for the Rotorua, Taupo, and Kuripapanga [Kuripapango] sanatoriums leave the “Masonic” corner. Convalescents in search of health obtain the benefit of the invigorating sea-breeze from the balconies or on the adjacent Parade, while the Bluff overlooking the shore is only a few minutes’ walk from the hotel. The house is nearly fire-proof, even the beautifully panelled ceilings being of iron.

Mr. F. MOELLER, the Proprietor of the Masonic Hotel, though still a young man,

Photo caption – MORMON MEETING, TE MAHANGA.

156   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

has had an extended experience in his present line. His father, the late Mr. Philip Moeller, of Wellington, was for a considerable period proprietor of the Empire Hotel and at the time of his death was  proprietor of the Occidental Hotel, which is still carried on by his widow. Mr. Frank Moeller gained his experience during his management of the “Occidental” for his mother. In 1892 he left Wellington for Napier and since then has been host of the “Masonic,” which during his occupation has been renovated and refurnished throughout. Mr. Moeller was specially complimented on the excellent management of his fine hotel by His Excellency the Earl of Ranfurly. Mrs. Moeller, the popular hostess, personally superintends the domestic arrangements and is painstaking in her attention to invalids.

THE NAPIER HOTEL (William Parnell, proprietor), Hastings and Edwards Streets. Telephone 251; P.O. Box 142. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. This is a fine two-storey building containing about fifteen bedrooms, ladies’ drawing-room, sitting rooms, commercial-room, and also a fine well appointed dining-room, capable of accommodating fifty guests. There are also hot, cold, and shower baths, and salt-water baths adjacent. The whole house is very comfortably furnished, and guests receive every care and attention combined with quietness.

Mr. W. PARNELL, the Proprietor, is the son of Mr. William Parnell, superintendent of the Botanical Gardens, Dublin, and was born in Dublin in 1855, where he was educated and afterwards brought up to the grain trade. He came to Gisborne in 1884 and was with his uncle, Mr. Arthur Parnell, of Gisborne, trading as Parnell and Baylan, general merchants. He remained in that firm six years, then started business for himself as stationer and bookseller, which  he carried on successfully for a considerable time. In 1895, he came to Napier and purchased the present hotel. Mr. Parnell, who has a fine baritone voice, was leader of the principal concerts at Gisborne for a number of years. He was also master for two years of Lodge Turanganui, Gisborne. In 1891 he married Miss Dinan.

GILLESPIE, PETER, Registered Plumber, Tinsmith, Gasfitter, Sheet Zinc and Galvanised Iron Worker, Emerson Street, Napier. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Established in 1865. The business, which is one of the principal ones in Napier, employs eight men; the workshops occupy a space of half an acre and are fitted up with the latest machinery. Connell, plumbers of Glasgow, with whom he remained three years and gained a thorough experience. In 1893 he came out to New Zealand to take up the present business which had been started originally by his late uncle, and which he has greatly increased since taking possession. Mr.  Gillespie is a member of the Masonic Body attached to Victoria Lodge, Napier, and also a member of the Napier Park Racing Club.

FRYER, JAMES ATKINSON, Ironmonger, Hastings Street, Napier. Telephone 5. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Fryer’s business, which is one of the largest in Napier and was established in 1866, occupies one of the best sites in Napier. The building is a handsome two-storey one with front of Oamaru stone, and has a width of forty feet with a depth of 119 feet. The shop is entered by heavy cedar and plate-glass doors, and presents a very fine appearance with a splendid stock of hardware, cutlery and electro-plated wares in beautiful showcases. At the back of the premises and approached from Tennyson Street, are the workshops for gunsmithing, plumbing, and gasfitting, in which nine hands are employed. The first floor immediately over the shop is used as a showroom where a large portion of the fine stock is exhibited. Store-rooms at the back of the main building contain the principal part of the bulk goods. Mr. Fryer is a native of Bradford, Yorkshire, and was brought up to the wool trade. He came to New Zealand in 1864 by the ship “Annie Wilson,” landing at Auckland. He settled at the Thames goldfields some time afterwards as a wholesale wine and spirit merchant, and general dealer. He came to Napier in the latter part of 1876 and in conjunction with Mr. Ruddock, the well-known sharebroker of Auckland, bought the old-established ironmongery business of Mr. Mike Boylan, a business he carried on very successfully for years. Mr. Ruddock retired in 1895, leaving Mr. Fryer sole proprietor. Mr. Fryer is a Mason of some years standing.

HANNAH AND CO. (William Hannah), Boot and Shoe Importers, corner of Browning and Hastings Streets, Napier. Branches, Heretaunga Road, Hastings. Mr. J. Hodd (manager). Telephone 248. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private address, Brewster Street. This firm’s business, which is one of the largest in Hawke’s Bay, was established by Mr. Hannah in 1883. The premises are large and commodious and situated in the centre of the town. The shop has two large plate-glass windows filled with boots and shoes of the best European and Colonial manufactures. Besides keeping a large and

Photo captions –
MR. W. PARNELL.
MR. P. GILLESPIE.
MR. J. A. FRYER.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   157

varied assortment from the best known and fashionable makers a considerable stock of New Zealand manufactured goods is also kept. Inside the shop are ladies’ and gentlemen’s fitting rooms, where attention is paid to the requirements of customers.

Mr. WILLIAM HANNAH, one of the proprietors, is a native of Belfast, and brother of Mr. Robert Hannah, of Wellington; he came to the Empire City in 1877 by the ship “Wairoa,” joining his brother’s business on arrival. Four years later he left for Wanganui and took charge of the branch there in 1881. In 1883 Mr. Hannah came to Napier and opened the present business, but remained there some time, then went to Auckland and opened premises in Queen Street, where he remained about a year, then returned to Napier to again take charge of the business. Mr. Hannah is married and has two children.

KING, ARCHIBALD, Saddler and Harness Maker, Agent for the Humber and Massey Harris Bicycles, Emerson Street, Napier. Branch, Taradale. Private residence, Edward Street. The shop occupies a frontage of twenty feet with fine plate-glass windows, displaying an assortment of saddlery and harness. A good stock of bicycles is kept and a complete plant for the repairs of machines is also on the premises. Mr. King is a native of Yorkshire, and came with his parents in 1884 to Napier. He learned his trade in the well-known establishment of Mr. John McVay, in whose employment he remained about eight years, then started business on his own account in 1893. He takes a great interest in sports, especially cycling and cricket. Mr. King is married and has one child.

NORTH BRITISH AND HAWKE’S BAY FREEZING COMPANY, Ltd. (Mr. W. Kinross White, general manager). Head Office, Glasgow, Scotland; London Office, 22 Basinghall Street; Colonial Office, Napier; Works, Western Spit, Hawke’s Bay. The London managers are Messrs Bryce, Junor and White, and the Colonial Board, with head-quarters at Napier, consists of Messrs E. W. Knowles (chairman), Sydney Johnston, H.H. Bridge, Arthur Harding, J. B. A’Deane, and T. H. Lowry.  Mr. W. Kinross White is, ex officio, a member of the Colonial Board. The Home Board consists of Messrs John Galloway, chairman (director of Shaw, Savill and Albion Company); Edward Nelson (James Nelson and Sons); T. R. Johnston, and R. B. Bryce. This company was established in March, 1888, and succeeded so well that in three years it was found necessary to extend the buildings and double the plant. The average output has increased from 500 to 1200 sheep per day, and the works can also deal with fifty bullocks per day. The works include a boiling-down establishment, a cooperage and a fellmongery, and in all five acres of ground are covered by the plant. The machinery includes a Hall’s carbonic anhydride refrigerator and a Haslam cold-air machine with a capacity of 110,000 cubic feet. The company’s capital is £80,000 and the plant and buildings have cost £68,000. Over a hundred hands are employed at the works, and the greatest care and ingenuity are called into requisition in every department. Twenty butchers can work at a time in the slaughter-house; the electric light is installed at the works, which are kept clean and fresh throughout by means of excellent sanitary arrangements and efficient drainage. There are four freezing-rooms with a capacity for 28,000 carcases, and there are two large rooms for the cold-air machines. Steam is supplied by two large boilers, manufactured by W. Cable and Co., Wellington, and by an auxiliary small tubular boiler by Messrs Niven and Co., of Napier. The large boilers are of the Lancashire type, and are each of fifty horsepower. Mr. T. J. Wilson, the chief engineer, has all this department under his supervision. The company ships to London and other ports, and its shipments are handled chiefly by Messrs James Nelson and Sons. In connection with the work of shipping carcases a contrivance known as a “revolving traveller” is used, and the company also has an insulated steam tender

Photo captions –
WAIRAU MOANA [WAIKAREMOANA?].
MR. A. KING.
MR. W. F. HIGHLEY.   See page 158.

158   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

and refrigerator for use in transhipping from the works to outgoing steamers.

Mr. W. KINROSS WHITE, the general manager for the company, has resided for about nineteen years in Hawke’s Bay. In 1886 he was instrumental in forming the North British and New Zealand Investment Company, Ltd., of which he has from the first been manager. It was he who, in 1888, formed the North British and Hawke’s Bay Freezing Company, which he has managed since its establishment, and he occupies other important commercial positions. Mr. White is referred to elsewhere as a member of the Napier Harbour Board.

Mr. THOMAS JAMES WILSON, Chief Engineer of the North British Freezing Company, Napier, was born in 1864, and is the son of Mr. Alexander Wilson, one of Wellington’s oldest and most respected colonists. He was educated at Government schools and showing an early aptitude for mechanics, his father apprenticed him to Messrs. Cable and Co., the well-known firm of engineers and ironfounders, of Wellington. On the expiration of his indentures, he joined the Government steamer “Stella” as second engineer, then entered the Union Steamship Company’s service as third engineer of the s.s. “Penguin” and was afterwards on the s.s. “Kuranui.” Mr. Wilson then entered the service of the North British Freezing Company as third engineer. His thorough knowledge soon raised him to the position of second engineer and in 1896 he was appointed chief engineer. Mr. Wilson married a daughter of Mr. Henry Fletcher, a well-known resident of Hawke’s Bay, and has two children.

Mr. WILLIAM FREDERICK HIGHLEY, Fellmonger-in-charge and wool expert of the North British and Hawke’s Bay Freezing Company, Napier, is the son of Mr. Henry Highley, a retired tanner and leather manufacturer, who was one of the earliest to introduce that industry into Hawke’s Bay. Mr. Highley was born in 1856 at Halifax, Yorkshire, and was educated and trained to the wool trade at Bradford. He had an early start in life in the factories and rapidly advanced in his line, and at the age of twenty-one was second buyer for a firm of merchants in his town, doing a large wool export trade. Mr. Highley came to Napier in 1876 in the ship “Waitara,” and entered into business with his father in the leather trade, but after a year or so took to his old line, classing some of the best clips of wool in Hawke’s Bay and also managing various fellmongeries from time to time, till receiving his present  appointment in 1896. Mr. Highley has taken an active part in social and local political affairs, holding many useful positions, and has also during his Colonial career contributed his quota to transforming our forests into the proverbial “waving cornfield.”

TOMOANA STATION AND FREEZING WORKS (Nelson Bros., Ltd., proprietors) are situated on the line of railway about ten miles from Napier. These are extensive works, and include the dwellings of the managers and cottages of the employees. It would be difficult to imagine a more suitable situation, with its perfectly level and fertile land for the

Photo caption – OFFICES OF THE NORTH BRITISH AND HAWKE’S BAY FREEZING CO., LTD, NAPIER.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   159

receiving paddocks, of which there are ten of various sizes. The paddocks are plentifully supplied with water from a dozen or more artesian wells, the deepest of which is about 180 feet and gives over 130,000,000 gallons per annum; and with space enough for still greater and almost unlimited extension, the Tomoana Works are assuredly amongst the most advantageously constructed industries in the Colony. To fully describe this important concern would fill many pages of the Cyclopedia, and more than can be spared. The reader is therefore referred to the English periodical “Commerce, of August 25th, 1897, and to the “Journal of the Society of Arts,” London, of March 15th, 1895, in both of which a mass of interesting information is given concerning the frozen meat industry in general and the Tomoana Works in particular. However, in order to give some idea of the gigantic proportions which the frozen meat trade has assumed in this Colony, a few facts and figures are necessary and must prove interesting. To describe even cursorily the whole process, which begins with live sheep and cattle in the paddocks at Tomoana and ends with deliciously prepared joints on the tables of the wealthy in England, might be wearisome to readers, and it must suffice to say that time and labour saving innovations have been exhaustively introduced to minimise human contact and rigidly ensure cleanliness. In the  slaughterhouse, a long narrow building with constantly-flushed concrete floors, there are thirty-six butchers, who, in the course of one day, kill and dress fifty head of cattle and 2500 sheep, the carcases of which are despatched by  overhead rails to the dressing, cooling, weighing, ticketing and grading-room. The greatest care is exercised in grading, no old ewes and no sheep weighing over seventy pounds being passed for shipment. The examining expert, in penalty of losing his position, is charged with the duty of rejecting all carcases showing blemishes, bad colour, poor condition, or excessive fattiness. The freezing-rooms, of which there are six, are capable of holding 12,000 carcases, and are situated in the upper storey of the building, the cooled carcases being elevated for freezing by very ingenious contrivances on the endless chain principle. When frozen, each carcase is put into a separate bag and passed through shoots in the floors into the store-rooms below, whose capacity is equal to the safe storage of 100,000 carcases. Electric light is fitted throughout the entire establishment, and every precaution is taken against fire; water mains extend to every part, a night watchman is on duty, and the men are trained for any emergency. The engine and boiler-rooms are most interesting to the ordinary observer. Steam is supplied by six Babcock and Wilson’s boilers, producing 800 horse power. The engine-room contains two of Haslam’s largest cold-air refrigerators, each capable of delivering 170,000 cubic feet of cold air per hour at a temperature of seventy degrees below zero. There is also a 120,000 cubic feet Haslam refrigerator, which has been converted by Messrs. J. J. Niven and Co. to the Linde British Ammonia system, and now easily accomplishes all the refrigerating for the establishment at a greatly reduced cost of working and consumption of fuel. The other two machines, therefore, are mere stand-byes in case of emergency. Firewood is largely used for fuel, and this is split in the slack season by the company’s men. Besides beef and mutton freezing and exporting, Messrs. Nelson Bros. do a very large trade in tinned meats, and also in freezing and storing fish, fowls, game, etc., for local consumption. The boxes and tins required are made on the premises, and everything from start to finish is on a splendid scale. The “Tomoana” brand of root and crop manure is favourably known and is in great demand all over the Colony. In every way the Tomoana Freezing Works reflect the greatest credit on all concerned in their management, as well as on the Colony at large. Mr. William Nelson, of Tomoana, is the general manager for New Zealand; Mr. G. L. Sunderland, the works manager; Mr. H. G. Warren, secretary; and Mr. J. P. Elwood is engineer. By these gentlemen the utmost courtesy was extended to the writer on the occasion of his visit to the works, and their kindness included a very enjoyable luncheon, at which the  previous season’s frozen mutton was practically tested, and so much enjoyed that it became a question whether it had not really been greatly improved by freezing.

Mr. WILLIAM NELSON, General Manager for New Zealand of Nelson Bros., Ltd., was born in Warwick, England, in 1848, and is a son of Mr. George Nelson, now deceased, but formerly very well known as the founder of the

Photo captions –
EXTERIOR VIEW OF THE TOMOANA FREEZING WORKS.
CARCASS STORAGE ROOM, TOMOANA FREEZING WORKS.

160   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

still celebrated firm of Nelson, Dale and Co., gelatine manufacturers. Educated at Warwick College, Mr. Nelson, when twenty years of age, came to New Zealand, and landed in Auckland in 1863, per ship “Devonshire.” He immediately joined the militia, but before the end of the year he began sheepfarming with his elder brother, Mr. Frederick Nelson, mentioned in another article as one of the directors of the Colonial Consignment and Distributing Company, Ltd. Their first station was at Kereru. Then they had one at Waipukurau, and latterly one on the Heretaunga Plains, which is still in full swing, and contributes during the season an average of 6000 sheep to the works, which were started by Messrs. Nelson Bros. privately, and afterwards sold to the company. Few of Hawke’s Bay’s pioneers and leading men are more highly esteemed than Mr. William Nelson, either as a colonist or as an employer. Mr. Nelson lives on the Tomoana estate, about half a mile from the works, and is the popular chairman of the Clive River Board. Married in 1865 to Miss Bicknell, daughter of the late Mr. Henry Bicknell, of Bangor, North Wales, Mr. Nelson has five daughters and six sons. All the sons are either farming or connected with the works.

Mr. HENRY GEORGE WARREN, the New Zealand Secretary of Messrs. Nelson Bros., Ltd., was born at Hampstead, Middlesex, England, in 1862. He is the son of the late Mr. H. I. Warren, gentleman, and was educated at the Palace School, Enfield, and at King’s College. In 1879 he joined the staff of the Royal Bank of Scotland, and a year later came out with Mr. Nelson as a cadet for the New Zealand counting-house, per Orient liner “Sorata,” on her fateful voyage when she ran ashore near Adelaide, South Australia. Mr. Warren has therefore seen the growth of the establishment from its embryo stage and has been intimately connected with it ever since. It is hard to believe that well within his lifetime the splendid buildings at the Tomoana Works have been erected, yet in 1880 only a whare stood on the

Photo captions –
MR. W. NELSON.
ENGINE ROOM, TOMOANA FREEZING WORKS.
AN INTERIOR VIEW OF THE TOMOANA WORKS.
MR. H. G. WARREN.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   161

site of the present magnificent estate. When the office of New Zealand secretary was created Mr. Warren was appointed to it. Mr. Warren is a cricketer and a lover of golf, and is the honorary secretary and treasurer of the Heretaunga Clay Pigeon Shooting Club. In 1887 he married a daughter of the late Mr. Leslie Thomson, of Canterbury, but had the misfortune to lose his wife in 1892, and was left with one daughter.

Mr. GEORGE LANGDALE SUNDERLAND, Manager of Tomoana Freezing Works, was born in Ulverstone, Lancashire, England, in 1852. He is the son of the late Captain G. H. C. Sunderland, R.N., and was educated at Greenwich Royal Naval College. Joining the Navy in 1864, Mr. Sunderland served on the Mediterranean, Pacific and West Indian stations, but retired in 1873 with the rank of sub-lieutenant. Two years later he came to this Colony, per ship “Earl of Zetland,” and on his arrival at Dunedin he went on to Poverty Bay, where some of his friends resided, and there he engaged in sheepfarming on his own account at “Lavenham,” a station in the Patutahi block, about ten miles from Gisborne. Mr. Sunderland, in 1888, undertook the management of Messrs. Nelson Bros. Poverty Bay branch works, and five years later was promoted to his present position. Since then the works have been very greatly extended. While resident in Poverty Bay, Mr. Sunderland held a seat on the Cook County Council for fourteen or fifteen years; he was chairman for five years, and was the Government nominee on the Licensing Bench. He is a good cricketer, and on many occasions he was a representative of the district in interprovincial and other matches. At the present time he is Master of the Hounds in the Hawke’s Bay Hunt Club. He was married in 1875 to the daughter of Mr. Wordsworth Harrison, of “The Lund,” Ulverstone, and has three daughters. In 1893 Mr. Sunderland took a trip to the Old Land, during a well-earned leave of absence.

Mr. JOHN PATRICK ELWOOD, the Engineer for Messrs. Nelson Bros., Ltd., served his apprenticeship with Messrs. May and Mountain, civil and mechanical engineers, of Birmingham, and came to this Colony in 1880, per ship “Waikato,” under engagement to Messrs. Nelson Bros. and Williams (afterwards Nelson Bros.). Mr. Elwood has, since his arrival, lived at Tomoana, and has drawn the plans for, and superintended the erection of, all the buildings at the head establishment and the branches. These, and the condition of the machinery under his charge, reflect the greatest credit upon Mr. Elwood.

THE COLONIAL CONSIGNMENT AND DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, LTD., London. This company was formed in 1895 to take over the English branch of the business of Messrs. Nelson Bros. Ltd., and therefore no notice of the latter could be complete without reference to the Distributing Company. The capital consists of £225,000 in ordinary shares, £75,000 in cumulative six per cent. preference shares, and £100,000 in four and a half per cent. first mortgage debentures. Sir Montague Nelson, K.C.M.G., is chairman of directors, and his co-directors are Sir Westby Percival, K.C.M.G., and Messrs. E. H. Byas, W. S. Davidson, Harrison Davis, W. T. Holmes, Frederick Nelson, and M. C. Thomson. The Colonial Consignment and Distributing Company does not confine its operations to frozen meat, but transacts a large and increasing import trade in colonial fruit and dairy produce. The head offices are at 15 Dowgate Hill, London, E.C., and the refrigerating stores are at Nelson’s Wharf, Lambeth, S.E. The dairy produce stores are at 64 and 66 Tooley Street, the meat stalls are in Smithfield Market, and the provincial branches are at Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Sheffield. The company’s refrigerated store at Mode Wheel, on the Manchester Ship Canal, erected to meet a desire expressed by Colonial shippers, has been completed, and the company is now in a position to deal in the most advantageous manner with direct shipments of frozen meat and other produce. The building is believed to be the most complete of its kind in the world, and has every facility for meeting all requirements of the trade, having storage capacity for 100,000 sheep. Vessels drawing 26 feet of water can lie alongside the wharves and discharge their cargo into the store, which is directly connected with the principal railway systems of the Midlands, North of England and Scotland. Within a radius of forty miles from this store, the population exceeds very considerably that of the same area around London, and can be supplied from this centre with a minimum amount of handling and exposure. Special arrangements have been made for defrosting meat, the eight chambers fitted for this purpose being capable of dealing with 4000 sheep, or an equivalent in beef, per week. Fruit, butter, and other articles of similar character can be stored at any required temperature. The store will work in connection with the existing agencies of the company at the Manchester Central Meat Market,  Liverpool, Birmingham, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and Sheffield, etc., besides distributing direct to retailers, and will be under the management of Mr. M.C. Thomson, a director of the company. The capacity of the principal store at Nelson’s wharf, Lambeth, is equal to the accommodation of 250,000 carcases, and most complete arrangements exist for the rapid and economical distribution of the cargoes as they arrive. The chief difficulty with which the meat industry had to contend for many years after its success in all other important respects had been well proved, was thawing in such a manner as to render the meat thoroughly presentable for sale. This has been overcome now by a process invented by Sir Montague Nelson. The importance of this invention – the “defrosting” process, it is called – can hardly be overestimated, for it completely removes the signs of the freezing, and re-imparts the dry, well-set appearance of fresh-killed meat. The formation of the Colonial Consignment and Distributing Company, Ltd., marked an epoch in the Colonial trade with the Mother Country, the importance of which it is even yet impossible to accurately gauge. Some idea may, however, be gained from the fact that an average day’s operations of the company in April, 1898,  included the distribution of over 8000 sheep and lambs, over 3000 legs, shoulders, etc., and over 100 quarters and pieces of beef, among 987 consignees, retailers and private consumers, in 625 separate centres of population in England.

Mr. J. B. REID is Manager for the Colonial Consignment and Distributing Company, Ltd., in New Zealand, with offices in Christchurch. Mr. Reid is referred to at page 156 of the Christchurch section of this work.

Photo caption – FURNACES AT THE TOMOANA FREEZING WORKS.

162   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

NEW ZEALAND LOAN AND MERCANTILE AGENCY COMPANY, LTD., Hastings Street, Napier. Telephone 8. Bankers, Union Bank of Australia, Ltd. The offices of this company occupy an excellent site in the principal street of Napier and adjoin those of the Bank of New Zealand. The buildings are of brick, and handsome and extensive. The manager, Mr. Craig, is assisted by a staff of twelve, including two warehousemen at the Spit. The head office of the company for the Colony being at the capital, the extended notice is given in the Wellington volume of this work.

Mr. JOHN CRAIG, the Manager of the Napier branch of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, Ltd., was appointed to the position in 1886.

ROSS AND GLENDINING, Wholesale Warehousemen, Emerson Street, Napier. Telephone 236; P.O. Box 116. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. This is a branch of the well-known firm whose headquarters are at Dunedin and which is fully described in the Dunedin volume. Though the firm have been represented in Napier ever since the business was established, yet it was only on the closing of Messrs. McArthur and Co.’s Napier branch that they opened a branch there, securing the latter firm’s premises and manager. Messrs. Ross and Glendining practically secured the business of the departing firm, and this they have greatly increased. They have just completed the erection of a fine three-storey brick building, having a frontage to Emerson Street of 40 feet by a depth of 100 feet. It is fitted with all conveniences, including an hydraulic lift, which is said to be the first one in Napier. The branch is under the management of Mr. R. A. Wilson.

Mr. ROBERT AIKENHEAD WILSON, Manager at Napier for Messrs. Ross and Glendining, was born in Kirkcaldy, Fifeshire, Scotland, in 1857, and is a son of Capt. A. Wilson, of that town. He was educated in London, and entered the warehouse of Messrs. Welch, Margetson, and Co., and after a short experience there, transferred to Cook, Son and Co., of St. Paul’s Churchyard. In 1876 Mr. Wilson decided to come to New Zealand and left London in the ill-fated ship “Strathmore,” which so many readers will remember, was wrecked on the Crozet Islands. Between forty and fifty were drowned in endeavouring to get ashore, but about fifty effected a landing on one of those desolate islands. One passenger managed to save his mother – the only lady who survived. After seven months of terrible privations, with nothing but sea birds and a grassy weed for sustenance, forty-four survivors were picked up by an American whaler and taken to Ceylon. Five of those who escaped drowning died on the island. The weather for the first part of the time was very severe, and there is no doubt that Mr. Wilson and his fellow survivors have every reason to remember their existence on the inhospitable Crozets. They were brought to Melbourne by a P. and O. steamer. Arriving in Dunedin, Mr. Wilson after a few months with the New Zealand Hardware Company, secured a position with Messrs. Ross and Glendining, with whom he remained for some four or five years. He then went Home to England, and on his return started in business for himself in Hawke’s Bay. About five years later be took the management of Messrs. McArthur and Co.’s Napier branch, and after creditably holding that post for eight years was appointed to his present position, as before stated. Mr. Wilson is one of the managing committee of St. Paul’s Presbyterian church, and takes an interest in social affairs generally. He was married in 1880 to the daughter of Mr. William Green, of London, and has a daughter and four sons.

SARGOOD, SON AND EWEN, Warehousemen, Herschell Street, Napier. Mr. Robert Bishop (manager). The premises of this firm occupy part of the large brick and concrete building opposite the Masonic Hotel.

Mr. ROBERT BISHOP, the Manager, was born in London, and was brought up to commercial pursuits, having been employed in one of the large London warehouses for a number of years. He came to Wellington in 1874 by the “Halcione,” and was with Messrs. A. P. Stuart, Harcourt and Co., then Sargood, Son and Ewen, the original business of A. P. Stuart having changed successively to the latter firm. Mr. Bishop was a well-known traveller for over eighteen years, representing these firms in various parts of New Zealand, and in 1893 received his present appointment. His relations are well known in Wellington, several of his people being among the earliest settlers there. He is married and has eight children. His eldest daughter is married to Mr. Holt, a son of the well-known Napier timber merchant and sawmiller. Mr. Bishop is an old member of the Craft.

WILLIAMS AND KETTLE, LTD., General Merchants and Importers, Stock and Station Agents, etc., Browning Street, Napier. Branches, Port Ahuriri (Spit), Hastings, and Gisborne. Telephones, Head Office 100; Port Ahuriri 24, and (goods department) 142; Hastings 212; Private telephones of managing director, Mr. F. W. Williams, 116; and Mr. N. Kettle, 117. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Directors: Captain Russell (M.H.R.), Messrs. J. H. Coleman, A. McHardy, William Nelson, A. S. G. Carlyon, J. B. Chambers; F. W. Williams and N. Kettle (managing directors). A glance at the directorate of this company is sufficient evidence that Messrs. Williams and Kettle, Ltd., is one of the most important mercantile corporations in the Colony. The nature of the business is varied and the field of operations worldwide. Whilst fulfilling all the essentials of the “middleman,” the profits arising from export and import transactions are very largely distributed amongst the producers, who also play an important part in the control of the business. So popular is the company that its operations have extended into the domain of finance, and many of the large runholders of the province use it as a banking institution. Advances are made on stock, wool on the sheep’s back, and other produce, absentee and other estates are supervised and managed. Messrs. Williams and Kettle, Ltd., are export agents for Messrs. Nelson Bros., Ltd. The business was established in 1880 by Mr. F. W. Williams, who some three or four years later, was joined by Mr. N. Kettle, and when the company was formed in 1891 these gentlemen were jointly appointed managing directors.

Mr. FREDERICK WAMKLYN [WANKLYN] WILLIAMS, one of the Managing Directors of Messrs. Williams and Kettle; Ltd., is referred

Photo captions –
MR. R. A. WILSON.
MR. R. BISHOP.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   163

to at length in connection with the Napier Harbour Board, of which body he has been a member for many years.

Mr. NATHANIEL KETTLE, a Managing Director of Messrs. Williams and Kettle, Ltd., is a son of the late Mr. Charles Henry Kettle, who was chief surveyor for the New Zealand Company, surveyed the site of Dunedin and discovered the Wairarapa Plains in 1839. Mr. Kettle was born in Dunedin in 1854, educated at the High School and other local schools, and in 1869 entered the office of Messrs. G. G. Russell and Co., wool and general merchants. Eight years later he removed to Napier to fill the position of manager of the Hawke’s Bay business of Messrs. Murray, Common and Co. (now Murray, Roberts and Co.), general merchants, stock and station agents. Mr. Kettle resigned this position in 1884 to join Mr. Williams in the business which has since attained such large proportions. Though Mr. Kettle has closely applied himself to the firm’s business, he has found time to devote to public duties. He has been chairman of the Napier Chamber of Commerce, with which he has been connected since its inception, and he was one of the promoters of the Free Association of Employees and Workmen of Hawke’s Bay. In 1880 he was married to the daughter of Major Von Tempsky and has two sons and two daughters.

HOLT, ROBERT, Sawing, Planing, and Moulding Mills, Sash and Door Factory, Thackeray and Carlyle Streets, Napier. Telephone 84; P.O. Box 33. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Private residence, Cameron Road. Branch at Hastings, and sawmills also at Piripiri. These are among the largest and best-equipped mills in the Colony. There is a ten-ton steam travelling crane, supplemented by tramways in every direction, with splendid stocks of seasoned kauri, rimu, cedar, totara, and other kinds of timber. The proprietor has a lease of 12,000 acres of fine forest country at Piripiri. Labour-saving machinery of every description abounds for planing, turnery, mortising, paling pointing, boring, shaping, tenoning, gulleting, and other work. Power is derived from a forty horse-power steam engine and three fine boilers. Every variety of timber work is executed at the mills, such as doors, windows, mouldings, architraves, skirtings, verandah and eave brackets, finials, balusters, chair and table legs, gates, shop fronts, mantelpieces, ceiling centres, etc., etc. A very neat fifty-page quarto catalogue, printed and lithographed by the “Hawke’s Bay Herald,” shows the great variety of plain and fancy timber work turned out by Mr. Holt. A very large number of hands are employed and Mr. Holt and his sons are assisted by competent and well-tried foremen. Mr. Holt, the proprietor, was born in Oldham, Lancashire, in 1833, and educated in his native town. He was apprenticed to a joiner and pattern-maker, and at the age of twenty-six years landed in Auckland. Removing to Napier in 1866 he engaged in contract work, and in 1862 started a small mill in Hastings Street. Mr. Holt did five years’ active service as a volunteer and was engaged in the Omaranui and Petane fights. For many years he was a member of the old Napier Philharmonic Society. He was married in 1861 to a daughter of the late Mr. John Marshall, farmer of Paisley, Scotland, and has two daughters and three sons.

SHIPPING.

NEW ZEALAND SHIPPING COMPANY. The Napier branch of this important company is under the management of Mr. G. B. Bullock.

Mr. GEORGE BARKENTIN BULLOCK, Manager of the New Zealand Shipping Company at Napier, is well known in many parts of the Colony, having held many responsible positions under the company in both islands. He was born at Great Barr, Staffordshire, England, in 1863, and is the son of Mr. Alfred Bullock, a retired gentleman residing in Christchurch. Mr. Bullock was educated at Framlingham, in Suffolk, and in 1882 came to this Colony on a visit by the ship “Crusader.” He, however, accepted a position with the New Zealand Shipping Company in 1882 in the Christchurch office, and was soon after transferred to Lyttelton. He was next for a term at Invercargill, then returned to the head office and was sent to the Napier branch in time to load the “Waipa” at Gisborne, the first of the company’s ships to leave that port direct for Home. Mr. Bullock was afterwards relieving agent at Oamaru and accountant at Auckland, and in 1887 was appointed agent for the company at Timaru where he remained until July, 1896, when he was appointed manager at Napier. While in Timaru, he was a member of the Harbour Board and took a general interest in local affairs. Mr. Bullock was a prominent footballer whilst in the South Island. He possesses musical tastes and is president of the Napier American Banjo Club.

THE TYSER LINE. LTD., Australasian Head Office, Emerson Street, Napier. Capt. Richard Todd, Colonial Superintendent,

Photo captions –

THE WAIKARE-MOANA EXPEDITION (OLD MILITARY PICTURE).
Standing – Major Richardson, Capt. Handley (deceased), Ensign Davis, Major (now Judge) Gudgeon, Lieut.-Col. Herrick (deceased), Lieut. Spiller, Lieut. Milner (18th Royal Irish).
Sitting – Lieut. Witty, Lieut. Ferguson, Capt. Northcroft, Major (now Judge) Scannell, Capt. Bower (Adjutant), Capt. Corfield, Major Withers (Paymaster).

MR G. B. BULLOCK.

164   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Head office, 16 Fenchurch Avenue, London. New York representatives, Messrs. Finch, Edye and Co., Produce Exchange. The Tyser Line, which was established in 1887 by Messrs. Tyser and Co., for many years owners in the East India trade, is one of the most important shipping corporations engaged in the New Zealand trade. The fine vessels at present running between this Colony and London are “Star of England,” “Star of New Zealand,” “Star of Victoria,” “Hawke’s Bay,” “Indramayo,” and “Indraghiri,” and two other fine large steamers are in course of construction. All these steamers are insulated for the carriage of frozen meat and produce, they each make two trips per year and they call at all the principal New Zealand ports from Auckland in the north to the Bluff in the south. Capt. East, the company’s marine superintendent, goes round the coast with the steamers to superintend their loading. The New Zealand agencies are: – Auckland, Messrs. Heather, Robertson and Co., and Mr. A. H. Nathan; Gisborne, Messrs. Williams and Kettle, Ltd.; Wellington, Messrs. W. M. Bannatyne and Co.; Wanganui, Messrs. Johnston and Co.; Lyttelton, Messrs. Kinsey, Barnes and Co.; Dunedin, Messrs. Hick, Martin and Drysdale; Bluff, Messrs. Henderson and Batger; and the Australasian agents are: – Melbourne, The McCulloch Carrying Company; Sydney, Messrs. Tyser and Co.; Newcastle, Messrs. Earp, Gillam and Co. The steamers are all very fast, the record trip for insulated cargo vessels being made by the “Star of New Zealand” in forty-two days from New Zealand to London. The company also claims to hold the record for carrying cargoes of meat in the best condition. A new departure has recently been made, which entitles it to the heartiest support of all New Zealanders. Arrangements have been completed for a service of first-class cargo steamers from New York at regular intervals, taking cargo for Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Wellington, Canterbury, and Otago. The value of this service to New Zealand can hardly be over-estimated, and the Tyser Line is to be complimented on having the enterprise of pioneers in this most important trade. That the Colony will reap immense advantages from the  connection with the United States being thus formed there can be no two opinions, and it is clearly the duty of all concerned to remember practically the company which has been the means of securing these advantages. The steamers engaged in the United States trade are all of modern type classed 100 Al at Lloyds, and thoroughly equipped to satisfactorily deliver their cargoes.

CAPTAIN TODD, the Colonial Superintendent of the Tyser Line, Ltd., is a well-known and very popular commander, who took to the sea nearly forty years ago, serving his apprenticeship on the Bast India trade. For twenty years ending 1887, Capt. Todd commanded ships of the Shaw Savill Company in the New Zealand trade. In that year Capt. Todd was appointed marine superintendent to the Tyser Line and to his present position on the death of Mr. Robert Dobson in 1893. If, therefore, the captain looks with some measure of pride upon the great expansion of trade which has taken place under his able management, it must be admitted that he is justly entitled so to do. Capt. Todd is highly esteemed and exceedingly popular. His private residence is in Thompson Road, Napier.

UNION STEAMSHIP COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. Napier offices, Colonial Bank Building, Hastings Street. Mr. R. Puflett (manager). There is also a branch office at the Spit. A staff of clerks is kept at both places under Mr. Puflett, who divides his time between the two. He is also agent for the Orient line, British India Company, and Australian Steam Navigation Company’s steamers.

Mr. ROBERT PUFLETT, the popular manager at Napier for the Union Steamship Company, has been in the service since its inauguration and is therefore widely known in shipping circles. Born in Geelong, Victoria, in 1846, the eldest son of the late Mr. Thomas Puflett, the subject of this sketch was educated at the Geelong Grammar School and National Grammar School, and came to this Colony in 1865. Early in the following year Mr. Puflett was appointed assistant wharfinger at Dunedin where he was for some four or five years, and became shipping-clerk in the Harbour Steamship Company, under the management of Mr. James Mills, the present general manager of the Union Steamship Company. In 1875 the Harbour Steamship Company was merged into the latter and Mr. Puflett, three years later was entrusted with the duty of opening the Napier branch. He was transferred in the following year to the Christchurch office where he stayed some nine or ten years, and on leaving that city was presented with a purse of 220 sovereigns and an illuminated address. He was next appointed manager of the Wellington office, after which he was in the head office, Dunedin, for a few months prior to his appointment as manager at Napier, which position he has occupied for the past nine or ten years. Mr. Puflett is chairman of the Napier Chamber of Commerce, president of the Port Ahuriri Swimming Club and of the Port Ahuriri Bowling and Tennis Clubs, a Master Mason and a member of the Scinde Lodge. In 1872 he was married to a daughter of Mr. Andrew Mercer, of Dunedin, and has five sons and five daughters.

OLD COLONISTS.

Mr. JOHN BEGG, of Thompson Road, Napier, is an old and respected Colonist with nearly half a century’s experience in the southern hemisphere. He was born in 1815 at North Esk, Forfarshire, and is the son of Mr. William Begg, sheepfarmer, and brother of the late Mr. Charles Begg, the well-known music importer of Dunedin, whose portrait appears in the Dunedin volume of the  Cyclopedia. Educated in Aberdeenshire and brought up to farming, Mr Begg for six or seven years before leaving his native land, was manager of a co-operative store, but the store having been profitably sold he emigrated to Victoria in 1852 and engaged in mining at Ballarat and Forest Creek. In 1855 he came to New Zealand, landing in Wellington soon after the great earthquake. A few weeks later he moved to Napier, where he took up some town and country sections. Losing his only son some few years later, Mr. Begg gave up farming and confined his attention to his town properties. At the time of the Maori war he took part with the volunteers under Captain Buchanan and also served in the Militia. He married in 1859 the daughter of Mr. John Herd, of Cults, Aberdeenshire, and has two daughters living.

Mr. JOHN BURDEN, J.P., an old resident of Hawke’s Bay, was born in the City of Bristol in the year 1840, where he was educated and learned the trade of wood turning.

Photo captions –
CAPTAIN TODD.
MR. R. PUFLETT.

OLD COLONISTS.   165

He came to the Colony at the age of eighteen in the barque “William Watson.” Shortly after his arrival the Waikato war broke out; he, therefore, joined the Auckland Rifle Volunteers, commanded by Capt. Stewart, and served through the whole campaign, during which he rose to the rank of sergeant and eventually received the New Zealand war medal. Mr. Burden arrived in Napier in 1867, where he joined the militia and in which he remained until their disbandment. For several years he carried on his business of wood turner with considerable success, but has now practically retired from business. Mr. Burden’s political views are most pronounced, being strongly democratic and liberal. “The greatest good to the greatest number” is the motto he has adhered to in a most practical manner, but with no inclination to attain either place or position which would bring him into prominence. Mr. Burden is married and has three daughters and one son. His eldest daughter is head-mistress of the Kumeroa school, under the auspices of the Hawke’s Bay Education Board; the second daughter is married to Mr. Robert Davies, sheepfarmer, and his son is at present studying for law.

Mr. JOHN DAVIS CANNING, J.P., who was one of Hawke’s Bay successful sheep-farmers, was born at “Ogbourne,” St. Andrew, Marlborough, Wiltshire, England, in 1822, his father, Mr. Davis Canning having in his day been a prominent  landowner of those parts. The Cannings of Ogbourne, in England, and of Oakburne, in Hawke’s Bay, are a branch of the well-known old English family of which Lord Canning, Viceroy of India, was an illustrious member. Educated in his native place, the subject of this sketch came to this Colony in 1851 in the ship “Cornwall,” landing in Lyttelton, and began his Colonial career with Mr. John Harding, of “Mt. Vernon,” Waipukurau. He afterwards purchased land and sheep on his own account, selecting a fine property of upwards of 2000 acres at Porangahau, which he increased to 40,000 acres by leasing from the Maoris a tract of country adjoining the freehold. He introduced the Cotswold variety of sheep and in all classes of stock kept only the best breeds. In 1868 he married Elspeth, daughter of Mr. John McQueen, of Strathspey, Inverness, and had two sons. In 1883 accompanied by his eldest son he took a trip Home to see his wife who had then been an invalid in the Old Land some five years. The effects of the voyage, however, resulted in his death, immediately on landing and without meeting his wife. Eight years later, Mrs. Canning so far recovered her health as to be able to return to New Zealand and she now lives in quiet retirement at “Ellerslie,” Thompson Road, Napier. The late Mr. Canning took an active part in public affairs, for which his liberal education eminently fitted him.

The Rev. WILLIAM COLENSO, who  recently passed away at a ripe old age, was a distinguished New Zealander, and deserves a much more detailed biography than it is possible to give in these pages, but which it is hoped some future historian of the Colony may undertake in justice to the memory of this fine old colonist who gave upwards of sixty years of useful life to his adopted country. Mr. Colenso was born in 1811 at Penzance, and is a member of an old Cornish family, being a son of Mr. Samuel May Colenso, and first cousin of the late Bishop Colenso of Natal, the celebrated mathematician and theologian. Educated privately at Penzance, Mr. Colenso learned printing and bookbinding in his native town, and subsequently worked as a compositor in the book-printing office of Messrs. Watts and Son of Crown Court, Temple Bar, London. In the year 1833 the Church Missionary Society, feeling the need, through their missionaries in New  Zealand, of a printing press in this country, where all errors might be  corrected on the spot by those familiar with the Maori language, appealed to their  supporters with a view to securing the services of a missionary printer; and Mr. Colenso, on the recommendation of Messrs. Watts, and after the usual preliminary  examination, offered for this very trying position. That he ever regretted the step is not recorded; but small wonder be it if he did “many a time and oft.” On the 3rd

Photo captions –
Mr. J. BEGG.
MR. J. BURDEN.
THE LATE MR. J. D. CANNING.
THE LATE REV. W. COLENSO (In 1861)

166   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

of January, 1835, he landed at the Bay of Islands. On opening his boxes, however, New Zealand’s pioneer found that he had no cases, leads, rules, ink-table, roller stocks, nor frames, lye-brush, nor potash, and, worst of all, no paper! Fortunately he had provided himself with a composing-stick, the resident missionaries had a little writing paper among their stores, the expert’s ingenuity enabled him to supply other requirements after a fashion, and on 17th of February, 1835, was worked off in the presence of admiring spectators the first copy of the first book printed in New Zealand – the Epistles to the Ephesians and Philippians in the Maori language. In December, 1837, Mr. Colenso printed, amidst many difficulties, the New Testament in Maori. If the printer of to-day were asked to produce a volume of the New Testament in the Maori language single handed and with even the best appliances that were available in the Old World seventy years ago, he would sicken at the thought. But the father and hero of the New Zealand press had to surmount difficulties tenfold greater than those indicated by the above supposition. Some of these difficulties are graphically described in an American Art journal – the “Inland Printer,” for March, 1890; but as any  narration of them could be appreciated by practical printers only, it must suffice here to say that the most provoking of them resulted from the determination on the part of the society’s officials not to allow sufficient weight to attach to the suggestions of either Mr. Colenso or any other practical printer, in the selection of the necessarily limited plant. Time seems to have been the only thing to go slowly in those days; eighteen months could slip by comfortably while an order despatched from New Zealand was being fulfilled in London and sent to its destination. Yet all this time, Mr. Colenso was turning out printed work which under the circumstances reflected upon him unlimited credit. At the same time he was learning the Maori language and performing the arduous duties of an ordinary missionary. But of this part of Mr. Colenso’s interesting career an excellent outline is given in a 50 pp. pamphlet, entitled “Fifty Years Ago in New Zealand,” being a Jubilee paper read by the reverend gentleman himself before the Hawke’s Bay Philosophical Institute in 1887. For many years past Mr. Colenso had been the only surviving European who was present and took part in the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Fortunately he was  indefatigable in keeping up his diary and from these notes he was able to write for the Church Missionary Society a full and true account of Governor Hobson’s arrival and the  interesting proceedings consequent thereupon, and the account was afterwards attested as correct by the late British Resident, Mr. James Busby, who was present officially on that great occasion. This “History” of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi was copied by Mr. Colenso in 1890 and printed by the Government for general circulation. The pamphlet consists of some forty octavo pages, and the information it contains is most interestingly told; for it he received the special thanks of Sir George Grey, who also said he was not aware of any such authentic account having been written. Mr. Colenso had been in New Zealand about six years, when the advent of Captain Hobson, the first Governor, marked a new departure in the history of the country; and during the whole of that time he had been working at his occupation of church printer,  producing several other books both small and large, in thousands, the principal ones being the “Common Prayer of the Church of England,” 372 pp., 12mo., and the “Gospel of St. Luke,” 68 pp., 12mo. Among many important acts of assistance rendered by the missionaries to the new Governor, the work done by Mr. Colenso was by no means the least. With his own hands – unlike the Government printer of today – the typographical missionary printed the Proclamation and the Treaty itself, besides much other Government work, including the first “Government Gazette” issued in the Colony. Though Mr. Colenso received no additional pay for all this labour, he was more than rewarded by, the very handsome letter of thanks sent to him and wholly written by the generous Governor, whose sagacious efforts on behalf of the infant Colony have never yet been fittingly appreciated. Prior to this the Maori Testament of 356 pp., 8vo., had been entirely set up by Mr. Colenso, and with such assistance as he could get, no fewer than 5000 copies had been printed, and a large number of them bound by himself. How all this was accomplished in considerably less time than two years is indicated in Mr. Colenso’s Jubilee paper; but yet for the most part it remains a mystery to every printer in the land. It was the first edition of the New Testament printed south of the line in any language, and only one copy of it is now known to exist, and was in Mr. Colenso’s own possession. It was an accomplishment of which any man might be proud, and even the printers of today may be pardoned if they feel that some of the credit almost attached itself to them, inasmuch as they are now members of a noble craft so nobly introduced to this Britain of the South. But, though Mr. Colenso was always proud to call himself a printer, he was destined soon to find yet more important work. Truly has it been sung: – “Legislators, Great debaters, Scientific men have arisen from the prison of the printers’ den.” As a “legislator,” Mr. Colenso’s abilities were recognised by his election to the General Assembly as a representative of Hawke’s Bay, his appearance as a member of that body dating from 1861; in Parliament he remained five years. As a “great debater” his weight was felt also in the Hawke’s Bay Provincial Council, where he held the office of provincial treasurer, and as a “scientific” man he towered high on the list of celebrities. As a botanist he was in the front rank with a world-wide reputation. Speaking of Mr. Colenso’s scientific achievements, the “Inland Printer,” above mentioned, says: – He is a Fellow of the Linnean Society, and a few years ago was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in recognition of his distinguished services in the cause of botanical science. He was the first to identify the fossil bones of the long extinct moa as those of a gigantic bird, and very accurately indicated its place in the animal kingdom. On the subject of ferns, lichen, and the humble but beautiful hepaticae, he is one of the greatest authorities. On the subject of Maori history and tradition there is only one other man – Sir George Grey – who will bear comparison with him as an authority. He has in manuscript a voluminous lexicon of the Polynesian language, which he was

Photo captions –
THE LATE REV. W. COLENSO (A recent portrait).
FRONT OF MR. COLENSO’S RESIDENCE.

OLD COLONISTS.   167

commissioned by the Government many years ago to write. The work was approaching completion when a change of administration reversed the order, and succeeding Governments have declined either to carry out the work officially or to permit the author to find a private publisher. Mr. Colenso was one of the founders of the Hawke’s Bay branch of the New Zealand Institute, and has always been the largest and most valued contributor to the “Transactions” of that auxiliary branch. For precise, exact, and well-authenticated information his “Contributions towards the Better Knowledge of the Maori People,” excel all that has been written or collected by any other writer.” Mr. Colenso removed from the Bay of Islands to Hawke’s Bay in 1844, which place he had also visited in the preceding year, having been stationed at Port Ahuriri as the resident clergyman of the district by Bishop Selwyn. Among many positions filled by him since that time was that of inspector of schools for Hawke’s Bay. He has published many valuable books which will live to his memory while the language lasts. During his missionary days, Mr. Colenso became thoroughly acquainted with the North Island, for he traversed the whole of it on foot from Cape Terawiti, in Cook’s Straits, to Cape Maria Van Diemen, besides frequently travelling over both the East and West coasts, and more than once crossed the great dividing range, the Ruahine Mountains. The reverend gentleman continued to enjoy good and hearty health almost up to the time of his death, which took place on 10th February, 1899, in his eighty-eighth year. If the great work in which the late Mr. Colenso spent his valuable time and brilliant talents be lost to the world through the quarrelling and jealousy which seem to be necessary concomitants to party government, then, indeed, that system is responsible for one of the greatest blunders ever committed in this Colony of New Zealand.

Mr. DAVID GLENDINNING, of Napier, the late well-known contractor, was born in Port Patrick, Scotland, in 1832, where he was educated and followed the calling of a builder. In 1858 he went to Cape Colony and carried on business as a builder and contractor until 1865, when he sailed for New Zealand per brig “Reichstag.” Whilst at Capetown, Mr. Glendinning married the daughter of Mr. John Norkett, of Sussex, a Cape settler. After spending two or three years in Auckland, Mr. Glendinning went to the Thames, and until 1872 was variously engaged in building, contracting and speculating. Securing large contracts in various parts of the North Island, he moved with his family from place to place, and finally settled in Napier to carry out the contract for the extensive bridge at the Western Spit. He also built the Redcliff and Mohaka bridges, and many handsome buildings in Napier were wholly or partly erected by Mr. Glendinning. While building for others he secured for himself a good deal of house property, which is now in the possession of Mrs. Glendinning and family. For many years Mr. Glendinning was in partnership with Mr. John Griffin, the well-known builder and contractor, of Napier. He died on the 23rd of January, 1896, from paralysis, and left a widow, five sons, and three daughters.

Mr. J. P. HAMLIN, for many years a native interpreter at Napier, was a son of the late Rev. James Hamlin, and was born at Waiuku, Auckland; he was educated at Mr. Gorrie’s seminary, Auckland city, and after leaving school was employed in farming pursuits. During the Maori troubles in 1863 he joined the 3rd Waikato Regiment under Colonel Lyon and served for five years, first as ensign and afterwards was promoted to the rank of lieutenant. At the termination of the war, Mr. Hamlin went to the Thames goldfields where fortunes were being rapidly made and lost, but his speculations not  proving successful he came to Napier in 1871 and entered into practice as a native interpreter, his knowledge of the Maori language and customs being extensive. In 1877 he acquired possession of the Te Uhi Station, near Wairoa, a splendid property of 5000 acres which is now managed by his sons. He was a Mason of old standing and senior warden. Mr. Hamlin became suddenly ill at Wairoa and died before his wife, who rode night and day from Napier, could reach him. He left two sons and two daughters.

CAPTAIN KENRICK HILL, of Poraite [Poraiti], near Napier, is a very old Colonist. He was born in the North of Ireland and is a son of Mr. John Hill, of Bellaghy Castle, for over fifty years magistrate for the counties of Derry and Antrim. Captain Hill was educated at the Grace Hill Academy and joined Lord Donegal’s Regiment in 1854. In 1855 he was gazetted to the 31st Regiment and served in the Crimea for six months and afterwards  accompanied his regiment to Malta, Gibraltar and other posts; exchanged to the 14th Regiment in 1857 and came to the Colony in 1860, where he went through a five years’ campaign in the Maori wars. He then sold out of the Army and settled down as a sheep-farmer in Hawke’s Bay. For twenty years Captain Hill, in partnership with Captain Gordan, had a run on the Heretaunga Plains. In 1893 Captain Hill purchased his partner’s interest in the latter property and afterwards leased it to his son, Mr. Dudley Hill, and purchased the charming property of fifty acres on which he now resides. It is situated on a point jutting out into the Inner Harbour of Napier, opposite Scinde Island, and the water frontage includes a very beautiful bay. Close to the shore is a delightful and valuable piece of bush, while at the back of the house is quite a forest of eucalyptus of immense size. Captain Hill has greatly

Photo captions –
THE LATE MR. D. GLENDINNING.
THE LATE MR. J. P. HAMLIN.
CAPTAIN K. HILL.

168   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

enlarged and improved the house, which occupies one of the most beautiful spots in the province. He married a daughter of the late Mr. Charles French, of Dublin, and has a son and a daughter.

Mr. JOHN HINDMARSH, for the last twenty years a retired resident of Napier, was born in 1820 in France, where his parents were temporarily residing. He was educated at the Royal Naval College, Portsmouth, where he won the gold medal with right to a lieutenant’s commission; but his father, Rear-Admiral Sir John Hindmarsh, did not consider him strong enough for the Navy. In 1836, when his father was appointed Governor of South Australia, Mr. Hindmarsh accompanied him to that Colony and for some time followed the calling of a surveyor, in partnership with Mr. A. F. Lindsay, M.P., and laid out the towns of Hindmarsh and Walkerville. Going to England in 1841, Mr. Hindmarsh was called to the Bar of the Middle Temple, but after practising the legal profession for a few months, he returned to South Australia, where he settled on a largo property on the shores of Victor Harbour, at the same time practising in the courts and  filling the appointment of Revising Barrister under the Electoral Act for nearly all the Colony. In 1878 the fine climate of Napier tempted Mr. Hindmarsh to leave Australia, where he had spent the best part of his life, and which from old associations was dear to him. On arrival in the Colony he purchased a large run in the neighbourhood of Napier. He also acted as trustee for Mr. J. Ellis, the owner of some large estates in Otago, until recently, when he transferred the charge to his eldest son. He married a daughter of the late Captain Leworthy, R.N., and has three sons and two daughters. The eldest son is very well known in Napier as a partner in the firm of Messrs. Robjohns, Hindmarsh and Co., merchants; the second son is a barrister in Wellington, referred to in Volume I. of the Cyclopedia; and the third is a runholder at Tokomaru, on the East Coast. Mr. and Mrs. Hindmarsh live in a beautifully situated residence on Scinde Island, overlooking the Bay and town.

REAR-ADMIRAL SIR JOHN HINDMARSH, Knight of the Royal Hanoverian Guelphic Order, first Governor and Commander-in-Chief of South Australia, is sufficiently prominent in colonial history to render any account of his life superfluous here. He was the father of Mr. John Hindmarsh, referred to above. Amongst the number of beautiful and interesting heirlooms handed down by Sir John to his only son, are the letters patent constituting the Colony of South Australia, the letter from Sir Herbert Taylor Private Secretary to King William VI., naming the capital of the Colony Adelaide, and a letter from Admiral Lord Nelson appointing Rear. Admiral Hindmarsh – then a midshipman – to the “Victory” shortly before Trafalgar, the Imperial war medal and seven clasps, a gold and jewelled cup presented by King Frederick VII., of Denmark, and a gold cup, the gift of Prince Esterhazy, who was one of the  Ambassadors to England on the occasion of the Queen’s coronation.

Mr. JAMES LAWRENCE, who lives in quiet retirement in his beautiful home on the Thompson Road, Napier, is a prominent colonist of over forty years’ standing. He was born in 1826, at Hythe, Kent, and is the son of Mr. Job Lawrence, of Canterbury, England, was educated in his native town, and joined the Customs at Folkestone. On the occasion of the late Mr. H. S. Tiffen’s second visit to this Colony, Mr. Lawrence accompanied that gentleman and became his manager at “Homewood,” Kaikora, in 1856. He arrived in Wellington in the ship “Westminster” and came on to Napier in the little schooner “Salopia.” About a quarter of a century ago, Mr. Lawrence purchased a part of the “Homewood” estate from Mr. Tiffen, and carried it on as a sheep run until 1886, when he sold it to the present owner, Mr. James Collins. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence then took a two years’ trip to Europe, visiting Rome, Venice, Milan, and many other cities of interest. Mr. Lawrence has taken an active part in public matters. He represented Waipawa in the Hawke’s Bay Provinical [Provincial] Council for a term, but declined re-election. He was a warm Supporter of Sir Donald McLean. Mr. Lawrence was chairman of the Kaikora Road Board, School Committee, and Licensing Committee, and president of the Waipawa Racing Club. For many years he was a Justice of the Peace. In 1866 he married a daughter of Captain Brown, R.N., of Sligo, Ireland.

Mr. CHARLES JAMES NAIRN, who was a well-known and very highly esteemed Colonist of Hawke’s Bay, was born in Carshalton, Surrey, England, and came to this Colony in 1849, per ship “London,” landing in  Wellington in December of that year, with many other prominent settlers. Early in the fifties Mr. Nairn settled at Pariri, Hawke’s Bay, and entered into the work of a pioneer sheepfarmer with such zest that many years before his death he bequeathed to the Church of England in Hawke’s Bay, land valued at £10,000, from which a rental of £900 a year is derived. Mr. Nairn was a member of the Patangata County Council and chairman of the Patangata Road Board. During a visit to England he was married to a daughter of Mr. Thomas Wright, of Boston, Lincolnshire. His last visit to the Old Country was in 1891, when he was accompanied by his wife and family. There he died on the 21st of July, 1894, and Mrs. Nairn, with three sons and two daughters, returned to the Colony.

Mr. FREDERICK JOHN TIFFEN, one of Hawke’s Bay’s earliest and most respected settlers, was born at Hythe, Kent, in 1828, and is the third son of Mr. William Tiffen,

Photo captions –
REAR-ADMIRAL SIR JOHN HINDMARSH.
MR. J. LAWRENCE.
MR. F. J. TIFFEN.

OLD COLONISTS.   169

stationer and printer, of Hythe and Folkestone. Mr. Tiffen left for Wellington, New Zealand, in the barque “Louisa Campbell” on his seventeenth birthday, arriving at his destination via Nelson after a voyage of 131 days. Here he awaited the arrival from New South Wales of a shipment of 758 Merino ewes to the order of Messrs. J. H. Northwood and H. S. Tiffen (an elder brother who had entered into partnership as sheep farmers on the Ahiaruhi run of 9000 acres it the Wairarapa valley. Some idea of the difficulties of travelling with sheep in those days may be gained from the fact that the journey of seventy miles occupied no less than eighteen days. This was early in September, 1845. In the following year the adjoining Tauanui and Taratahi runs were similarly leased, and in the management of those properties Mr. Tiffen found congenial, if rough employment. But the distance from civilization was occasionally keenly felt. Mr. Tiffen has still a vivid recollection of a journey on foot to Wellington, a distance of seventy-five miles, with a dislocated shoulder. A road over the Rimutaka ranges afterwards reduced the distance by some fifteen miles and when Mr. Tiffen had to visit Wellington again on foot he was able to accomplish the journey in two days each way. In 1849 with the assistance of Mr. Northwood and others, including half a dozen Maoris, he drove 3000 sheep by way of the East Coast to Pourerere, a run of 25,000 acres which Mr. Northwood, assisted by Mr. Charles Nairn, had secured from the native owners. This journey of 140 miles occupied four weeks and only two runs, the Pahau and Castle Point stations, were passed on the way. It being decided to take 2000 of the sheep some miles inland to the Omakari portion of the run, Mr. Tiffen took up his residence at that point, and for nearly three years lived there almost alone, his nearest European neighbour northward being the Rev. W. Colenso, of the Waitangi mission station, twenty-five miles distant. Five miles still further on, at the Western Spit, lived Messrs. Alexander and Anketel, traders, but to the southward the nearest Europeans were at Castle Point, seventy miles away. When Mr. Tiffen was called to Wellington to give evidence at the trial for murder of one William Good, he had to walk 340 miles and carry both food and blankets with him. Yet this hardship he eagerly undertook as a welcome change, having seen but few European men and no women for nearly two years. In 1852, having been over five years in the employ of Messrs. Northwood and Tiffen, he again walked to Wellington to take passage for Sydney, this time accompanied by a Maori, by an almost unknown track through the so-called Forty Mile bush. Hawke’s Bay was at that time part of the Wellington province, and Dr. Featherston, the superintendent, being desirous of turning this track into a road, Mr. Tiffen was asked to make a report on the route, through Mr. A. Ludlaw, member of the Provincial Council for Ahuriri, by which name the northern portion of the province was known. In this report it was estimated that the bush was seventy miles in extent. In Australia he found the gold-fever  raging, and by way of a decided change from his former employment, he joined the mounted patrol and did gold escort duty between Bathurst and the Turon fields. Within a year, however, he was back in Wellington, and thence he walked to Homewood Station in Hawke’s Bay, a run of 10,000 acres which had fallen to his brother through the dissolution of the partnership with Mr. Northwood. He was placed in charge of the stock and successfully set to work to eradicate that most destructive disease among sheep, the scab, from which the flocks had not been entirely free for Seven years. Later on Mr. Tiffen was appointed inspector of sheep and registrar of brands under the Provincial Government of Wellington, and held the positions for twelve years, during which period the sheep in the district increased from 55,097 to 464,312. At the same time Mr. Tiffen was manager of the Gwavas and Milbourne sheep stations. In 1859 he acquired his present “Elmshill” estate in Hawke’s Bay and married the second daughter of Dr. Monteith, coroner and provincial surgeon, who with his wife and family had resided in Wellington since 1839. Mr. and Mrs. Tiffen have three daughters and four sons; the latter own 17,000 acres of land in Poverty Bay which Mr. Tiffen had purchased from the natives.

Mr. HENRY STOKES TIFFEN, whose useful life closed on the 21st of February, 1896, was a prominent New Zealand colonist for over half a century. On the 9th February, 1842, in company with several other surveyors of whom but one – Mr. A. J. Allom – now remains, Mr. Tiffen landed at Wellington under engagement to the New Zealand Company. He was one of the first to cross the Rimutaka Ranges to the Wairarapa. Leaving his cattle run in the Wairarapa,  he journeyed overland into Hawke’s Bay, taking with him a mob of sheep – the first introduced to the district – and leased a very large tract of country from the Maoris, on which he successfully carried on sheep farming. He subsequently purchased his Greenmeadows Estate. On the separation of Hawke’s Bay from Wellington, Mr. Tiffen accepted the position of chief surveyor and commissioner of crown lands, and on his resignation some years later, he was elected to the Provincial Council of Hawke’s Bay. On the abolition of the provinces and the introduction of the county system, he was chosen first chairman of the Hawke’s Bay County Council, and did much to put the affairs of the county on a firm footing. In every walk of life, Mr. Tiffen set a good example to his fellow Colonists. As chairman of the Hawke’s Bay Hospital and Charitable Aid Board, and of the Children’s Home, and as a liberal supporter of the High School, he exerted a beneficial influence that will be long felt. To the Home particularly Mr. Tiffen was a tower of strength and it is regarded as a monument to his energy and liberality. Speaking of the deceased gentleman, the “Hawke’s Bay Herald” in its obituary notice, said “Even to the last he was actively engaged in trying to show by practical example how the rich lands of the Ahuriri Plains could be profitably worked as fruit farms and vineyards, while for several years he was engaged in experiments in growing beet-root sugar. Kindliness and sympathy with all who were struggling or in distress were ever his most prominent characteristics. Many a successful settler owes his start in life to the ready aid of Mr. Tiffen, and no case of genuine distress ever appealed to him and was sent empty away. Wealth came to him as the reward of his early years of hard, uphill work, but he truly held it as if in trust for others. To all religious denominations, Presbyterian, Baptist, or Roman Catholic, he was a generous friend, and his own beloved Church of England owes much to him. The fine cathedral, of which Napier is so justly proud, was made possible largely by his munificent liberality. Few knew so well how to use fortune and none grudged him the success he achieved.” Mr. Tiffen left two brothers, a sister (Mrs. C. J. A. Haselden, of Wellington), and a number of nephews and nieces. One of the latter, Mrs. A. M. Randall, occupies the home in Tennyson Street, where Mr. Tiffen was so well known.

Mr. HUTTON TROUTBECK, who died in 1893 in his fifty-eighth year, was a prominent colonist of Hawke’s Bay for more than a quarter of a century. He was in partnership with Messrs. Thomas and William Richardson in large undertakings connected with sheep farming, but for some twelve years prior to his death, he conducted the business on his own account. His principal estate was “Blencowe,” at Petane, where he died, but he had property all along the line to Galatea. Mr. Troutbeck has been greatly missed, for he was an enterprising, thorough-going colonist. He was born in Blencowe, in Cumberland, and came to this Colony in 1860. Mrs. Troutbeck and her only son live in Napier.

Photo caption – THE LATE MR. H. S. TIFFEN.

170   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

SHEEP FARMERS ETC.

BROUGHTON WILLIAM, Runholder, Ngapuke (The Hills), Omahu. Mr. Broughton’s run contains 2600 acres of good pastoral land and carries 6000 crossbred sheep and about 100 head of cattle. The sporting public know Mr. Broughton best as a successful breeder of good racing stock, among which may be mentioned “Forest Rose,” “Rangipuinhu,” “Titike,” “First Blood,” “Rakahoe,” and others. Mr. Broughton afterwards disposed of his stud to Mr. Richardson, of Napier. He is a native of Wanganui, where he was born in 1857, educated in the native school at Pakohai [Pakowhai?] and at Mr. Reardon’s school in Napier, and brought up to agricultural pursuits. He has resided on the station for the past twenty years. He is vice-president of the Town and Suburban Jockey Club and member of numerous other clubs. He is married to a daughter of the well-known Bay of Plenty chief, Tuhoe, and has four sons and three daughters.

CRISSOGE STATION (George Prior Donnelly, proprietor) is about eleven miles from Napier, and also includes the Ngatarawa property a few miles further on. The area of “Crissoge” is about 9000 acres, and 20,000 sheep of the Lincoln type are depastured. There are also 500 head of shorthorn cattle (Bate’s blood) and sixty horses, including the famous sire “Gold Reef.”

WAIMARAMA, another station on the coast south of the Kidnappers, twenty-four miles by water from Napier and about three hours’ drive from Hastings, contains 17,000 acres, all limestone downs, and carries 30,000 sheep of the Lincoln type. There are also 1800 shorthorn cattle and about seventy horses.

THE MANGAOHANE RUN comprises about 17,000 acres of freehold and a few thousand acres of leasehold, and is stocked with 23,000 first cross Lincoln and merino sheep.

OHURUKURA [OHURAKURA], about thirty miles from Napier on the Taupo Road, is another of Mr. Donnelly’s runs. It consists of 26,000 acres of freehold and leasehold country, and carries 16,000 Lincoln-merino sheep, 300 head of cattle, and twenty-five horses.

RAUKAWA is a small property which also belongs to Mr. Donnelly, and contains 2000 acres of superior totara and matai forest. On this there are 500 shorthorn steers. Besides the foregoing runs, Mr. Donnelly has numerous smaller properties, some of them as far away as the Rangitikei and Manawatu districts.

Mr. GEORGE PRIOR DONNELLY, the enterprising proprietor of the above estates, manages them personally, he being possessed of an inexhaustible store of activity and strength. He is the breeder and owner of a very large number of valuable animals, and has always been an ardent sportsman, having ridden and owned some of the most noted cross-country horses in the Colony, and won many races both on the flat and over country. In passing judgement on the imported sire “Gold Reef,” the property of Mr. Donnelly, the “Hawke’s Bay Herald” said: “As he stood for inspection, covering a lot of ground without the slightest bit of lumber showing, with perfect feet, he presented himself as the beau ideal of a racehorse and sire. Handsome he should be too, for no horse in the world possesses a better pedigree, and certainly no horse with a more fashionable pedigree, or one more likely to make a successful sire, has ever left England.” “Following up the Turf,” as his forefathers, is a hobby with Mr. Donnelly, and he spares neither trouble nor expense to keep himself in the front rank as a breeder. As early as 1864 he was a member of the Auckland Cavalry and rode his first race at Tamaki in the Garrison Hunt Steeplechase. A son of Mr. Patrick Donnelly, a landed proprietor of County Tipperary, Mr. Donnelly was born at “Brittus,” an old family residence, which had belonged to the Langleys, his mother’s side of the family, she being the daughter of Mr. John Prior, a large landed proprietor of County Waterford, and brother of the well-known Dr. Prior, of Dublin University. Educated in County Limerick, Mr. Donnelly left for this Colony in 1863 with his mother and family. His father having died in 1861, this step was recommended by an uncle, Captain Hamilton, who had visited the Colony in command of the “Esk,” and who was subsequently killed at the Gate Pah.

Photo captions –
THE LATE MR. H. TROUTBECK. See page 1.
MR. W. BROUGHTON.
MR. G. P. DONNELLY.
MR. H. WARREN.

SHEEP FARMERS, ETC.   171

Landing in Auckland, Mr. Donnelly lived for a time at Wairoa South, and went to Hawke’s Bay in 1867, where he became manager of Major Carlyon’s run. Mr. Donnelly, however, soon after took up land on his own account, and in thirty years he has achieved a wonderful success. On account of having so much of his own business to attend to, he has always declined public office. Mr. Donnelly married in 1877 the daughter of the late great Chief Karauria, and niece of Tareha, the celebrated Hawke’s Bay Chief, and has an only surviving daughter.

DOLBEL, PHILIP, Sheepfarmer, Taradale, Napier. Mr. Dolbel was born in Jersey, Channel Islands, in 1827, followed a seafaring life from an early age and owned a vessel called the “Hearty,” trading on the English coast. He came to New Zealand from Melbourne in 1855, landing at Wellington from the brig “Hokoporinga” and for about twelve months was employed at bridge building, etc. He came to Hawke’s Bay in 1856 and resided for a considerable time at Clive, engaged in various pursuits in that district until 1869. He was more than once burnt out by the Maoris and suffered great losses. Some thirty-five years ago he purchased about 900 acres, part of his present beautiful estate at Springfield, on which he runs over 3000 sheep. To this property he has added to the large station at Petane, consisting of 24,000 acres and which is now one of the successful sheepfarms of Hawke’s Bay. Since Mr. Dolbel’s arrival in Hawke’s Bay, he has worked very hard for the district and gained considerable reputation in politics, having been member of the Provincial Council for over sixteen years. He was also member of the Hawke’s Bay County Council, many of the most important works being carried out during his term of office. He has always taken a keen interest in harbour works, having been member of the Napier Harbour Board for years, his experience in various parts of the world being extensive, many of his valuable suggestions have borne good results. His well-known figure is often seen in Napier, though latterly his visits into town are becoming less frequent, but his kindly smile, friendly counsel and help will long live in the memory of his host of friends.

OKAWA STATION (Thomas Henry Lowry, proprietor) is one of the finest stations in the neighbourhood of Napier, and includes a small property named “Dartmoor” on the opposite side of the Tutaekuri River. The total area is 20,000 acres. The handsome homestead is surrounded by beautiful grounds. Thirty-five thousand Lincoln sheep and lambs are shorn annually, and the herd of shorthorn cattle numbers 550, many of them being exceptionally valuable animals. Of the eighty horses at “Okawa”, many are pure bred from blood sires and mares. Of these there are the favourite sires “St. Conon” and “Dotterel,” and “Lady Helen” and ‘‘Woodthorpe,” besides the mare “Bijou.” Mr. Lowry breeds pedigree shorthorn bulls for sale, and has some of the finest animals in the Colony. There is a large demand for his Lincoln rams, and his stock of breeding ewes numbers over 300. In sheep and cattle

Photo captions –
MR. P. DOLBEL.
MR. T. H. LOWRY.
MR. T. H. LOWRY’S INFANT SON AT FIVE MONTHS.
MR. T. H. LOWRY’S HOMESTEAD AT OKAWA.

172   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND

particularly Mr. Lowry has been a successful prize-taker for many years, as was his father, who is generally credited with being the first in the district to introduce good breeds of cattle, horses and sheep.

Mr. THOMAS LOWRY arrived in the early fifties, and acquired the Okawa Estate and other properties in the district. He was gifted with the faculty of inspiring confidence in the natives, and his son is now reaping the reward of his father’s enterprise and foresight.

Mr. T. H. LOWRY, present proprietor, was born on the estate in 1865, and, being the only son, he inherited the property. He was educated at Christ’s College, Canterbury, and was afterwards at the Royal Agricultural College of England, whither he went in 1883, and, later, at Jesus College, Cambridge. He distinguished himself on the football fields of both colleges, and continued to sustain his reputation in this respect after his return to New Zealand. Mr. Lowry is a member of the committee of the Acclimatisation Society, a steward of the Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club, a member of the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural Society, and a director of the North British and Hawke’s Bay Freezing Company, Ltd. He was married in 1897 to the daughter of the late Mr. James Watt, of Napier. A portrait of Mr. Lowry’s son, at the age of five months, accompanies this notice, and it will be seen that the little fellow is a fine specimen of “Young New Zealand.”

TANNER, THOMAS, Sheepfarmer, “Balquhidder,” Napier. Mr. Tanner was born in Wiltshire, England, in 1830, his father, Mr. Joseph Tanner, being a landed proprietor in that county. He began the study of medicine, but not liking the profession came to    Wellington in 1850 and went to Wanganui to learn sheep farming with Mr. John Cameron, a large stock owner in that district. In the beginning of 1853 Mr. Tanner came to Hawke’s Bay and took up a large run on the Ruataniwha Plains. Some years afterwards he took up lands on the Ahuriri Plains, and later on acquired the Endsleigh and Patene [Petane] runs. The Endsleigh run, which comprises some of the finest land in the Havelock district, contains about 3000 acres of freehold and the Patene run 14,000 acres of leasehold, both properties being sown in English grasses. Mr. Tanner has always identified himself with the fortunes of the province; during the native troubles he took part in raising the Waipawa and Hawke’s Bay Cavalry Volunteers and proceeded with his troop to the relief of the settlers and friendly natives at the time of the Mohaka and Poverty Bay massacres. Mr. Tanner has been always a keen politician and represented Waipawa from 1887 till 1890 as a supporter of the Atkinson Government. He was for many years a member of the various local bodies. In 1893 he visited England, when he resigned all his public offices except his seat on the Education Board. During his long residence in the district Mr. Tanner has taken a prominent part in all matters for the advancement of the district. He married an English lady and has eight children, several of whom are married and settled in Hawke’s Bay.

SPIT.

THE SPIT is the landing place of Napier with which it is connected by rail and telegraph and is distant two miles. There is a breakwater and other harbour works. Mails are exchanged with the chief office three times daily and there are all the usual postal facilities.

THE SPIT POST OFFICE occupies a central position and is an old building which might very fittingly be replaced by one better suited to the requirements of the times. The postmaster, Mr. William Wilkie, is assisted by a staff of three. The telegraph, money order, and Government Life Insurance branches are also under the control of the postmaster. Mails arrive and depart three times daily, in addition to seaborne mails.

Mr. WILLIAM WILKIE, Postmaster at the Spit, is a well-known and extremely popular official. He was born in Invergowrie, near Dundee, in 1840, is the son of the late Mr. William Wilkie, builder and stone quarry owner, was educated at the National schools and at Grigg’s Academy, Perth, and was apprenticed to the sea. In

Photo captions –
MR. T. TANNER.
MR. W. WILKIE.
UNION STEAMSHIP CO.’S OFFICES, SPIT.

SPIT.   173

1862 he was on the coasting schooner “Geelong,” trading between Lyttelton and Dunedin. He joined the Survey Department of the Otago Provincial Government, and was one of the first party to traverse the almost impassable country between Queenstown and Martin’s Bay in 1865. He next joined the Post and Telegraph Department, was at Roxburgh and Naseby, and lastly appointed to his present position in 1871. He is a past master of the Masonic Lodge Victoria and a past grand of the Manchester Unity of Oddfellows. He was married in 1873 to a daughter of Mr. T. B. Harding, of Napier, and has a daughter and seven sons.

PORT AHURIRI DISTRICT SCHOOL occupies a prominent position between the wharves of the Inner Harbour and Scinde Island. It is under the control of Mr. John Wolstenholme, who has three assistant teachers and six pupil-teachers. The school consists of five large, lofty, and well-lighted class-rooms. The number of pupils on the roll is about 400. A good average number of scholarships is gained every year by the school. There is a gymnasium and the boys and girls are exercised in drill and calisthenics.

Mr. JOHN WOLSTENHOLME, Headmaster of the Port Ahuriri District School, has an extensive English and Colonial scholastic experience. He was born in Rishton, Lancashire, in 1857, and is the son of Mr. J. Wolstenholme of that town, where he was educated. He was assistant master at the Belgrave schools, Darwen, and three years later was appointed headmaster of the Bolton Road school in the same locality. Here he remained eight years with much credit to himself, but failing health compelled him to seek a milder climate. On the occasion of his leaving for the Colony, Mr. Wolstenholme was presented by the manager and teachers of the Bolton Road school with an illuminated address, handsomely bound and framed. On his arrival in Napier in 1886 he was appointed to the headmastership of the Norsewood school, but two years later resigned and returned to his native land. His health not permitting him to live in England, however, he returned to Napier in 1890 and was appointed to his present position. Mr. Wolstenholme is a Mason unattached, but is an active member of Napier Lodge of the Manchester Unity Oddfellows. He was married in 1881 to Miss M. A. Leech, of Darwen, and has two sons and three daughters.

ST. ANDREW’S CHURCH, Spit. Rev. Oliver Dean (incumbent).

The Rev. OLIVER DEAN, Vicar of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church at the Spit, is well known throughout Hawke’s Bay and the Poverty Bay districts. The reverend gentleman was born in London in 1856, is a son of Mr. H. L. Dean, of Manchester, was educated in London and came to the Colony in 1870. Deciding to enter the ministry, Mr. Dean prosecuted his studies with that view, and was ordained deacon in 1886 and priest some three years later. His first charge was the curacy of Gisborne, under Canon Fox. Prior to his appointment as vicar of St. Andrews, Mr. Dean had charge of the Woodville church, which, however, he relinquished in favour of his present appointment in 1890. Mr. Dean is the diocesan correspondent for the “Church News,” and is Church of England chaplain to the Napier Hospital and Old Men’s Refuge. The vicar takes a deep interest in all religious and social questions. He was married in 1890 to a daughter of Mr. R. Holt, sawmiller, and has a son and two daughters. Mrs. Dean is indefatigable in Church work and is one of the organists of St. Andrew’s.

GIFFORD, PLOWMAN AND CO. (William Gifford, William Plowman, and F. W. Robjohns), Aerated Water and Cordial Manufacturers, Battery Road, The Spit.  Telephone 121. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Private residences: Mr. Gifford, Buller Road; Mr. Plowman, Chaucer Road; Mr. Robjohns, France Road. The business of this firm, which is undoubtedly the largest of its kind in Hawke’s Bay, was established many years ago and was purchased in 1894 by the present proprietors. It was formerly carried on under the style of Thomson, Gifford and Co., Mr. Thomson being also the senior partner of Messrs. Thomson, Lewis and Co., of Wellington and Wanganui, and Mr. Gifford, the late brother of the present partner of that name. The establishment of Messrs. Gifford, Plowman and Co. is thoroughly up-to-date, all the machinery being of the best description, a four and a half horse-power Otto silent gas engine supplying the motive power, and throughout the factory are evidences of first-rate management.  A very large business is done and several delivery carts are in constant use. Special rooms are set apart for vinegar-brewing, culinary essence- making, spice-grinding, bottling, packing, etc.

Mr. WILLIAM GIFFORD was born in Otahuhu, near Auckland, in 1864, and is the son of Mr. George Gifford, brewer and maltster of Napier. Educated in Napier, he learned his trade with his late brother, Mr. T. H. Gifford, whose manager he was for several years. Mr. Gifford was married in 1897 to the daughter of Mr. Balwin Franklyn, of Germany.

Mr. F. W. ROBJOHNS, the sleeping partner, is the well-known brewer, and is referred to elsewhere under a separate  heading.

DENHOLM, WILLIAM, General Storekeeper, Glasgow House, Waghorne and Churchhill Streets, The Spit. Telephone 136. Bankers, National Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Denholm, who is an old resident of the Spit, hails from Charlestown, a Fifeshire seaport on the Firth of Forth, where he was born in 1837, is the son of Mr Thomas Denholm, a boat-builder of those parts, and was educated in his native town. Going to Glasgow he was employed for a few years in Mr. John Read’s wine and tea warehouse in Exchange Square. At the age of eighteen, he obtained an engagement with the firm of Stuart and Kinross in Glasgow, and came out in 1855 with those gentlemen, per ship “Maori” to Wellington, where they immediately set up in business. Three years later, the firm opened a branch in Napier, under the management of Mr. Alex. Kennedy, late father of Mr C. D. Kennedy, the well-known solicitor of Napier, and Mr. Denholm came to Napier. On the dissolution of the firm he remained with Mr Kinross for a few years, then afterwards entered the service of Mr. Stuart, continuing with him until about 1878, when he started his own business. The Spit was a small place when Mr. Denholm first settled there and few have done more unostentatiously than he has to push it ahead. The Spit has in turn done well for Mr.

Photo captions –
MR. W. GIFFORD.
MR. W. DENHOLM.

174   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Denholm, who, during his forty years’ residence, accumulated a good deal of property there. In military matters he took an active part and was in the militia from its organisation to its disbandment. He took part in the fight at Omaranui, and in the hunt after Te Kooti, for which service he obtained the New Zealand war medal. Mr Denholm was a member of the first local school committee, and for many years was an active member of the Spit Fire Brigade. For about fifteen years he was a prominent member of the Ancient Order of Oddfellows, having passed through all the principal chairs; he is also a member of Masonic Lodge Victoria. He was on the management committee of St. Paul’s Presbyterian church, Napier, until the erection of the Spit church, in which he was elected to a similar office. In 1862 he married the daughter of the late Mr. John Slater, of Napier, and has six daughters and four sons. Of the former, one is married to Mr. Henry Bull, another to Mr. Edward Bull, and another to the Rev. R. McCully. His eldest son is in West Australia, and the others are employed in the business.

WIDERSTROM, UNO THURE GIDEON, Ship Chandler, Sail and Flag Maker, Tent and Oilskin Manufacturer, Waghorne Street, The Spit. Established 1878. Private residence, Roslyn Road. Capt. Widerstrom’s business is an extensive one and employs over six hands. The premises are large and spacious, with an immense stock of the various articles required in the trade. Capt. Widerstrom is a native of Finland and was brought up to the sea from his early years. He commanded various vessels and has sailed under the British flag for fifteen years and the American flag for five years. For a number of years he was engaged in the inter-colonial trade, commanding the “May Wadley’’ and afterwards the “Pendle Hill.” He sold out his interest in the latter vessel in 1895 and purchased his present business. Capt. Widerstrom has been a Mason and an Oddfellow for many years. He is married and has three children.

GREENMEADOWS.

GREENMEADOWS. This township lies to the south-west of Napier, from which it is distant three miles. It is within the county and electoral district of Hawke’s Bay. There is a daily postal service between the township and Napier, but the nearest telephone office is a mile distant at Taradale. Conveyance between Napier and Greenmeadows is by coach.

BOWRON AND BUTCHER (late Bowron Bros.), Wool-Brokers, Wool-Scourers, Fell-mongers, etc, Greenmeadows. P.O. Box 149; telephone 262. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. This firm’s business was established many years ago by Messrs. Bowron Bros., of Christchurch, by whom it was carried on until 1894, when Mr. H. F. Butcher joined the business. The premises are situated on three acres of ground, and in the busy season between forty and fifty hands are employed. An eight horsepower steam engine drives the machinery, water being obtained from two artesian wells, and has a pressure of about twelve pounds to the square inch. Wool and skins are bought from the neighbouring farmers and pelts from the freezing-works, large shipments being made direct to London. Messrs. Bowron Bros. are fully mentioned in the Canterbury volume of the Cyclopedia in connection with their firm in Christchurch.

MR. HENRY FAIRBURN BUTCHER, of the above firm, is a son of Mr. H. R. Butcher, woolcomber and fellmonger, of Kaiapoi.

TARADALE.

TARADALE is almost a suburb of Napier, from which it is only six miles distant, and with which it has hourly communication by coach. It is situated within the county and electoral district of Hawke’s Bay. Mails are received and despatched twice daily, and there is a telephone office in the township. The local school has an average attendance of about 150 pupils.

POTHAN BROS. (R. J. and J. A. Pothan), Coachbuilders, Wheelwrights, and General Blacksmiths, Taradale. The business now owned by this firm was established many years ago, by Mr John Drummond now of Dannevirke, and was purchased by the present proprietors from Mr. Bower in 1897. Messrs. Pothan Bros. have made for themselves a reputation as builders of rustic dogcarts with patent movable seats and spring folding-back seats. They have greatly increased their business, and have a good town and country connection.

Mr. R. J. POTHAN was born in Canterbury and his brother in Westland, and both were educated and brought up in Hokitika. The first-named worked in Christchurch and at Ahaura on the West Coast before settling at Taradale.

Mr. J. A. POTHAN , on the expiry of his apprenticeship, went to Eketahuna, and was  in partnership with Mr Wright, coach-builder, until buying into the present business. While in Eketahuna he was a member of the school committee, a trustee of the cemetery, and master of the local brass band, which was formed by him. In Greymouth he was an active member of the Fire Brigade, and besides being the winner of a cup and several medals, he holds a certificate for general efficiency.

WATERHOUSE, WILLIAM, J. P., Orchardist, Taradale and Papakura, Hawke’s Bay. Mr. Waterhouse has two orchards and attends to both with the assistance of his four sons. The one at Taradale is the original holding, on which the homestead is situated. Its area is eight and a half acres, and there are four hothouses for grapes and one for tomatoes, the total area under glass being nearly 4000 square feet. Large quantities of table-grapes are raised every year and besides supplying the local markets, Mr Waterhouse forwards supplies of them to both the Wellington and Taranaki districts. The Papakura property contains thirty acres, of which about a sixth is occupied by fruit trees in great variety, the major portion being cropped with oats, maize, potatoes, carrots, mangolds, melons, etc. Both places are in excellent order. Mr. Waterhouse was born in Burwash, Sussex, England, in 1848, where he had a large experience, and came to this Colony in 1874 per ship “Bebington,” landing at Napier. In the following year he established himself at Taradale. Mr. Waterhouse has been in various ways connected with local matters; he has been a member of the Taradale Town Board and School Committee, of which latter body he was secretary for two years and chairman for a year. For a few years he was clerk to the Meanee [Meeanee] Road Board, and for the past fifteen years clerk to the Taradale River Board. He was appointed a Justice of the Peace in 1893.

Photo captions –
CAPTAIN WIDERSTROM.
MR. W. WATERHOUSE.

TARADALE.   175

Mr. THOMAS ANDREW SHIRLEY, Settler, “Mt. Wensley”, Taradale, is a well-known and highly respected Colonist, who has spent almost the whole of his life in New Zealand. He was born in 1837 in the parish of Horsington, Somersetshire, England, and is the son of Mr. Thomas Shirley, who landed in Wellington with his family from the ship “Arab” in 1841, and leased some sections of land at the Lower Hutt. At that time it was common for all residents of the Hutt Valley to be called into barracks for protection from hostile Maoris, but Mr. Shirley was averse to giving in to them, and he and his sons had to carry on their farming operations under martial law and efficiently armed. Many were their narrow escapes from violence at the hands of the natives. When at length war openly broke out, the Maoris killed eleven soldiers, and one who was dangerously wounded would certainly have made a twelfth victim but for the bravery of Mr. Shirley, senior, who ran to his assistance and amidst a shower of bullets carried him to a place of safety. After the war was over the hero of this incident continued farming at the Hutt until 1856, when he purchased land at Puketapu, near Napier, and resided there until his death in 1887 at the advanced age of eighty-six, being followed a year later by his wife, who was also eighty-six at the time of her death. Both are buried at Napier in the family grave, which already contains four generations. Educated and trained to farm life, Mr. T. A. Shirley joined in Fox’s “rush” to Lake Wakatipu, and for a few months kept a store at Queenstown. Going afterwards to Invercargill, he entered the employment of Messrs. Morison and Law, merchants, and remained with them until 1867, when he returned to Wellington and began farming at “Longwood” in the Wairarapa, now the property of Mr. Charles Pharazyn. Three years later Mr. Shirley took Abbott’s Featherston Hotel, and after a similar period there bought the Royal Hotel in the same town. This he also conducted for three years, replacing the old building in, 1874 with a fine new hotel of about forty rooms. He then retired to “Underhill,” a large private house which he had built near Featherston, but in 1880 he let this, and moved to Napier, where he bought the Masonic Hotel. Selling out of that two years later he bought ‘‘Korokepo [Korokipo] ”, a  property of 340 acres, which he farmed until 1885, when he leased it, and in 1897 he sold it to Mr. William Nelson, of Tomoana. Mr. Shirley now lives in retirement at “Mt. Wensley”, a charming home on a block of eighteen acres of land all thoroughly cultivated and with orchard, tennis lawn, flower gardens, and paddocks. Mrs. Shirley was also born in Somersetshire, and came to Wellington with her parents (Mr. and Mrs. Bicknell) in 1841, being then but a few months old.

Mr. WILLIAM SMITH, of Upper Papakura, near Taradale, was born and educated at Montrose, Scotland, where his father was an architect. He came to New Zealand, via Melbourne, in the clipper ship “Shalemar,” and landed in Napier, then known as Port Ahuriri, in the end of 1855. Since then he has gone through a varied experience. Taking up land on the bank of the Tutaekuri river, near Puketapu, he underwent all the difficulties and privations of a pioneer. He remembers the starting of the first bullock-sledge in the district, at Poraite, and heard the rumble of the first horse-dray in Napier. When Hawke’s Bay Province was separated from Wellington in 1858, he was appointed to the barren office of deputy-provincial auditor, which he held until the abolition of provincialism in 1876. During the disquieting times of the Maori disturbances his family lived quietly in the country, whilst he was engaged as a militiaman at the Omaranui fight, for which he holds the New Zealand medal. Having been a quiet, sober, unassuming and efficient settler, he ultimately succeeded in acquiring sufficient property to enable him to retire to his present comfortable homestead. Though he has completed his seventieth year, he still enjoys vigorous health, is an active member of the Napier Bowling and Golf Clubs, and thinks nothing of cycling into Napier and back, a distance of seven or eight miles each way. He was married in 1851 to a daughter of Mr. Thomas Alexander, a Forfarshire farmer, and niece of the late Mr. Alex. Alexander, one of the first European settlers in this district, who had almost unbounded influence with the natives at a time when law and order could scarcely be said to prevail. Mr. Smith has had eleven children, of whom nine survive; he and his good wife are highly respected throughout the district, and are enjoying a green old age, hoping in a year or two, to celebrate their golden wedding.

BENNETT, JOHN SAMUEL, Sheep-farmer, Nga Taihira. Mr. Bennett was born at Puketapu in 1867 and is the eldest son of Mr John Bennett, of Newstead; he was educated at the Napier High School and Wellington College, and brought up to pastoral pursuits by his father, and latterly has been managing a  property of 163 acres, which are under crop and in grass. Mr. Bennett grazes a flock of about 1000 Lincoln sheep. He is a member of the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society and is much interested in sporting affairs, including football, golf etc. Mr. Bennett is a member of the famous Wharerangi Polo Club, which played against all New Zealand in the Champion Tournament and won the junior cup at Auckland, as well as running second for the Saville Cup at Hastings in the following year. He was married in 1892 to the daughter of Mr. Heslop, and has one son.

Photo captions –
MR. T. A. SHIRLEY.
MR. W. SMITH.
MR. J. S. BENNETT.

176   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

CODD, CHARLES, Sheep-farmer, Moteo. Mr. Codd occupies a very fine property of 369 acres of arable land in a sheltered valley. About 100 acres are under crop and the remainder is in grass. The land produces sixty bushels of oats and seventy bushels of barley to the acre; 800 Lincoln sheep are depastured, besides cattle and horses. The farm is furnished with the latest machinery and  implements, including a Cambridge roller, combined threshing and traction engine, an elevator for stacking, three of Hornby’s reapers and binders, two of Kersley’s mowing machines, a double-bagging chaff cutter by Andrews and Beaven, two double-furrow ploughs, sowing drill, disc and Tyne harrows, etc. Born in Grainthorpe, Lincolnshire, England, in 1858, and the son of a farmer, Mr. Codd was educated in his native place and brought up to agricultural pursuits on his father’s farm. In 1881 he came to this Colony, per ship “Rakaia,” Captain Metcalf, and landed in Wellington. Proceeding to Hawke’s Bay, Mr. Codd found suitable employment with the Hon. J. D. Ormond for over two years. Mr. Codd was afterwards with Mr. John Bennett and with Mr. Philip Dolbel, and closed his career as an employee with a few months in Mr. Lowmen’s service. Removing to Taradale, he spent three years there as a contractor for ploughing, road metalling, carting, etc., and then, in 1890, he leased his present holding. Mr. Codd is a member of the Manchester Unity Oddfellows, and when in Taradale was a member of the school committee. He was married in 1887 to a niece of Mr. Philip Dolbel, and has two sons and two daughters.

HESLOP, WILLIAM, J.P., Sheepfarmer, Omaranui, near Napier. Mr. Heslop, who has led a life full of interest and activity, was born at Blackhill, Northumberland, in 1845, and came to this colony with his parents in 1856. His estate is probably the one spot of great historical interest in Hawke’s Bay, for on it was fought the battle of Omaranui, the site of which is now marked by a large willow tree. The interest of the place is, of course, very much heightened by the fact that Mr. Heslop himself was in the thick of the fight. For over forty years he has taken an active part in all local movements. He joined the militia in 1864 and the cavalry in 1868, and wears the New Zealand war medal. Te Kooti, the great rebel chief, at one time, under the name of Hiroke, worked for Mr. Heslop’s father in charge of the men employed to drain the Puketapu property, and was well known to the family. Some time after this Hiroke was tried at Poverty Bay for some trivial offence, and obtained the nickname of “Te Kooti,’ the Maori rendering of “The Court,” or “the man who was tried by the court.” Even after Te Kooti had broken out in open hostility, Mr. Heslop received messages from the redoubtable warrior under the old name of Hiroke. After the memorable massacre of Poverty Bay, in 1868, Mr. Heslop, as a mounted trooper, was sent to the district to assist in the burial of the mutilated bodies of the victims, many of whom had been personally known to him. This he describes as the saddest work he ever performed, though in April of the following year he had to take part in a similarly sad interment of the victims of the Mohaka massacre, whither he went as orderly trooper to Major Lambert. Mr. Heslop claims that during his two years of patrol duty he never once missed his drill, and that he was the only militiaman of whom that could be truthfully said. Accustomed from boyhood to mix amongst the Maoris, he had little fear of them. He is said to have been the first European to carry the mails between Ressington [Rissington] and Puketapu. Mr. Heslop has always taken a keen interest in politics, and ever since the old provincial days has been chairman of Captain Russell’s Omaranui and Puketapu election committees. He has been a member of the Okawa Road Board and chairman of the Puketapu School Committee, is a member of the Hawke’s Bay Racing Committee, Napier Park Racing Club, and has always been prominent as an exhibitor at the agricultural shows of the district. No fewer than thirty silver medals for cattle, horses and sheep have fallen to Mr. Heslop’s family in Hawke’s Bay, including first prizes for a shorthorn bull and shorthorn cow as far back as 1863 at the first Havelock Show. As a judge of sheep at Gisborne, and draught tones Wanganui, Mr. Heslop has earned a reputation, whilst Mrs. Heslop has carried off a number of dairy prizes. Mr. Heslop was married to the daughter of Mr. Thomas Waldrom, farmer, of Waipawa, and has three daughters and two sons, the eldest daughter being the wife of Mr. J. S. Bennett, of whom mention is made in these pages. The daughters are artists of no mean order, and a number of their paintings adorn the walls of the homestead at Omaranui.

MEANEE [MEEANEE].

MEANEE is a post town and old mission station on the Tutaekuri river, five miles from Napier with which it is connected by coach. There is an hotel, public and private schools, and Roman Catholic church. The drive from Napier is a very enjoyable one.

MEANEE MISSION AND SEMINARY. The Roman Catholic Mission at Meanee was founded in 1858 by the Very Rev. Father Regnier [Reignier], S.M. Eight years previously, in December, 1850, he had, with the assistance of Rev. Father Lampila, S.M., and two lay Brothers, Basin and Florentin, established the first Catholic Mission in the Ahuriri Plains, now the Province of Hawke’s Bay, at Poukawa on the banks of the river Ngaruroro. The Maori chief of the district gave them a few acres of land which the two lay Brothers cultivated, and on which they built a hut or whare, and afterwards a somewhat more comfortable dwelling in a position less exposed to the inundations of the river. In 1851 Father Lampila left Poukawa to establish a mission on the banks of the Upper Wanganui, and Father Regnier remained alone to carry on the work of the mission in a vast district which extended beyond the limits of the present province of Hawke’s Bay. He had to travel long distances on foot, across rough country without roads or bridges, with no other food but coarse Maori fare and with no place of rest but a wretched whare. Nothing daunted, Father Regnier persevered in his good work for forty years, spreading the light of faith amongst the natives and bringing the consolations of religion to the early settlers. In 1856 the missionaries, finding that, on account of  hostilities between their friend Powore and another chief, their position at Poukawa had become very precarious, purchased from the Government a large tract of land at Meanee on the left bank of the Tutaekuri, and on 11th of May, 1858, after the death of Powore in a battle with Karaitiana, they transferred thither the mission and all its belongings, including the cottage, which continued to be the residence of the missionaries for more than twenty-five years. While the lay Brothers were converting a wilderness into productive land, Father Regnier laboured for

Photo captions –
MR. C. CODD.
MR. W. HESLOP.

MEANEE.   177

the spiritual welfare of the natives and also of the Europeans, whose numbers were then fast increasing. Through his exertions land was bought and churches were built, at Napier in 1859, at Waipawa in 1874, at Hastings in 1881, and at Wairoa in 1882. These churches soon became centres of missionary districts with resident priests, and all claim Father Regnier as their founder. At Meanee divine service was held for some years in the mission house, until in 1863 a small church was built, to which a transept was added in 1874. As the Catholic population gradually increased it was found necessary in 1892, when it reached the number of five hundred, to enlarge the church to its present form. Father Regnier also erected a school in Napier in 1869 for native and half-caste girls, and another for Maori children at Meanee in 1872. Owing to the difficulty, however, of recruiting Maori boys, the Meanee school became eventually the parish school, and since 1886 it has been under the direction of the Sisters of St. Joseph. The average attendance of day-pupils is ninety and the building, which now bears the name of St. Mary’s College, has, besides, accommodation for about thirty boarders. Amongst the many improvements made by the lay Brothers in the Mission estate is the cultivation of grape vines. Some samples of the Meanee Mission wine were sent, at the request of the French Consul, Comte D’Abbans, to the Paris Exposition in 1892, and were awarded a silver medal for excellence and purity. The local medical faculty frequently recommend the mission wine to their patients, and it is owing to its success that a considerable number of vineyards have been planted by other settlers in various parts of the district. In 1880 a large and commodious building was erected, which was intended to serve as a residence for the members of the mission and as a retreat for members of the Society of Mary, who are  incapacitated by age or infirmities. Here Father Regnier ended his days on 29th of October, 1888. His honoured remains rest in the cemetery at Taradale under a monumental cross erected by his numerous friends of every denomination, as a tribute of their respect and esteem. Brother Basil, who had been the faithful companion of Father Regnier and his principal co-operator in the foundation of the Meanee Mission and the promotion of its material prosperity, and who spent fifty-seven years labouring on the mission field in New Zealand, went peacefully to his reward on the 2nd of April, 1898, at the ripe old age of eighty-four. Mention  must also be made of Father Michel, S.M., who had been a missionary in Fiji and who worked for nearly twenty years as curate at Meanee, till his death in October, 1887. In 1884 the property of the mission was sold with the exception of the buildings and about sixty acres of land reserved for the wants of the establishment, and in 1890 the old mission house was destroyed and in its place a large house was erected for the lay Brothers, who generally number about ten.

THE SEMINARY. In 1889 the districts entrusted to the Marist Fathers in New Zealand were canonically erected into a religious province, and the house of Meanee was made the Novitiate and Scholasticate; that is, a house of probation for those who wish to join the society and of study for aspirants to the priesthood who have already completed their classical course of studies. The Very Rev. Dr. Pestre, S.M., who had been for many years professor of Theology in France, Ireland, and America, was appointed first Superior and Master of Novices. The classes opened in February, 1890, with three or four students, but the number gradually increased to fifteen or sixteen, and additions were made to the building in 1892 and 1896. The now completed house presents a most  imposing appearance, being a noble two-storey building with two long wings. On one side, on the ground floor, are situated the parlour, dining-room, and kitchen, with other necessary offices; above these are rooms, a small oratory, a dormitory, bathrooms, etc. On the ground floor of the left wing and surrounded by a beautiful verandah are the study and recreation halls, and above these are a large oratory and another dormitory. The centre of the building is occupied by the professors’ rooms. In front is a beautifully laid out flower garden, while on each side and behind are an orchard, a vegetable garden, and vineyard. The average number of students is fourteen

Photo captions –
GRAPE GATHERING, MEANEE STATION.
MEANEE MISSION STATION.

(N)

178   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

or fifteen, and since the foundation of the institution in 1890, twenty-six priests have been educated and ordained within its walls. Most of these are young New Zealanders who received their classical training in St. Patrick’s College, Wellington, and who are now engaged either as professors in their old Alma Mater, or assistant priests in various parishes of the Colony. Some French students have also been trained and ordained here, who are now labouring as missionaries amongst the natives of the South Sea Islands. The course of studies comprises the usual subjects of a Catholic seminary, viz., Dogmatic and Moral Theology, Holy  Scripture, Philosophy, Canon Law, Sacred Liturgy, Church History, Ecclesiastical Chant, and Sacred Eloquence and recently other classes have been added in which the students continue the study of classics and the natural sciences. The present staff consists of the Very Rev. Father John Goutenoire, S.M., superior and manager Rev. Pl. Huault, S.M., vice-superior and Master of Novices, professor of Moral  Theology, Rev. D. Kennedy, S.M., D.D., B.A., B.C.L., professor of Dogmatic Theology, Holy Scripture, Sacred Eloquence, Plain Chant, and Natural Sciences, Rev. L. Leser, S.M., professor of Philosophy and Classics. The Very Rev. Dr. Pestre, S.M., Provincial, teaches temporarily Canon Law and Sacred Liturgy. Another resident in the seminary is the Venerable Father Yardin, S.M., well known in New Zealand, who laboured for many years with great success in the sacred ministry both in France and in New Zealand. In 1897 he celebrated the golden jubilee of his religious profession and of his ordination to priesthood, and he is now enjoying a well-earned rest after his long years of arduous labours.

The Very Reverend Father JOHN GOUTENOIRE is a native of France. He was ordained priest in 1863, and has since then been engaged in the sacred ministry in America and New Zealand. He has been in the Colony over thirty years, and has been directing the Meanee Seminary since 1895.

The Very Reverend Dr. PESTRE, S.M., the present Provincial of the Marist Fathers in New Zealand, is also a native of France. He took his degree in Divinity at Maynooth College, Ireland, and was immediately  afterwards appointed by the Archbishop of Dublin, professor of Theology at Holy Cross College, Clonliffe, where he had as a fellow-professor his Eminence Cardinal Moran, of Sydney, and as president Dr. Verdon, Bishop of Dunedin. Dr. Pestre has been engaged all his life teaching in seminaries in various parts of France, Dublin, Dundalk, San Francisco, and finally in Meanee.

ST. MARY’S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH, Meanee, was founded by Father Regnier, is dedicated to Our Lady of the Assumption, and was originally built in 1863, the present fine structure taking its place in 1893. The church, which cost £1300, is of Gothic style, and is capable of seating 300 worshippers. Adjacent is the Convent of St. Joseph, originally intended for the education of Maori children but afterwards changed into an establishment for the education of European children. It is presided over by the Reverend Mother Aloysius and three sisters of the Order of St. Joseph from Sydney. There is an attendance of 112 pupils, who can also receive instruction in the higher branches of education. The school is yearly inspected by the Government inspector, whose reports are of a very satisfactory character.

Reverend Father JOHN NICHOLAS BINSFELD, of St. Mary’s Church, Meanee, is a native of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, studied at the Royal Grand Ducal Gymnasium, in that city, and was ordained at Treves in 1859. After ministering in France, England, Ireland, and America, he came to New Zealand in 1869, where he has laboured in several parts of the Colony and took over his present charge in 1895.

CLIVE.

CLIVE is a prosperous township in a thriving district on the south side of the Ngarururu [Ngaruroro] river, connected by a suspension bridge with Farndon on the opposite bank, and is six miles from Napier. It is situated in Hawke’s Bay County and contains several business places, wool-washing and other factories, flour-mills, brewery, and dairy. The railway station is at Farndon, and it receives and despatches mails daily through the local post office.

THORNTON, P. G., General Store and Post Office, West Clive. Established in 1866 by Mr. J. Bray, and taken over by Mr. Thornton in 1888. The store contains a large and varied stock of general goods, and does a considerable trade with the settlers in the surrounding districts. Mr. Thornton is local agent of the Alliance Assurance Company. The post office was opened in 1886 at the same time as the store. Mr. Thornton is a native of Clive, where he was born in 1876, is a son of Mr. S. G. Thornton, was educated locally, and trained to the business by his father.

OTAWHAO.

OTAWHAO is a small post town, sixty-three miles distant from Napier, and three miles from Ormondville, which has the nearest telegraph office. There is daily mail communication with Napier.

FOUNTAINE, THOMAS FRANCIS, J.P., Farmer, Otawhao. Mr. Fountaine’s farm is one of the choice spots of a fine and fertile district. It consists of 1075 acres in splendid condition, with a handsome homestead, which has recently been erected. One of the apartments is a billiard-room, fitted with one of Thurston’s best tables. Two men are employed on the farm, which is stocked with thirty head of cattle and 2700 crossbred Lincoln sheep. The orchard occupies about one and a half acres. Mr. Fountaine was born in Buckinghamshire in 1842, and is the son of Mr. T. F. Fountaine, farmer, of Stoke-Hammond, was educated at Banbury, Oxfordshire, and brought up to farming by his father. In 1861 he left for Queensland per ship “Wanatah,” and, following various occupations, travelled the country from the Gulf of Carpentaria to Melbourne. In 1871 Mr. Fountaine came to New Zealand, landing in Wellington, worked for some time in Hawke’s Bay on the station of the Hon. J. D. Ormond, then later on went to Norsewood and worked on the main road opening up the bush district. In 1874, in conjunction with Mr. J. H. Monteith, he contracted for the construction of the road between Woodville and the Manawatu river. In March, 1876, they opened the first store in Woodville, and continued in partnership until June, 1884, when Mr. Fountaine retired. In the following March he went home for a twelve months’

Photo captions –
REV. J. N. BINSFELD.
MR. P. G. THORNTON.

PETANE AND PUKETAPU.   179

visit, and on his return to the Colony took up his present estate. Mr. Fountaine was chairman of the Woodville Road Board for many years, member of the Waipawa County Council for three years, member of the Kumeroa Road Board; and has also served on other local bodies.

PETANE.

PETANE is six miles from Napier by coach, and is a pleasant suburban district. It has a telephone office and daily mail service.

ARNOTT, J. B., Post Office Store, Petane. Mr. Arnott is a native of Scotland, was born in 1858, brought up to the tailoring business, and served his time with his father. He came to the Colony in 1893 by the s.s. “Waihora,” and worked at his trade in Dunedin for nine years. Removing to the North Island five years ago, Mr. Arnott purchased the above store, which had been established some twenty years. A good stock of groceries and general stores is kept on hand and the post and telegraph office is conducted on the premises. Mr. Arnott is an Oddfellow, and has been a member of the Hand and Heart Lodge for many years.

GILMOUR, WILLIAM, Sheepfarmer, “White House,” Petane. Mr. Gilmour’s Station is situated at Waikari and consists of 6000 acres of good pastoral land, with about 8000 sheep. The property has been under occupation for the last twenty years. This old colonist was born in the North of Ireland in 1838, and brought up to farm life there. In 1861 he went to Victoria, and after some years on the Bendigo diggings crossed to Otago and went to Gabriel’s Gully, thence to the lakes, where he went in for stock-dealing. He afterwards had a farm at the Shotover, where he remained for a period of eight years. Whilst at the Shotover he erected a flourmill and did very well with it, selling out to come to Hawke’s Bay.

MILNE, DAVID, Settler, “Burnside,” Petane. Mr. Milne’s homestead is situated some seven miles from Napier and consists of fifteen acres, being part of the farm of which 785 acres are let to a tenant. The house, which contains fourteen dwelling-rooms, has been recently renovated, Mr. Milne having purchased the property about eighteen months ago. He is a native of Scotland, where he was born in 1859, came with his parents to New Zealand by the ship “Gananoque,” and was trained to agricultural pursuits in the Colony. He, in company with his father and brother, acquired a sheep run at Mohaka, where he lived for some time, finally dissolving partnership and coming to reside at “Burnside.” Mr. Milne was married in 1893 to a daughter of the late Mr. George Bowman, a well-known Napier settler, and has two sons and one daughter.

NORTH BRITISH ESTATE (A. Mitchell, manager), Petane. This estate is used for running stock by the North British Freezing Company, principally during the winter months. A stud flock of Shropshire Downs is to be seen on the property, which comprises 740 acres and a homestead, where the manager resides.

Mr. ANDREW MITCHELL, the Manager, was born in Scotland in 1855, and followed farm life. He came to the Colony in 1879, and after a time purchased a farm at Pahiatua. He leased this farm and about three years ago accepted his present position. Mr. Mitchell has taken considerable interest in Church matters, and has for several years been on the committee of the Presbyterian Church. He is married to a daughter of Mr. George Mills, of Glenmore Park, Victoria, and has one daughter.

PUKETAPU.

PUKETAPU is nine miles south-west from Napier, in the county of Hawke’s Bay, and in the electoral district of Waiapu. It has a public school, with an average attendance of thirty. A coach plies daily between the township and Napier, via Taradale. Mails are received and despatched daily, and there is a telephone office in the township.

BENNETT, STANLEY, Sheepfarmer, “Wharerangi,” Puketapu. Mr. Bennett is the second son of Mr. John Bennett, of “Newstead,” and was born at Puketapu. Educated at the Wanganui Collegiate School, Mr. Bennett learned farming with his father. His property consists of 1700 acres of first-class land, carrying 5000 Lincoln sheep, besides cattle and horses. On the football field, Mr. Bennett has won honours as a representative of Hawke’s Bay, but the result of an accident has prevented further indulgence in the game. He is, however, a member of the Wharerangi Polo Club, and took part in the tournament at Hastings, Palmerston, and at Auckland, and his club won the Junior Cup. Mr. Bennett was married in 1898 to the daughter of the late Mr. W. Balfour, of Mohaka.

BROOKLANDS ESTATE, Puketapu, consists of 2315 acres, all fenced and grassed. It was the property of the late Mr. Gavin Peacock, and is now managed by his son, Mr. W. I. Peacock, on behalf of the family. About 6500 Lincoln sheep are shorn every season, and the stock includes 100 head of cattle and about thirty horses.

Mr. GAVIN PEACOCK came to the Colony in 1854, at the age of fifteen. Settling in Hawke’s Bay, he took up land at Meanee, and in 1874 acquired Brooklands. Mr. Peacock was for many years sheep inspector for Hawke’s Bay, was a member of the Puketapu Road

Photo captions –
MR. J. B. ARNOTT.
MR. D. MILNE.
MR. A. MITCHELL.

180   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Board and other local bodies, and very much respected. He died in 1881, at the age of forty two years, leaving a widow, two daughters and four sons. Mrs. Peacock is a daughter of Mr. Frank Bee, formerly of Wellington, and now of Gisborne.

Mr. WILLIAM IRVING PEACOCK, third son of the late Mr. Gavin Peacock, and manager of Brooklands, was born in Hawke’s Bay in 1869, educated at the Napier High School, and was brought up to sheepfarming. He is a first-rate cricketer and footballer, as well as a good golf and polo-player. He is a member of the Wharerangi Polo team, which was “runner-up” for the Senior Cup at the New Zealand Tournament, held at Hastings in 1898.

MOTEO STATION, Hawke’s Bay, owned by Mr. Lawrence Higgins, is a fine run of 4000 acres of mixed flat and hilly limestone country, stocked with 10,000 Lincoln sheep, 200 head of shorthorn cattle, and a few horses. The land has a considerable frontage to the Tutaekuri river. It is well watered in every part, and contains a large quantity of rich swamp soil, which is being drained and scientifically treated.

Mr. LAWRENCE HIGGINS was born in Ireland in 1853, and is a son of Mr. Francis Higgins, a farmer and stock dealer, and was educated in his native town. Mr. Higgins came to this Colony in 1866, per ship “Strathallan,” Captain Paddle, and entered into business in the boot trade, at which he did very well for five or six years. He then went to Gisborne, and built the Shellbourne Hotel at Makaraka. He conducted the “Shellbourne” for about four years, and then sold out to Mr. George Saunders. In 1878 Mr. Higgins took up his present property, which was unimproved native land, which he has cleared, ploughed and sown in grass and also fenced and subdivided.

PUKETAPU ESTATE, the property of the late Mr. John Heslop, and held in trust, is a block of grazing country, 5600 acres in extent, well-improved, and containing about forty miles of fencing.

Mr. JOHN HESLOP, a farmer of Bellingham in Northumberland, was born in 1812, and at one time was caretaker and had charge of some 200 horses of the Ridsdale Ironworks, and subsequently worked as a miner at Netherton, near Newcastle. Coming to the Colony in 1856, per ship “Indian Queen,” Captain Jobson, his first employment was on the road from the Lower Hutt to Waiwetu [Waiwhetu]. He next had charge of a farm near the Hutt Bridge for Mrs Bircham but, being advised by Mr. Purvis Russell to try Hawke’s Bay, he accepted the management of that gentleman’s run until 1859, when he was employed by the late Mr. Lowry at “Okawa” Estate for about a year, afterwards leasing and ultimately purchasing the run at Puketapu, which consists of  upwards of 1100 acres. Some years after, when his son William bought the Omaranui property of 4000 acres, the two went into partnership and worked both runs conjointly. On the two estates there are now about 11,000 sheep, 300 head of cattle of the shorthorn cross, and about forty horses. Prior to this partnership the subject of this sketch had been in partnership with his twin brother, Mr. George Heslop, of the “Chesterhope” Estate, which, on the dissolution of the firm, was retained by the latter. In 1894 Mr. Heslop, senior, died, and since then the estates have been partially managed by trustees.

Mr. WILLIAM CARSWELL, the Manager, was born in Fifeshire in 1839, and his father, Mr. John Carswell, a well-known manufacturer, came to Wellington with his family early in 1852. Mr. Carswell, whilst still a lad, worked for Mr. Gillies, of Otaraia, and afterwards for Mr. Robert Russell, of Whangamoana, Wairarapa. After four years of colonial experience he left for Castle Point, where he was a shepherd on Mr. J. V. Smith’s run, and was next manager at Mataikuna for a further period of four years. Mr. Carswell then moved to Hawke’s Bay, where for two years he was manager for Mr. Samuel Begg, of Mangawhare. After this he was associated with others in leasing from the natives the Te Haroto Block of 30,000 acres, but sold his share to his partners about three years later. At this time the country was disturbed by Te Kooti’s rebellion, and for two years Mr. Carswell was employed in the difficult and dangerous work of packing from Petane to Taupo for the Government. He next leased the Puketitiri Estate for about six years, after which period he was engaged by the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company as manager of the Seafield and Eskmount Estates. Then he managed “Awamate,” in the Wairoa district, and afterwards “Lochinvar,” [Lochinver] at Taupo, for the Bank of New Zealand. In conjunction with his son James, Mr. Carswell acquired “The Incline” property, which is managed by the former. This estate consists of 1603 acres of open country, partly ploughed and grassed, and stocked with 2500 sheep, besides cattle and horses. It is situated on the Tutaekuri river, about four hours’ ride from Puketapu. Mr. Carswell was a member of the Wairoa County Council for some three years, and has held seats on the Petane School Committee and Board of Trustees of the Petane Cemetery. He was married in 1860 to Miss Orrock, of Scotland, and has four sons and four daughters living; the eldest son, John, died at Petane at the age of twenty-seven.

ESKDALE.

ESKDALE is a farming district ten miles from Napier, with which there is a daily mail service and telephone communication.

COUPER, DONALD McLEAN, Sheep-farmer, “Glenora,” Eskdale. Mr. Couper’s estate consists of some 1135 acres of good land, which with “The Ridge,” another property of 1450 acres, depastures altogether about 3500 sheep and 150 head of cattle. “Glenora” is fully improved and has been in occupation for about twelve years. The homestead is on this property. Mr. Couper was born in Napier, and is a son of the late Mr. William Couper, a well-known colonist of Hawke’s Bay. Educated at the Napier Grammar School and Nelson College, Mr. Couper entered the mercantile office of Messrs. J. G. Kinross and Co., with whom he remained two years. After a short stay on his father’s, property, Mr. Couper purchased “Glenora.”. In public matters he has done much for the welfare of the district and benefit of the settlers. Mr. Couper married a daughter of the late Mr. J. Le Luesine, and has three sons and four daughters.

HEDGLEY STATION, Eskdale. This fine property consists of about 6300 acres, and is one of the model estates in the district. The station can winter about 12,000 crossbred sheep and 250 head of cattle, besides horses. The necessary appliances and sheds are thoroughly up-to-date. The woolshed is a fine, substantial building, and accommodates ten shearing hands.

Photo captions –
THE LATE MR. G. PEACOCK.
MR. W. CARSWELL.

POHUI [POHUE] AND MOHAKA.   181

The homestead is surrounded by beautiful grounds, tastefully laid out, and it is a perfect picture in summer time.

Mr. THOMAS CLARK, of Rongotea, Manawatu, recently bought “Hedgley” from Mr. W. H. Smith, J.P., who had long been known in Hawke’s Bay as the owner of the property.

Mr. WILLIAM HENRY SMITH, J.P., is a native of Northumberland, and is a son of Mr. Thomas Ulster Smith, of Newcastle. After receiving his education at Harrow, he was articled to Messrs Prior, Waterhouse and Co., of London, with whom he remained for three years. Mr. Smith came to Napier in 1878, and was for some time on “Hedgley” as cadet under Captain Carr, from whom he subsequently bought the estate. He has taken great interest in public matters, and has been connected with all the local bodies, while a resident of Hawke’s Bay. He married a daughter of Mr. T. Tanner, of Riverslea, and has a family of three daughters and two sons.

POHUI.

POHUI is an outlying district twenty-six miles from Napier. There is a weekly mail service and also telephone connection.

CARMICHAEL, DUNCAN, Farmer, Glengarry Station, Pohui. Mr. Carmichael was born in Argyleshire, Scotland, in 1841, and came with his mother to New Zealand in 1863, landing in Southland. Shortly after their arrival he started farming and was the first settler to take up land north of Winton. For a number of years he carried on successful farming operations at Wallace, Toitoi, and at Eastburne Park, near Riverton. Seeing the great capabilities of sheepfarming in Hawke’s Bay, Mr. Carmichael in 1888 acquired his present station, which consists of 5700 acres now much improved and laid down in English grasses, and on which about 6000 sheep, 100 head of cattle, and thirty horses are grazed. There are about fifty miles of fencing and the property is subdivided into paddocks. Mr. Carmichael married in 1877 and has one son and one daughter.

THE POHOKURA STATION (Walter James Hill, manager), Pohui, Hawke’s Bay, consists of 52,000 acres of which 5000 are already cleared and laid down in grass and runs 8000 sheep and 250 head of cattle. Twenty-five men are constantly employed on the station at bush-felling, etc. The land was under bush when Mr. Hill took charge and the large area already cleared and the class of stock on the station reflect great credit on his energy and management. This Station is one of the back blocks of the North Island and when Mr. Hill took charge there were no roads. But he arranged with the Wairoa County Council and gave on behalf of his firm £ for £, and thus obtained a good bridle track for twenty-five miles from the Taupo coach road to the station. The estate was originally owned by Messrs. Sutherland and Glendining, and is now the property of Messrs. Riddiford and Co., of Hawera.

Mr. WALTER JAMES HILL, Manager of the above station, was born at Bristol, England, in 1868, and came out with his parents to Auckland in 1864. His father, Mr. James Hill, proceeded to Waiuku where he took up a small property and was largely engaged in the flax industry. The subject of this sketch was educated at Waiuku and was engaged with Mr. Edward Constable for seven years, one of the largest farmers and oldest settlers in the district. About 1884 Mr. Hill went to Hawera, Taranaki, which was then a rising district, and was for some time head shepherd for Messrs. Hammond Bros. of Rangitikei, remaining with them for three years. He then determined to start on his own account and successfully speculated and dealt in sheep and cattle for some years, until he received his present appointment.

MOHAKA.

MOHAKA is a small township forty-three miles from Napier, with which it is connected by telephone. There is a weekly mail service and other postal facilities.

UPPER MOHAKA HOTEL (William Haimes, proprietor). This hotel was established many years ago, was enlarged in 1894, and now contains thirteen or fourteen good rooms. It is one of the stopping-places for the coaches, and the proprietor, Mr. Haimes, is, like his hostelry, more than ordinarily popular. Every convenience is provided for visitors, including paddocking, there being a small grazing run attached to the hotel. The waterfall, a short distance down the river, is a favourite source of attraction.

Mr. W. HAIMES, the Proprietor, was born at Rhyl, North Wales, and was educated there. He worked as a baker in London and was in India, before coming to this Colony in 1880. About a year after landing in Lyttelton, Mr. Haimes removed to Hawke’s Bay and took a situation on a station. Subsequently, he took up a Government lease at Puketitiri, where he was the pioneer settler. Four years later he sold that property and bought Mr. Viller’s Petane store, and conducted it for two years, when he sold out to the present proprietor, Mr. J. B. Arnott. Before taking up land at Puketitiri, Mr. Haimes learned wool-classing and scouring and worked at these occupations for some time. He was married in 1890 to the daughter of Mr. Thomas Jennings, a Worcestershire farmer.

McKINNON, JOHN, Runholder, Arapawanui. This well-known and much respected early colonist has had a varied and interesting career, and the story of his life shows how industry and enterprise, tempered by good judgement, must make headway in spite of many difficulties. Born in the year 1825, in the island of Lewis-with-Harris, the largest and most northerly of the Outer Hebrides, Mr. McKinnon was educated in his native island, and at an early age followed a seafaring life. For twelve years he voyaged round the world and experienced many hardships, including shipwreck. On the occasion of the wreck of the “Mary Florence,” off the coast of Africa, when seven of the ship’s company, including the captain’s wife, were drowned, Mr. McKinnon was one of those who were fortunate enough to be rescued, after four months of doubt and dread, and taken to Aden. He then joined the service of the East India Company. Later on, he was for two years on a Mississippi river steamer. In 1854 he left Dundee for Melbourne as mate of the ship “Kossuth,” and came to this Colony as mate of the brig “Kirkwood,” with which he severed his connection at Wairoa to take command of the schooner “Wave,” owned by Messrs. Hamlin Bros. He was shortly after this appointed pilot for the port of Napier, being the first to hold that position, and in that capacity he took the first steamer, the p.s. “Wonga wonga,” into the harbour, and also brought

Photo captions –
MR. W. J. HILL.
MR. J. MCKINNON.

182   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

the first English ship to her anchorage in the roadstead. After two years as pilot, Mr. McKinnon had the ferry at Clive for about four years. In 1863 he settled at Arapawanui. His property is situated close to the sea, and contains 5000 acres, on which 9000 crossbred sheep and 100 head of cattle are depastured. In 1848 Mr. McKinnon, a young sailor of twenty-three years, returning to his native isle, was married to Miss McIver, of Stornaway, little dreaming that, fifty years afterwards, he and his bride, at the head of four generations, would be celebrating their golden wedding in New Zealand, then almost unheard of, surrounded by a stalwart  runholders and other well-to-do colonists. Yet in December, 1898, this happened. Of their family of eleven, five sons and four daughters survive, and of these two sons and three daughters are married. Mr. McKinnon is hale and hearty, is an old member of the Napier Harbour Board, and was a member of the first County Council of Wairoa. In their declining years Mr. and Mrs. McKinnon have the good wishes of a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

TAIT, JAMES, Settler, Waikare. Mr. Tait’s farm consists of 4000 acres, on which 6200 crossbred sheep and 200 head of cattle find good pasturage, besides about fifteen horses. The station was taken up in the sixties by the late Mr. James Tait, who was one of the earliest settlers in the district. The subject of this sketch was born in 1870, and in due course became manager of the estate.

KURIPAPANGO.

KURIPAPANGO lies forty-five miles distant from Napier, with which there is a weekly mail service.

KURIPAPANGO HOTEL (Alexander Macdonald, proprietor). This fine hotel is situated at Kuripapongo within fifty miles of Napier. It is the great health resort for sufferers from chest complaints and consumption and the medical faculty recommend patients to go to this establishment. It is a modern building of over thirty beautifully-appointed rooms, and is in a most charming part of the country 1800 feet above sea-level, where the air is eight degrees drier than at Napier. Adjoining the hotel are beautifully laid-out gardens, bowling green, and tennis courts, and the surrounding country is celebrated for its magnificent scenery of mountains and dales, lake and river, with some of the finest waterfalls in New Zealand. “Gentle Annie,” 3200 feet, Mount Cameron, 3800 feet, and Kawita [Kaweka], 4000 feet, are within very easy distances of the hotel, easily accessible, and afford magnificent panoramic views from their summits. To lovers of fishing the lakes and rivers offer every attraction, being abundantly stocked with trout. In the mountains red deer are plentiful and to those who prefer the more exciting pastime of pig-hunting, the mountain forests offer every inducement. Pheasants, wild duck, and every variety of the smaller game abound. Patients coming to this hotel after a few months in the balmy but invigorating climate are completely cured and able to take their share of sporting. The hotel table is supplied with every modern luxury; vegetables,

Photo captions –
MR. J. MCKINNON’S HOMESTEAD.
MRS. J. MCKINNON.
KURIPAPANGO HOTEL.

TIKOKINO, TURIROA AND WAIROA.   183

fruit, and poultry are grown by Mr. Macdonald, whose large orchard supplies unlimited quantities of the choicest fruit. Mrs. Macdonald superintends all the domestic arrangements of the hotel, her greatest care being the comfort and welfare of her guests. The stables provide accommodation for a large number of horses. In connection with the hotel is the post office and also a line of coaches running between Napier and Kuripapango. A five-horse coach leaves the Masonic and Albion Hotels, Napier, every Monday at 7 a.m. for Kuripapango and Moawhango, connecting with coaches for Tokaanu.

Mr. ALEXANDER MACDONALD, the popular host, was born in Edinburgh in 1830, and has had a considerable goldfield experience in California, Australia, and New Zealand, and also as an hotelkeeper.

TIKOKINO.

TIKOKINO is fifty miles from Napier and has a tri-weekly mail service. There are the usual postal and telegraph facilities.

HOWARD, JOSIAH, Junr., Sheepfarmer, Smedley, Tikokino. Mr. Howard was born in 1836 in Manchester, where his father, Mr. John Howard, was engaged in commerce. He was brought up as a machine joiner and came to New Zealand in 1862, first making his way to the Otago goldfields, where not meeting the success he anticipated, he turned his attention to his trade at which large wages were then to be earned. He remained in Otago and Dunedin about four years, then came to Hawke’s Bay, and worked at his trade in various parts of the country until 1870. Mr. Howard gradually purchased land until he acquired a fine estate of 7590 acres, which is carrying 14,000 sheep.  He is a fine type of a colonist, who through his own unaided efforts and with great pluck and perseverance, has assumed a foremost position in the community. He is chairman of the North Ruataniwha Road Board and devotes considerable attention to local matters.

TURIROA.

TURIROA. This township is in the County of Wairoa and the electoral district of Waiapu. A steamer plies between Clyde and Napier, seventy-five miles distant, and from Clyde to Turiroa, three and a half miles, there is a coach road. The nearest telegraph office is at Clyde, and there is a weekly mail service  \between Napier and the township.

McKINNON, JOHN MURDOCK, Settler, Turiroa. Mr. McKinnon’s homestead is situated on a farm of 100 acres, and on the Cricklewood Road is his “Kaihunahuna” Station, a run of 4009 acres, stocked with 3500 crossbred sheep and forty head of cattle. The proprietor is the second son of Mr. John McKinnon, a well-known and highly-esteemed settler of Arapawanui. He was born at Clive in 1861 and educated at the Napier Grammar School. Brought up to farming, he acquired his present  property in 1888. He is married to a daughter of Mr. J. Davis, of Wairoa, and has two sons.

WAIROA.

WAIROA is a coast town seventy miles by land north of Napier, and forty by sea, and is approached by the river Wairoa, which is navigable for small craft. The surrounding country is rough and broken, but provides good grazing for stock. There is a weekly mail by steamer, and also a telegraph station, post, money order, and savings bank offices. The “Wairoa Guardian” is the local paper.

CLYDE TOWN BOARD.

The population of the town district is 580, and the capital value of property £45,560, on which there is a general rate of 34d. in the £.

Mr. GEORGE BRITNELL, Chairman of the Clyde Town Board, has held that position for some time and has done much for the advancement of the Wairoa district. He was born in Buckinghamshire, England, came out to Australia in 1864 with his parents and for some years resided in Victoria. Brought up to commercial pursuits, Mr. Britnell eventually started in business

Photo captions –
KURIPAPANGO HOTEL
OPENING OF THE BAR, WAIROA.

184   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

in Creswick, Victoria which he carried on successfully for many years. In 1889 he came to this Colony and took up land in the Taranaki district where he remained until commencing business in Wairoa five years ago. Mr. Britnell takes a great interest in all matters affecting the welfare of the district, and is a member of the Wairoa Harbour Board.

WAIROA HARBOUR BOARD. This Board manages the affairs of the port of Wairoa at Clyde, in the County of Wairoa. There is communication with Napier, thirty-six miles distant, by means of small steamers. The depth  of water is from seven to nine feet at high tide, and the board’s revenue is derived from pilotage, port charges, and a harbour improvement rate. The present members of the board are Messrs J. Corkill (chairman), J. H. Brown, G. Britnell, T. Carroll, J. P. Lomax, W. Moloney, G. B. Flint. Some time since the board had a bill passed through Parliament to enable it to borrow £5000 for river conservation works, and the loan was duly sanctioned by a poll of ratepayers with only five votes against it. Thereupon the money was raised at five per cent., and tenders were called in May for the works, the expenditure on which is to be limited to £5000. The future of Wairoa greatly depends on these works, as communication with other ports is at present very irregular owing to large shingle beds forming in front of the river entrance, and making it too shallow for steamers to come over. The proposed training walls will, if successful, do away with all this, and then the river will be able to take in the largest boats afloat. There is thus a notable future in store for the district. It may be mentioned that the whole of the work in connection with the Loan Bill and loan itself was carried through within twelve months – a fact which reflects credit on the administrative ability of the board and its officers.

Mr. JOSEPH CORKILL, Chairman of Wairoa Harbour Board, has held that position since 1897, and is one of the most progressive and energetic men in the district. He is a warm supporter of the River Improvement scheme, and it is mainly due to his efforts that active steps have been taken in the matter. Born in the Isle of Man, he was educated there, and was apprenticed for three years to a joiner and cabinet-maker. He left his native land for this Colony in 1884, and for some time worked as a journeyman in Dunedin. After removing to the North Island he worked at New Plymouth with Mr. Fowler, builder, and afterwards with Messrs. Weir and Sellar, of Hastings, and with most of the large builders of Napier. He afterwards went to Wairoa and established himself in business as cabinet-maker, ironmonger, etc., in conjunction with Mr. P. Wilson, who retired from the firm in 1889. In all public matters Mr. Corkill takes a lively interest, and he is extremely popular with all who have the pleasure of meeting him. He is bandmaster of the Wairoa Band, which he started seven years ago. Mr. Corkill is married and has two of a family.

Mr. STEPHEN GEORGE STACEY, who is a member of the Wairoa County Council and Wairoa Harbour Board, was born in Tasmania. He came to New Zealand in 1864, landing at Napier, and is a son of the late Mr. Stephen Stacey, a well-known military settler. The subject of this notice commenced business as a butcher at Frasertown in 1883, and has since been joined by his brother, the business now being carried on under the name of Stacey Bros. Mr. Stacey has done much in public matters; he has been connected with the County Council for two years and has been a member of the Harbour Board for eighteen months, and is one of the progressive members strongly supporting the scheme for improving the river. He is a member of the Frasertown School Committee, and has been connected with the Church of England for many years. Mr. Stacey married in 1890 a daughter of the late Mr.Gosnell, a well-known and respected settler.

WAIROA COUNTY COUNCIL meets at Clyde, the county town, on the second Friday in each month. The population of the county is about 1500, and there is an annual revenue of £9895 obtained from all sources. Property within the county has a capital value of £909,334.

COUNCILLOR JOHN HUNTER BROWN, who since 1884 has represented the Waikaremoana

Photo captions –
WAIROA BRIDGE.
MR. J. CORKILL.
MR. S. G. STACEY.

WAIROA.   185

Riding in the Wairoa County Council, resides at “Aorangi,” his handsome homestead. The run, “Whakaki,” consists of 14,000 acres, all sown in English grass, and grazes 18,000 crossbred sheep and 500 head of cattle. “Whakaki’ was purchased by Mr. Brown in 1881. Nearer town is a special stud farm of 140 acres, where Mr. Brown runs a stud flock of 200 Lincoln sheep, besides horses and cattle. Mr. Brown was born in Dumfriesshire, Scotland, in 1852, and is the eldest son of Mr. Adam Brown, of Bennan, Thornhill. He was educated at Marlborough College, was engaged for some time in scientific farming in Ross-shire and Inverness-shire, and in 1880 came to this Colony. After looking round the country, Mr. Brown purchased “Whakaki,’ and has since then been an active colonist, in regard to the management of his own estates and the public duties which he has undertaken. He has on several occasions been elected to the Wairoa Harbour Board, and is a member of the school committee, Gisborne Hunt Club and Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society. Mr. Brown was married to a daughter of the late Mr. John Hunter, C.E., of London, and has a son and a daughter.

COUNCILLOR THOMAS CARROLL, who represents Clyde Riding on the Wairoa County Council, has been a member since the second year of the council’s existence, and has taken a keen interest in all matters concerning the district. He has been a member of the Harbour Board for a number of years, and has filled many other important positions, including the secretaryship and vice-presidency of the local jockey club. Councillor Carroll was born in Mahia in 1851, educated at public schools, and brought up to pastoral life. At Taupo he had four years’ experience under Mr. Bold, of the Telegraph Department, and for a while he worked on the estate of the late Mr. William Heslop, of Puketapu. He resides on his “Huramua”’ Station, which was acquired by him in 1880, and is a property of upwards of 2009 acres, of which a third is good flat agricultural land. The stock includes 5000 sheep of the Lincoln variety, besides cattle and horses, amongst the latter being “Dudeen,” Thyn,” “Dynamite,” and other well-known racers, mostly bred by Mr. Carroll. The yield of wool amounts to about 100 bales per annum.

COUNCILLOR FARQUHAR McRAE, who represents the Waikaremoana Riding in the Wairoa County Council, resides at “Springhill,’’ a run of 4600 acres, stocked with 5000 crossbred sheep and about twenty head of cattle. He is the owner of another property, near Eltham, Taranaki, of 655 acres, which is leased to seven dairy farmers. Mr. McRae was born in Ross-shire, Scotland, in 1855, where he was educated and brought up to farming pursuits. He came to the Colony in 1882, and for seven years managed Mr. Hunter Brown’s run. He then took a trip to Australia, and on his return speculated successfully in property, visited Europe, and on his return to the Colony purchased his present property. He takes a general interest in public and social matters.

COUNCILLOR WILLIAM MOLONEY, J.P., who represents his riding for the fifth successive term in the Wairoa County Council, was chairman of the council when the Wairoa bridge was completed, and in his official capacity he declared it open for traffic in 1887. For twelve years he was a member of the Wairoa Harbour Board, and for a fourth of that time its chairman, and he was a member of the old Town Board and other public bodies. He was born in Queen’s County, Ireland, in 1840, is the son of Mr. James Moloney, and was educated and brought up to farming in his native county. Mr. Moloney left the Old Land in 1860 for Melbourne, and spent four years on the New South Wales goldfields, and two years on the Otago and Westland fields. ettling in Wairoa in 1866, on a farm near to his present holding, he had the misfortune to be turned off in 1869 by Te Kooti. He then joined the Wairoa Rifles and was present at the Lake Waikaremoana skirmishes. In 1872 Mr. Moloney started business in Wairoa as a storekeeper, and has done well there. He was elected to the Council on its inception in 1876. Councillor Moloney has taken an active interest in public and social matters generally, and was one of the founders of the Roman Catholic Church in Wairoa.

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR J. J. BROWN.
COUNCILLOR F. McRAE.
COUNCILLOR W. MOLONEY.
COUNCILLOR J. POWDRELL.   See Page 186.

186   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

COUNCILLOR JOSEPH POWDRELL, who represents the Clyde Riding in the Wairoa County Council, is an ex-member of the Wairoa Harbour Board, member of the Hospital Committee, chairman of the Railway League, and was for some years chairman of the Council, of which he has been a member almost since its inception. He is vice-president of the Wairoa Rifle Club, and has been a Justice of the Peace since 1888. Born in Cheshire, England, he is the third son of the late Mr. Thomas Powdrell, of “Barhill Farm,” was educated at Malpas Grammar School, and came to New Zealand in 1861, at the age of twenty years, per ship “Indiana.” Purchasing a farm at Kereru, Mr. Powdrell remained there for six years, and then settled in Wairoa on an excellent farm of 1400 acres, now known as “Turiroa” Station, and stocked with 150 head of cattle, about twenty horses, and 3500 crossbred sheep.

COUNCILLOR JAMES STARK, who represents Mohaka Riding in the Wairoa County Council, is in his third term of office. A son of the late Mr. William Stark, who came to this Colony in the early days and settled in the district, Mr. Stark was educated by private tuition at Mohaka, where he has lived since 1864. Councillor Stark owns ‘“Rangiriri”. Station, which contains nearly 1000 acres of good pastoral land, and is stocked with 2000 crossbred sheep and forty head of cattle. The annual yield of wool is about forty bales. Mr. Stark is secretary of the Mohaka Rifle Club and was chairman of the school committee for several years. He married a daughter of the late Mr. H. C. Chapman, a well-known settler of Hastings, and has an only son.

WAIROA HOSPITAL. This hospital, situated at Clyde, the county town of Wairoa, is of particular service to an extensive district, which, on account of its distance from Napier, and Gisborne, would otherwise be without public provision for the proper treatment of accidents and other cases of human suffering.

Mr. THOMAS BUTTLAR BAX, Warder of the Wairoa Hospital, has been connected with that institution for about two years. Born in London in 1850, Mr. Bax was educated there. For nineteen years he was at sea, trading between the Colonies, India and the Old Country. He came to New Zealand in 1879 as first mate of the barque “Nancy,” and decided to settle in the Colony. Having had considerable experience in hospital work during the Indian Mutiny, Mr. Bax obtained a position in the Wellington Hospital, and afterwards joined the staff of the Blenheim Hospital. He then went to Hawke’s Bay and kept several hotels in the district, and was eventually apponted [appointed] warder in the Wairoa Hospital. Mr. Bax is well known throughout the Colonies as a professional club-swinger, and in 1897 he defeated the Queensland champion, J. Griffiths. Mr. Bax is married and has a family of one son and two daughters.

ST. PETER’S CATHOLIC CHURCH, Wairoa. This is one of the oldest churches in Wairoa and was erected with money collected during the late Father Regnier’s time. The structure is of wood and has seating accommodation for 100. A good choir of twelve is led by Mr. Cosgrove and Mrs. Cosgrove and Miss Douglas act as organists.

Father LEPRETRE, the Priest-in-charge, has a large district and holds mass at frequent intervals at Frasertown, Pakipaki, Tamaki, and Tiniroto. He was born in Brittany, France, was educated at Nantes, Chateaubriant, and Ancenis. He then went to Dundalk, in Ireland, where he joined the Society of Mary there, was ordained subsubdeacon at Armagh in 1881. He returned to France, where he was prefect for two years at St. Joseph’s College, Montlugon. He then went to Barcelona, in Spain, and after completing his studies in theology, was ordained priest at Lyons, France, in 1884, and came to this Colony in the same year. Father Lepretre was first stationed at Jerusalem, near Wanganui, where he learnt the Maori language, and was afterwards in charge of the Hawke’s Bay and Wairarapa Maori districts. He built the Maori church at Te Ore Ore, near Masterton, and came to Wairoa as first resident priest in 1894, and built the presbytery there. He is extremely popular amongst all classes and well known throughout Wairoa.

WAIROA BRASS BAND (Mr. Joseph Corkill, bandmaster), Wairoa. This band has a creditable musical record, but it has something else as well in its list of achievements. It is probably the only band in the Colony with a record ride to its credit. In April, 1896, Mr. Swan, the Mayor of Napier, invited the band to attend and assist at Napier in a demonstration in aid of the Brunner Relief Fund. The invitation was cordially responded to by Mr. Corkill on behalf of himself and his fellow bandsmen, but, when the time came to take steamer from Wairoa to Napier, the Wairoa bar was in what was then its too frequent condition of impassableness. The visit to Napier had, therefore, to be abandoned, or undertaken on horseback overland, a distance of seventy-five miles. In view of all the circumstances, Mr. Corkill and his corps of instrumentalists determined to face the latter alternative, and they set out in the evening to accomplish their long journey by night. The novelty of the undertaking and the object in view inspired the party with high spirits, and as there was bright moonlight to help them on their way, they anticipated no serious difficulties. These,

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR J. STARK.
MR. T. B. BAX.
FATHER LEPRETRE.

WAIROA.   187

however, soon presented themselves in divers shapes. For instance, the big drum received its mortal quietus from a hook on the pack saddle to which it was fastened, and various other misadventures took place in connection with the choice of tracks, one by the beach, and one inland. Creeks were found to be in flood, and the bandsmen had to get off their horses and lead them up scraggy hillsides and along the edges of beetling precipices. ‘‘Are you going up there?” said the drummer to a fellow bandsman, as the latter with his horse faced a precipitous ridge. “If you are, not I; I am going home.” And home he went. The others, however, pushed on to their journey’s end, where they were cordially welcomed by the Mayor of Napier, sumptuously entertained in many ways, and presented with a purse of money to help to defray the expenses of what is still talked of in Hawke’s Bay as “Corkill’s Ride.”

“WAIROA GUARDIAN” (William Timperley, proprietor), Wairoa. This paper was established over twenty years ago and has a rapidly increasing circulation in Wairoa, Frasertown, Turiroa, Waikaremoana, Marumaru, Nuhaka, Morere, Mahia, Mohaka, Waikare, and Petane, and is a splendid medium for advertising throughout the district.

Mr. WILLIAM TIMPERLEY, the proprietor, is a native of Darwen, Lancashire, England, where he was educated, and was trained in the leading printing offices in Darwen and Manchester. He came to New Zealand in 1886 and settled in Wairoa in 1895. In addition to the newspaper and printing business, he has a high-class stationery department, and receives shipments of all the latest books, music, etc., by every steamer. Photographs and paintings of the beautiful Wairoa scenery are also obtainable at his establishment.

SOMERVILLE, JOHN, M.B., M.S. (Edin.), Physician and Surgeon, Wairoa, Hawke’s Bay.

ROBB, JOHN, Photographer, Painter, etc., Wairoa. Agent for Messrs. Howe Bros., booksellers and stationers of Napier. Mr. Robb has been in business in Wairoa about five years, and is acquiring a good connection. All kinds of photographic work and enlargements are finished in first-class style. Mr. Robb keeps on hand a large stock of mouldings for picture frames. He is also agent for Mr. S. McLernon, watchmaker, of Napier, and forwards repairs by every steamer. Mr. Robb was born at Gisborne, was educated there and learnt his trade under his father, with whom he remained until starting on his own account. He is well liked in the district and takes considerable interest in public matters.

FERRY HOTEL (Peter Craver, proprietor), Wairoa. This well-known hostelry is situated on the bank of the Wairoa River, and is within a few minutes walk of the township. The “Ferry” is probably the oldest hotel in the district, and has been in the hands of the present proprietor for the last nine years. It contains sixteen rooms, exclusive of dining, sitting, and drawing rooms, and is comfortably furnished throughout. For tourists the conveniently

Photo captions –
WAIROA BRASS BAND.
MR. J. ROBB.
MR. W. TIMPERLEY.
MR. P. CRAVER.

188   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

situated on the main road to the lake, where fine shooting, boating, etc., may be obtained.

Mr. PETER CRAVER, the Proprietor, is a native of Perthshire, Scotland, and came to this Colony with his parents in the ship “Rangoon” in 1863, landing at Napier. He was educated at Waipukurau, and afterwards was for some time farming with his father. He first commenced hotel-keeping at Tahoraiti, near Dannevirke, where he had the Tamaki Hotel for four years, eventually taking the Ferry Hotel. Mr. Craver takes a great interest in all local matters, and is well known and respected in the district.

WAIROA HOTEL (Arthur Poyzer, proprietor), Wairoa. Established 1877. This fine hotel, which has lately been rebuilt, was established by the present proprietor about twenty-one years ago. Situated close to the wharf, it is handy for travellers and visitors to Wairoa, and Mr. Poyzer has a good connection with the travelling public and settlers in the district. The Wairoa Hotel, which is beautifully furnished, contains twenty-five rooms, including large dining-room, sitting-room, billiard-room, etc. From the balcony a fine view of the surrounding country is obtained, and as the house is directly opposite the river, shooting and boating are within easy reach of those seeking pleasure in that way.

Mr. ARTHUR POYZER, the popular host, is a native of Leicestershire, England, and was educated in his native town. He came to the Colony in 1863, and landed in Auckland per ship “Gertrude,” and was for some time in the employment of Sir George Grey and Bishop Selwyn. He then settled in Hampden, and for two years kept the Tikotiko Hotel, and afterwards established the Wairoa Hotel. Mr. Poyzer has devoted a good deal of time to public matters, and was for many years chairman of the harbour and town boards. He has also been connected with the school committee, and has done much for the welfare of the district. Mr. Poyzer is married and has four daughters and two sons.

JOHANSEN, OLAF, Plumber, Painter, Paperhanger, Wairoa. The business was established by Mr. Johansen in 1878. Most of the plumbing and painting work in the district has been carried out by him. A large stock of tinware and material necessary for carrying on a good business are kept on the premises. Mr. Johansen is a native of Norway, and came to New Zealand with his parents in 1873 in the ship ‘‘Hovding,” landing at Napier. He learnt his trade with Mr. Nash, of Waipawa, and was also with Mr. Abrahams of that town for seven years. Coming to Wairoa in 1878, Mr. Johansen decided to settle there, and shortly afterwards established his present business. As a member of the Foresters he has held office as S.C.R., and has been through all the chairs. Mr. Johansen is married and has a son and daughter.

BIRD, DAVID, Boot and Shoe Dealer and Importer, Wairoa. Mr. Bird’s business has been established about seven years, and conducted by the present proprietor since 1896. A large and varied stock of English and Colonial boots and shoes is kept, and bespoke work and repairs are executed on the shortest notice. Born at the Thames, North Island, Mr. Bird learnt his trade under the Northern Boot and Shoe Company of Auckland, and was afterwards with Messrs. Wilson and Co., of Napier and Wanganui, for five years as manager of their Emerson Street branch in Napier. He purchased the above business, and has every prospect of good success. As a member of the Druids he has held office at Napier and Wanganui.

CENTRAL STORE (Mrs. Parker, proprietress), Wairoa. This well-conducted store was established thirty years ago by the late Mr. Parker, and receives a fair share of support from the settlers in the district.

Mr. PATRICK COSGROVE, the Manager, is a native of Napier, and after receiving his education was with Messrs Alex. Brown and E. Bibby, of Waipawa, for ten years. He came to Wairoa in 1893, and has since managed Mrs. Parker’s store. Mr. Cosgrove has taken a considerable interest in local matters, and is secretary of the school committee and an active

Photo captions-
MR. A. POYZER.
MR. O. JOHANSEN.
MR. D. BIRD.
MR. P. COSGROVE.

WAIROA.   189

member of the Debating Society. He was one of the originators of the Dramatic Club, and is choirmaster of St. Peter’s Church. Mr. Cosgrove married a daughter of the late Mr. Robert White, a well-known settler.

PERKINS, GEORGE, General Storekeeper, Wairoa. Mr. Perkins is an old settler of many years standing and was born in Wellington. He resided at the Hutt for over thirty years during which time he worked an extensive sawmill in that valley. He came to Wairoa in 1888 and purchased a station of some 2500 acres, which at present carries about 2000 crossbred sheep, and about fifty head of cattle. The station is managed by Mr. Percy Scott, Mr. Perkins devoting part of his time to the management of his store. In public matters he has been closely connected with the various local bodies, both at the Hutt and Wairoa. He was a member of the Hutt County Council for several years and held the position of chairman for some time. In leaving the district for Wairoa the residents showed their appreciation of his services by presenting him with a handsome gold watch and illuminated address. In Wairoa he is connected with the local school committee and is secretary of the Wairoa Brass Band. Mr. Perkins is married and has two children.

CRAM, PETER, Wairoa Livery and Bait Stables, Wairoa. Mr. Cram’s well-known stables were established by him five years ago and contain ten stalls and two loose boxes, with an accommodation paddock for fifty horses. Traps and saddle-horses can always be obtained by the travelling public. Mr. Cram’s coaches carry most of the passengers overland to Napier or Gisborne. He was born in Scotland, and came to this Colony when only nine years old in the ship “Timaru.’’ For many years he was farming on the Henley Estate, near Dunedin, and eventually settled at Wairoa. Mr. Cram is married and has two children.

BARKER, W. E., Sheepfarmer, “Avalon,” Frasertown, Wairoa. Mr. Barker was born in 1875 at Glastonbelle, Somersetshire, England, his father, Mr. Eustace Barker, being manager of the Wilts and Dorset Bank in that city. The subject of this notice, after receiving his education at Blundel school, followed various official pursuits. Contemplating a farming life he came to New Zealand in 1893, landing at Wellington, and afterwards where he purchased his present run of 1000 acres. Since then great improvements have been made by Mr. Barker and he now depastures 900 sheep on the property, which will be capable of carrying a much larger number as the land is brought under grass.

CRICKLEWOOD STATION (H. L. Donnelly, owner), Wairoa. This station is one of the finest in Wairoa, and consists of about 15,000 acres, carrying about 12,000 Lincoln sheep and 300 head of cattle.

Mr. HARRY LANGLEY DONNELLY, of Cricklewood Station, is a native of the South

Photo captions –
MR. G. PERKINS.
CRAM’S LIVERY AND BAIT STABLES.
MR. P. CRAM.
MR. W. E. BARKER.

190   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

of Ireland, was educated at Limbrick College, and came to New Zealand with his mother, brothers and sisters in 1862 per ship “Indian Empire,” and shortly afterwards he and his brother took up a property at Ngaratia, Auckland. In 1874 he went to Hawke’s Bay, and was for many years engaged in trading in cattle and managing various stations in the Wairoa and Inland Patea districts. Mr. Donnelly’s varied and extensive experience of station management has stood him in good stead, and during his term of management “Cricklewood” has been brought to its present state of perfection. Mr. Donnelly takes a great interest in local matters, and has been connected with several road boards. He married a daughter of the late Mr. William Couper, of Havelock, and has a family of two sons and one daughter.

GOLDSTONE, WILLIAM, Sheepfarmer, Frasertown and Riverslea, Wairoa. Mr. Goldstone is a native of Suffolk, England, and son of the late Mr. James Goldstone, of the same place, and formerly in the Guards. He was educated at Newmarket, Cambridge, and entered the 12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales’ Own), in 1851, shortly after went to South Africa to take part in the Kaffir war under Sir Harry Smith and saw about eight months’ active service there and in Basutoland. At the battle of Berrier the troops under Sir George Cathcart were kept in square for eight hours, repeatedly charged by the enemy who were finally repulsed and the force marched to Williamstown in British Kaffraria. A portion of the troops were cut off whilst coming through a narrow pass and a number were shot. Captain (now Sir George) Whitmore, of the Cape Mounted Rifles, took part in that affair. Shortly afterwards the 12th were ordered to India where they arrived in 1854 and a few months later proceeded to the Crimea. They landed at Suez, marched through to Cairo, and down the Nile to Alexandria, which formed a curious coincidence and was brought to their memory by one of the inhabitants. The same regiment, then known as the 12th Light Dragoons, had marched down the banks of the river exactly fifty years previously under Sir Ralph Abercrombie. The 12th were present at many engagements and formed a part of famous Light Brigade. After the fall of Sebastopol, the regiment was ordered to Upatoria and next to Upper Scutari. Peace being proclaimed the 12th were ordered back to India but through the influence of Sir George Paget they were taken to England first. In 1856 the Lancers landed at Madras and proceeded to Bungalore, just as Nana Sahib’s great mutiny broke out. In 1857 the 12th formed part of General Whitlock’s brigade and proceeded to the Kanool district, which was in a most disturbed state. Some native troops, who formed part of the column, mutinied on the march; the ringleaders were flogged in the presence of the disaffected men, and the revolt was quelled to a great extent. The 12th Lancers afterwards went to the Hyderabad and Deccan districts. Mr. Goldstone’s troop was stationed till 1860 at Trimingalli, a cavalry station four miles from Secunderabad. In 1860 he embarked with his regiment for England, where he joined the 4th Dragoon Guards, remaining with the regiment till 1873, when he retired from the army with the rank of sergeant. He came to New Zealand by the ship ‘‘Douglas” and joined the Armed Constabulary in which he served for five years. He retired from the force to enter into business in Frasertown and carried it on successfully for several years. Mr. Goldstone has also acquired two valuable properties, one of which is a sheep farm, He holds the Kaffir medal for 1851-52-53, the Crimean and Turkish medals with clasps, and the long service and good conduct medals. Mr. Goldstone married previous to his departure for New Zealand, and has three sons and four daughters.

KIWI ESTATE (Messrs. Chamber Bros., proprietors; Mr. Murdoch Mackay, manager), Wairoa. This well-known station consists of some 18,000 acres of first-class sheep country; about 24,000 cross-bred sheep and 800 head of cattle are grazed on the property which is one of the finest in the Wairoa district. Twelve hands are constantly employed and in the shearing season, as many as twenty shearers are engaged. The popular manager, Mr. Murdoch Mackay, has had considerable experience in sheep farming and it is under his care the estate has been brought to its present state of perfection.

Mr. MURDOCH MACKAY, the manager, was born in Hawke’s Bay and brought up to pastoral pursuits on Mr. McHardy’s run at Blackhead. He was afterwards with Mr. Johnston of Tamumu. He then managed the Putere station for Messrs. Murray, Roberts and Co. for twelve years, and took up his present position in 1895. Mr. Mackay is married and has four sons and one daughter.

MANGARUHE STATION is situated on the Wairoa river, and is the property of Messrs. Twigg Bros. It consists of 5630 acres, bounded on two sides by the Mangaruhe and Wairoa rivers and on the third by ‘‘Ruakaturi” Station. It is stocked with 5500 crossbred sheep, the annual yield of which averages 100 bales of wool. The land, being of papa formation, is excellent for sheep carrying. For the season of 1897-8 1500 wether freezers were sent to Gisborne from this estate.

Mr. SAMUEL TWIGG, managing owner of Mangaruhe Station, is the eldest son of Mr.

Photo captions –
MR. H. L. DONNELLY.
MR. W. GOLDSTONE.
MR. M. MACKAY.

WAIROA AND FRASERTOWN.   191

H. J. Twigg, of Petane, and has been at Wairoa since 1895. Born at Petane in 1872, and educated at the Napier High School, Mr. Twigg was two years with the North British and Hawke’s Bay Freezing Company. He then spent five years at Moeangiangi Station, his father’s estate, which he left to take up his present position.

WHITE, FREDERICK, Sheepfarmer, “Maungataniwha Station, Lower Mohaka, Wairoa. This gentleman, who is a son of Mr. Bertram White, resident magistrate, was born at Mongonui and educated at the Church of England school, Parnell, Auckland, and afterwards spent two years at the Lincoln Agricultural College, Canterbury. He then went on Archdeacon Williams’s sheep run at Mangatari, where he remained five years, obtaining a thorough knowledge of sheep farming. In 1890 he purchased, in conjunction with his brother William, the Maungataniwha Station of 36,000 acres which was then covered with bush and scrub. 5000 acres have been cleared and sown with English grasses on which 7009 sheep and a number of cattle are depastured. Several men are kept employed in clearing to make more grazing ground for increased stock. The property promises to be one of the most valuable in the district and already reflects great credit on the industry of Messrs. White Bros. Mr. White was a well-known athlete in his college days, was one of the first team who visited Australia from this Colony and successfully contested running races in Hawke’s Bay for five years. He holds the amateur record for high jumping.

FRASERTOWN.

FRASERTOWN is a village in the County of Wairoa. It is situated on the Wairoa river, twelve miles above Clyde, the county town, which is three miles from the mouth of the river. Small craft go up the river as far as Frasertown, which is seventy-five miles by road from Napier and sixty-seven from Gisborne. There is weekly communication by post with both Napier and Gisborne.

McKINNON, NORMAN, Settler, Stratholm. Mr. McKinnon is the youngest son of Mr. John McKinnon, of Arapawanui, where he was born in 1871. Educated at the Napier High School, he learned farming on his present estate, which consists of 8000 acres, about half of which is sown in English grasses, and grazes 6000 crossbred sheep, with fifty head of cattle. Mr. McKinnon was married in 1895 to a daughter of the late Mr. Peter Walker, of Wairoa, and has a son and a daughter.

“MOEANGIANGI STATION” is situated on the East Coast between Napier and Wairoa, and consists of 5000 acres of freehold and 5000 acres leasehold native lands. It was taken up in the sixties by Messrs. Gordon and Finlayson, but passed into the possession of the McKinnon family, and has recently been taken over by Mr. Donald McKinnon. The stock includes 12,000 crossbred sheep and 100 head of cattle, and about 200 bales of wool are annually sent to market.

Mr. DONALD McKINNON is the third son of Mr. John McKinnon, and was born in 1863 at Arapawanui. Educated at the Napier Grammar School, he was brought up to station life, and managed his father’s station for a few years before moving to Moeangiangi.

THE “RIVERINA STATION” contains 4600 acres, and is an education reserve in the occupation of Mr. Colin Munro and his sons, Messrs W. C. and Duncan Munro. The stock includes 3500 crossbred sheep and about thirty head of cattle. The homestead stands on the river bank.

Mr. COLIN MUNRO, the proprietor, was born in Ross-shire in 1826, and was educated and brought up there to farming pursuits. Landing in Australia in 1853, per ship Ida”, he managed a large station on the River Murray for twelve years. In 1869 he came to New Zealand and purchased a farm in South Canterbury. This he worked for ten years, and then moved to Hawke’s Bay and settled on a run of 55,000 acres on the Taupo Road. There he remained ten years, and then acquired his present property.

Photo captions –
MR. S. TWIGG.
MR. F. WHITE.
MR. N. McKINNON.
MR. D. McKINNON

192   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Mr. W. C. MUNRO was born in Victoria in 1855, was educated there, and accompanied his parents to this Colony. He was a member of the Wairoa County Council for six years and takes a keen interest in local affairs.

Mr. DUNCAN MUNRO was born in Victoria in 1886, and was educated in this Colony.

“WINDSBOROUGH STATION” (Mr. T. J. Tunks, proprietor), Waikaremoana, contains 4500 acres of pastoral land, all drained, fenced, grassed, and subdivided, and is stocked with 6000 crossbred sheep, 100 head of cattle, and about twenty horses. A portion of the estate is devoted to the growth of winter feed. The output of wool averages about ninety bales per annum. “The “Mahanga” Station, which is situated on the road to Lake Waikaremoana, is also the property of Mr. Tunks, and is managed by Mr. D. Anderson. It contains 3000 acres of good pastoral land, and carries 8000 crossbred sheep and twenty horses.

Mr. T. J. TUNKS, proprietor of the above property, though now residing in Frasertown, was one of the first to take up land in the Waikaremoana district. Born in Warwickshire, England, in the early fifties, Mr. Tunks came with his parents to Auckland, per ship “Northumberland,” in 1861, and was educated at Prince Albert College. In 1870 he left Auckland for Wairoa, and after spending five years in commercial pursuits, he acquired and entered upon his present property at Waikaremoana. As county councillor, chairman of school, licensing, library, and church committees, etc., Mr. Tunks has taken an active part in public matters and is very highly esteemed throughout the district.

MAHIA.

MAHIA. The Mahia Peninsula, at which there is a village of the same name, is in the County of Wairoa, Its distance from Clyde, the county town of Wairoa, is thirty miles, and it lies 103 miles to the north of Napier. A steamer plies once a month from Napier.

THE WHANGAWEHI STATION, Mahia, is situated about 100 miles inland-from Napier, and is one of the many station properties owned by the Ormond family in Poverty Bay and Hawke’s Bay. Its area comprises 20,000 acres of table-land and hills, partly in bush, the balance being laid down in English grasses and well-watered. About 17,000 crossbred Lincolns, with a few head of cattle and horses, are depastured on the run. The average clip of wool is about eight and a half pounds per fleece, equal to a total output of 320 bales, which are shipped from Mahia to Napier. There is a comfortable homestead, with wool-sheds and accommodation whares, and a number of permanent station hands are employed.

Mr. GEORGE CANNING ORMOND, Run-holder and proprietor of the above station, is the eldest son of the Hon. J. D. Ormond, M L.C., formerly a Minister of the Crown, a notice of whom appears in the political section of the Wellington volume. The subject of this notice was born at Napier, and received his education at Napier Grammar School and Wellington College, during the headmastership of Mr. Kenneth Wilson, one of the first principals of the college. On leaving the latter institution, Mr. Ormond visited England, and returned to the Colony in 1883. He then commenced his experience in sheepfarming on the Hon. J. D. Ormond’s Paremata Station, Tologa Bay, where he remained two years, and in 1885 he acquired the Whangawehi Station. Mr. Ormond is a member of the Wairoa County Council and Racing Club.

TINIROTO.

TINIROTO is in Hawke’s Bay and is a small outlying district forty-two miles south of Gisborne. It has a weekly mail service.

LAKE HOUSE HOTEL (Samuel James Cooper, proprietor), Tiniroto. This hotel has been established some eight years, and being centrally situated between Gisborne and Wairoa is practically a half-way house. Tourists visiting the lakes can make this their headquarters while in the district. Some of the most beautiful falls in the North Island are within easy distance and in Tiniroto (“many lakes’’), splendid shooting can be obtained. A general store, post office, and stables are conducted in connection with the hotel, which has been erected only three years. No pains are spared by the proprietor and his wife to make visitors feel at home, and in the summer a pleasant holiday can be spent here.

Mr. S. J. COOPER, the Proprietor, is a native of Yorkshire, England, and came to New Zealand with his parents in 1860 in the ship ‘“Derwentwater,” landing at Wellington, where he was educated. He afterwards went to Dunedin and settled in Roslyn for a few years. In 1877 he removed to Gisborne and shortly afterwards took the hotel at Waerenga-a-hika, eight miles from Gisborne where he remained six years. Mr. Cooper then took up land in the same locality and was engaged in farming until taking over the above hotel in 1890. He has been chairman of the local school committee for many years and is starter of the Wairoa Racing Club. Mr. Cooper is married and has seven sons and six daughters.

Photo captions –
MR. W. C. MUNRO.
HOT BATH, NUHAKA.

NUHAKA AND HASTINGS.   193

NUHAKA.

NUHAKA is situated ninety-six miles northeast from Napier in the county of Wairoa, within the electoral district of Waiapu. There is a telephone office in the township, which has a weekly mail service with Napier. The means of conveyance from Napier is by steamer to Wairoa and thence by road to Nuhaka.

“WAI” STATION, Nuhaka. This run contains 6500 acres, of which 1000 are under cultivation for fodder. There are 14,000 pure Lincoln sheep and a pure stud flock of-300 from imported stock. The cattle number about 400. The land was taken up in 1870 by the late Mr. George Walker, and for the last quarter of a century the flocks have enjoyed a reputation for excellence.

Mr. GEORGE WALKER, the present proprietor, was born at Whangawehi in 1886. Educated at the Napier High School, he studied for a surveyor and passed his examination in 1884. He followed his profession for ten years at Napier, and by the death of his father in 1897 he inherited the estate, on which he now resides. As a footballer, Mr. Walker represented Hawke’s Bay during several seasons. He is married to a daughter of Mr. E. Homlin, of Napier, and has a son and daughter.

HASTINGS.

HASTINGS, a town on the Heretaunga Plains, famous for their fertility, situated twelve miles north from Napier, on the railway line to Woodville and the direct route to Wellington, Wanganui, and New Plymouth. The country is very rich, both for agricultural and pastoral purposes and the township possesses extensive meat-curing, canning, gelatine works, woollen and other factories in connection with these industries.

Photo captions –
THE LATE. MR. G. WALKER.
MR. G. WALKER, JUNR.
MR. B. CHAMBER’S RESIDENCE, TE MATA, HASTINGS.
MR. B. CHAMBERS’ CIRCULAR SHEEP YARDS, TE MATA.

(O)

194   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

The population has increased very much within the last few years and numbers about 3500. The hotels are: – ‘‘The Railway,” Hastings,” “Carlton,” “Albert,” and “Pacific”; newspaper, ‘‘Evening Star”; banks, Bank of New Zealand, New South Wales, Union; churches, Episcopalian, Presbyterian, Wesleyan, Roman Catholic; public and private schools, public hall and library, Protestant Hall, Oddfellows’ and Masonic Halls, and other social and benefit societies, and a fine racecourse near the town.

THE BOROUGH COUNCIL OF HASTINGS has control over an area of about 5740 acres, within which limits there are 1100 ratable [rateable] properties, on which a general rate of one shilling and a special rate of a like amount are levied, the estimated annual value being £35,000. The total annual revenue from all sources is £3850.

His Worship the Mayor Mr. CECIL AUGUSTUS FITZ-ROY has been connected with the council since its inception, and has filled the civic chair for the last four years. During his term of office a system of surface drainage, involving an expenditure of £5000, has been undertaken. He was born in Norfolk, England, and received his education at Eton and Cambridge. Coming out to Australia in 1867, he crossed over to New Zealand and took up land in Canterbury, where he was engaged in sheepfarming for twelve years. Mr. Fitz-Roy then came to the North Island and has since resided on his property, ‘‘Ringstead,’’ near Hastings, and has taken an active part in public affairs. For several years he represented Selwyn in the House of Representatives. He was a member of the Selwyn County Council, of which body he was one of the first members, and has been closely connected with local politics in his present district for many years; he is a member of the Education Board and was a member of the Hospital and Charitable Aid Board for some considerable time. He is a member of the Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club, and Agricultural and Pastoral Association. Mr. Fitz-Roy has only been opposed once for the mayoral chair, and on that occasion defeated his opponent by a large majority. He stood against the Hon. J. Carroll at the last general election, but was defeated. Mr. Fitz-Roy married Miss Beetham of the Hutt, and has two sons and two daughters.

Councillor WILLIAM ARTHUR BEECROFT, Member of the Hastings Borough Council, is fully referred to under his business notice on another page of this section.

Councillor WILLIAM BEILBY, J.P., Member of the Borough Council of Hastings, is a partner in the firm of Maddison and Co., Heretaunga Street, Hastings. He was born at Birmingham in 1839 and educated at King Edward’s school in that city. Coming in 1855 by the ‘‘Josephine Willis” to the Bay of Islands he joined his uncle, Capt. Buteman, who was engaged in farming and with whom he remained two years, then went to sea in an American whaler. A year later he went to Boston, then to England for a short time and returned to Wellington. He worked on various stations in Hawke’s Bay until 1877, when he received an appointment from his brother-in-law, Mr. J. Bishop, with whom he remained till 1880. Mr. Beilby next entered into business on his own account as commission and insurance agent, then became book-keeper to the firm of Messrs E. Beck and Co., and remained with the firm until they closed their business. In 1890 he entered into partnership with Mr. Maddison, as general drapers and storekeepers, and they have one of the most progressive businesses in Hastings. Mr. Beilby is secretary to the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society and clerk of the scales to the Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club. He is also a Mason of thirty-two years’ standing and is at present grand superintendent of the Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne districts. He is married and resides at ‘‘South View,” Southland Road, Hastings.

Councillor CHARLES HUGHES, J.P., Member of the Borough Council of Hastings, is a grandson of the late Colonel James Hughes, who fought at the battle of Waterloo and settled afterwards in Victoria. Mr. Hughes was born in Fitzroy, Melbourne, in 1850, and was brought up by his grandfather, who articled him to a firm of architects. Not liking the profession, he entered the service of Mr. W. S. Cox, pork butcher, Bourke Street, Melbourne, with whom he served five years as apprentice. After serving his time he went to the Spring Creek “rush’’ for a short time, when he joined a meat preserving factory, in which he was employed for five years. In 1868 he came to New Zealand, landing at Dunedin, but continued his journey to Oamaru, where he got employment in the meat preserving works for two years. He then started business for himself and about three years after made arrangements to proceed to Melbourne by the ill-fated ‘‘Tararua,” but owing to some changes in his plans he had to forego his intended journey and came to Wellington, a fortunate change for him as the “Tararua’’ was lost with nearly all hands. In Wellington he entered the service of Mr. Gear, remaining with him three years, and in 1883 came to Hastings and started a business which he afterwards sold to Messrs Nelson Bros. Mr. Hughes proceeded to Masterton where he bought an old established business which he carried on for three years, then returned to Hastings in 1894 and started his present business. Mr. Hughes has been a very fortunate speculator and is the owner of very considerable house property in Hastings. He is an ardent politician and has been always a strong supporter of the Ballance Government and its successors. He is a member of the Hibernian and Druid societies and was formerly member of the licensing committee. In Masterton he was a member of the borough council, after defeating a candidate who had been member for fourteen years. Mr. Hughes was first returned to the Hastings Borough Council in 1886, and re-elected in 1895. He married the daughter of Mr. John Bridgeman, of Knockfinney, Ballingarry, County Limerick, Ireland, and has an only son.

Councillor ROBERT WELLWOOD, Member of the Hastings Borough Council and at one time Mayor, has been connected with local affairs for many years. He was chairman of the old Town Board before the town was formed into a borough, and has been a member of the Borough Council since its inception, having been the first mayor, and filled the civic chair for three years in succession. Mr. Wellwood has been an energetic supporter of all progressive movements for the welfare of the town, such as drainage and the formation of streets and footpaths. He was born in Ireland, and came to Wellington in the ship ‘‘Queen of the

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR W. BEILBY.
COUNCILLOR C. HUGHES.

HASTINGS.   195

Avon” in 1859. After a varied Colonial experience during which he was at the Otago and Hokitika diggings, he came to Hawke’s Bay and for two years managed Mr. J. Williams’ estate. He then took up the land on which he resided until he acquired his present property in 1887, which consists of 450 acres of good pastoral country and runs about 1600 sheep. Mr. Wellwood devotes his chief attention to grazing and stock-dealing. He has been connected with the local Masonic lodge for many years, and has held office as P.M. Mr. Wellwood has been twice married and has nine children.

Mr. DONALD McLEOD, J.P., Ex-Councillor of the Hastings Borough Council, was born in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, in 1843, and left that Colony with his father and family for New Zealand in 1859 by the barque “Ellen Lewis” of 330 tons, landing in Auckland in 1860. He worked for nearly fourteen years in the Auckland province, engaged in carpentering, bridge and ship building, bush-felling, pitsawing, and other pursuits, a considerable part of this time being spent at Waipu, Omaha, and Whangarei. In 1873 Mr. McLeod removed to Gisborne and was engaged in building the first Masonic Hotel in that town. In 1874 he came to Hawke’s Bay, where he was for a number of years engaged in the house and bridge building trades. He erected Mr. Sydney Johnston’s beautiful residence at Takapau, and at Waipukurau, where he resided for six years, he built the Anglican Church, town hall, and other buildings, and also Mr. Bridge’s flour mill at Onga-Onga. In 1881 he settled in Hastings, where he was engaged in the house building trade, and in 1887, in conjunction with Mr. Knight, started a sawmill at Tahoraite, which was carried on for about four years, during which time he was a member of the Dannevirke Road Board and School Committee. Returning to Hastings in 1891, he started his present business in 1893 as timber merchant, and purchased the Makotuku sawmill, which unfortunately was burnt down early in 1896, having no insurance on it, but was re-erected at Waikopiro in the same year. The yards are situated on the Heretaunga road, Hastings, and occupy three-quarters of an acre, where he keeps a large stock of seasoned timber and general building and fencing materials, coal, firewood, and an assortment of builders’ ironmongery. Mr. McLeod was elected to the first Hastings Borough Council in 1887, retiring in 1888, and was re-elected in 1892, retiring in 1895. In 1878 he married Miss Isabella Coghill, of Bower, Caithness, and has had two sons, the eldest of whom, a promising youth of eighteen years, died in 1897.

Mr. SAMUEL THOMAS TONG, Ex Member of the Hastings Borough Council, has been connected with local politics for many years. He was a member of the old Town Board, and has been on the school committee for fifteen years. Mr. Tong is a builder and contractor by trade. He was born in Falmouth, England, educated and brought up to his trade there under Messrs. Oliver and Son, with whom he remained thirteen years. In 1872, he went to New York and spent four years in the United States. Returning to England in 1876, he decided to come to this Colony and join his parents, and after a stormy voyage in the ship “Roderick Castle,” during which the vessel was dismantled in the Bay of Biscay, arrived safely in Auckland. For many years, Mr. Tong was in business in that city, and then removed to Hamilton and Cambridge. He came to Hastings in 1878 and established his present flourishing business. He promoted the local fire brigade in 1882 and was captain and fire inspector for twelve years. Mr. Tong is a Freemason, and has held office as J.W., and was also P.P.G.M. in the Oddfellows. He has been a very successful rifle shot, and won many prizes whilst a member of the Hastings Rifles. Mr. Tong is married and has five daughters and three sons.

HERETAUNGA BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL (John A. Fraser, headmaster), Hastings. The primary object of this school is to provide a thorough English and commercial education; the course includes preparation for Matriculation, Medical Preliminary

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR R. WELLWOOD.
MR. D. McLEOD.
HERETAUNGA SCHOOL, HASTINGS

196   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

and Civil Service examinations. Situated in a very healthy part of Hastings, the school is without doubt one of the best in the Hawke’s Bay Province. It was established in 1882 by Mr. W. Rainbow and met with great success, there being now between forty and fifty boys, a large proportion of whom are permanent boarders. The house is admirably adapted for its purpose. The bedrooms are spacious and healthy and arranged on the collegiate principle of the Old Country. The main schoolroom is 60 feet by 20 feet in dimensions, is particularly well lighted, and can be fitted up as a gymnasium in a very few minutes. Every convenience has been provided, including inside and outside lavatories, bath-rooms, etc. The grounds are one of the features of the place and comprise in all five and a a half acres, which afford ample scope for physical recreation. There is a fine asphalt tennis court, and also a workshop where the boys are given a thorough technical training. Mr. A. R. Meek, A.R., LL.B., in his report of the last examination speaks highly of the progress made by the boys. Mr. Fraser is assisted by Mr. E. H. Andrews and Mr. N. R. Wellwood, Mr. W. T. Sharpe of Napier Cathedral being music master, and Sergeant-Major Dewar drill instructor. The fees for boarders are fifty guineas per annum, including stationery, laundry, etc.; day boys £9 9s. per annum, music and dancing being extras.

Mr. J. A. FRASER, the Principal, is a native of Tunbridge, England, was educated at Haileybury College, Hertford, and afterwards spent two years in teaching in France, Germany, and Spain. Coming to New Zealand in 1886, he landed at Timaru and followed commercial pursuits for three years, during which period he pursued his studies and matriculated, also obtaining a D certificate. He came to Hastings in 1890 and assisted Mrs. Rainbow until taking over the school in 1892 on his own account. Great improvements have been made since the school has been in Mr. Fraser’s hands, and the number of pupils has considerably increased. Mr. Fraser is an enthusiast in his profession and takes great interest in public and athletic matters.

THE CHURCH OF THE SACRED HEART, Hastings, is a beautiful edifice, erected in 1895 through the unceasing efforts of Father Smyth. It is of the Gothic style of architecture, ornamented by a noble spire which contains a peal of bells, equal to any in New Zealand. The interior of the church is most artistic and chaste. The church has seating accommodation for about 600 worshippers. The original church, which is now the boys’ school, was erected by the late Father Regnier in 1880. Adjoining the church are the convent and schools of the Sisters of St. Joseph, with about 250 pupils, who receive instruction in all the branches of education, including music, painting, and art needlework. The church and presbytery are surrounded by most charmingly laid out grounds.

Reverend FATHER SMYTH, a native of Limerick, Ireland, received his early education at the Limerick Seminary and completed his theological studies at St. Mary’s Marist College, Belley, Province of Ain, in France, and was ordained priest at St. Mary’s, Dundalk, Ireland, in 1878. He immediately afterwards went to America to take the important position of professor in the Jefferson College, near New Orleans, Louisiana. Six years later he went on a mission for two years. He took a trip Home in 1884 and came out the year following to New Zealand, taking charge at Hastings. Through his indefatigable efforts, the large sum of £3300 was raised to build the church of the Sacred Heart. In addition to services fortnightly services at Clive, where he also procured the erection of a very fine little church.

EBBETT, GEORGE, Barrister and Solicitor, Hastings. Mr. Ebbett is a son of Mr. James Ebbett, a well-known settler of Hastings, and was born in 1872, the first

Photo captions –
MR. J. A. FRASER.
REV. FATHER SMYTH.
SANCTUARY OF THE SACRED HEART CHURCH, HASTINGS.

HASTINGS.   197

child of European parentage born in that town. He was educated at Hastings and at the High School, Napier, and was articled to Mr. C. A. Loughnan, barrister and solicitor of Hastings, in 1891, passed all three sections of his law examination in one sitting and was admitted to the bar in 1896. Since then he has made great strides in his profession as a general practitioner. He was a member of the Borough Council, but owing to his increasing practice had to retire from that body. He is a member of the Hawke’s Bay Trotting Club and is an Oddfellow.

WILLIAMS, EDWARD HEATHCOTE, Barrister and Solicitor, Hastings. Branch at Napier. (See Napier.)

LINNEY, WILLIAM WYCLIFFE, J.P., L.R.C.P. (Lond.), M.R.C.S. (Eng.), Physician and Surgeon, Hastings. Dr. Linney was born in Lancashire, came to New Zealand as medical officer of the “Ionic’’ in 1886, and shortly afterwards established himself in practice in Hastings.

NAIRN, ROBERT, L.R.C.P. (Lond.), F.R.C.S. (Eng.), Physician and Surgeon, Hastings. Dr. Nairn was born at Wellington, studied at St. Thomas’ Hospital, London, and returned to New Zealand in 1893.

WRIGHT AND CHICK (George William Wright and William Chick), Surgeon Dentists, Hastings; also at Dannevirke and Woodville. This firm was established in 1897. The well-appointed dental-rooms in Hastings are situated at the corner of King and Eastburne [Eastbourne] Streets.

Mr. G. W. WRIGHT, Senior Partner, was born in Auckland in 1873, where he was educated and afterwards articled to Mr. A. L. Smith, the well-known dentist of that city. In 1892 Mr. Wright went to Dunedin, where he successfully passed his examination in dental surgery and dental mechanics. He was afterwards associated for three years with Mr. J. P. Armstrong, of Dunedin, and in 1896 went to New Plymouth to manage the business of Mr. D. Gray. He came to Hastings in 1897 and in conjunction with his partner, Mr. Chick, established the present progressive business in that town, Dannevirke, and Woodville, Mr. Wright taking charge of the former branch and Mr. Chick the latter two. Mr. Wright is an enthusiastic bowler, also a musician of some note, and was a member of the Liedertafel at Dunedin for some years.

Mr. WILLIAM CHICK, the Second Partner, was born in 1875 at Port Chalmers and was articled to Mr. J. P. Armstrong, of Dunedin. After passing his dental examination, he practised for two years at Port Chalmers and in 1897 joined Mr. Wright in the present business in Hawke’s Bay. Mr. Chick is an enthusiastic bowler and tennis player.

ECCLES, ALEXANDER, AND CO., Pharmaceutical Chemists, Heretaunga Street, Hastings. Principal establishment, Hastings Street, Napier. Established 1895. The shop is a two-storey building centrally situated and is entered through cedar and plate-glass folding doors. The interior is very attractive. Behind the plate-glass window are a great variety of toilet and other articles arranged with artistic effect and when lighted up at night with powerful incandescent lamps, the whole presents a most brilliant effect. The shop contains a very large stock of drugs and medicines of all descriptions. The surgery, consulting and dental rooms are conveniently situated.

Mr. W. K. WALLACE, the popular manager, was born and educated in Auckland and acquired his profession under Mr. Graves Aitken, of that city, whose assistant he was for two years. Mr. Wallace came to Hawke’s Bay in 1893 and for twelve months was assistant to Mr. Eccles, at Napier, and in the beginning of 1895 took charge of the Hastings branch.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.

BRATHWAITE AND TIPPING (Robert Brathwaite and Francis Charles Tipping), Grain, General, Commission, and Financial Agents, and agents for the New Zealand Shipping Company, Hastings. Established in 1895. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Mr. Brathwaite, the senior partner, was born in London, and came to New Zealand in 1864 by the ship “Queen of the Deep,”’ landing at Auckland. Proceeding shortly afterwards to Napier, he first entered the service of one of the banks for a short time, then went on a station and managed “Riverslea” for about four years. He afterwards acquired Eskdale Station where for four years he was sheepfarming. He sold his run and became associated in the business of Messrs Williams and Kettle for about two years. After severing his connection with that firm he started the above business in conjunction with his present partner. Mr. Brathwaite is secretary to the Hastings Building Society and has been for the last thirteen years, registrar of births, deaths, and marriages, and vice-president of the Athenaeum. Mr. Brathwaite took part in the fight of Omaranui in 1866 where he was slightly wounded, and was promoted to the rank of sergeant. He afterwards joined the cavalry, in which he attained the rank of lieutenant, and was engaged against the natives after the Poverty Bay and Mohaka massacre. Mr. Tipping is a native of Swords, Dublin, and at an early age went to Australia. After a varied experience on the goldfields and in the Mounted Police he

Photo captions –
MR. R. NAIRN.
MR. G. W. WRIGHT.
MR. W. CHICK.

198   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

came to New Zealand in 1868 and for twenty-eight years was engaged in farming at Rangiora, Canterbury. For a short time he was employed on survey work in the Waikato. He came to Hawke’s Bay in 1890 and was clerk of works at the Waipukurau Freezing Works and for four years was manager of Messrs Williams and Kettle’s Hastings branch.

DENNETT, WILLIAM YOUNG, Auctioneer, Commission Agent, Hotel Valuer, and General Financial Agent, Hastings.

WINSLEY, ROGER, Pastrycook, Confectioner, and Caterer, Hastings. Mr. Winsley’s well-known business was established by him three years ago and has supplied a want long felt in the district. A splendid stock of high class English confectionery is kept and the window has an attractive display of small goods, etc. Mr. Winsley makes a specialty of catering and is caterer for the Napier Park Racing Club, Agricultural and Pastoral Society, Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club, New Zealand Polo Association, Hawke’s Bay Trotting Club, etc. He was born in Devonshire, England, served his apprenticeship at the original Bath Bun establishment in Bath and claims to be the only person now holding the receipt for making them. He came to this Colony in 1884 and was head cook at the Star and Garter hotel, Wellington Club, and Criterion hotel, Napier, until establishing himself as above.

NEWBIGIN, E., Brewer, Wine and Spirit Merchant, Aerated Water and Cordial Manufacturer, Burton Brewery, Hastings. Established 1881. Telephone 12. Bankers, Bark of New South Wales. The brewery has all the latest appliances for the manufacture of beer and cordials. Water is obtained through a four-inch pipe from a well 271 feet in depth. The analysis of the water shows its chemical qualities to be specially adapted for the manufacture of beverages. Six men are employed in the brewery, which is a fine three-storey building, and all the plant is arranged on the gravitation principle. The cellar is large and cool and the bottling department is constructed of brick, ensuring an even temperature. The ales produced at this brewery are of a very high character, delicate to the palate and for brilliancy and flavour leave nothing to be desired. They have been awarded several prizes and the leading hotels have them on tap. Mr. Newbigin, the Proprietor, was born at Ryton Grange, Newcastle-on-Tyne, and came to the Colony at an early age. Shortly after his arrival he was employed at Swan’s Brewery, Napier, where he was brewer for several years, and was altogether connected with that establishment for twenty-one years. He recently determined to start business on his own account and purchased the freehold buildings and plant of the Hastings Brewery. Since he took possession his output has increased three-fold. Mr. Newbigin is president of the Hastings Bowling Club.

SYMONDS, WILLIAM, Coachbuilder and Bicycle Manufacturer, Queen Street, Hastings. Telephone 9. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Private residence, Havelock. Established 1888. The workshop is one of the most complete in Hawke’s Bay. There is a large showroom with a number of beautifully finished vehicles on view. The workshops and smithies are large and fitted with the latest labour-saving tools including an eight horse-power steam engine, and the painting-room, to which the vehicles are raised by a steam lift, is 66 feet by 33 feet, the whole occupying a floor space of 11,000 feet. Mr. Symonds employs sixteen men in his business, including painters, upholsterers, smiths, and body-builders. The manufacture of landaus and high-class vehicles is a specialty, many of these being in use in Mr. Beecroft’s well-appointed livery stables. The buggies, waggonettes, cabs, and hansoms turned out from this establishment reflect the greatest credit on the proprietor. Mr. Symonds is a native of London where he was brought up to the ironmongery business, and came to Auckland in 1862 by the “Matilda Wattenbach,’’ and spent twenty-five years at Kaipara, where he was engaged as a boatbuilder and shipwright. In 1888 he came to Hastings and established his present business which has since assumed such large proportions and to which latterly he has added bicycle manufacture under the supervision of his son. During his residence at Kaipara Mr. Symonds was a member of the school committee and road board, but since he came to Hastings he has taken no part in local affairs. He is married and has three sons, who assist him in the business and two of whom are married.

THE HERETAUNGA CO-OPERATIVE BUTTER FACTORY (John Twigg, manager), St. George’s Road, Hastings. Established 1893. This factory contains all the latest appliances for the manufacture of butter, of which the yearly output is about forty tons. There are two separators driven by steam-power.

Mr. JOHN TWIGG, the Manager of the Heretaunga Co-operative Butter Factory, is a native of Derbyshire, England, was brought up to farming and dairying pursuits. He came to the Colony in 1885, landing at Dunedin, and shortly afterwards received an appointment at the Geraldine Butter Factory, Canterbury; here he remained two years, when he became manager at Chew Chong’s Butter Factory, Taranaki, of which he was in charge for some years prior to his present appointment in 1893. Mr. Twigg is married and has one child.

Photo captions –
Mr. R. BRAITHWAITE [BRATHWAITE].
MR. W. SYMONDS.
MR. J. TWIGG.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   199

ROACH, G. H., Draper, Clothier, Grocer, and Provision Merchant, Hastings. Telephone 7. Bankers, Union Bank of Australia. Established 1884. Mr. Roach’s is one of the largest and oldest establishments in Hastings. The drapery business is carried on in a handsome building situated in the busiest part of the township, the windows being rendered very attractive with a large display of the latest goods imported direct from the manufacturers in Great Britain. The interior of the shop is tastefully fitted up, special attention being paid to lighting. The stock is new and in the latest style and is divided respectively into fancy, dress, and Manchester, gents’ mercery, and clothing departments. The grocery and general store, including crockery and ironmongery, is situated a few doors further up the street and is managed by Mr. Roach’s eldest son. Two delivery carts are in use and there are six employees.

Mr. G. H. ROACH, the Proprietor of the above business, is a native of Richmond, near London, and received his education at the Birmingham Grammar School. On completing his education, he returned to London and was for some considerable time with the well-known firm of Messrs Shoolbread and Co., of Tottenham Court Road, wholesale and retail drapers, and one of the largest firms in the Old Country. Coming to Australia in 1857 in the ship ‘‘Red Jacket,’ Mr. Roach was with Messrs Alston and Brown, of Melbourne, until crossing over to Dunedin, in 1862, where he was for six years in business on his own account. Removing to Christchurch, Mr. Roach was in business there until accepting an appointment as traveller for Messrs Harcourt and Co., of Wellington, with whom he remained ten years, and he has found his extensive experience of the trade of great use in building up his own present large connection. He is married and has four sons and three daughters.

Mr. G. F. ROACH, Manager of the grocery branch, was born in Dunedin and received his education in Wellington. After leaving school he was in the Wanganui branch of the New Zealand Clothing Factory for some time. He came to Hawke’s Bay with his father in 1884 and has since assisted him with the business. Mr. Roach is a Mason and secretary of his lodge.

THE COMMERCIAL AND FAMILY HOTEL (Daniel O’Reilly, proprietor), corner of Heretaunga and Railway Streets, Hastings. Telephone 190. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. This hotel is a large two-storey building, situated in the centre of the town and near the railway station, post office, and other public buildings. It contains on the upper floor about thirty bedrooms, ladies’ drawing-room, and a number of private sitting-rooms, all furnished in first-class style. On the ground floor are the dining-room, capable of accommodating ninety guests, commercial and billiard rooms, and six parlours. The house is much resorted to by country settlers, tourists, and the general travelling public. The whole domestic arrangements are under the immediate supervision of Mrs. O’Reilly, who makes the comfort of patrons her greatest care.

Mr. DANIEL O’REILLY, the Proprietor, is a native of Cork, Ireland, and came to the Colony in 1878 by the “City of Auckland,’’ which was wrecked on the Otaki Beach. Mr. O’Reilly lost all his possessions, and was conveyed with other passengers to Napier by the Government steamer ‘‘Hinemoa.” He energetically set to work to make the best of bad fortune, and obtained agricultural employment, at which he continued for six years. He came to Hastings in 1885, started a boot and shoe shop, and carried on that business successfully for three years, when he sold it to the Egmont Boot Factory Company of New Plymouth. Mr. O’Reilly opened a drapery business which he also sold three years later to considerable advantage, and in 1892 bought an interest in the above hotel. Mr. O’Reilly also owns a fine little farm of about ten acres, from which the hotel table is supplied with fruit, vegetables, and poultry. He also owns a large block of land opposite the railway on which he has erected five large commodious shops. In politics Mr. O’Reilly is a thorough Liberal. He has been a member of the Hibernian Society for the last seventeen years and of the Napier Park and Hastings Trotting Clubs, Agricultural and Pastoral Society and Hastings Bowling Club. Mr. O’Reilly married in 1887 Miss Julia O’Neill and has two children.

ANNETT, JOSEPH, Ironmonger and General Storekeeper, Hastings. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. The premises in which this first-class business is carried on comprise a fine two-storied building, with a store and outbuildings. Mr. Annett, who is a native of Ireland, came to this Colony in 1877 in the ship ‘Ballarat,’ landing at Napier with his parents, and received his education and commercial training in that town. After having served fourteen years with Messrs. Ruddick and Fryer of Napier, he removed to Hastings and established himself as above. Mr. Annett is a member of the Oddfellows’ lodge. He is married and has one’ daughter.

BONE AND HOBROYD (F. L. Bone and T. C. L. Hobroyd), Wholesale and Retail Ironmongers, Dealers in Firewood, Coal, etc., Hastings. Bankers, Bank’ of New South Wales. This well-known firm was established about sixteen years ago, and the business has extended to very considerable dimensions, necessitating larger premises. Messrs Bone and Hobroyd hold very large stocks, and being direct importers from the English, American, and Continental market are able to supply goods at very reasonable prices. The timber, firewood, coal, and produce yards adjoin the business premises.

Mr. F. L. BONE, the Senior Partner, is a native of England, and came to New Zealand with his parents in the ship “Etna,” landing in Napier. He served four years with Messrs. Ruddick and Fryer, of Napier, then, coming to Hastings, entered the employment of Mr. W. F. Bennett, and was for some time in partnership with him. On Mr. Bennett retiring in 1896, Mr. Bone and his present partner purchased the business. He takes great interest in musical and public affairs. He is married and has two daughters.

Mr. C. L. HOBROYD, the Junior Partner, is a native of Rochdale, England, where he was educated. He came to Napier in 1886, was for twelve years with the Tomoana Freezing Company, and joined Mr. Bone in business in 1896. Mr. Hobroyd is a member of the Hastings Rifle Corps.

WEAVER, ALFRED, Riverslea Wool Scouring Works, Hastings. Mr. Weaver’s well-known business was established by him twenty-one years ago at Clive, but owing to the disastrous floods of 1897 which

Photo captions –
MR. G. H. ROACH.
MR. F. L. BONE.

200   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

destroyed the whole of the plant and buildings, he removed to Hastings, where he has erected all the necessary buildings for an extensive trade. The main building is of wood and iron, 80 feet by 68 feet, and contains the engine and scouring rooms, wool-sorting and baling department, etc. The machinery is driven by a five horse-power engine, and the scouring-room is fitted with Williams’ patent wool-washing boxes and a new up-to-date patent extractor by Broadbent and Sons, Ltd. The wool after being passed through the above machines is spread on the drying ground, then brought in and baled for the London market. Mr. Weaver, the proprietor, is a native of Kent, England, and was educated and brought up there. He came to New Zealand in the ship ‘‘Hudson” in 1874, landing at Napier, and learnt his trade with the late Mr. C. Mitchell, of Clive. He was in charge of various wool-scouring works in Hawke’s Bay until starting his own at Clive, where, by energy and perseverance, he had one of the finest businesses of the kind in the province. Mr. Weaver is, however, rapidly rebuilding his trade. As a Forester he has held office as P.M. in Court Waitangi.  His present residence is all that was saved from the Clive property, and was conveyed in sections thirteen miles and re-erected where it now stands.  Mr. Weaver is married and has four sons and five daughters.  He is assisted at the works by his two eldest sons.

WYATT, JOSEPH, Butcher, Heretaunga Street, Hastings.  Bankers, Union Bank of Australia.  Mr. Wyatt was born in 1862 in Gloucestershire, England, came to Napier in 1875 by the barque “Hudson,” shortly afterwards starting a butchery business in Havelock, which was then a rising town.  He acquired a fine property of about eighty acres at Havelock, and came to Hastings and established his present business, which is carried on in conjunction with the one at Havelock.  Mr. Wyatt has been a member of the licensing committee, vice-president of the Plumpton Park Coursing Club, and is a Forester of several years standing.  He is married and has five children

BEECROFT, WILLIAM ARTHUR, Livery Stable Keeper, Hastings. Telephone 29. Bankers, Union Bank of Australia, Private residence, Queen Street. These stables are the most complete in Hawke’s Bay and occupy a space of about one and a half acres in the centre of the town. There is accommodation for eighty horses in single stalls and loose boxes. Mr. Beecroft’s plant numbers over twenty-five vehicles, including landaus, drags, dog-carts, gigs, hansoms, and spring carts, besides two fine hearses, mourning coaches, and an ambulance van. The horses and trappings are in keeping with his carriages, and careful drivers are always sent in charge. His saddle and carriage horses are the best to be obtained, the owner’s great desire being to have the neatest and finest turn-outs procurable. During the visit of the vice-regal party to Hastings, His Excellency the Governor specially complimented Mr. Beecroft on the style of his landaus and general turnout on that occasion. He also took first prize at the Palmerston Agricultural and Pastoral Show for three years in succession for best pair of carriage horses. Adjoining the stables are large saleyards where horse sales are conducted by the leading auctioneers. The proprietor runs a daily line of buses between Hastings and Havelock. Mr. Beecroft is a native of Lowestoft, England, and during his earlier years was engaged in the butchering business. He came to the Colony in 1865 by the ship “Liver- pool,” landing at Auckland, and for a short time after his arrival was engaged in gumdigging. He arrived in Napier in 1866, went to the Thames in the early days of the field, but only remained there about two years and returned to Napier. He received the appointment of salesman and manager to Messrs Kinross and Co., merchants, and remained with that firm eight years. In 1877 Mr. Beecroft came to Hastings and purchased the Railway Hotel, of which his present stables then formed a part. He owns the Lucknow Estate at Havelock, on which he has built a residence known as “Lucknow Lodge,” and bus stables. He takes part in all matters associated with the advancement of Hastings, was a member of the Heretaunga Road Board until the district was taken over by the County Council, and was elected a member of the Hastings Borough Council in 1894. He is a member of the Masonic body, was lodge Secretary for two years, and claims to be the father of the Foresters in Hawke’s Bay, having called the first meeting of the Order at Napier in 1871.

McLEOD, DONALD, Timber Merchant, Builder, etc., Hastings. Full particulars of Mr. McLeod will be found elsewhere under the heading of ‘‘ex-councillor.”

Mr. NATHANIEL E. BEAMISH, of “Stoneycroft,” Hastings, is an old colonist who has resided in this Colony for nearly fifty years. He was born in County Cork, Ireland, and came to New Zealand in the “Lady Nugent” in 1850, and for two years resided at Lyttelton. He then came to the North Island and for eighteen years was manager of the well-known “Heaton Park” estate in the Rangitikei district, the property of the late Hon. W. B. Rhodes. Owing chiefly to the native troubles, Mr. Beamish disposed of a property he owned near Marton and removed with his family to near Hastings, and became manager for the late Mr. T. Lowry of the Okawa estate with whom he remained twenty years after which he settled down at “Stoneycroft.” Mr. Beamish is owner of the Whana Whana

Photo captions –
INTERIOR OF MR. WEAVER’S DINING-ROOM AND DRAWING-ROOM.
MR. W. A. BEECROFT’S PREMISES.

PROFESSIONAL, COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL.   201

station, which is managed by his son, Mr. George Beamish, and consists of 19,000 acres and runs about 23,000 Lincoln sheep and 1000 head of cattle. Ploughing, grain and root cropping, laying down grass, etc., are also liberally carried on. Mr. Beamish has long been closely identified with public matters, and is a member of various local bodies.

FLAXMERE ESTATE, the property o [of] the Hon. Capt. W. R. Russell, is situated within three miles of Hastings and consists of 1700 acres of good level country suitable for agricultural purposes and sheep grazing, 7000 Lincoln sheep being run on the property. Over 200 acres are down in grain and about 150 in various crops. The wool-shed has accommodation for about twelve shearers and all the latest necessary agricultural implements are to be found on the property, including a traction-engine and threshing-machine. A great portion of the land was originally flax swamp and extensive drainage operations have been carried out, over forty miles of surface drains having been cut.

Major FREDERICK JOHN WILLIAM GASCOYNE, who holds office in the Colonial Forces, late Stipendiary Magistrate at the Chatham Islands, was born in 1838 at Cawnpore, India, and is the son of Major Charles Manners Gascoyne, of the East India Company’s service, who served throughout the Sutlej Campaign (medal and three clasps). The subject of this sketch came to New Zealand in 1853 with his father, who settled in Motueka, Nelson. In 1863 he joined the Colonial Defence Force, and in 1865 was attached to the East Coast expeditionary force, under Captain Fraser, serving throughout the Waiapu campaign and subsequent operations on that coast. After the Poverty Bay massacre in 1868, Major (then Lieutenant) Gascoyne, with some friendly natives and a few white volunteers, went in pursuit of the murderers, overtaking and defeating them at Mangakaretu, with heavy loss to the enemy. Subsequently he was present at the capture of Ngatapa and the operations on the West Coast against Titokowaru. The next year found him again on the East Coast, with the force operating in the Uriwera [Urewera] country against Te Kooti. In 1868, Major Gascoyne volunteered to carry despatches across sixty miles of country covered by the enemy’s scouts, and returned the same way, meeting a second messenger (Paku Parene) who was killed a few minutes after they had parted. Major Gascoyne was twice mentioned in the despatches during the war and was recommended by Major Westrup (commanding the Poverty Bay district) for the New Zealand Cross. He remained in the Permanent Force until he was appointed sheriff of Auckland in 1888 and in 1890 he received the appointment of stipendiary magistrate at the Chatham Islands, which post he resigned in 1897. Major Gascoyne lives in retirement at Hastings. He is a Mason of many years’ standing.

HAVELOCK NORTH.

HAVELOCK NORTH is situated on a branch of the Ngaruroro river, in Hawke’s Bay County, and is fourteen miles from Napier. It is two miles from the Hastings railway station, with which it is connected by a coach road. Coaches run daily, carrying mails, and there is telephone connection with the usual postal facilities. There are three good hotels, public school, library, Mechanics’ Institute, Foresters’ Hall, three churches, etc. The population of the township is about 400, whose local affairs are managed by a town board. The ratable [rateable] value of property is about £18,000 and the general rate is one penny in the £.

CHURCH OF ENGLAND, Havelock North and Clive. Rev. H. W. St. Hill has charge of both parishes.

Rev. HARRY WOODFORD ST. HILL, Vicar of Havelock North and Clive, was born in the West Indies, was partly educated in England and completed his studies at Bishop’s College, Calcutta. He came to New Zealand in 1850 to Bishop Selwyn, was ordained deacon in 1852 and priest in 1859. Mr. St. Hill ministered at Remuera, Auckland, and for several years had charge of the district. Coming to Wellington in 1856, he was in charge at Porirua until 1860, when he was appointed to Napier, where he had charge of the parish until 1865; he then removed to Crofton and was in charge of the Church of England Grammar School for ten years. After a trip to the Old Country, Mr. St. Hill returned to Napier and shortly afterwards was appointed vicar of Havelock. During his term of ministration, the chancel was added to the pretty church of St. Luke, and he has made himself very popular among his parishioners. Mr. St. Hill, who is a widower, has four sons and two daughters.

GUTHRIE, WILLIAM, Orchardist and Fruiterer, Havelock and Hastings. Mr. Guthrie started his orchard in 1872, and has two places of eighteen and eight acres respectively under cultivation and well stocked with apple trees, plum trees, lemons, oranges, grapes, red and black currants, etc. He established the Hastings shop in 1895. It is under the capable management of his daughter, and is supplied with fruit daily from the orchard. Born in Scotland, Mr. Guthrie learned his trade as a gardener when quite young, and went to Rockhampton, Queensland, in 1861. Crossing over to New Zealand eight years later, he worked at his trade in Auckland for three years, when he removed to Hawke’s Bay and purchased

Photo captions –
“STONEYCROFT,” THE RESIDENCE OF MR. N. E. BEAMISH.
MAJOR F. J. W. GASCOYNE.

202   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

his present property. Mr. Guthrie is married and has a family of eight children.

HAVELOCK NURSERIES (John Goddard, proprietor), Havelock North. These nurseries are said to be the finest and largest in New Zealand and are twenty-four acres in extent. They are without doubt one of the attractions of Hawke’s Bay, and strangers to the district should not fail to pay them a visit. Mr. Goddard has had years of experience and has worked hard to bring the nurseries to their present state of perfection. There are a great many varieties of chrysanthemums, camellias, daphnes, English and Dutch bulbs, and over 250 different classes of roses. The orchard is many acres in extent and contains a large selection of apples, pears, cherries, peaches, nectarines, apricots, prunes, currants, mulberries, figs, medlars, lemons, etc., etc., the prolific qualities of which his numerous customers can testify. Mr. Goddard is a very successful grape grower and his vineries contain over twenty different kinds. The beautifully clean condition of the foliage and few remaining bunches shows that the dreaded mildew, the bane of viticulture out or indoor, has never obtained a footing. Mr. Goddard’s practice in grape growing indoors differs in some material points from the generally accepted standard, and undoubtedly his success demonstrates the soundness of his arguments. These nurseries were honoured in 1893 by a special visit from the Governor of New Zealand and Lady Glasgow, while staying at Flaxmere, and they expressed themselves as highly gratified to find horticulture in such a forward state in the neighbourhood, and chiefly congratulated Mr. Goddard on his success in grape culture. Black Hamburgh is of course, the leading kind grown in the vinery, but a number of other varieties are grown successfully, such as Gros Colman, Foster’s Seedling, Ferdinand de Lesseps, Madresfield Court, Muscat of Alexandria, and other Muscats, and late and early varieties are represented, and are in the fullest vigour of health and bearing. Close by is an outdoor vineyard, the vines showing vigorous health and growth, but as yet too recently planted to call for special remark. In the immediate vicinity of the packing and plant sheds, and other offices, are the miscellaneous flowering shrub and ornamental plant grounds, with large stocks of healthy and thrifty young plants in excellent condition for immediate sale. Of the hedge plants, many thousands are grown, large breadths of cupressus macrocarpa, African box thorn, common barberry, and Californian privet. Blight of every description is carefully guarded against, apples being all worked on blight-proof stocks, and the various modern appliances and specifics are freely used in the proper seasons to secure immunity from all other pests. The codlin moth has been much less destructive this season than usual, sound fruit being, in consequence, more plentiful. The neat, legible, and careful way in which everything is labelled proves sufficiently how much interest is taken in having everything true to name and reliable. Mr. Goddard is entirely absorbed in his business, he lives in and for it, and has done so for thirty years in New Zealand, mostly in Hawke’s Bay. The nurseries give employment to seven competent gardeners, who keep the grounds in beautiful condition. A large stock of seeds is always kept, a splendid collection of which may be obtained for twenty shillings. Mr. Goddard issues a very complete and attractive catalogue which he is pleased to forward, post free on application.

Mr. JOHN GODDARD, the Proprietor, is a native of Lancaster, England, and was brought up to the trade there. He came to New Zealand in the ship “Flying Foam” in 1864, landing in Auckland, and was for four years with Mr. C. W. Wren, the well-known nurseryman of Remuera. Coming to Hawke’s Bay in 1871 he was employed as head gardener to Mr. Chambers and others, eventually starting his present business in 1873. Mr. Goddard was the founder of the Loyal Hastings Lodge of Oddfellows (M.U.) He is married and has two sons and two daughters.

CHAMBERS, THOMAS MASON, Sheep- farmer, ‘‘Tauroa,’’ Havelock North. Mr. Chambers’ fine property, which is a portion of the “Te Mata” estate, consists of 6200

Photo captions –
HAVELOCK NURSERIES.
MR. J. GODDARD.
THE LATE MR. J. CHAMBERS.

HAVELOCK NORTH.   203

acres of excellent sheep country and carries a flock of 12,000 sheep and about 200 head of cattle. The station and stock are in fine condition and there are all the latest agricultural implements in use for operations on a large scale. There is a complete telephone system connecting the homestead with Mr. Chambers’ brother’s stations and with his head shepherd, three employed, the wages bill amounting to about £1000 per annum. A splendid woolshed is erected on the property in which accommodation is provided for eighteen shearers. The homestead is beautifully situated and a fine view of Hastings and the surrounding country can be obtained from the verandah. Mr. Chambers was born in Hawke’s Bay, is a son of the late Mr. John Chambers of “Te Mata,’’ and was educated at the Napier Grammar School. After receiving his education, he went on extensive travels and has been twice round the world. His fine property has been in his possession since 1886 and is regarded as one of the best situated stations in Hawke’s Bay. Mr. Chambers has been closely identified with various public bodies for some years. He has been a member of the Hawke’s Bay County Council for some considerable time, and was a member of the old road board for ten years. Mr. Chambers is married to a daughter of Mr. McLean, solicitor, of Dunblane, Scotland, and has three sons and one daughter.

KAIKORA NORTH.

KAIKORA NORTH is situated in Patangata County, thirty-six miles from Napier on the Wellington line of railway. Mails are received and despatched four times daily, and there are the usual post and telegraphic facilities.

KAIKORA NORTH TOWN BOARD. The ratable value of property in the town district is £2415, on which a general rate of one shilling in the £ is levied. The population is over 800.

Mr. CHARLES CLARK, who has been chairman of the Kaikora Town Board since its formation in 1886, is a native of Kirkcudbright, Scotland. After receiving his education he followed various commercial pursuits in Glasgow for five years, came to New Zealand in 1859, landing at Auckland, and shortly afterwards went to Napier. He was in the Hawke’s Bay militia until coming to Waipawa in 1863. He then took up his present property of 400 acres and has been farming in the district ever since. In public matters he has always promoted the welfare of the township. He is a member of the Patangata Road Board, of which he has been chairman on several occasions, and is at present chairman of the school committee. He has been an Oddfellow for over twenty-five years. Mr. Clark married a daughter of the late Mr. John Stephen, one of Napier’s old settlers, and has nine children.

Mr. GEORGE CLARK, who is a member of the Kaikora North Town Board, is a native of Hampshire, England. After receiving his education he followed various

Photo captions –
FLOATING BRIDGE OVER THE TUKI TUKI RIVER – MADE WITH BARRELS.
MR. T. M. CHAMBERS.
MR. G. CLARK’S PREMISES.   See page 204.

204   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

commercal pursuits. Landing in Napier in 1879 he was engaged in farming at Tamumu until 1882 when he established himself in business as a general storekeeper in Kaikora. Mr. Clark is married and has two sons and two daughters.

CLARK; GEORGE, General Storekeeper and Provision Merchant, Kaikora North. Agent for the South British Insurance Company. Mr. Clark established his business in 1882 and it is one of the most flourishing in the district. An extensive stock of goods of all kinds is kept. Mr. Clark is further referred to elsewhere as a member of the Kaikora Town Board.

EVANS, ROBERT, Farmer, Kaikora North. Mr. Evans is a native of Llansaintffraid, Montgomeryshire, North Wales, and was brought up to farming pursuits. Arriving in Auckland in the ship ‘‘Queen of the Mersey” in 1863 he came to Hawke’s Bay and shortly afterwards entered the employment of the late Mr. H. S. Tiffen, of ‘‘Homewood,’’ with whom he remained ten years. He purchased his farm of 665 acres, on which he resides, in 1873 and has made considerable improvements. The land being very fertile, runs a flock of 1800 sheep, about thirty-five head of cattle and several horses. Mr. Evans was at one time a member of the local road board and school committee; he is also an elder in the Presbyterian church. He is married and has two sons and two daughters.

SMALL, HENRY, Sheepfarmer, Kaikora North. Mr. Small was born in Devon, England, and spent the earlier portion of his life at sea, trading for several years in the Indian Ocean. He came to New Zealand in 1865 and was engaged in farming pursuits for three years. Coming to the North Island he took up his present farm of 1070 acres in 1873 and has since considerably improved the place, which is now one of the best grazing runs in the district. It carries a flock of about 3000 sheep and 100 head of cattle and horses. There is a splendid woolshed in which shearing is carried out on a new plan of Mr. Small’s. He takes great interest in the welfare of the district and has been connected with the local road board and school committee. Mr. Small is held in great respect by the residents of the district. He is married and has six sons and five daughters.

TOD, JAMES, Sheepfarmer, “The Park,” Kaikora North. Mr. Tod’s property consists of 1242 acres and carries 3000 sheep and fiftyone head of cattle in prime condition. “The Park” was originally a portion of the ‘“Homewood” Estate, and since its purchase by Mr. Tod considerable improvements have been effected, including the building of a pretty homestead and the plantation of ornamental and shelter trees. Born in Fifeshire, Scotland, Mr. Tod was educated and brought up for a commercial career, and was for some years in a bank. He came to New Zealand in the ship “Rangoon,” in 1864, and landed at Napier,

Photo captions –
MR. R. EVANS.
MR. EVANS’ RESIDENCE.
MR. H. SMALL’S RESIDENCE.

PATANGATA.   205

where he followed commercial pursuits until taking up his present property, twenty-five years ago. Mr. Tod was a member of the Napier Volunteers, and was present at the engagement at Omaranui. He was chairman of the first Patangata Road Board and was a member of the old school committee during the days of the Provincial Government. He is married and has three sons and one daughter.

PATANGATA.

PATANGATA lies forty-three miles south of Napier and is seven miles from the railway-station at Kaikora North, with which it is connected by coach. There is a biweekly mail service.

THE PATANGATA COUNTY has a population of 2374, and property of a capital value of £1,690,152, on which a general rate of 3/4d. in the £ is levied. The annual revenue is £8,000. The council meet quarterly at Waipukurau.

Mr. WILLIAM WHITE, who has been Chairman of the Patangata County Council for the last five years, has been connected with that body since its formation. Born in Devonshire, England, in 1840, Mr. White was educated there and brought up to farming pursuits. Coming to New Zealand in 1859 by the ‘‘Joseph Fletcher,” he landed in Auckland and lived there for two years. He next tried the Otago diggings and worked on the fields with various success for some time. Mr. White then settled on the Canterbury Plains and was one of the first settlers at Greendale where he remained fourteen years. He then came to Hawke’s Bay and was for some time sheepfarming in that province. He is now in Kaikora North and devotes his attention to the manufacture of ‘‘White’s Celebrated Sheep Dip,’’ of which he disposes in large quantities every year. Mr. White has given much attention to public matters. When residing in the South Island he was a member of the Canterbury Provincial Council for the Rakaia district, and for many years was a member of the Courtney Road Board and Greendale School Committee. In his present district he has been a member of the Patangata Road Board for the last twenty years, chairman of the Kaikora School Committee for sixteen years and has also been on the Education Board. He is also president of the Waipawa County Racing Club which position he has filled for twelve years. Mr. White married the sister of Mr. Duncan McLaren, a well-known South Canterbury settler and has ten sons and two daughters.

Mr. EDWARD WATTS, who has been a member of the Patangata Road Board for the last ten years, is a native of Kent, England, and was brought up to farming on his father’s farm in the Old Country. He came to this Colony in the ship “Oriental” in 1841 and was engaged in common with the early settlers in pioneer work. He took up his present property in the rough state, but it has been greatly improved and runs about 2300 sheep. Mr. Watts was one of the earliest settlers in Hawke’s Bay and the first to erect a homestead in the district. He has all the latest agricultural machinery, including steam-thrashers, convenient sheds for storing grain, shearing, etc. Mr. Watts is married and has eight sons and two daughters.

DILLON, ALFRED, J.P., Sheepfarmer, Patangata. Mr. Dillon is a native of Wales and came to the Colony at an early age, with a large stock of energy and determination to succeed. He took the first job that offered and was employed as a cook by a party of roadmakers. After various other occupations, which all successful colonists experience in the early struggles of colonization, he gradually attained the position he now occupies. He acquired part of the Homewood station of about 4000 acres which was the nucleus of the fine estates he now owns. At Patangata the hotel, stores, and other businesses adjoining have claimed Mr. Dillon as their owner. During his long residence in Hawke’s Bay he has devoted a good deal of time to local affairs. He has been an active member of nearly all the public bodies, is a member of the Napier Harbour Board, chairman of the Hawke’s Bay County Council and Hospital Board, and has identified himself with every forward movement in the

Photo captions –
MR. J. TOD.
MR. W. WHITE.
MR. E. WATTS.
MR. A. DILLON.

206   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

district. He is also a Mason. He married a daughter of Mr. S. Collins and has twelve children.

FLEMING, DAVID STAIG, Sheepfarmer, Flemington Station, Wanstead, Patangata County, Hawke’s Bay. Mr. Fleming was born at St. Andrew’s, Fifeshire, Scotland, where he was educated. He arrived at Auckland in 1856 by the ship “Sandford,” and remained there about two years. He came to Hawke’s Bay in 1858 when he obtained employment as shepherd on a large run for five years. In 1863 Mr. Fleming took up his present run, containing about 6500 acres, the land being then in its virgin state, and has improved it into one of the finest properties in Hawke’s Bay. It now runs about 9000 sheep, besides 150 horses of the draught, hackney, and thoroughbred classes, to which he has devoted considerable attention. He was the breeder of the well-known racing hack “Jack Spratt” alias ‘‘Charlie,’’ also ‘‘Taurekaitai,’’ winner of the Hawke’s Bay steeplechase in 1893, and of a great number of other races. His breed of horses are well known throughout the Colony.  Mr. Fleming has been a member of the Wanstead Road Board for a number of years and chairman for the last three years. He is also a member of the Waipukurau Racing Club and of the Masonic Order. He is married and has seven children.

HARTREE, HENRY, Sheepfarmer, “The Gums,’’ Patangata. Mr. MHartree’s fine property consists of 744 acres of good sheep country and runs a stud flock of about 1850 pure-bred Lincolns and some thirty head of cattle. The homestead is beautifully situated near the main road, and is surrounded by an extensive plantation of bluegums. Mr. Hartree has a fine woolshed and all

Photo captions –
PATANGATA POST OFFICE, HOTEL AND STORE.
MR. H. HARTREE.
MR. HARTREE’S RESIDENCE.

WAIPAWA.   207

the latest agricultural implements. There is a large dam for storing water which is stocked with perch and other fish. The proprietor was born in London, educated at Lancing, Sussex, and came to Auckland early in 1870 in the ship ‘‘Alexandrina.’’ He spent some time on the Thames goldfields, then came to Hawke’s Bay in 1871 and shortly afterwards took up land at Wanstead, which he sold in 1888. Mr. Hartree next obtained a section of land at Ngatiwi, which he also sold, and bought his present property in 1891. He was chairman of the Wanstead Road Board, and member of the Patangata County Council for some time. He is married and has three sons and one daughter.

WAIPAWA.

WAIPAWA is a flourishing town and pastoral district thirty-nine miles from Napier and 177 from Wellington by rail. It has many fine buildings and places of business. There is a daily mail service with all telegraph and postal facilities.

Mr. GEORGE HUNTER, Member of the House of Representatives for Waipawa, was born in Wellington and educated in that city. In 1880 he succeeded with his brothers to the Porangahau Estate, which is now carried on by them under the title of Hunter Bros. Mr. Hunter has always taken a very keen interest in sporting, and is a member of the committee of the Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club, and one of the three judges appointed to hear the first appeal against a decision given by a metropolitan Jockey Club. He is also president and patron of a number of country racing clubs, chairman of several local bodies, and a member of the Patangata County Council. For a number of years he has paid great attention to the politics of the country, and contested the Waipawa seat at the general election in 1896, being returned by a large majority. Mr. Hunter is a keen debater and a speaker of great ability, with a very promising future as a public man.

WAIPAWA TOWN BOARD. The population of the town district is 770, with property of an annual value of £6251, on which a general rate of 10d. in the £ is levied.

Mr. WILLIAM HENRY JAMES BENNETT, Chairman of the Waipawa Town Board, was born at Waipawa in 1867, attended the Marist Brothers’ school in Napier, and completed. his education at Meanee College. He engaged in journalistic work in connection with the Napier papers, and was sporting correspondent for several other journals. In 1888 he purchased the old-established business of Mr. Harwood, bookseller and stationer, which he carried on for several years until he started as auctioneer, stock and station agent, in which line he achieved considerable success. In 1893 he took charge of the Settlers’ Arms

Photo captions –
MR. G. HUNTER.
WAIPUKURAU.

208   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Hotel, which he pulled down and rebuilt under the new name of the ‘‘Commercial.” This hotel Mr. Bennett carried on for four and a half years, when he leased it and took possession of the ‘‘Empire.’’ Mr. Bennett was elected a member of the Waipawa Town Board in 1890, also a member of the Road Board in the same year, and was a member of the school and library committees for over two years. Since he took office great improvements have been carried out, the town has been lighted, the footpaths asphalted, a fine water service for fire prevention and a sewerage system instituted. Mr. Bennett is secretary of the Hawke’s Bay Hunt Club and Steeplechase Committee, and for six years has been secretary of the County Coursing Club. He was captain and secretary of the cricket and football clubs and secretary of the old athletic club. As an athlete he was well known, having held the record in the North Island for the hop, step, and jump and 100 yards running. Having musical tastes and dramatic talent, he was secretary of the Waipawa Orchestral Society and is chairman of the Dramatic Society, of which body he was the originator. In 1889, Mr. Bennett married Miss Carlyle, a grand-niece of the great essayist, and has four children.

Mr. GEORGE L. ABRAHAMS, who has held a seat on the Waipawa Town Board for the last six years, is one of its progressive members and a warm supporter of all matters tending to advance the town and district. He was born in London, where he was educated and brought up as a painter and paperhanger by his father. He came to New Zealand in 1873 per ship ‘‘Schiehallion,’’ landing at Napier, and shortly afterwards came to Waipawa, where he worked as journeyman for Mr. H. J. Baker until 1876. In 1879 he established his present business. He has been a member of the local school committee and was one of the founders of the fire brigade, of which he was lieutenant, until he retired after eleven years’ service. As a member of the Oddfellows he has held office as past provincial grand master. Mr. Abrahams is married and has one son.

Mr. HERBERT MELVILLE RATHBONE, Member of the Waipawa Town Board, is the son of Mr. William Rathbone, station-owner and merchant and one of the oldest settlers of Hawke’s Bay. He was born in Waipawa in 1870, educated at the Napier Boys’ High School and afterwards studied farming at the Lincoln Agricultural College, Canterbury. He joined his father in business in 1891 and was elected a member of the town board in 1896. Mr. Rathbone is a thorough sportsman and well known in connection with racing matters as a member of the Waipawa County Racing Club. He is a member of the Waipawa Lawn Tennis, Cricket, and Football Clubs, and of the Loyal Abbotsford Lodge of Oddfellows, in which he is at present N.G., and captain of the recently-formed Waipawa Rifle Corps. Mr. Rathbone is married and has two children.

WAIPAWA COUNTY has a total population of over 7600. The capital value of property within the County is £2,107,981, and the annual revenue of the Council £7753. Rates of 5/8d. and 1/38d. in the £ are levied. The council meet at Waipawa on the first Friday in each month.

COUNCILLOR RICHARD CHARLES BAINES, of the Waipawa County Council, in which he represents Ormondville Riding, was born in Widdington, Essex, England, in 1844, and was educated and brought up to farming there. Coming to this Colony in 1876, per ship “Hudson,” he went to Hawke’s Bay and became a railway contractor, making many of the cuttings on the line between Te Aute and Waipawa, and between Takapau and Ormondville. After about five years of this work, Mr. Baines in 1878 settled on his present farm at Papatu, known as “Prospect Farm,” which consists of 700 acres of good land, and is stocked with 1570 crossbred sheep and fifty head of cattle. Mr. Baines is also engaged in the timber trade, as agent for Mr. McLeod, of Hastings. He is an old member of the Ormondville Road Board, a moving spirit in agricultural shows and other kindred objects, and a

Photo captions –
MR. W. H. J. BENNETT.
MR. G. L. ABRAHAMS.
MR. H. M. RATHBONE.
COUNCILLOR R. C. BAINES.

WAIPAWA.   209

member and trustee of the Ancient Order of Foresters. Mr. Baines married the eldest daughter of the late Mr. Charles Tassell, of Rochester, Kent, and has ten sons and two daughters, all of whom are at home with the exception of one married daughter.

COUNCILLOR ARCHIBALD McCORMICK, who represents the Woodville Riding in the Waipawa County Council, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, in 1856. At the age of five years he left with his parents for this Colony, and was educated in Napier. In 1883 he settled at Woodville, on a farm of 100 acres. Mr. McCormick is married and has seven sons.

COUNCILLOR FREDERICK WILLIAM REDWARD, Member of the Waipawa County Council, has sat in the council continuously since its initiation in 1876. He was born at Portsea, Hampshire, in 1831, and educated there. In 1852 he sailed for Victoria, per ship “Kent,” and after spending about two years at Bendigo and other goldfields, crossed over to this Colony, and found employment on a run at Te Ore Ore, in the Wairarapa. He was for a number of years on the Hon. J. D. Ormond’s “Wallingford” Station. In company with two of his brothers he purchased a station; but the speculation was unfortunate. He was next at Taupo, then had a farm at Havelock North for a year, and was afterwards for some years at Porangahau. In 1874 he settled at Norsewood. Mr. Redward conducted a hostelry business till 1880, when he moved to Ormondville. He was a member of the school committee for some time, and treasurer of the local Tent of Rechabites. Mr. Redward married in 1875 a daughter of Mr. Mortensen, and has seven sons and two daughters.

Mr. ANDREW GILMOUR, who has been Engineer for the Waipawa County Council for the last fifteen years, is a native of Ireland. He came to the Colony per ship “Chili” in 1862, landing at Dunedin, and was for some time on the goldfields. Coming to the North Island during the native troubles, Mr. Gilmour joined the 3rd Waikato Militia, and served through the Waikato war. He afterwards went to Hawke’s Bay and was for many years connected with the Napier breweries. For some eighteen months he kept the Pacific Hotel at Havelock, and after a few years at farming in the Seventy Mile Bush, received his present appointment. He is owner of several properties in Hawke’s Bay, and has a good farm of 615 acres in the Mangatoro Valley. Besides holding the above responsible position he is engineer to the Waipawa Road Board, North Ruataneki Road Board, Takapau Road Board, and Waipawa Town Board. Mr. Gilmour is married and has eight children.

Mr. SAMUEL JOHNSON, J.P., Coroner, Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, Agent for the Public Trustee, Returning Officer of the Electoral District and County of Waipawa, Chief Almoner for the United District Charitable Aid Board for the Counties of Waipawa and Patangata, Vaccination Inspector, etc., was born at Manchester in 1827 and educated there. In due course he was apprenticed to the printing trade and commenced business in his native town in 1850, where he took an active part in the abolition of the so-called “Taxes on Knowledge”’ and gained his initiatory training in journalism in connection with “The Daily Telegraph,” the first daily paper published in Manchester. In 1858 he removed to Castleford, in Yorkshire, where for four years he was editor and proprietor of “The Castleford Guardian,” a journal of progress. In 1862 having allied himself with the promoters of the Albertland settlement, proposed to be formed in Auckland, he was chosen as secretary of the board of management and proceeded to the Colony in the first ship, the ‘‘Matilda Wattenbach.” On arrival in October, 1862, he declined two offered positions on journals in Auckland and went to Port Albert, and having brought out a complete printing plant, started “The Albertland Gazette,” the first two numbers of which he had printed at sea. Finding this enterprise unremunerative, Mr. Johnson, in 1866, removed to Blenheim and founded “The Marlborough Express.’’ In 1880, owing to ill-health, he disposed of this business to Messrs Furness and Boundy.

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR F. W. REDWARD.
MR. S. JOHNSON.
MR. S. JOHNSON’S RESIDENCE

(P)

210   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

In 1881 he took a trip with his family to the Old Country, where he advanced the interests of the Colony by contributions to various newspapers. In 1883 he returned to New Zealand and purchased ‘‘The Waipawa Mail,” and a year later found it advisable to sell out to a company formed in opposition, and retired from business. Mr. Johnson has always taken an active part in public affairs and was a member of the Provincial Council of Marlborough. He was a promoter of the Blenheim Fire Brigade, of which body he was captain for some years, and is still a trustee. He was an active officer of the Blenheim Literary Institute for fifteen years, and is still a trustee. He has been connected with the Masonic Order for twenty-nine years, and is a past master and an officer of the Grand Lodge. The only other institutions that he now takes an active part in are the Waipawa School Committee, of which he has been secretary and treasurer several years, the public library of which he has been president for about a dozen years, and the Waipawa Building Society, having been chairman of the latter for eight years. Mr. Johnson has two daughters, one of whom is married to Mr. P. Barrie, J.P., of Waipukurau, and one son who is in the General Post Office at Wellington.

WAIPAWA DISTRICT HOSPITAL. Dr. Godfray (visiting surgeon), Miss Godfray (matron). This fine hospital was opened in 1880 and a new wing added in 1895. The building, which is a handsome structure of wood, situated on a rise commanding a fine view of the surrounding country, is furnished with all the most modern medical appliances. There are twenty-eight beds in the medical ward, nine in the surgical ward, eight in the women’s ward, and nine in the fever ward. The hospital is under the immediate supervision of Miss Godfray, who is assisted by four nurses.

Miss GODFRAY has had great experience in a number of London hospitals, and previous to her appointment at Waipukurau, she had charge of a large private hospital in Wellington. Further particulars of her career will be found in connection with that institution on page 493 of the Wellington volume of the ‘‘Cyclopedia.’’

LOUGHNAN, FRANK O’BRIEN, Barrister and Solicitor, Waipawa. Private residence, Ruataniwha Road. Mr. Loughnan was born in India, educated at Stoneyhurst College, England, and came to New Zealand in 1877. He was articled to Mr. Cotterill, solicitor, Christchurch, admitted in 1884, and established himself in practice the same year in Waipawa.

REED, J. LEWIS, M.B., C.M. (Edin.), Physician and Surgeon, Waipawa. Dr. Reed is a son of the late Mr. G.M. Reed, the well-known journalist of Auckland, was born in Queensland and returned with his parents to Ireland, and was educated at Belfast College and Victoria College, Jersey. He studied medicine at Edinburgh University and received his diploma in 1890. He then practised in Cumberland for eighteen months, when he took a tour through England and the Continent, visiting the various hospitals in Scotland, Antwerp, and Brussels. Shortly after this he received an appointment on the “Erlangen,’’ of the Deutsch-Australische line, and came to Sydney, where he practised for two years. Dr. Reed came to Waipawa in 1893 and was associated with Dr. Godfray, who has since taken charge of the Waipukurau Hospital. He is medical officer to the Oddfellows, Foresters, Hibernians, and Rechabites, surgeon to the Waipawa Volunter Corps, and health-officer to the Waipawa Town Board. Dr. Reed is a member of the principal athletic, racing, and hunting clubs, and was for years a member of the Edinburgh University Cricket Team. He is a member of the Waipawa Dramatic Society and is in great request for all the social functions held in that charming little town.

TODD, ALEXANDER, M.D., L.R.C.S. (Edin.), Member of the British Medical Association and Brigade-Surgeon-Lieutenant- Colonel New Zealand Military Forces, “The Pines,’’ Waipawa. Dr. Todd is a son of the late Mr. William Todd of County Tyrone, Ireland, was born near Castlederg, and educated at a private school at Omagh. He studied medicine, and obtaining his diplomas in 1862 and 1863, came to New Zealand in 1864 by the ship ‘‘Rangoon,’’ landing at Napier. Shortly after his arrival he received the appointment of assistant surgeon to the Colonial Defence Force, Military Settlers, and Napier Militia, at the same time being attached to the Imperial forces as assistant surgeon to the 12th and 14th Regiments, then stationed at the Waipawa Stockade. Dr. Todd shortly after began practice in Waipawa and made himself very popular in the district. In 1869 he received the appointment of district coroner. Latterly he has given up active practice, occasionally acting in consultations with other members of the profession. He is public vaccinator of the district, also president of the principal social clubs, and is a Master Mason, being one of the originators of the Waipawa Masonic Lodge and treasurer since its foundation. Dr. Todd married in 1875 Miss Arrow (daughter of a well-known resident), and has three daughters and one son.

MOORE, THOMAS FREDERICK, Chemist and Surgeon Dentist, Waipawa. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Ross Street. Mr. Moore was born in 1834 at Castle Cary, Somersetshire,

Photo captions –
MR. J. L. REED.
MR. A. TODD.
MR. T. F. MOORE’S PREMISES.

WAIPAWA.   211

and is the son of Mr. Samuel Moore, printer, bookseller, stationer, and chemist of that place. He learned his profession from his father and came to Melbourne in 1856 by the ship ‘‘William Jackson,’’ then to Dunedin, where he remained two years. Returning to England he spent seven years there in journalistic and various other employments. He returned to Christchurch, thence to Wellington, and eventually came to Waipawa about 1870 and started a photographic studio, in which he did very well, and gradually added the business of chemist and fancy goods, developing it into one of the finest businesses in Waipawa. He designed and erected his fine three-storey business premises with his own hands. The building reflects great credit on Mr. Moore, and its unique style attracts many a visitor from Hastings and Napier to Waipawa to see it. He keeps a very large stock of drugs, patent medicines of all kinds, besides an extensive assortment of fancy goods, etc. Mr. Moore’s private residence is a modern villa with well laid-out grounds. He was for a considerable period member of the Foresters’ Order, but latterly retired from that body. Mr. Moore has one son, a printer, bookseller, and stationer at Pahiatua.

BANK OF AUSTRALASIA, Waipawa. Mr. Douglas M. Graham (local manager).

Mr. DOUGLAS MOORE GRAHAM, Manager of the Bank of Australasia, Waipawa, and son of Mr. C. C. Graham, Official Assignee, Dunedin, was born at Ben Lomond Station, Waitaki, Otago. He was educated at the State school and the Thorndon Classical School, Wellington, and entered the Wellington branch of the Bank of Australasia in 1885, remaining there eighteen months, when he was removed to Manaia, and then to Marton and Wellington. In 1892 he was sent to Masterton as accountant, and in 1897 received his present appointment as manager at Waipawa. He is a member of the tennis club committee, and takes a great interest in all local sports.

BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, Waipawa. Mr. W. G. Downes (local manager).

Mr. WALTER GREGORY DOWNES, Manager of the Bank of New Zealand, Waipawa, is the son of the late Mr. Thomas William Downes, formerly sheriff of the Province of Marlborough, and was born in Kensington, London. Coming with his parents to New Zealand in 1857, he was educated at Dunedin, joined the Bank of New South Wales in 1873, and three years later joined the Bank of New Zealand as teller. In 1884 he was appointed manager of the branch at Waipukurau, and eleven years later took charge of the present branch at Waipawa. Mr. Downes has at various times been a member of several local and public bodies, is a past master of the Masonic body, Fellow of the Society of Accountants and Auditors of England, life member of the Bankers’ Institute, and member of the committee of the Waipawa County Permanent Building and Investment Society, with which he has been connected since its inception, in 1884.

JOHNSON, SAMUEL, Commission Agent, Waipawa. Agent for the Public Trustee, Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, Vaccination Inspector, Returning Officer for the Electoral District, etc. Mr. Johnson is fully referred to elsewhere in these pages in his capacity as coroner, etc.

McINTYRE, JAMES, Baker and Confectioner, Waipawa. Mr. McIntyre has been established in business for the last seven years, and has a good connection with the residents of Waipawa and district. Three hands are employed in the shop and bake house, and one man with the delivery cart. Mr. McIntyre is a native of Auckland, and was at one time farming in the Hawke’s Bay district for many years. He learnt the baking trade with Mr. Robertson, of Kaikora North, and eventually bought out his present business in 1891. Mr. McIntyre keeps a good stock of groceries, and is also the mail contractor between Waipawa and Tikokino.

THE COMMERCIAL HOTEL (Jull and Oakenfull, proprietors), Waipawa. This fine hotel is situated at the junction of Main and Kenilwith Streets, and is a fine handsome wooden structure with a broad balcony. There are twenty-seven bedrooms and nine

Photo captions –
MR. W. G. DOWNES.
MR. J. MCINTYRE’S PREMISES.
COMMERCIAL HOTEL, WAIPAWA.

212   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

sitting-rooms, besides commercial, dining, and billiard rooms, all of which are furnished in the best style, and visitors can rely upon receiving every comfort and attention. Mrs. Oakenfull devotes her whole attention to the domestic arrangements of the hotel.

Mr. JOHN HENRY JULL, Senior Partner, was born at Maidstone, Kent, England, in 1832, and joined the railway service in 1854. Going to Canada two years afterwards he was employed on the Grand Trunk Railway. He came to New Zealand in 1878, and joined the railway service, taking charge at Waipawa at the end of the same year. He retired in 1897 with the respect and good wishes of those with whom he had been brought into contact. Shortly after his retirement, in conjunction with his son-in-law, Mr. Oakenfull, he took possession of the present hotel. Mr. Jull is a member of the Masonic order, which he joined in Canada in 1861. He is married and has three sons and one daughter. His eldest son has an hotel at Woodville, the third son, Mr. Albert Edward Jull, is the well known brewer of Waipawa and chairman of the Waipawa County Council.

THE EMPIRE HOTEL (W. H. J. Bennett, proprietor), Waipawa, is a large two storey building, adjoining the Bank of New Zealand and Post Office. It contains about fifty well-furnished rooms, including commercial, drawing, and private rooms, which would do credit to a town of greater pretensions. In connection with the hotel, there are three lawn tennis courts, as well as a cricket and football field. The pleasure grounds comprise an area of about four acres, beautifully laid out, the flower beds forming a charming picture. All the vegetables and fruit for the table are grown by Mr. Bennett. This house is a splendid resort for tourists, and good shooting is obtainable within a few miles, whilst the rivers teem with trout. Mr. Bennett being himself a sportsman and angler, visitors may depend on obtaining useful hints and thorough enjoyment in these pastimes. Connected with the hotel are the Empire stables, where buggies, traps, ladies’ and gentlemen’s saddle horses can be procured at short notice.

MR. W. H. J. BENNETT, the Proprietor, is referred to elsewhere as chairman of the Waipawa Town Board.

BRITTEN, JOHN, Butcher, Waipawa. Mr. Britten, who is an old colonist, was born in Wiltshire, England, in 1836, and came to Wellington in 1856 by the ship ‘‘Westminster,’’ and obtained an engagement on Mr. Matthew’s station, Palliser Bay, where he remained two years. He was next employed on the Government survey in Wellington, where he was engaged in cutting a line from Kaiwarrawarra [Kaiwharawhara] to Porirua Bay. After working some time on street formation in Wellington, he came to Napier in 1858 and was employed for four years on Mr. Collin’s station ‘‘Tamumu,’ now owned by Mr. Johnston. In 1862 Mr. Britten went to the newly discovered goldfields in Otago, but not meeting with his expectations, he returned to Hawke’s Bay and started the present business at Waipawa, where he has purchased some fine properties. Mr. Britten has taken no active part in political or social matters, but is a member of the racing club. He is married and has four daughters and one son.

WAIPUKURAU.

WAIPUKURAU was founded by the late Hon. Henry Robert Russell, M.L.C., in 1866 as a model village and he planted the plantations which now add such a charm to the place. The land was cut up into sections and sold on the ninety-nine years’ lease system, at a peppercorn rental of one shilling. Mr. Russell’s idea was that at the expiration of the term the property should revert to the municipality, or whatever local body was in control. His intention was also to subdivide the adjoining run into small farms; unfortunately that part of his scheme fell through and retarded the progress of the town. Since then the sections have been sold under freehold tenure. Mr. Russell generously gave sites for a hospital, town hall, Rechabite hall, and two churches, manse, and parsonage. He further endowed the town hall with a sum of £200. After Mr. Russell’s death Messrs Wilson Bros. built the freezing works which employed a large number of men, near the railway station, but after being four years in operation the works were closed down and the men with families were thrown out of employment. Waipukurau possesses a Jockey Club, race course, with a fine grand stand, where some of the best events in Hawke’s Bay are held. It is contemplated by the Government to purchase an estate of 27,000 acres for small holdings which will prove a great boon to the district. The climate of Waipukurau is very salubrious and makes the place a very delightful one for invalids. There is a commodious family hotel, affording every comfort and the best accommodation.

The Hon. WILLIAM COWPER SMITH, Member of the Legislative Council, of Waipukurau, was born in London and educated at Barnet High School. He came to the Colony in 1862 by the ship ‘‘Egmont,’’ landing at Lyttelton, thence went to Auckland, where he served through the Waikato war in the volunteers and received the New Zealand

Photo captions –
MR. J. H. JULL.
MR. J. BRITTEN.
HON. W. C. SMITH.

WAIPUKURAU.   213

land war medal. Mr. Smith started in business at Waipukurau in 1872 and identified himself with the advancement of that place. Two years afterwards he was elected a member of the local road board, and was chairman for fourteen years. In 1877 he was elected to the county council, remaining eighteen years on that body, six years of which he was county chairman. In 1881 he entered the political arena and defeated the Hon. J. D. Ormond after a most exciting contest, and represented the Waipawa electorate for over twelve years, and for three years was senior whip to the Ballance Government. In the session of 1882 he moved a resolution for the increase of the wages of railway employees and in recognition of his successful services on their behalf, was presented by that body with a magnificent gold watch, suitably engraved, and an illuminated address. He also for several sessions carried a vote of £6000 for a subsidy to public libraries and was the father of the Lease in Perpetuity Clause of the Land Act. After a very active political career he was compelled by ill-health to retire from public life, and from his many local appointments. He was instrumental in having the Waipukurau traffic bridge erected at a cost of £6000, and a great many other local works done in the district. Mr. Smith was chairman of the county hospital for many years in which he took a great interest. In 1895 he was called to the Upper House.

WAIPUKURAU POST, TELEGRAPH, AND MONEY ORDER OFFICE is a handsome wooden structure in the centre of the town, and has the postmaster’s private residence attached. The postmaster is assisted by one telegraph operator and a lineman.

Mr. THOMAS WILLIAM LE COCQ, Postmaster, Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, and Agent for the Government Life Insurance Department, Waipukurau, was born at Alderney, Channel Islands, in 1856, where he was educated, and entered the post and telegraph service in his native town, where he remained six years. In 1877, Mr. Le Cocq went to St. Kitts, West Indies, but returned Home after six months. He came to New Zealand in 1878 and entered the post and telegraph service at Wellington in 1879. After two years he was appointed a postmaster at Duntroon, Otago, was transferred two years afterwards to Takapau, Hawke’s Bay, and five years later was appointed to his present position. Mr. Le Cocq is an enthusiastic cricketer, member of the Waipawa-Patanga‘s County’s Cricket Club and vice-president of Waipukurau Junior Football Club. He possesses great musical talent, and during its existence was secretary to the Waipukurau Orchestral Union. He is a member of the Masonic body and past grand deacon of the Grand Lodge of New Zealand.

WAIPUKURAU STATE SCHOOL is a fine wooden building situated near the Post Office, with an average attendance of 143. The headmaster, Mr. Cooke, is assisted by the mistress and three pupil-teachers. The school is surrounded by a large play-ground.

BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, Waipukurau. Established 1878.

Mr. JAMES MATIER, the Manager, is a native of Ireland, received his education in Belfast city and had considerable commercial experience before coming to the Colony in 1879. Upon arrival, he joined the head office of the bank, in Auckland, and shortly after was sent as relieving-officer to various agencies. Having gained considerable experience in colonial banking he was sent as accountant to the Napier branch, where he remained some three years, receiving his present appointment in 1897. Mr. Matier is married and has two daughters.

JONES, A., AND SONS, Coachbuilders, Blacksmiths, Engineers, Farriers, and Ironmongers, Waipukurau. Agents for P. and D. Dunean’s Agricultural Implements. This large and flourishing business was founded in 1865 and now employs ten men working four forges, where every sort of machinery is made; coaches, waggons, and drays built and turned out from this factory are equal to any in the Colony for workmanship and finish.

Mr. ALEXANDER JONES, Senior Partner, is a native of Forfarshire, Scotland, and learnt his trade in the neighbourhood of Dundee. He left his home in 1865 by the ship ‘‘Berar’’ for New Zealand, landing at Wellington, under an engagement to the late Hon. H. R. Russell of Hawke’s Bay, and remained in the employment of that gentleman for about two years when he started the present business in Waipukurau. Mr. Jones has been a constant exhibitor since the inauguration of agricultural and pastoral shows in Hawke’s Bay and the reputation of his exhibits for superior workmanship has spread throughout the province. He has won seventy-three first-class certificates, fifteen silver medals, and one twenty-five guinea cup, besides other trophies, which is a record hard to be beaten in New Zealand. He has also invented a large number of improvements in agricultural implements of various kinds, being the maker of the first locally-made plough and disc harrow, and he invented the Giant wire-strainer which has proved such a boon to fencers. Mr. Jones has always been a prominent figure in local affairs; he was chairman of the school committee and has been on the road board for seven years. He has also been an elder of

Photo captions –
MR. T. W. LE COCQ.
MR. J. MATIER.
MR. A. JONES.

214   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND

the Waipukurau Presbyterian church for eighteen years, and is a past chief ruler of the Rechabite tent. He also held the position of superintendent of St. Andrew’s Sunday school for eight years; he is now president of the Christian Endeavour Society in connection with St. Andrew’s church and of the Public Library Trustees. Mr. Jones married at Home in 1859 and has two sons and seven daughters living; the eldest son, William, carries on a large business at Hastings in the same line.

THE TAVISTOCK HOTEL (Peter Gow, proprietor), Waipukurau. This fine hotel, the only one in the township, is a fine two-storey building, the older part of which contains about twenty rooms with good drawing-room and a number of sitting-rooms, furnished in a most comfortable manner. Owing to the increasing number of visitors the proprietor built a new wing with spacious dining, commercial, and sitting rooms, hot, cold, and shower baths, etc. Mr. and Mrs. Gow spare no trouble or expense in making the hotel one of the most popular in Hawke’s Bay; again finding the accommodation insufficient, they have erected an additional sixteen rooms. The apartments of the new wing are luxurious and the beautiful entrance-hall is uniquely decorated. The house commands a lovely view of the country and to those seeking change of air the “Tavistock’’ offers every attraction. Adjoining the hotel are well-kept flower and vegetable gardens.

Mr. PETER GOW, the Proprietor, was born in 1838 at John o’ Groat’s, Scotland, and arrived in Auckland in 1862 by the “Royal Charlie.” During the Waikato war he was employed in bridge-building and cutting timber. In 1864 he went to the West Coast goldfields, but not meeting with the success he anticipated, returned to Auckland where he was engaged in sawmilling and later was at Hastings in the same line for about two years. He came to Waipukurau about 1869 and was employed in the bush where the present township now stands, afterwards starting a sawmill of his own at Hampden. He then received a contract from the Government to cut railway bridge timber required for the line between Waipukurau and Pukipuki. Selling out his sawmill, he bought his present property in 1875, where the hotel stands, with forty-seven acres of land adjoining the township. Mr. Gow has been a member of the road board for a number of years, besides being on other local bodies. He visited the Old Country in 1890 and 1894 and saw many places of interest on his tours.

MITCHELL, CHARLES WILLIAM, Storekeeper, General Provision Merchant, and Sawmiller, Waipukurau. Sawmill at Makotuku; Timber yards at railway station, Waipukurau. Agent for the National Fire Insurance and Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance Companies. Mr. Mitchell’s business was one of the first established at Waipukurau and has been in the hands of the present proprietor for the last nine years. The general store is a wooden building and well stocked with merchandise. Besides the store, Mr. Mitchell has a considerable interest in the firm of Wilding and Co., of Makotuku, and acts as their agent at Waipukurau. He was born in Scotland and was educated in Aberdeen. For six years he was in the office of a law advocate before coming to the Colony per ship “Auckland” in 1879. He landed in Otago and was for some years in the employ of the Agricultural Company of Dunedin as accountant on several of their properties. In 1882 he came to the North Island and served in a similar capacity for Messrs Murray, Roberts and Co., on their stations at Clive Grange, Tautane, Akiteo, and Aohanga. He next received a position as accountant with Messrs Wilding and Co., sawmillers, and eventually in conjunction with Mr. J. Scholes took over the above store and mills, Mr. Mitchell managing the business at Waipukurau and Mr. Scholes the mill at Makotuku. Mr. Mitchell takes a general interest in local matters and is generally held in respect in the district.

Mr. JOHN HARDING, who was a well-known settler in Hawke’s Bay, resided in the Waipukurau district for fully thirty years. He owned “Mount Vernon,” one of the finest estates in the North Island. It consists of 15,000 acres of first-class land carrying 25,000 pure-bred Romney Marsh sheep and about 300 head of pure Shorthorn Durham cattle. The homestead is beautifully situated within easy distance of Waipukurau, built of brick and is a handsome residence. There is a splendid woolshed with a complete shearing plant. About twenty hands are employed, some of whom had been with Mr. Harding for twenty-five years. A good deal of cropping is carried on with the latest improved agricultural machinery. Nearly 500 bales of wool are shipped every year, the brand ‘‘J.H.’’ over ‘‘Mt. Vernon,’’ being well known in the leading wool markets. Mr. Harding was born in Southampton, Hampshire, and was brought up to the trade of a turner. He arrived in New Zealand in 1842, landing in Wellington by the ship ‘‘Burmah.” For some time he worked at his trade in that town and was afterwards in business as an ironmonger. He came to Waipukurau in 1867 and was one of the first settlers to take up land in the district. Mr. Harding was a strict prohibitionist; he formed the first Temperance Society in New Zealand in Wellington as far back as 1842 and always worked hard for the cause. He had

Photo captions –
MR. P. GOW.
MR. C. W. MITCHELL.
THE LATE MR J. HARDING.

WAIPUKURAU.   215

been connected with various local bodies and was on the licensing bench for some time. He was married and had seven sons and five daughters. His eldest son manages the estate. Mr. Harding himself died on the 25th of June, 1899.

MANGATARATA ESTATE (Spencer Herbert Gollan, proprietor), Waipukurau. This estate consists of 30,000 acres of first-class grazing land, and is situated about four miles from the township of Waipukurau. The property carries 45,000 sheep and about 750 head of cattle, and employs a permanent staff of twenty-five men. Mr. Gollan has the reputation of being a breeder of thoroughbred horses, several of which have given a good account of themselves on the Colonial and English turf. The following horses are at present on the station: – Miss Ilbargon, Tiraillerie (dam of Tirant d’Eau, winner of the N.Z. Cup, 1898), Cartouche, Namoa, Forlorn Hope, Escalade, Leonie, Lady Hamilton, Bonne Idee, Julia, Bessie McCarthy, Tireuse, and the well-known stallions

Photo captions –
MR. S. H. GOLLAN.
“MOSQUETAIRE,” MANGATARATA ESTATE.
THE MANAGER’S HOUSE, MANGATARATA ESTATE.
MR. L. DE PELICHET.

216   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

lions Jet d’Eau, Captain Webb, and Bonnie Scotland. Mr. Gollan is at the present time in England with the racehorses Norton and Ebor, which have won several races. The estate is managed by Mr. L. de Pelichet.

Mr. L. DE PELICHET, Manager of the Mangatarata Estate, was born in Taranaki, and was educated in Napier and Wellington College. He has had considerable experience on various stations in Hawke’s Bay, and was appointed manager of the above estate in 1885.

HERBERTVILLE.

HERBERTVILLE is eighty-nine miles from Napier and twenty-six miles by coach from Waipukurau railway station. There is a tri-weekly mail service, and also telegraph connection.

HERBERT, CHARLES, J.P., Sheep-farmer, Farnham, Herbertville. Mr. Herbert was born in Wellington in 1845, his father, Mr. Joseph Herbert, being one of the old pioneer settlers. He was educated at Wellington and at the age of ten accompanied his parents to Hawke’s Bay, where he with his brothers afterwards took up a large tract of land, 3000 acres of which is now good grass country capable of carrying 6000 sheep. When first taken up, the land was covered with thick bush and fern, but with the indomitable energy which distinguished the early settlers, a house was soon built by the brothers themselves, the bush was cleared, laid down in grass and fenced into paddocks. About 1878 the township of Herbertville was founded and now has a population of about 150, with store and a post office. Mr. Herbert, who is hospitable and popular, has always identified himself with local matters and was for years a member of the Porangahau Road Board and School Committee. He has also been on the Commission of the Peace for a number of years. Mr. Herbert is married and has three sons and four daughters.

ORMONDVILLE.

ORMONDVILLE is a thriving township which lies sixty-nine miles south-west from Napier. It is situated within the county and the electoral district of Waipawa. The attendance at the public school averages about 100. There is a telephone office in the township, and the local post office receives and despatches mails twice daily.

ORMONDVILLE TOWN BOARD. The Ormondville Town District has a population of 700 persons. Its ratable [rateable] property is valued at £25,000, on which a rate of 6d in the £ is levied by the Town Board, which administers the affairs of the district. Mr. Charles Garforth, the clerk to the board, resides at Ormondville.

Mr. MATTHIAS JOSEPH SKINNER, Chairman of the Ormondville Town Board, was born in London in 1856. He received his education there, and at the age of fourteen went to a brother in Ontario, Canada, and with him he learned the baker’s trade. Returning to England soon afterwards, he came out to New Zealand, whence he went to Melbourne, where he remained a year and then came back to this Colony. He worked at Napier for about eighteen months, and in 1877 settled in Ormondville. Mr. Skinner has for many years been a member of the school committee, and is a past grand of the Independent Order of Oddfellows.

Photo captions –
GROUP OF SHEPHERDS, MANGATARATA ESTATE.
GROUP OF YEARLINGS, MANGATARATA ESTATE.
MR. C. HERBERT.
MR. M. J. SKINNER.

ORMONDVILLE.   217

He is married and has five daughters and four sons.

Mr. JOHN CHARLES DAVIS, Member of the Ormondville Town Board, has represented the Makotuku Riding since 1892, and has for some time been a member of the local school committee. Mr. Davis is the popular host of the Makotuku Hotel, with which he also has a smithy. He was born and educated in Auckland, where he learned the blacksmith’s trade, and on the completion of his apprenticeship left for Taradale, where for three years he worked for Mr. Robertson, and was for some time with Mr. T. Lawten. Mr. Davis commenced business on his own account first in Taradale and in 1889 removed to Makotuku. He married a daughter of the late Mr. W. Burton, of Taradale, and has two sons and two daughters.

Mr. ROBERT READ GROOM, J.P., who was Chairman of the Ormondville Town Board from its inception in 1886 till 1898, and still holds a seat, has been a Justice of the Peace since the former year. He is chairman also of the Domain Board and of the Cemetery Board, and is a member of the Hawke’s Bay Land Board. Born in Dartford, Kent, in 1846, and educated there and at the Church of England School in London, Mr. Groom served an apprenticeship to the milling trade with an uncle, and in 1874 came to this Colony per ship “Winchester.” Landing at Napier, he went inland to Waipawa, where he remained until 1876, when he settled in Ormondville, and started one of the first stores there. Mr. Groom is also chairman of the Library Committee and for sixteen years has been chairman of the Ormondville School Committee. He is a Mason of twelve years’ standing, and a trustee of the Oddfellows, in which society he has passed through all the chairs. For a number of years he was a member of the Waipawa County Council, and has taken the greatest interest in public matters generally. He married a daughter of the late Mr. Charles Beale, of London, and has six children.

Mr. WILLIAM SHUKER, Member of the Ormondville Town Board, is a native of Shropshire, England, where he was born in 1845. Educated in Sheffield, he was apprenticed to the butchering trade, and came to this Colony in 1864, per ship “Portland.” Landing in Auckland at the time of the Maori war, Mr. Shuker joined Major Jackson’s Forest Rangers in 1864 and afterwards served on the West Coast under the gallant Von Tempsky. He received the New Zealand war medal and a grant of land at Rangiaowhia. Mr. Shuker visited various parts of Australia, and returning to New Zealand, settled in Ormondville in 1882. He married the second daughter of Mr. James Beard, of Marton, and has two daughters and a son.

FORBES, GEORGE HENRY, General Draper and Outfitter, Ormondville. This business was established in 1892 by Mr. M. A. Bowen, now of Levin, and purchased by the present proprietor in 1896. A good general stock is kept, and particular attention is paid to the soft goods branch in all its departments, the well-known houses of Archibald Clark and Son, Auckland, Bing, Harris and Co. and Abbot, Oram and Co., Wellington, and Benjamin and Co., Dunedin, being the principal suppliers of dry goods. Mr. Forbes was born in Kaiapoi in 1871, and is the third son of Mr. William Forbes, of Leithfield, Canterbury. Educated at Kaiapoi and Amberley, he was apprenticed to Mr. J. J. Wooler, of the latter place, and on conclusion of his five years’ term, entered the service of Messrs Ballantyne and Co., Christchurch, where he gained valuable general experience. Leaving Christchurch, Mr. Forbes went to Ormondville to take the management of the store which two years later he purchased. He is local agent for the United Fire and Marine Insurance Company, Australian Widows’ Fund Life Assurance Society, Oates, Lowry and Co.’s cycles, Henry Fielder, general furnisher, W. H. Tisdall, fishing-tackle and gunmaker, and Dresden Piano Company. He was an active member and committeeman of the first Association Football Club in Christchurch, while he has for many years been prominent in cycling circles as a member and officer of the Bicycle Touring Club, which subsequently became the first cash club in New Zealand under the name of the New Zealand

Photo captions –
MR. J. C. DAVIS.
MR. R. R. GROOM.
MR. W. SHUKER.
MR. G. H. FORBES.

218   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

Cash and Amateur Bicycle Club, now known as the Christchurch Cycling Club, and was, therefore, one of the pioneers of cash cycling in the colony. Mr. Forbes is vice-president and was one of the promoters of the Dannevirke Cycling Club, is secretary of the local athletic and cricket clubs, and until recently was secretary of the Oddfellows Lodge, of which he is P.G. and P.P.S.

NORSEWOOD

NORSEWOOD. This flourishing township is settled chiefly by families from Norway. It lies seventy-three miles south-west from Napier, and is within the county and electoral district of Waipawa. The public school has an average attendance of about 130, and the local industries include a dairy factory. There is a telephone office in the town, which has daily postal communication with Napier. The nearest railway station is at Ormondville, four miles distant, and there is a coach service between Norsewood and Ormondville.

NORSEWOOD ROAD BOARD. This board’s district is in the county of Waipawa. There is a population of between 1100 and 1200 in the district. The ratable [rateable] property is valued at upwards of £100,000, and the rate is 3/4d. in the £.

Mr. O. O. NORDBYE, Chairman of the Norsewood Road Board, is an ex-member of the Waipawa County Council, on which he sat for three years, and he has also been a member of the local school committee for a number of years. As the proprietor of the Union Sawmills, Mr. Nordbye carries on an extensive timber business. The mill is conveniently situated about three miles from Norsewood. Born in Frederikshald, in Norway, in 1842, and educated in his native town, Mr. Nordbye came to this Colony in 1872, per ship “Hording,” and at once took up the farm of 200 acres on which he resides. Mr. Nordbye is married and has three sons and three daughters.

BARCLAY, T. H., AND CO. (Thomas Hugh Barclay), Coachbuilders, Wheelwrights and General Blacksmiths, Norsewood. This business was established twenty years ago, and was taken over by Mr. Barclay in 1897. Born in the West of England, in 1874, and educated in his native place, Mr. Barclay served his apprenticeship with Messrs Webb Bros., of Mortlake, Surrey, and afterwards came to the South Island of New Zealand. After working at Ashburton for some time, he moved northwards to Dannevirke and Takapau, and eventually purchased his present business. Mr. Barclay is a past chief ranger of the Ancient Order of Foresters, and takes a general interest in all local affairs.

GRANT, DAVID HOWISON, General Blacksmith and Wheelwright, Norsewood. Mr. Grant’s successful business was established by him in 1891. Born in Forfarshire, Scotland, in 1865, Mr. Grant came with his parents to this Colony per ship ‘Excelsior,’ landing in Napier in 1870. Educated there and in other parts of Hawke’s Bay, Mr. Grant, after serving an apprenticeship with Mr. Jones, of Waipukurau, went to Waipawa and entered into business, which he relinquished two years later to join his father, Mr. George Grant, in sawmilling. After being eighteen months in that line and working for a few months at his own trade, he went to Queensland, and worked for twelve months at Mount Albion. He then returned to New Zealand and established himself at Norsewood. Mr. Grant, who is a trustee of the Norsewood Domain, has been an active member of the school committee for the last four or five years. He is also secretary to the Dairy Factory Company, in the floating of which he took a leading part, and for the last seven or eight years he has been secretary of the local Foresters Lodge. He is married to a daughter of Mr. Halliburton, and has one daughter and three sons.

COLLINGE, EDWARD, Saddler and Harness-maker, South Norsewood. Established 1895. A good general business is done, Mr. Collinge being the only saddler in the district. He was born at Taradale, Hawke’s Bay, in 1867, and was educated at Hastings and Napier. Apprenticed to Mr. John McVay, the well-known saddler, of Napier, Mr. Collinge on the expiration of his time went to Sydney and was

Photo captions –
MR. D. H. GRANT.
MR. E. COLLINGE’S PREMISES.
MR. A. B. THOMSEN’S PREMISES.   See page 219.

DANNEVIRKE.   219

in Australia two years. Returning to Hawke’s Bay, he started in business at Kaikora and afterwards moved to Hastings, where he stayed a year before coming to Norsewood. Mr. Collinge takes some interest in football and cricket.

THOMSEN, ANTON BERNARD, General Storekeeper, ‘‘The Settlers’ Store,’’ Norsewood. Mr. Thomsen established his business in 1894, and two or three years later moved into the present premises, in which a good general stock is maintained. The proprietor was born in Christiania, Norway, in 1842, was educated there, and served his time to the saddlery and upholstery trades. Coming to this Colony in 1873, per ship “Hording,” Mr. Thomsen was employed on Colonel Lambert’s farm, and also worked on the railway for some time prior to starting in business as above. He was mail contractor between Ormondville and Norsewood for four years. He has been a member for many years of the Norsewood Road Board, and was also a member of the Norsewood School Committee. Mr. Thomsen is married and has four sons and one daughter.

DANNEVIRKE.

DANNEVIRKE is a flourishing settlement, chiefly founded by Danish special settlers, situated on the railway line and eighty-five miles from Napier. It lies in the heart of the Seventy Mile Bush and has a number of timber mills, tile works, etc. There are two hotels, public school and Government offices, with a daily mail service, and telegraph facilities. It has also a weekly paper.

THE DANNEVIRKE BOROUGH has a population of 1500. Ratable [Rateable] property has an annual value of £10,255, on which is a general rate of 1s. 3d. and a water rate of 9d. in the £. The annual revenue is £1453.

His Worship Mr. JOHN DRUMMOND, Mayor of Dannevirke, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1854, and is a son of Mr. David Drummond, engineer, of that city. Educated in Perthshire, Mr. Drummond, in 1866, came to this Colony with his parents, per ship “King of Italy.” Landing at Auckland, the family soon afterwards settled in Hawke’s Bay, where Mr. Drummond was apprenticed to one of the leading engineers. In 1892 the firm of Tinline and Drummond was formed. Whilst devoting himself diligently to business, Mr. Drummond gave a good deal of time to public affairs. Nearly twenty years ago he was elected to the Taradale Road Board and River Conservation Board. He was also for many years a member of the Meanee Road Board, of which he was chairman for a term, as also of the Taradale Town Board. Since settling in Dannevirke, he has held a seat on the County Council for about three years, and has been connected with the borough as councillor and mayor for six or seven years, being elected to the civic chair in November 1897. Mr. Drummond has taken a good deal of interest in military matters, and is a good shot. Besides winning six or seven medals and a large number of trophies at Christchurch in 1884, he gained fifth place for the Carbine belt; he was sergeant in F Battery at Napier, and is at present lieutenant in the Dannevirke Rifles. Mr. Drummond resides in a handsome house on a twenty acre section on the Taradale Road. In 1883 Mr. Drummond married Miss McLeod, of “Woodside,” Ongaonga, Waipawa, and has two daughters and five sons.

COUNCILLOR CHARLES BADDELEY, of the Dannevirke Borough Council, is a well-known and successful resident of that progressive borough. He was born at Crewe, Cheshire, England, in 1864. He is a son of the late Mr. Samuel Baddeley, and was educated at the Napier Trust School, and apprenticed at the Railway Workshops at Napier. In 1885 Mr. Baddeley took the Railway Hotel in Dannevirke, and carried it on for about ten or twelve years, when he sold out and began sheepfarming on an excellent property near Dannevirke. He was one of the senior members of the old Town Board, and has been on the council from the date of its formation. He has also been treasurer and vice-president of the Dannevirke Jockey Club, treasurer and president of the Foresters Lodge, and for six years he was treasurer of the Masonic Lodge. Councillor Baddeley was married in 1898 to the third daughter of Mr. A. B. Jackson, of Port Awanui.

COUNCILLOR JOHN BARGH, of the Dannevirke Borough Council, who is a well-known engineer and surveyor, was born at Tatham Hall, Lancashire, England, in 1854, and is the son of Mr. Samuel Bargh, farmer. He was educated at Wray Grammar School, and articled to Mr. Robert Lawson, C.E., Lancaster, and afterwards to Mr. Crayson Webster, the borough engineer of Kendal, in the adjoining county of Westmorland. He was employed by the trustees of the late Sir Charles Searis Crick, of Southport, with whom he remained as engineer and surveyor until 1879, when he came to this Colony, per ship “Euterpe.’’ Landing at Lyttelton in 1880, he decided to settle in the North Island, and with that object he purchased some land at Dannevirke, but a short experience of bush life sent him back to his own profession. He was then engaged in surveying and engineering for the Government, and in that way he was connected with many of the principal works in the district. In 1887 he entered into practice at Dannevirke on his own account, and since then he has been engineer for the Maharahara Road Board, Kumeroa Road Board, and the Dannevirke Road Board, and he is also engineer for the Takapau Road Board and Ormondville Town Board. Mr. Bargh fixed the permanent levels of all the streets of the borough. In 1897 he

Photo captions –
HIS WORSHIP THE MAYOR.
HARVEST THANKSGIVING DAY, INGLEWOOD WESLEYAN CHURCH.

220   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

was elected a member of the council, and he was a member of the first licensing committee. He was married in 1885 to a daughter of Mr. L. Neilsen, of Makotuku, and has three sons and three daughters.

COUNCILLOR JOHN CALDER, of the Dannevirke Borough Council, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1862. He is the son of Mr. Alex. Calder, and was educated and apprenticed to the building trade in his native town. In 1885 he sailed for this Colony, per steamship “Aorangi,” and landed in Dunedin, where he carried on building and contracting operations for seven or eight years. He then left for the North Island, and finally settled at Dannevirke in 1893. Since that time Mr. Calder has been actively engaged in building and other contracts. A great many of the recently-erected shops at Dannevirke have been built by him, and the Bank of New Zealand was erected from his plans. Councillor Calder was elected in 1897, and is looked upon as a hard-working representative, whose practical knowledge is very useful to the council. He is a Forester, and has been always ready to assist in movements for the welfare of the town and district. Mr. Calder was married in 1890 to the daughter of Mr. J. Pottor, sawmiller, of Balclutha, Otago, and has two daughters and a son.

COUNCILLOR OLAF CARLSON, Member of the Dannevirke Borough Council, is a son of Mr. Henry Carlson, the well-known saw- miller, of Dannevirke. Born in 1865 at Carlshamon, Sweden, he was educated partly in his native town, but came to the Colony with his parents in 1876, and completed his education at Palmerston North. Mr. Carlson’s time has been largely occupied in bridge-building, in company with his father; but he has also for several years managed his father’s sawmill at Tanaki. Councillor Carlson has sat in the council since the formation of the borough. Prior to that date he was a member of the Town Board for about a year, and he has also held a seat on the local school committee. He was married in 1888 to a daughter of Mr. B. Amundsen, of Maharahara, and has two daughters and a son.

COUNCILLOR MATTHEW HENDERSON, who was elected to the Borough Council of Dannevirke in 1895, is a well-known member of the firm of Greenaway and Henderson, saw- millers and timber merchants. He was born in Sunderland, Durham, England, in 1848, and is the son of Mr. John Henderson, of Dannevirke. He came to the Colony in 1858, per ship “Evening Star,” landed at Auckland, and was educated at Auckland, Mangere and Otahuhu. Councillor Henderson worked on his father’s farm at Mangere until 1867, when he went to Canterbury and entered the employment of the late Mr. Marmaduke Dixon at Eyrewell Station, Eyreton. Leaving Canterbury for the North Island, Mr. Henderson joined forces with his brother, Mr. William Henderson, and Mr. George Wratt, sawmillers, near Feilding. In 1883, after working out the bush in the Manawatu district, the firm moved its headquarters to Dannevirke, and some years later Mr. Greenaway took the place of the two retiring partners. Mr. Henderson was for some years a member of the Dannevirke Road Board and was chairman of the first Town Board of Dannevirke. He is vestryman of St. John the Baptist’s Church, and takes an interest in all local matters. In 1876 he married a daughter of Mr. P. Rossiter, of Oxford, Canterbury, and has three daughters and four sons.

Councillor WILLIAM ROSE, Member of the Dannevirke Borough Council and Agent for the Public Trustee at Dannevirke, was born in Culvain, near Tain, Ross-shire, Scotland, in 1852, and is a son of Mr. Donald Rose, farmer. On leaving school, he was with his father on the farm until about twenty years of age, when he left for this Colony in the ‘‘Peter Denney.” On landing at Port Chalmers, Mr. Rose found employment as a shepherd at Cromwell, and was subsequently for about five years on the estate of the Hon. Matthew Holmes, at Lee Stream, near Outram. Coming to the North Island in 1878 he engaged in the meat trade at Taradale, until 1886, when he settled in Dannevirke. Since that time he has been Government valuator. In 1897 the duties of the Public Trust Office were added and for many years he has been in business as a land and financial agent. Mr. Rose was a member of the Dannevirke School Committee for a few years, and was elected to the Borough Council in 1897. He was married in 1880 to the daughter of Mr. Henry Howard, of Taradale, and has five daughters and two sons.

COUNCILLOR GEORGE WRATT, Member of the Dannevirke Borough Council, was born in Nelson in 1850 and is the son of Mr George Wratt, who arrived there per ship “Clifford” in the year 1842. Educated at Blenheim and brought up to useful work, Mr. Wratt at the age of twenty-one struck out for himself, and going to Canterbury, engaged in contract work in the Oxford district. After five years’ experience in this line he went north to the Manawatu district and went into sawmilling at Halcombe. Here he spent another period of five years, and in 1883 removed to Dannevirke, where he continued in the same line until 1888, when he retired from business to settle down to the more congenial work of farming and looking after his town properties. He was elected to the Dannevirke Road Board in 1884 and was chairman of that body for five years. When the Town Board was brought into operation he was a member of it during almost the whole of its existence, and when it was succeeded by the Borough Council, he was elected to a seat in the latter, of which with a short exception, he has ever since been

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR O. CARLSON.
COUNCILLOR W. ROSE.
COUNCILLOR G. WRATT.

DANNEVIRKE.   221

a member. He was also a member of the County Council, but resigned that position. He gave his warm support to the water supply scheme for the borough. Mr Wratt is a past master of Masonic Lodge Rawhiti, a vestryman of St. John the Baptist’s church, and chairman of the domain board and school committee.

Mr. WILLIAM HENDERSON, who was Mayor of Dannevirke in the second year of the borough’s existence, is a well-known retired saw-miller. He is the proprietor of the Dannevirke Gasworks, an account of which is given elsewhere. Mr. Henderson was born in Sunderland, Durham, England, in 1852 and is the son of Mr. John Henderson, an early colonist who brought his young family to Auckland per ship “Evening Star” in 1858, and now lives in Dannevirke, and is also referred to elsewhere in these pages. Educated at Auckland and Otahuhu, the subject of this sketch entered into farming pursuits with his brother, Mr. Matthew Henderson, in the Manawatu district, where they started a sawmill and after a successful period transferred their interests to Dannevirke. Some few years ago Mr. Henderson devoted himself once more to farming; but the project for lighting the town of Dannevirke with gas offered at once fresh scope for his energy and capital. As an old member of the Road Board and subsequently of the Dannevirke Town Board, Mr. Henderson was placed at the head of the poll at the first election of borough councillors, but resigned his seat on initiating his present gasworks enterprise. As a member of the Waipawa Licensing Bench, chairman of the Waipawa School Committee and president of the Progressive Association etc., Mr. Henderson has rendered useful public service, while as one of the originators of the tennis and bowling club, he has earned the thanks of his fellow members by laying out and forming the ground. In 1884 Mr. Henderson was married to the daughter of Mr. Friis, farmer, of Norsewood.

Mr. ANGUS MACKAY, who was the first Mayor of Dannevirke, though now in his eightieth year, is still hale and active and capable of performing many public duties, as well as attending to his own line of business. He was born in Pictou, Nova Scotia, in 1820, his father being a builder and farmer from Sutherlandshire, Scotland. He was educated in his native town, and learned the trade of a stonemason and builder. In 1853 he left for Melbourne, where he carried on building operations until 1865, when he came to this Colony to erect, in conjunction with Mrs McKenzie (now a successful contractor in Melbourne), the large wharf at Mokomoko, near Invercargill, at a cost of £30,000. Mr. MacKay did very well by this undertaking, and was afterwards appointed Government inspector for the Panmure bridge, near Auckland, and the new post office and Supreme Court, Auckland. He then removed to New South Wales, where he was employed by Messrs Ames Bros. to supervise the construction of the railway between Muswellbrook and Murruranda. In 1873 Mr. MacKay returned to this Colony to inspect for Messrs. Brogden and Sons the bridge on the Picton-Blenheim line. He then went to New Plymouth to manage the construction of the line between Sentry Hill and Inglewood for the contractors, Messrs Henderson and Davies. His next move was to Napier to superintend the construction of the groins in the harbour. Mr. MacKay then entered on bridge building on his own account, his first contract, being at Clive, over Ngaruroro River, and he was subsequently employed as inspector of the railway under construction between Woodville and Matamau. In 1883 Mr. MacKay settled in Dannevirke, where he is greatly respected. He was a member of the Road Board and the Town Board, and on the formation of the borough was elected first mayor, and was again elected for two subsequent terms. Mr. MacKay has been chairman of the school committee for some years. He is a member of the Domain Board, and was elected to the licensing committee at the head of the poll in his own district. He is also an elder of the Presbyterian Church, in which he takes very great interest. In 1850 Mr. MacKay was married to Miss Janet Murray, of Easttown, Nova Scotia, and has an only daughter – Mrs. S. W. Luxford, of Awapuni. Mr. and Mrs. MacKay have a comfortable home near the Presbyterian Church, where they enjoy a “green old age.”

Mr. NEIL McPHEE, who occupied the mayoral chair during the year 1895-6, is one of the leading business men of Dannevirke, being a partner in the firm of Messrs Godfrey and McPhee, drapers and general storekeepers. Mr. McPhee was born at Footsceray, near Melbourne, in 1859, and is the son of Mr. John McPhee, a well-known official in the railway service. Educated in his native town, Mr. McPhee spent some two years in a bookbinding establishment, but left that to enter a sugar refinery, where during a connection of fifteen years he learned every branch of the trade and rose to the position of foreman, with upwards of forty men and boys under his charge. In 1888, Mr. McPhee came to New Zealand with the object of setting up in business in Dannevirke, in conjunction with Mr. Fraser. Some three years later Mr. Fraser withdrew from the firm and for a period of four years, Mr. McPhee carried on the business by himself, the present partnership being effected in 1897. In public matters he has been prominent for many years, and prior to election as mayor

Photo captions –
MR. W. HENDERSON.
MR. A. MACKAY.
MR. N. MCPHEE.

222   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

he served as councillor for a considerable period. For two years he was secretary to the school committee and chairman for a like period. As secretary of the Caledonian Sports Committee, and in connection with football and cricket he has done good service and for a number of years was steward of the racing club. In the Masonic Order Mr. McPhee holds office as junior deacon and was formerly secretary of Lodge Rawhiti. He is a past chief ranger of the Foresters, and a member of M.U.I.O.O.F. Mr. McPhee is a director of the Dannevirke Permanent Co-operative Building and Investment Society, and a promoter and part owner of the Umutaroa Dairy Factory. It was during Mr. McPhee’s occupancy of the mayoral chair that the water supply scheme was inaugurated, and in which he took a very active part, particularly in securing the loan of £10,000 from the Bank of New Zealand at five per cent. He was married in 1885 to Emma, daughter of Mr. Lees, manager of the Williamstown Woollen Mills, near Melbourne, and has two daughters.

BLAKISTON, REGINALD NORMAN, Barrister and Solicitor, High Street, Dannevirke. P.O. Box 14. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Agents, Messrs Sainsbury and Logan (Napier) and Messrs Chapman and Tripp (Wellington). Mr. Blakiston is a son of the late Mr. C. R. Blakiston, well known in Christchurch as manager in New Zealand of the Trust and Agency Company of Australasia Limited. He was born in Christchurch in 1866 and was educated at Christ College, Canterbury. On the completion of his articles under Messrs Duncan, Cotterill and Martin, of Christchurch, he was admitted in 1891 a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court and a few months later commenced practice in Dannevirke in centrally-situated offices opposite the Bank of New South Wales. He is solicitor for the Bank of New South Wales, Dannevirke Permanent Building and Investment Society, the Norsewood Co-operative Dairy Factory Company, and other corporations. As a Mason, Mr. Blakiston is attached to Lodge Rawhiti. An enthusiastic cyclist, he is vice-captain and treasurer of the local club, having in his days of greater leisure ably filled the duties of captain. He is a member of the tennis, bowling, and rifle clubs. When in Christchurch Mr. Blakiston was lance-corporul in the College Rifles and carried off the captain’s cup for 1891 for rifle shooting. He has also been a footballer and was goal-keeper in the Christchurch La Crosse Club, when the team was victorious against Otago in the interprovincial match of 1888. Mr. Blakiston’s name is familiar to readers of a very interesting book entitled “Pioneer Work in the Alps of New Zealand” by Mr. Arthur Paul Harper. He accompanied the author on one of his most difficult exploring expeditions and is mentioned in terms of high praise for the courage and intrepidity he displayed in most dangerous situations. Mr. Blakiston was married in 1894 to the second daughter of the late Mr. William Hunter, of Porangahau, and has one daughter.

GUY, DUNCAN, Barrister and Solicitor, High Street, Dannevirke. P.O. Box 19; Bankers, Bank of Australasia, Napier. Mr. Guy, who is solicitor for the Borough Council of Dannevirke, has had an interesting Colonial career of nearly forty years. He was born in 1841 in Helensburgh, Dumbartonshire, Scotland, where his father, the late Mr. Andrew Guy, was a prosperous farmer. Educated at the Free Church Schools, and articled to Mr. George MacLachlan, of Helensburgh, a well- known Writer to the Signet, Mr. Guy came to this Colony in 1860, as purser of the ship “Robert Henderson,” with the first batch of immigrants to the Bluff. He joined in the Dunstan rush, but soon returned to Invercargill, where for a few months he acted as clerk to Mr. James Harvey, solicitor. Making his way to Dunedin, he entered the office of Mr. Edward Francis Ward, and in the next three years gained there a good deal of legal experience. “Rushing” thence to the Wakamarina goldfields, Mr. Guy, after his arrival at Picton, was appointed clerk to the Court for that district, and held the position for seven years. He then went to Nelson, where he was clerk of the Court for two years. He was afterwards at Wanganui for six months, and in 1873 he moved to Hawke’s Bay, where he has since resided. During the ensuing six years he held a number of positions, having been registrar of the Supreme Court, clerk of the District Court, and Sheriff and Deputy Commissioner of Stamps. He was admitted a barrister and solicitor by the Chief Justice Sir James Prendergast in 1879, and in that year he resigned his appointments in the Civil Service and began the practice of the legal profession in Waipawa. After seven prosperous years he sold his practice to Mr. F. O’B. Loughnan, and paid a visit to the Old Country. On returning he settled in Napier, but in 1893 he re-established himself in his profession. Mr. Guy is the proprietor of the Dannevirke Town Hall and several of the adjacent shops. For three years he was a member of the Napier Borough Council, and while in Waipawa he was a member of the Hawke’s Bay Education Board and of the High School Board of Governors. Though now unattached, Mr. Guy joined the Masonic fraternity at Nelson in 1872. He entered the volunteers at the outset of the movement in Scotland in 1859, and kept up his interest in volunteer matters for many years, after coming to the Colony. At One Tree Hill, Auckland, in 1871 he won the gold medal and a sum of £42 10s in prize money at the butts, being second for the championship in that year. In the following year he won the champion prize given by the Provincial Government of Nelson. In Wanganui and other places he has also won many prizes. In 1865 he married the daughter of Mr. Andrew Gilchrist, farmer, of Rothesay, and has three daughters and four sons.

LLOYD, THOMAS HENRY GORDON, B.A., LL.B., Barrister and Solicitor, High street, Dannevirke. P.O. Box 46. Mr. Lloyd is a son of Mr. H. J. Lloyd of Palmerston North and was born in Birmingham, England, in 1866. Coming to the Colony with his parents per ship “Himalaya” in 1877, the subject of this sketch was educated at the Wellington College under Mr. Kenneth Wilson, and at the Wanganui Collegiate School under Dr. Saunders and Rev. B. W. Harvey. Matriculating at Canterbury College in 1888, Mr. Lloyd gained his B.A. degree in 1891 and that of LL.B. in the following year. In 1893 he was admitted a barrister and solicitor of the Supreme Court of New Zealand by Chief Justice Sir James Prendergast, at Wellington, and in December of that year settled in Dannevirke to the practice of his profession. He is a Mason and was initiated in the United Manawatu Lodge No. 1721 E.C. Mr. Lloyd married in 1896 the daughter of Mr. S. Graham, of Ashburton.

Photo captions –
MR. R. N. BLAKISTON.
MR. D. GUY.

DANNEVIRKE.   223

BANK OF NEW SOUTH WALES, Dannevirke. This branch was opened in 1891. In 1895 the present fine and commodious building was erected; it includes the manager’s private quarters. This bank is the first that was opened in Dannevirke for daily business, and is a popular institution.

Mr. ALEXANDER PAUL, the Manager of the Bank of New South Wales at Dannevirke, was born in London in 1864 and is the eldest son of Mr. Alexander Paul, who died in Wellington many years ago. He was educated at the Presbyterian school, and at Mr. Mowbray’s private school. Mr. Paul joined the staff of the Bank of New South Wales at Wellington in 1879. His first move was to Wanganui as ledger-keeper, thence he was transferred to Christchurch as bill-clerk, to Timaru as accountant, and then back to Wellington as accountant, in which position he was well and favourably known. Mr. Paul takes an interest in all matters bearing upon the welfare of the district, and is both a cricketer and a bowler. In 1895 Mr. Paul was married to the daughter of the Rev. John Menzies, of Otakaia, Otago.

THE BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, Dannevirke. This branch was opened in 1892 by Mr. Campbell Thomson, now town clerk of Dannevirke, who filled the position for two years. The present manager, Mr. G. J. E. Bickford, was appointed in May, 1896. The existing substantial two-storied premises, with

Photo captions –
BANK OF NEW SOUTH WALES, DANNEVIRKE.
BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, DANNEVIRKE.
MR. A. PAUL.
MR. G. J. E. BICKFORD.

224   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

manager’s residence, were occupied in 1897. There is also a good garden and orchard.

Mr. GEORGE JAMES ERNEST BICKFORD, the Manager of the Bank of New Zealand at Dannevirke, was born in Plymouth, England, in 1865, was educated at the Corporation and Park Grammar Schools, Plymouth, passed the competitive examinations and joined the Naval Bank as a junior in 1878. Prior to leaving for the Colony in 1891 he was in charge of the Plympton and other agencies of that Bank in whose service he remained for over ten years. On arrival in Auckland, via Sydney, Mr. Bickford presented his letters of introduction to the Bank of New Zealand and was taken into the Auckland office. Soon afterwards he obtained charge of the Otahuhu agency and three years later was transferred to Ohinemuri as accountant, where he remained until he was appointed to his present position. Mr. Bickford is a vestryman of St. John the Baptist’s church, and takes a great interest in social matters generally.

HUNTER, WILLIAM GEORGE, Land, Financial, Insurance, and General Commission Agent, High Street, Dannevirke. P.O. Box 35. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Private residence, Edinburgh Street. A son of the late Mr. William Hunter, of Porangahau, the subject of this sketch was born in 1862, and educated at Napier. Joining the Bank of Australasia, he has since been in various parts of the Colony and gained a thorough knowledge of financial business generally. On leaving the bank, he purchased a farm at Otope, some ten miles from Dannevirke, which he has carried on in conjunction with his business. The farm consists of 400 acres of good land, well stocked with Lincoln sheep and store cattle. Mr. Hunter is agent for the South British Insurance Company and the National Mutual Life Assurance Association, and he does a very extensive land and financial business. As an athlete, he holds numerous trophies won at foot-racing in various parts of the Colony. In 1890, Mr. Hunter was married to Miss Woof, a Westmorland lady, and has two sons and two daughters.

ROSE, WILLIAM, Land, Finance, Insurance, and General Commission Agent, High Street, Dannevirke. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Rose, who is also Government valuer and agent for the Public Trustee, established himself in 1890. His thorough knowledge of the district, and especially of land values, is of very great assistance to him. Mr. Rose is further referred to in connection with the Borough Council, of which he is a useful member.

CALDER, JOHN, Builder and General Contractor, High Street, Dannevirke. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Calder, who established his business in 1893, is more fully mentioned in connection with the Dannevirke Borough Council, of which he is a member.

MASONIC HOTEL (Alexander Cameron Scrimgeour, proprietor), High Street, Dannevirke. P.O. Box 11. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Telegraphic address, ‘‘Masonic,’’ Dannevirke. The ‘‘Masonic’’ is without doubt one of the best hotels on the Wellington-Napier line. It was originally opened in the early eighties, but the present fine building has been erected only some seven or eight years. There are upwards of thirty-five rooms on the first floor, and the ground floor has a splendidly-equipped dining-room, billiard-room, commercial-room, parlours, etc., with sample-rooms for commercial travellers for whose special use also a tastefully furnished writing-room has recently been set apart, and is one of the many improvements which have been made since the present proprietor entered into possession, about three years ago. Pictures and curios adorn the walls in every portion of the house, and there is an air of home-like comfort throughout the establishment. Not the least of its merits is the excellent table always provided, therefore the increasing patronage accorded to the ‘‘Masonic’’ by the travelling public is a natural consequence and bears testimony to the popularity of the host and hostess. Mr. Mrs. and the Misses Scrimgeour are indefatigable in their personal attention to the requirements of their customers.

Mr. A. C. SCRIMGEOUR, the Proprietor of the Masonic Hotel, was born in the parish of Methven, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1840, his father, Mr. Peter Scrimgeour, being engaged on the Balgowan Estate. He was educated in Perthshire, learned farming and in 1863 left for this Colony under engagement with the Hon. H. R. Russell, of Mount Herbert, Waipukurau. Mr. Scrimgeour has good reason to remember his trip. The vessel in which he sailed, the ‘‘Rangoon,’’ became almost a complete wreck on the Ramsgate Downs, a day or two after her departure. Putting into Ramsgate, a delay of two months occurred for repairs, and a second start was made on the 24th of January, 1864. After a most protracted time at sea the “Rangoon” was almost destitute of provisions when she made Sydney harbour, where another month was occupied in refitting. On the 24th of July, Napier was reached and an eventful voyage of eight months brought to a happy termination, though the ill-fated “Rangoon’’ had almost every vestige of her bulwarks washed away in a final storm in the Bay of Plenty. Notwithstanding the long and dangerous voyage only one death occurred, and that was balanced by the birth of a little boy, now a well-known settler in Hawke’s Bay, Mr. John McLeod, brother of Mrs. Drummond, wife of the present mayor of Dannevirke. Landing in Napier with a light pocket, but a stout heart, Mr. Scrimgeour set to work to earn and save. After four years with the employer mentioned, he was transferred to the estate of Mr. P. Russell, where he remained seven years. He then, in conjunction with Mr. Peter Gow, took the Tavistock Hotel, Waipukurau, and two years later (1877) became proprietor of the Tahoraite Hotel in the Seventy Miles Bush. After being there three years, Mr. Scrimgeour purchased a farm of 600 acres at Waipawa, but relinquished agriculture twelve months later, though still retaining the property. Mr. Scrimgeour afterwards purchased the Empire Hotel at Waipawa, which he conducted for twelve years to the entire satisfaction of the travelling and general public; on his departure for Dannevirke in 1895, his fellow townspeople gave a ball in honour of himself and family, and presented Mrs. Scrimgeour with a beautifully-jewelled gold bracelet and Mr. Scrimgeour with a numerously-signed address, splendidly illuminated and framed. During his residence at Waipawa, he was for several years a member of the Waipawa County Council, Road Board, Town Board, School Committee, and various other bodies. He was married in 1887 to Miss Gow, a sister of his old

Photo captions –
MR. J. CALDER.
MR. A. C. SCRIMGEOUR.

DANNEVIRKE AND WOODVILLE.   225

partner, and has four daughters and two sons.

TINLINE AND DRUMMOND (John Drummond), Engineers, etc., Miller’s Road, Dannevirke. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Taradale Road. The Dannevirke Engineering and Agricultural Implement Works were founded in 1892, but have latterly been carried on solely by Mr. Drummond. A considerable business is done in machinery for sawmills, and Mr. Drummond claims first-place for himself in that special branch. A great improvement has been recently achieved in the addition of an up-to-date plant for cycle manufacture, including enamelling, etc. Mr. Drummond has gained a high reputation for first-class work in every branch of his progressive business, and offers many advantages to wheelmen who patronize his cycle works.

NEAGLE, JAMES, Saddler, Harness Maker and Cycle Dealer, High Street, Dannevirke. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Established in 1891. Mr. Neagle’s shop is a large one, with two entrances and a fine window. He has done well and has an extensive country connection. His stock of cycles includes Humbers and many other good makes. Born in Napier, the son of Mr. Richard Neagle, of Taradale, Mr. Neagle was educated mainly at Meanee College and served an apprenticeship with Mr. John McVay, the well-known saddler, of Napier. On the conclusion of his apprenticeship, he took a trip round the Colony, but decided to return to Hawke’s Bay and start on his own account in Dannevirke. When in Taradale Mr. Neagle was a member of the representative football team, and in the Ancient Order of Foresters he holds the rank of Past Chief Ruler.

GREENAWAY AND HENDERSON (William Francis Greenaway and Matthew Henderson), Sawmillers, Timber Merchants and Exporters, etc. Railway Station, Dannevirke, P.O. Box 12. Bankers, Bank of New South Wales. Australian Mill, Factory and Timber Yards, at Yeeka Point, Black Wattle Bay, Sydney. Though this firm was not known in its present shape until 1898, both partners had a long previous connection with the timber trade before combining forces. The Phoenix Sawmills of the firm are situated at Mangatera, two or three miles up the railway line from Dannevirke. About twenty-two hands are employed, and the machinery includes a twin-saw breaking-down bench, capable of dealing with logs forty feet long by five feet thick, and a circular ripping bench. The monthly output is equal to 160,000 superficial feet. Matai (black pine), rimu (red pine) and kahikatea (white pine) are the principal timbers milled. The white pine is chiefly made up into butter boxes by the firm, and the red pine is largely used for mouldings. Both are, however, exported in large quantities to Sydney, for the supply of the firm’s mill there.

Mr. WILLIAM FRANCIS GREENAWAY, of the firm of Henderson and Greenaway, was born in Napier, Hawke’s Bay, in 1865, and is the son of Mr. James Henry Greenaway, a Belfast man, who came to this Colony in 1856, and who now resides at Woodville. Educated at Napier, Mr. W. F. Greenaway entered the service of Mr. Norman Campbell, sawmiller, Woodville, and afterwards became foreman. Mr. Greenaway was then appointed to the management of the Matahiwi Sawmills, the property of the Palmerston North Sash and Door Company. For this Company, Mr. Greenaway erected a mill at Oringi, and he still manages it, as he is a director of the company, and has a ten years lease of the mill. He is likewise the lessee of the Hawke’s Bay Timber Company’s Tahoraiti Mills. Mr. Greenaway’s employees number 100, and he has 120 working bullocks and forty draught horses. The total output of his mills is 500,000 feet per month. In 1888 Mr. Greenaway was married to the daughter of Mr. William Clark, contractor, of Hastings.

Mr. JOHN HENDERSON, one of Auckland’s early Colonists, now resident at Dannevirke, was born in 1823, in Sunderland, Durham, England, where his father was a brick and tile manufacturer. Educated in his native town, Mr. Henderson worked with his father until 1858, when he left England for this Colony, per ship “Evening Star,” Captain Ewen, and took up land in the vicinity of Auckland, Mangere and Otahuhu. He was employed by the late Captain Walmsley and the late Mr. William Buckland, and in 1867 removed to Canterbury, where he occupied a farm for many years. After his sons settled in Dannevirke, Mr. Henderson disposed of his farm, and removed to Hawke’s Bay, where he took contracts for cutting timber, etc. In 1892 he retired wit a competence. Mr. Henderson is married and has five sons and two daughters.

WOODVILLE.

WOODVILLE is a prosperous township in the Seventy Mile Bush, on the junction of the Napier-Wellington and Manawatu railways, and ninety-five miles from Napier. There are several sawmills, a cheese and butter factory, and other local industries. It possesses many business places, public offices, and Friendly Societies, besides a local newspaper, ‘‘The Woodville Examiner.”

Mr JOHN O’MEARA, M.H.R., for Pahiatua, was born in Melbourne in 1856 and is the son of the late Mr. James O’Meara. He was educated at the Melbourne Model School and at St. Francis and St. Augustine’s Schools, came to the colony in 1868, and settled in Queenstown, where he entered the Post and Telegraph Department, and remained in the service for about fourteen years. Mr. O’Meara first took an active interest in politics when

Photo captions –
MR. J. NEAGLE.
MESSRS GREENAWAY AND HENDERSON’S SAWMILLS.

(Q)

226   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

he was chairman of Lake County Council which position he held for three years, and for eight years was a member of the Queenstown Borough Council. He contested the Wakatipu seat in 1893 against the present member, Mr. Fraser, and the late Hon. W. J. M. Larnach, and was second on the poll. Mr. O’Meara afterwards came to reside in Hawke’s Bay and three years later stood for Pahiatua in the Liberal interest and was returned against four opponents. He is president of the Pahiatua Racing Club and of numerous other local institutions. In 1886 He married the second daughter of Mr. J. A. Hissenhardt, architect, of Greymouth, and has three daughters and two sons.

THE BOROUGH OF WOODVILLE has an area of 1240 acres within which is an estimated population of about 1200, with over 462 ratable [rateable] properties, the estimated annual value of which is over £10,000, and on which a general rate of 1s. 3d. in the £ is levied. The revenue from all sources is upwards of £1200, and the expenditure £1100.

HIS WORSHIP Mr. JOSEPH MOTLEY, J.P., Mayor of Woodville, is a well-known aerated water and cordial manufacturer and an old resident of the district. Born in Lincolnshire, England, in 1854, and son of the late Mr. Robert Motley, the subject of this sketch was educated at Boston in his native county, and apprenticed to a shoemaker. Love of adventure, however, caused him to throw up his employment before attaining the age of eighteen years and enlist in the 52nd Regiment of Infantry. Three years later, after having been quartered in Ireland, Malta, Gibraltar and England, he purchased his discharge and came out to this Colony per ship “Countess of Kintore.” Landing at Napier he joined the provincial police force and was transferred to the service of the General Government on the abolition of the provinces. In 1880 he was appointed officer-in-charge of the police, post and telegraph offices, in which he remained about four years. Leaving the force in 1886, he took the management of the Woodville Cheese Factory, but the venture like many others at that time, fared badly, and a year later he purchased the aerated water and cordial factory of Mr. Charles Birss, which he greatly improved and has conducted with success. Mr. Motley also owns 192 acres in the Hall Special Settlement, which he is getting cleared and

Photo captions –
MR. J. O MEARA.
WOODVILLE RIFLE CLUB TEAM, WITH THE WORLD’S RECORD SCORE.

WOODVILLE.   227

grassed for fruit culture and general farming. Mr. Motley has been secretary for about three years of the Woodville School Committee, Cottage Hospital Committee and Oddfellows’ lodge. In 1877 he was married to Miss Ellen Wainwright of Brighton, England, who died thirteen years later; in 1890 he married Miss Helena Lucy, of Cork, Ireland, and has nine children.

Councillor ROBERT ELDON GRINLINTON, who has occupied a seat on the Woodville Borough Council for about nine years, is a very popular storekeeper. He was born in Warrington, Lancashire, in 1860, and is a son of Mr. W. N. Grinlinton, of Napier. Educated at Easingwold in Yorkshire, he came with his parents to this Colony per ship ‘‘Winchester,’’ in 1874. On arrival in Napier he was apprenticed to Messrs Langley and Newman, cabinetmakers, and some four years later, when eighteen years of age, took up a bush farm near Woodville, which he still holds. In 1883 Mr. Grinlinton began business in Woodville as a cabinetmaker, and after a successful run of fourteen years, decided to extend his business so as to include general storekeeping. He has generally lent his aid to all progressive objects, has been an active member of the fire brigade since its institution in 1884, and was captain for some time. He is past master of Lodge Ruahine and a past grand of the Manchester Unity of Oddfellows. In 1884 Mr. Grinlinton married the daughter of the late Captain John Sedcole, of Wellington, and has two daughters and four sons.

Councillor DAVID GEORGE McKIBBIN, of the Woodville Borough Council, is a well-known draper of that place, was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1857, educated at the National schools of his native town and apprenticed to the drapery trade. On completion of his term he went to London and was for some four years with the well-known wholesale firm of Copestake, Lindsay, Crampton and Co. In 1884 Mr. McKibbin sailed for Melbourne in the s.s. ‘‘Austral,” landing a few days before she sank in Sydney Harbour. Crossing over to this Colony, Mr. McKibbin entered the employment of Messrs Sargood, Son and Ewen, remaining with them until 1887, when he removed to Woodville and established his present business. He did well from the start, and four years later moved into extensive premises, adjoining the original shop, which has since been used as a grocery store. Ready at all times to assist in the welfare of the district, Councillor McKibbin has taken part in almost every public and social movement. For several years he was a member of the Woodville School Committee, and is a useful member of the Woodville Agricultural and Pastoral Society. In 1887 he was married to a daughter of Mr. John Elliott, of County Armagh, Ireland.

Photo captions –
MR. J. MOTLEY’S RESIDENCE.
MR. GRINLINTON’S PREMISES.
COUNCILLOR R. E. GRINLINTON.

228   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

COUNCILLOR J. H. MONTEITH, of the Woodville Borough Council, is one of the best known public men of the district, having been more or less intimately connected with Woodville for nearly a quarter of a century. He has been a councillor since the formation of the borough and was a member of the old Town Board for many years. Councillor Monteith was born in Melbourne in 1848 and was educated and brought up to farming pursuits in Victoria and Queensland. In the last- named Colony he was for five years on his father’s station. Coming to New Zealand in 1868, Mr. Monteith was in business for a few years on the Otago goldfields and moved northwards to establish the first store in Woodville in partnership with Mr. Fountaine, a prosperous farmer of Kumeroa. This pioneer store is now carried on by Mr. Hall, a brother-in-law of Mr. Monteith. Seven years ago Mr. Monteith acquired his present estate, which is situated on the line of railway between Woodville and Pahiatua, and consists of 1100 acres of rich land, stocked with 2500 Lincoln sheep and 100 head-of cattle. He is married to a daughter of Mr. Edwin Hall, of Pahiatua, and has three sons and two daughters.

COUNCILLOR ALEXANDER SANDEL, of the Woodville Borough Council, who is now in his third term of office, was born in Konigsberg, Prussia, in 1856, and was educated in Riga in Russia, where he spent about eight years in a drapery and fancy goods store. In 1883 he went to St. Louis, and six months later to London, and came to New Zealand, per s.s. “Bombay,” in 1884. After four years in business as a draper at Woodville, Mr. Sandel purchased the “Star Hotel,” which he conducted for three years. He then entered into the grain and produce trade for a few months, after which he bought the Club Hotel and conducted it for two years. In 1894 he purchased the Masonic Hotel, which he has since sold, and he is now carrying on business in Woodville as a grocer, ironmonger, etc. Mr. Sandel is the Worshipful Master of Masonic Lodge Ruahine, No. 86, N.Z.C., and a member of the Jockey Club, Agricultural and Pastoral Society, Library Committee, and other institutions.

COUNCILLOR JAMES TAYLER, J.P., of the Woodville Borough Council, who is a well-known nurseryman, was born at St. Cyrus, Kincardineshire, Scotland, in 1852, educated in Aberdeenshire, and brought up as a gardener. At the age of twenty-one he went to Canada, where he worked at his calling until 1880, when he returned to his home preparatory to leaving for New Zealand per ship “City of Sparta.” Landing at Port Chalmers, Mr. Tayler was for a year on Mr. A. Mclean’s estate at Waitaki North, then moved northwards to Mr. Roberts, of “Clive Grange,” Hawke’s Bay, where he worked for nearly five years, after which he started on his own account as a nurseryman in Woodville. Mr. Tayler has been many years a member of the council and was a member of the old Town Board, the Licensing, Library, and School Committees. At the election of 1896 he stood as an independent candidate for the House of Representatives against Mr. O’Meara, the successful and present member. Mr. Tayler is a strong reasoner, a fearless speaker and writer and a pronounced socialist.

COUNCILLOR JAMES TROUP, who has been a member of the Woodville Borough Council for five or six years, was born in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in 1848, and is the son of Mr. James Troup, farmer. He was educated in the parish of St. Fergus and brought up to farming pursuits. Coming to the Colony in 1874, per ship “Auckland,” landing at Port Chalmers, Mr. Troup proceeded to Hawke’s Bay and settled for a time in Farndon and Clive, then removed to Woodville and successfully established himself in business as a butcher. He is a member of the Woodville Agricultural and Pastoral Society and School Committee, and has been a steward of the Woodville Jockey Club since its beginning. In 1883 Councillor Troup was married to a daughter of Mr. A. Peebles, of Woodville, and has six children.

Mr. WILLIAM GIBB CRAWFORD, Town Clerk and Treasurer to the Borough of Woodville, is a native of Glasgow, where he was born in 1836. His father, the late Mr. John Crawford, was a well-known manufacturer of that city. He received his education principally at the Andersonian Institute, and after finishing his term there decided to enter mercantile life in London. The following twenty years were Spent in that city in positions of trust and responsibility. He was with the large firm of Peter Robinson and Co., of Oxford Street, for a number of years, and Subsequently was twenty years with Messrs Dean and Co. In 1874 he came to New Zealand in the ship “Winchester,” landing in Napier, where he found employment for some twelve months at the “Herald” office as accountant. He was next appointed master of the Kaikora school. Three years later he was appointed headmaster of the Woodville school, where he remained eight years, then retired to establish himself in a general store in Woodville, which business he followed for seven years. He was a member of the Town Board for some years. In the latter part of 1894 he was appointed town clerk. Mr. Crawford was married in 1860 to a daughter of the late Mr. A. Andrews, of London, and has four sons and five daughters living.

Mr. JAMES HARVEY, Inspector of Stock for Woodville, Pahiatua, Patangata, and Waipawa, was born in Caithness, Scotland, and educated at Wick. He came to this Colony

Photo captions –
COUNCILLOR J. H. MONTEITH.
COUNCILLOR A. SANDEL.
COUNCILLOR J. TAYLER.

WOODVILLE.   229

with his parents in 1858, per ship “Ashburton,” and landed at Wellington. Mr. Harvey has been always associated with sheep and cattle. For a number of years he was a shepherd in the Wairarapa, and was afterwards for a while in the Forty Mile Bush. Joining the Government Stock Department in 1882, he was appointed rabbit agent in the Wairarapa district, and continued in that capacity until 1891, when he received his present appointment. Mr. Harvey is a member of the Masonic body, but unattached. He is married to a daughter of the late Mr. William Welch, of Taita, Hutt, and has three daughters and a son.

THE PUBLIC SCHOOL, Woodville, occupies a prominent position in the main street, opposite the Post Office. The buildings are commodious and contain six large, well-lighted class-rooms. The headmaster, Mr. Andrew Stevenson, is assisted by a staff of three assistants, five pupil teachers, and two probationers. The average attendance is 321 out of a total roll number of 395.

Mr. ANDREW STEVENSON, the Headmaster of the Woodville Public School, was born in 1865 in Dunedin and is a son of the late Mr. Robert Stevenson, an early settler. He was educated in Westland, where he served his pupil-teacher’s course and entered the service of the Canterbury Education Board in 1887. Prior to receiving his present appointment in 1891 he filled the position of headmaster of the Rakaia school for four years. For the past two years, Mr. Stevenson has been captain of the Woodville Rifles and takes an interest in all matters concerning the district.

THE WOODVILLE BRASS BAND was formed about 1888 and has at the present time twenty-seven players and six learners. Within the last four years over £400 has been spent on new instruments and uniforms. The band, led by Bandmaster Lawrence, is a great credit to the district.

Mr. ALBERT EDWARD LAWRENCE, Bandmaster of the-Woodville Brass Band, was born in London in 1864, received his education in the great city, and came to Napier at the age of fourteen years, where he learned the trade of a sign-writer and decorator. He was instructed in music by Mr. Bell, Bandmaster of the 65th Regiment. Prior to his appointment in 1891 as conductor of the Woodville Band, Mr. Lawrence was Band-sergeant under Bandmaster J. Chicken, at Waipawa, and afterwards under Bandmaster Curwen, at Woodville.

NICHOLSON AND CO. (Thomas Nicholson), Pharmaceutical Chemists and Druggists, Vogel Street, Woodville. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. The old-established business of this firm was purchased by Mr. Nicholson in 1896, and has since been considerably improved. The proprietor was born in Perthshire in 1873, was educated at Kaitangata, Otago, and at the Otago University; passed his examination and gained his certificate from the Pharmaceutical Society in 1896. Mr. Nicholson was articled to Messrs Wilkinson and Son, of Princes Street, Dunedin, and was afterwards senior dispenser to Mr. S. S. Bannister, of that city, for two years. He then went to Kaitangata, where he managed a business for a year, when he left that place for Woodville, and took over Mr. J. H. Nash’s business. Mr. Nicholson is secretary of the Woodville Football Club, captain of the Cycling Club, and a member of the Rifle and Dramatic Club.

MONTEITH, HENRY, Auctioneer, Land Estate, Financial and Stock Agent, Valuer, etc., McLean Street, Woodville. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Monteith was born in Victoria in 1848, where he was educated and brought up to farming. In 1861 he went to Queensland, where he remained for about five years on his father’s station. Coming to Otago in 1868, Mr. Monteith was at Switzers for two years. He then went to Ohinemuri, Thames, and soon afterwards to Tahoraiti, Hawke’s Bay, under engagement as book-keeper for Mr Elmbranch, storekeeper. Two years later he entered into contracting of various kinds, and in company with Mr. Angus MacKay, built the railway bridge at Waipukurau, and several other important bridges. When Dannevirke was first settled, Mr. Monteith contracted to “pack” thither the worldly goods of the first twenty-one families. Settling at Waipukurau, he opened a carrying agency and auctioneering business, and two years later purchased a horse bazaar at Napier, where he was actively engaged in business for eleven years, during six of which he was a member of the Napier Borough Council. He was instrumental also in floating several companies, such as the Napier Park Company, and the Napier Recreation Ground Company. Removing to Woodville in 1890, Mr. Monteith established his present business. Mr. Monteith has always been active in public matters. He was the first member representing Woodville in the Waipawa County Council after the passing of the Counties Act, and remained a member until change of residence necessitated his retirement. He is a steward of the Racing Club, a committeeman of the Agricultural and Pastoral Society, and a member of the Mangatua Road Board. He married a daughter of Mr. A. Jones, of Waipukurau, the well-known agricultural implement maker, and has four sons and two daughters.

WILSON, J. G., Authorized and Licensed Surveyor, Land Valuer, Finance, Insurance and General Agent, McLean Street, Woodville. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand, Woodville, and Union Bank of Australia, Wellington. Mr. Wilson was born at Turakina in 1861, son of Captain Wilson, who shortly afterwards removed with his family to Gisborne, where, with the exception of the subject of this notice, they all fell victims to the murderous work of Te Kooti and his followers. Captain Wilson and

Photo captions –
MR. A. E. LAWRENCE.
TEACHING STAFF OF THE WOODVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOL.

230   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

three of his children were killed at once, but Mrs. Wilson, though fatally wounded, was able to crawl away to some hiding place, where she was found and tended as well as was possible by her surviving son, a little boy of seven, who, in the excitement of the moment, had been allowed by his would-be murderers to escape to the bush, where he wandered about throughout the night. Mrs. Wilson was removed to Napier, where, a few days subsequently, she succumbed to her injuries. The young survivor was then placed under the care of his paternal grandparents in London, where he was partly educated at the North London Collegiate School, and on his return to New Zealand he attended the Napier Grammar School. Joining the Survey Department in 1878, Mr. Wilson was articled to Mr. Walter Hallet, Government Surveyor, and for the following fifteen years was engaged in the survey of the Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne districts. Following the military instincts of his father, Mr. Wilson joined the East Coast Hussars, Heretaunga Light Horse, etc., and is one of the best shots in the Colony. He is the present holder of the Wairarapa Championship and challenge shield. For the last six years he has been in the final fifty for the Colonial Championship, averaging about the tenth man. Mr. Wilson is exceedingly popular throughout the district.

CROSS, JOHN WALDRON, Builder and Contractor, Woodville. Mr. Cross was born in Leicester, England, in 1851, and was educated and apprenticed to the building trade in his native town. In 1874, after two years in business on his own account, Mr. Cross came to the Colony, per ship “Asia,” landing at Port Chalmers. He worked at his trade in Otago and Southland for eight or nine years, and after two years in Canterbury and a somewhat shorter period in Wellington, he settled at Woodville in 1886. As a borough councillor for about five years, Mr. Cross has taken his share in public affairs. He is an Oddfellow of thirty years’ standing, and has been through the chairs, and is a member of the Woodville Rifle Club. Mr. Cross is married and has a son and daughter.

MOTLEY, JOSEPH, Aerated Water and Cordial Manufacturer, Bowen Street, Woodville. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. Motley has filled up his factory with the newest type of machinery, which is driven by a small steam-engine. His general and special lines of manufacture, which are delivered all round the district, include lemonade, soda-water, gingerale, champagne-cider, raspberryade, football-punch, orange-champagne, and all kinds of syrups. Further particulars are given of Mr. Motley as Mayor of Woodville.

McKIBBIN, D. G., Draper, Grocer, and Ironmonger, Vogel Street, Woodville. P.O. Box 16. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Mr. McKibbin’s business is one of the largest in Woodville. The shops are extensive and well stocked, the one set apart for the drapery being exceedingly fine, with good show and millinery rooms at the back of the main building. Nearly all the stock is imported direct from European and American markets. A good trade is done with the farmers in the surrounding districts. Particulars of Mr. McKibbin’s career are given in connection with the Woodville Borough Council, of which for the last few years he has been an active member.

COMMERCIAL CLUB HOTEL (Christopher Ryan, proprietor), Woodville. This is the oldest and best situated hotel in the town. It contains thirty-five bedrooms, with drawing-rooms, club rooms, parlours, etc., and a very fine billiard room with an exhibition table. The dining-room accommodates sixty persons, and boasts of a splendidly provided table.

Mr. RYAN, who purchased the hotel in 1897, was born in 1857 in Jersey, where he was brought up to the business of a licensed victualler. Coming to the Colony in 1874, per ship “Stonebridge,” Mr. Ryan landed at Lyttelton. He found employment at Warner’s Hotel, Christchurch, for two years, and then went to Kumara, and was afterwards for a year at Mr. Churches’ Empire Hotel, Hokitika. Mr. Ryan next went to Wellington and was employed for some time in the Occidental Hotel. He then became proprietor of the Criterion Hotel, Blenheim, which he conducted for seven years, when he returned to Wellington and was at the City Hotel for a year and a half until he left for Woodville. While in Blenheim Mr. Ryan was for three years a member of the Borough Council. He was also a member of the school committee, treasurer of the Marlborough Racing and Trotting Club, originator and secretary of the Marlborough Gun Club, promoter and treasurer of the Marlborugh [Marlborough] Licensed Victuallers’ Association, senior warden of Lodge Killarney, and an officer in the Royal Arch Chapter. On leaving Blenheim, he was presented with a handsome gold watch, suitably engraved, as a token of the esteem in which he was held by his fellow townsmen. Mr. Ryan was for about two years part owner with Mr. Sutherland of a run in Queen Charlotte’s Sound; and he was also the owner of the hurdler “Clyde,” the racer “Gladstone,” and the hack “Pearl.”

HORNE, DAVID MITCHELL, Wheelwright and General Blacksmith, Woodville. Mr. Horne was born in 1844 in Forfarshire, Scotland, where he was educated and apprenticed to the blacksmith’s trade. He entered into business on his own account at March of Lunon Bank and continued there for eight years. In 1878 he came to this Colony, per ship “City of Auckland,” which was afterwards wrecked at Otaki on the passage out. After being four years in the employment of Mr. Jones, of Waipukurau, Mr. Horne settled in

Photo captions –
MR. J. G. WILSON
MR. C. RYAN.
MR. D. M. HORNE.

WOODVILLE.   231

Woodville and established his present business. He has taken an active part in public affairs, is now a member of the borough council for the third time, and for fifteen years has been a member of the school committee. As a member of the Independent Order of Rechabites he is superintendent of the Juvenile Tent, has been treasurer of the Presbyterian church since its establishment in Woodville, is a trustee of the public library and a director of the Woodville Building Society. At the local agricultural shows he has carried off the chief prizes against all comers. Mr. Horne has had four daughters and eight sons.

LOADER, WILLIAM, Saddler and Harness Maker, Vogel Street, Woodville. Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Branch at Mangatainoka. Mr. Loader established his saddlery business in 1885 in premises on the Masterton Road, but he moved to the principal street about six years later. His present premises have a frontage of thirty feet, and the stock is of excellent quality. Every description of saddlery and harness is manufactured by Mr. Loader, and horse covers are a specialty with him. The Mangatainoka branch is in charge of Mr. Reid, and both establishments are well patronized with an extensive town and country connection. Born in London in 1866, Mr. Loader came to this Colony in 1871 with his parents, who settled in Waipukurau, where he received his education. He served his time with Mr. J. L. Sterry, of Waipukurau, and worked at his trade in Woodville for two years before starting for himself. Mr. Loader was vice-president of the Woodville cricket club for 1897, and is a member of the Jockey Club and Agricultural and Pastoral Association. He is married and has four daughters and a son.

TAYLER, JAMES, Nurseryman, Woodville. Further particulars are given of Mr. Tayler as a member of the Woodville Borough Council.

GRINLINTON, R. H., AND CO. (R. E. Grinlinton), General Storekeepers and House Furnishers, Vogel Street, Woodville, Bankers, Bank of New Zealand. Private residence, Ross Street. Mr. Grinlinton’s business premises are Large and well appointed, and the stock, much of which is imported direct, is very extensive. Reference to Mr. Grinlinton’s career is given in connection with the Woodville Borough Council.

THE BANK OF NEW ZEALAND, Woodville, was opened in 1882, by Mr. G. H. Sinclair.  The building has been considerably enlarged of late years. Mr. Sinclair was succeeded by Mr. J. Guillum Scott and Mr. William Cook, and in 1890 the present manager, Mr. Charles Smith, was appointed.

Mr. CHARLES SMITH, Manager of the Bank of New Zealand at Woodville, was born in Wanganui in 1862, and is a son of the late Capt. R. W. Smith, who settled in Wanganui more than half a century ago. Educated at the Wanganui Collegiate School under Mr. H. H. Godwin, Mr. Smith joined the Bank in 1878, in his native town. Transferred shortly afterwards to the Wellington office, he rose to the position of first teller, and on the death of Mr. Taylor, the manager of the Te Aro branch, was appointed to succeed him. After some years at Te Aro, Mr. Smith was transferred to Woodville, where for nearly ten years he has unostentatiously taken a leading part in every public movement. He is a member and the auditor of the Woodville Agricultural and Pastoral Society, and of the Bush Districts Farmers’ Club. As a member of the school committee he has done useful work. In 1885 Mr. Smith was married to the daughter of Mr. David Porter, C.E., now of Wellington, but formerly of Wanganui, and has four daughters and two sons.

MURPHY, JOHN JAMES, Farmer, Woodville. Mr. Murphy, who is an old resident, occupies a grazing farm of some 200 acres. Born in 1837, at St. John’s, Newfoundland, and educated there, Mr. Murphy was brought up to a seafaring life, and at the age of twenty was a master mariner. For about five years he had command of various ships, and at the time of the Crimean war he was second mate of the ship “William Skiddle,” employed in transport service in the Baltic. During the blockade of Chesapeake Bay in 1861, at the

Photo captions –
MR. D. M. HORNE’S PREMISES.
MR. G. BRITNELL.   See page 183.
MR. H. G. PITCHER.   See page 87.

232   THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND.

time of the American Civil War, Mr. Murphy was master of the ship “Alpheus,’’ which was in the bay, and he sailed thence for New Zealand in the ship “John Duncan.” Landing in Auckland, he was appointed by the Provincial Government to take charge of the steamers running between Onehunga and the Waikato Heads, and he occupied that position for some time. After that he joined Messrs Gibbins Bros. as sawmillers in the Waikato, but the partnership was dissolved two years later, and Mr. Murphy started trading on the Thames river in kauri gum, flax, etc. Shortly afterwards he accepted the command of the Government steamer “Sturt.” Two years later he bought an interest in another steamer, and traded on the West Coast for two years, doing excedingly [exceedingly] well. Selling out of that venture, he returned to his old position on the “Sturt” which he finally left to take charge of the lighthouse on Mana Island, and afterwards of Cape Campbell Lighthouse. Retiring from the Government service, Mr. Murphy went to Wellington and established himself as a general storekeeper. In 1875 he purchased the site of the well-known Commercial Club Hotel at Woodville, which he successfully carried on for sixteen years, and retired in 1891. He was a member of the first Road Board, first Town Board, and school and other committees. Mr. Murphy is married and has a son and daughter.

KUMEROA.

KUMEROA, which is 115 miles south-west from Napier, is in the county and electoral district of Waipawa. It has a telephone office and also a public school, which has an average attendance of about sixty pupils. Kumeroa is connected by coach road with Woodville, distant nine miles. There is a thrice-a-week mail service between Napier and Kumeroa.

THE KUMEROA POST OFFICE is connected with the Woodville Post Office by telephone. It is also a savings bank and money order office.

Mr. DAVID GAIN, the Postmaster, is also proprietor of the post office store, and a popular settler.

Photo captions –
WESLEYAN CHURCH, WOODVILLE.
CLIVE SQUARE, NAPIER.

H. J. Weeks, Ltd., Printers and Publishers, Manchester Street, Christchurch. – 21323

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WalmsleyM826_CyclopediaOfNewZealand.pdf

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Book excerpt

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The Cyclopedia Company Limited, Christchurch

Additional information

Possibly published in 1906 – note that the text in this record is very different to the text contained in the more well-known 1908 publication which includes Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay and the Wellington District.

“The Cyclopedia of New Zealand” was published in six volumes between 1897 and 1908. Each volume deals with a region of New Zealand and includes information on local towns and districts, government departments, individuals, businesses, clubs and societies. There is biographical information about individuals included. It must be noted that people paid to have their details included and supplied the compilers with their own information.

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435205

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