Earthquake 1931

The following are the images published in the
AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
throughout 1931 of the
HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE

mostly in the first three issues following;
February 11, 18 & 25

And the
SUBSEQUENT REBUILDING
throughout the remaining years of the 1930s

Many have been commonly published, others less so.
But together they make a very comprehensive visual record of the disaster, predominantly Napier.
These Images have been sourced from the Auckland Libraries through the
SIR GEORGE GREY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
and provided from the Ewan McGregor Image Collection


THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
With which is incorporated “THE WEEKLY GRAPHIC AND NEW ZEALAND MAIL.”
AUCKLAND, N.Z., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1931.

HAWKE’S BAY DEVASTATED BY DISASTROUS EARTHQUAKES LAST WEEK: THE SCENE ON A ROAD AT NAPIER.

The worst disaster in NZ’s history occurred on Tuesday morning, February 3, when a large area of the Hawke’s Bay district, North Island, was devastated by a most severe earthquake. Many people were killed and thousands suffered injuries, while the total damage is estimated at some million pounds sterling. Awful havoc was wrought in the leading townships of Napier and Hastings, the former having to be evacuated. A full story appears in the news pages of this issue, and in addition to the illustrated section further pictures will be found on pages 16 to 33. The above photograph shows the scene on the Embankment at Napier, where great fissures opened in the road and motor vehicles, using the highway at the time, dropped into the cracks.  
– T.W. Collins.


February 11, 1931.   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   41

IN AND AROUND NAPIER AND HASTINGS, HAWKE’S BAY, JUST AFTER LAST WEEK’S TERRIBLE EARTHQUAKES.

TOP: Looking down Emerson Street, showing the litter of fallen bricks and masonry. On the left smoke is seen issuing from the burning Power Board building. CENTRE: A view of Marine Parade looking toward the bluff. Debris from the wrecked buildings was hurled across the road in the direction of the beach. LOWER: A car which was crushed by falling masonry while parked alongside the kerb of a street in Hastings. This scene is typical of many in both Napier and Hastings.


42   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 11, 1931.

WHERE SOME NURSES WERE BURIED ALIVE: THE TUMBLED MASS OF WOOD AND MASONRY THAT WAS THE NURSES’ HOME AT THE NAPIER HOSPITAL.

Formerly a fine three-storey structure, the Home is now a complete wreck. As well as other occupants, several night nurses, who were asleep when the earthquake occurred, were trapped in the falling building.

BLUEJACKETS AT THEIR GRIM TASK OF SEARCHING FOR BODIES IN THE TECHNICAL SCHOOL WHICH COLLAPSED ON SCHOLARS.

The collapse of the roof of the school trapped the children inside. A number had a miraculous escape but many are dead, including two teachers.

TWO NAPIER BUILDINGS IN WHICH A LARGE NUMBER OF FATALITIES OCCURRED.


February 11, 1931   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   43

THE FIRST MOMENTS OF NAPIER’S DOOM: A REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPH OF FALLING BUILDINGS AND SPREADING FLAMES TAKEN BEFORE THE EARTH CEASED TO ROCK.

This snapshot, secured in Emerson Street, looking toward Hastings Street, gives a vivid impression of the appalling nature of the catastrophe which overwhelmed Napier and in a few moments destroyed the whole of the commercial centre of Hawke’s Bay’s largest town. Mingled with the clouds of dust raised by falling bricks and masonry are flames and smoke of incipient fires which soon swept through many blocks of shattered buildings. Blythe’s premises are on the left of this picture and Haynes ‘building on the right.


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 11, 1931.

A FINE MODERN BUILDING IN RUINS: THE HASTINGS POST OFFICE ALMOST ENTIRELY DESTROYED.

The whole clock tower of the building fell forward into the street. One woman was killed but the entire postal staff escaped injury.

THE BURNING AND WRECKED MAIN STREET OF HASTINGS.

Heretaunga Street at the intersection with Karamu Road. The building standing on the corner is the Union Bank of Australia.

STARTLING PICTURES FROM HASTINGS, ANOTHER HAWKE’S BAY TOWN THAT SUFFERED GREAT LOSS OF LIFE AND PROPERTY.


February 11, 1931.   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   45

IN THE CENTRE OF THE BUSINESS AREA OF HASTINGS WHERE BUILDINGS WERE SHAKEN TO THE GROUND AND FIRE FOLLOWED EARTHQUAKE TO ADD TO THE DESTRUCTION.

A scene in King Street, near the intersection with Heretaunga Street. In the right background can be seen the tower of St Matthew’s Anglican Church.


February 11, 1931.   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 11, 1931.   47

A SCENE OF DESOLATION AND RUIN IN WHAT WAS FORMERLY THE PRIDE OF THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT: ALL THAT REMAINS OF THE FINE BUILDINGS WHICH FLANKED NAPIER’S THREE MOST IMPORTANT STREETS.

Following the earthquake a fire broke out in the Masonic Hotel and, helped by other outbreaks, spead through the entire two blocks shown in this and the lower photograph to Clive Square, where the open space prevented the flames from spreading further. The Public Trust Office (right) and Dalgety’s (middle distance right), were two of the few large buildings to escape complete destruction. In the extreme right-hand corner is a portion of the new St. Paul’s Methodist Church ruins. The numbers refer as follows:

1.  The Masonic Hotel.
2.  This block contained the buildings of Macky, Logan’s, Daily Telegraph Company, National Mutual Life Insurance, and Hawke’s Bay Herald.
3.  The Union Bank of Australia, the D.S.L., the Criterion Hotel and the National Bank of New Zealand were on the four corners.
4.  Blythe’s building.
5.  The new Post office.
6.  Dr. Gilray’s Hospital.
7.  The E. and D. building.

LIKE A LEVELLED CITY IN WARTIME: A FURTHER PANORAMA OF THE RAZED BUSINESS HOUSES IN THE MAIN STREETS OF NAPIER, SHOWING THE CONTINUATION OF THE VIEW GIVEN IN THE PHOTOGRAPH REPRODUCED AT THE TOP OF THIS PAGE.

By locating the Public Trust Office and Dalgety’s building on the left it is possible to follow the line of the streets from the right of the other photograph to Clive Square, on the extreme right of this picture.

1.  Blythe’s building.
2.  Municipal Theatre.
3.  Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Co-operative Association’s premises.
4.  The Baptist Church.
5.  Central Fire Station.
6.  Provincial Hotel.
7. The Roman Catholic Cathedral, which withstood the earthquake shocks, while, opposite, the Technical School collapsed.

NAPIER’S UTTERLY DEVASTATED MAIN BUSINESS CENTRE: TWO STRIKING AND COMPREHENSIVE CONTINUOUS PANORAMIC PHOTOGRAPHS SHOWING THE WHOLESALE DESTRUCTION CAUSED BY EARTHQUAKE AND FIRE.


48   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 11, 1931.  

ONE OF NAPIER’S PRINCIPAL STREETS, WHERE SOME OF THE WORST HAVOC WAS WROUGHT BY EARTHQUAKE AND FIRE.

Looking along Emerson Street after a passage had been cleared through the debris in the centre of the road. A party of bluejackets from the warships, who assisted in the search for victims among the wreckage, can be seen in the background.

WELL KNOWN TO MANY WHO HAVE VISITED THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: TWO NAPIER HOTELS WHICH ARE NOW A MASS OF RUINS.

Left: All that is left of the Masonic Hotel, on the corner of Tennyson Street and Marine Parade. This view is taken looking along Tennyson Street toward the sea front.
Right: Ruins of the Empire Hotel, in Shakespeare Road.

NUMEROUS CARS CAUGHT BY THE FALLING MASONRY DEBRIS IN THE MAIN STREETS OF BOTH NAPIER AND HASTINGS.

This photograph, taken in Hastings Street, Napier, shows one of the many cars which have been irreparably wrecked.

MORE PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE CENTRE OF THE VIOLENT EARTHQUAKES IN THE TOWN OF NAPIER.


February 11, 1931   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   49

THE NAVY TO THE RESCUE: WARSHIPS RUSHED TO THE SCENE OF THE EARTHQUAKE DISASTER.

H.M.S. Veronica was at Napier when the disaster occurred and Commander H.L. Morgan immediately took charge of the organisation of the relief and rescue work. The cruisers Dunedin and Diomede were at Auckland ready to sail for overseas, but their sailing orders were cancelled and they arrived at Napier with doctors and nurses early on Wednesday morning.

1.  H.M.S. Diomede photographed at full speed on her way to Napier. Inset is a portrait of Commodore Geoffrey Blake.
2.  H.M.S. Dunedin leaving Auckland on Tuesday.
3.  The sloop Veronica. Inset is a portrait of Commander H.L. Morgan.
4.  The officers and men of H.M.S. Veronica, who rendered yeoman service at Napier.
5.  Searching for victims among the wreckage in Tennyson Street, Napier.


50   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 11, 1931.  

THE DAMAGED WATERFRONT AT PORT AHURIRI AND ONE OF THE MANY PATHETIC SCENES AMONG THE REFUGEES.

Left: Looking along the twisted breastwork and railway lines at Port Ahuriri. H.M.S. Veronica can be seen berthed at the far end of the wharf.
Right: A homeless family on the beach at Marine Parade.

BURNING AND EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN NAPIER AND ITS PORT VIEWED FROM THE ROADSTEAD LAST WEDNESDAY.

On the left the smoke is coming from the ruined business area of the township. The changed face of Bluff Hill stands out prominently in the centre with the breakwater at the base. Port Ahuriri is to the right where smoke is visible.

FURTHER PICTURES OF BLUEJACKETS AT WORK AND SOME OF NAPIER’S HOMELESS RESIDENTS.

Left: Searchers removing a body found in the ruins.
Right: A family with their possessions on the beach.

FURTHER STRIKING PHOTOGRAPHS FROM NAPIER AND PORT AHURIRI.


February 11, 1931   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   51

THE RUINED MASONIC HOTEL AT NAPIER, PHOTOGRAPHED WHEN IT WAS STILL BURNING.

The grim skeleton of the four-storeyed structure outlined against the smoke from its blazing remains. Seven bodies had been recovered from the building at the time of going to press.

ANOTHER STRIKING PICTURE SECURED WHEN NAPIER WAS BEING RAVAGED BY FIRE AND EARTHQUAKES.

Looking over the burning township from the shelter of the Stewart Nash garage in Dickens Street.

REMARKABLE SNAPSHOTS IN NAPIER IMMEDIATELY AFTER TRAGIC FIRES FOLLOWED THE EARTHQUAKES.


SHOWING FINE COURAGE IN A TIME OF GREAT PERIL: AMONG THE REFUGEES AT NAPIER.


February 11, 1931   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   53

LOOKING DOWN EMERSON STREET FROM HASTINGS STREET INTERSECTION. THE BUILDING ON THE CORNER BEHIND THE POLICEMAN WAS THE UNION BANK OF AUSTRALIAN AND ON THE RIGHT ARE THE RUINS OF THE CRITERION HOTEL.

BLUFF HILL VIEWED FROM THE BEACH.

A photograph taken during the recent season.

BLUFF HILL SEEN FROM THE SAME ANGLE LAST WEDNESDAY.

A large part of the cliff crashed from the top burying the breakwater road at the foot under thousands of tons of debris. A cottage can be seen perched precariously on the brink of the precipice.

THE GREAT LANDSLIDE ON BLUFF HILL AND ANOTHER VIEW OF THE DEVASTATED BUSINESS AREA IN THE CENTRE OF THE TOWN OF NAPIER.


54   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 11, 1931.  

GENERAL EVACUATION OF NAPIER: RESIDENTS LEAVE RUINED HOMES AND TEMPORARY CAMPS.

1. Quite unconcerned in a back garden at Napier.
2.  Ready to leave: Napier residents at Nelson Park awaiting conveyances to other towns.
3.  Meal-time for homeless children at Napier.
4.  Attending to the casualties: Ambulance men placing an injured person aboard a horse transport truck.
5.  Refugees at Nelson park ready for the evacuation.
6.  Cheerful in their temporary “hospital quarters” at the racecourse.
7.  Lunching under difficulties in a Napier back yard.
8.  One of the many pathetic scenes among the refugees: A homeless family patiently waiting while measures for their relief were being prepared.


THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS
With which is incorporated “THE WEEKLY GRAPHIC AND THE NEW ZEALAND MAIL.”
AUCKLAND, N.Z. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1931.

THE TREMENDOUS RENDING FORCE OF THE EARTHQUAKE WHICH DEVASTATED A SECTION OF HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT, NORTH ISLAND.

This photograph strikingly illustrates the force of the earth tremors which wrought such havoc, causing a tragic loss of life and property, in the Hawke’s Bay district, North island, on February 3. It shows the smashed remains of the bridge across the Ngaruroro River [Karamu Stream], on the main highway between Hastings and Havelock North.   
– Staff Photographer.


36   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.  

A STRIKING PICTURE OF THE NAPIER GAS COMPANY’S OFFICE AND SHOWROOMS IN HASTINGS STREET IN FULL BLAZE. 
– W.S. Eastwood.

LEAVING STRICKEN NAPIER WITH ALL THEIR WORLDLY POSSESSIONS AFTER TERRIFYING EXPERIENCES.

One of the many homeless families taking part in the evacuation.    
T.W. Collins.

BLAZING BUILDINGS AND FLEEING REFUGEES IN THE CENTRE OF NAPIER DURING THE AWFUL EARTHQUAKES.


38   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.  

VICE-REGAL CONCERN FOR THE INJURED AND HOMELESS IN THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE AREA.

The Governor-General, Lord Bledisloe, accompanied by Lady Bledisloe, arrived at Napier on the Saturday following the earthquake disaster. Two days were spent by Their Excellencies in inspecting the badly-shaken district. With kindly words of cheer for the injured and homeless, and appreciation for the relief workers. Their Excellencies did much to restore the confidence among the people.

1.  Lady Bledisloe shows particular interest in the welfare of an earthquake baby born in a refugee camp at Hastings.
2.  Her Excellency meeting some of the womenfolk who passed through the trying ordeal.
3.  A section of the people who attended the combined church service in the open air at Clive Square on Sunday.
4.  The Governor-General, who addressed the congregation, photographed with the minister who conducted the service.
5, 6 and 7.  Their Excellencies with some of the gallant workers who did so much to relieve distress and to restore confidence in the earthquake zone.
8.  A motor-lorry loaded with palliasses leaving the Hastings Drill Hall for one of the relief camps. Their Excellencies are on the left.
9.  Lord Bledisloe has a word of cheer for a band of relief workers preparing food for the homeless.  
– Staff Photographer.


February 18, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   39

AS THE NAVY SAW THE PORT OF NAPIER IMMEDIATELY AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE COMMENCE

A snapshot taken from the bridge of H.M.S. Veronica, showing the dense smoke rising from the burning buildings at Port Ahuriri. In the foreground the wrecked wharf and demolished buildings give some indication of the tremendous force of the earthquake and of the narrow escape of the warships. The white ensign stands out clearly against the smoke. Had the vessel been berthed a little further down the wharf the outward thrust of the earthquake must have capsized her.

THE CHIEF BUSINESS CENTRE OF NAPIER ABLAZE AFTER BEING ALMOST COMPLETELY WRECKED BY THE DISASTROUS EARTHQUAKE.

A view taken in Browning Street, near the Hastings Street intersection, showing the road strewn with debris and dense volumes of black smoke arising from the burning buildings in the background. The Commercial Assurance Company’s premises are in the centre if the block of buildings in the right.

AWE-INSPIRING SIGHTS WITNESSED SOON AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE WHEN EXTENSIVE FIRES GRIPPED BOTH TOWN AND PORT IN NAPIER.


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.  

BUSINESS PREMISES DEMOLISHED WITH TRAGIC LOSS OF LIFE IN THE HEART OF THE TOWN OF HASTINGS.

Looking along King Street, near the Heretaunga Street intersection, showing the road completely strewn with debris from the fallen buildings.  
– Staff Photographer.

LOSS OF THE WAIROA FREEZING WORKS BY FIRE FOLLOWING THE EARTHQUAKE CREATES A SERIOUS POSITION.

A general view of the blazing works taken after the wooden portion of the structure had been completely gutted. Pending reconstruction of the building, the industry, which is one of the most important in the district, will receive a severe set-back.  
– Staff Photographer.

COLLAPSE OF THE WAIROA TRAFFIC BRIDGE OVER THE WAIROA RIVER ADDS TO THE ISOLATION OF GISBORNE AND NORTHERN TOWNSHIPS.

A view of the damaged span which has since completely collapsed and fallen into the river. In addition to destroyed bridges the road damage between Wairoa and Napier is so severe that it will entail much heavy work to establish communication again.

DAMAGE AT HASTINGS AND WAIROA, TWO SERIOUSLY STRICKEN HAWKE’S BAY CENTRES.


February 18, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   41

ANOTHER COMPREHENSIVE VIEW, SHOWING THE TERRIBLE HAVOC WROUGHT BY EARTHQUAKE AND FIRE IN NAPIER’S MAIN BUSINESS CENTRE.

The main thoroughfare, Hastings Street, can be followed for the entire length on the left of the photograph. The fire is still in progress. On the right is the Public trust Office, still standing.

February 18, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.

MAKING ORDER OUT OF CHAOS IN THE EARTHQUAKE AND FIRE STRICKEN HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: GREAT PROGRESS BEING MADE WITH THE DEMOLITION AND RESTORATION IN PREPARATION FOR THE REBUILDING OF NAPIER.

1.  Re-erecting one of the thousands of fallen chimneys.
2.   At work in the ruins of a large building.
3.   Demolishing the remains of the P. and O. building. A section of wall coming down with showers of dust.
4.  Bluejackets at work among the ruins of one of Napier’s large buildings in the main business area.
5.  Mending the roof of a residence damaged by the earthquake.
6.  The scene of desolation and ruin in Browning Street, one of the chief business thoroughfares. This photograph strikingly illustrates the tremendous amount of work to be done before the actual reconstruction could commence.
7.  Hauling down another large building with the aid of a motor-tractor.
8.  Cars belong to the Vice-Regal party passing along Browning Street during their visit to Napier. This shows the great clearance effected two days after picture No. 6 was taken. 
– Staff Photographer.


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.  

WHERE GALLANT SCHOOLBOYS GAVE THEIR LIVES IN AN HEROIC EFFORT TO RENDER ASSISTANCE TO GIRL SCHOLARS.

Ruins of the Napier Technical College, an old brick building in Munroe Street, where the greatest death-toll in any single building occurred. A number of boys who had left the building during the first shock realised that several girls were still inside. Regardless of the risk, they ran back into the swaying building which collapsed on top of them before they were able to render assistance.  
– T.W. Collins.

HOW THE WALLS WERE STRIPPED FROM A NAPIER HOTEL

Exposed rooms on one side of the Empire Hotel, a three-storeyed structure in Shakespeare Road.  
J.F. Louden.

ROMAN CATHOLIC CATHEDRAL AT NAPIER SURVIVES THE SHOCK.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral. In Munroe Street, viewed across the debris from the technical College, where some of the scholars were killed. With its tall spire the Cathedral is considered to have had a remarkable escape from destruction. 
– Staff Photographer.

WHERE ONE OF THE WORST TRAGEDIES TOOK PLACE IN NAPIER: THE NURSES’ HOME AND NAPIER HOSPITAL VIEWED FROM THE AIR.

Night nurses as well as other occupants were killed when the Nurses’ Home, a large three-storeyed building, collapsed into a tangled mass of wreckage. All that now remains of the building appears in the centre of the picture, while part of the Napier Hospital, where fatalities also occurred, is on the right.   – Air Survey and Transport Company.

WHERE TWO OF NAPIER’S SADDEST TRAGEDIES RESULTED FROM COLLAPSING BUILDINGS


February 18, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   45

DESTRUCTION OF NAPIER’S WATERFRONT AND AT PORT AHURIRI.

TOP: The changed face of a hill on the waterfront road from Napier to Port Ahuriri. 
CENTRE: Looking across burning Port Ahuriri.
LOWER: The wrecked breastwork on the waterfront at Port Ahuriri.
Bales of wool from one of the destroyed wool stores can be seen.  
– Staff Photographer and E.T. Robson.


46   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.  

TRAGEDY AND MIRACULOUS ESCAPE AT THE NAPIER HOSPITAL WHEN THE TERRIBLE EARTHQUAKES OCCURRED.

Left: A motor-car, which was parked beside the hospital. The two occupants were killed.
Right: Mr Len. Nicholson was driving his motor-hearse into the hospital grounds at the time of the earthquake and the vehicle was engulfed in the ruins of the building. He escaped uninjured. 
– Staff Photographer

MAN OF 90 ENTRAPPED FOR THREE DAYS: REMARKABLE FORTITUDE SHOWN BY AGED SURVIVORS OF A TERRIBLE ORDEAL.

Left: Mr. James Collins, aged 90, who was buried in the ruins of the Park Island Old Men’s Home for three days before being rescued.
Right: Mr. Henry Skelton, aged 91 years, a Maori War veteran, who was pulled out of the ruins of his house by his son (right), a few minutes after the building collapsed. His feet are badly crushed and he is in a serious condition. 
– Staff Photographer

COMPLETELY RUINED BY FALLING BRICKS AND MASONRY FROM COLLAPSING ADJACENT BUILDINGS.

All that remains of several motor-cars which were parked in a Napier street when the earthquake occurred.

SOME REMARKABLE INCIDENTS OF THE EARTHQUAKE AT NAPIER.  – H.J. Lovell-Smith.


February 18, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   47

AMONG THE HOMELESS AND DESTITUTE REFUGEES FROM THE STRICKEN EARTHQUAKE AREAS.

1.  Boarding a relief train at Hastings, en route to Palmerston North and southern towns.
2.  Age and youth among the refugees.
3.  Napier hospital nurses who survived the awful disaster.
4.  Youthful refugees with a pet dog at Palmerston North.
5.  All meals have to be cooked in the open owing to chimneys being shaken down.
6.  Brave women and sturdy children arriving at Palmerston North.
7.  Old folk at a relief camp.
8.  On the road near Hastings. Note the prams for the little girls’ dolls were not forgotten.
9.  Twins among the refugees at Palmerston North.
10.  Collecting the bread ration at a Hastings camp.
– Staff, Lovell-Smith and J.F. Louden.


48   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.  

RESIDENTS OF AN OUTLYING DISTRICT ESTABLISH A TEMPORARY CAMP TO BE SAFE FROM FURTHER EARTHQUAKES.

Scenes in the Havelock district, where many families slept in the open during the earthquake period.
– D.E. White.

TRAFFIC BRIDGE ON A MAIN HIGHWAY DESTROYED BY THE EARTHQUAKE.

All that remains of the structure on the road between Havelock and Hastings. The watermains can be seen still intact.  
– H.P.D. van Asch.

A GROUP OF THE HOMELESS AT THE IMPROVISED CAMP ON A FARM OUTSIDE NAPIER.
– C. Boyer

WHEN REFUGEES LIVED IN THE OPEN FOR SAFETY, AND AN IMPORTANT BRIDGE DAMAGED.


February 18, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   49

THE BUSINESS CENTRE OF PROSPEROUS HASTINGS RUINED BY EARTHQUAKE AND FIRE.

1.  Looking east along Heretaunga Street, the main thoroughfare.
2.  The Grand Hotel ruins, where several persons were killed.
3.  Heretaunga Street from the eastern end.
4.  J.S. Martin’s garage, which collapsed.  
– H.P.D. van Asch.


50   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 18, 1931.  

WHERE THE WORST TRAGEDY OCCURRED IN THE TOWN OF HASTINGS AS A RESULT OF THE EARTHQUAKE.

Ruins of Roach’s store, where several people were killed by falling debris or perished in the disastrous fire which followed. 
– Staff Photographer

LARGE SHOALS OF FISH LEFT HIGH AND DRY BY RECEDING WATERS AT PORT AHURIRI.

Workmen raking the dead fish into large heaps for immediate burial as a precaution against disease. These shoals were stranded on the mud-flat in the north pond, parts of which are now above sea-level owing to the general rising of the harbour bed. 
– Staff Photographer

GALLANT FIREMEN WHO RENDERED SPLENDID SERVICE AT PORT AHURIRI FIGHTING THE FIRES WHICH FOLLOWED THE EARTHQUAKE.  
– C.P.S. Boyer

TREMENDOUS TOLL OF THE EARTHQUAKE AT HASTINGS AND AT PORT AHURIRI.


36   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 25, 1931.  

PART OF THE RESTORATION WORK AT NAPIER: DEBRIS FROM WRECKED BUILDINGS BEING USED FOR RECLAMATION PURPOSES AT PORT AHURIRI.

Motor-lorries dumping the spoil from the devastated areas into a small lagoon at Port Ahuriri. By the time that all the debris has been cleared, quite a considerable area of land will have been reclaimed.
– Staff Photographer

A LEADING HAWKE’S BAY INDUSTRY DISORGANISED BY THE EARTHQUAKE: ONE OF THE DAMAGED FRUIT STORES.

A portion of Messrs. C.H. Slater and Company’s store at Hastings, where the damage was estimated at £15,000. Fruit boxes ready for packing fruit from the orchards of the district can be seen strewn among the wreckage. 
– Staff Photographer

FAMOUS GANNET ROOKERY AT CAPE KIDNAPPERS, HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT, DAMAGED BY THE EARTHQUAKE.

Views of the well-known rookery which is situated to the south-east of Napier, on the southern extremity of Hawke’s Bay. Although many slips occurred, structural damage was not severe. The gannets are still in possession.

AFTERMATH OF THE RECENT DISASTROUS EARTHQUAKE IN THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT, NORTH ISLAND.


February 25, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   37

TYPICAL OF MANY SECTIONS OF HAWKE’S BAY MAIN HIGHWAYS WHICH WERE BLOCKED TO TRAFFIC BY EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE.

Subsidences on each side of a bridge on the Hastings to Napier main road. By speedy organisation this section was soon made passable for motor traffic. 
– P.F. Nash

BEGINNING AGAIN

Occupants of a Hastings building from which one wall was taken down by the earthquake. They are seen making a start to do their part in the great task of restoring order from chaos.

THE NAVY’S SPLENDID WORK.

H.M.S. Diomedes photographed from the stern of H.M.S. Dunedin on the way to Napier. The cruisers left Auckland a few hours after the earthquake occurred, reaching Napier the following morning.  
– Staff Photographer.

FURTHER PICTURES BEARING ON THE EARTHQUAKE WHICH WROUGHT SUCH HAVOC IN THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT EARLY THIS MONTH.


38   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 25, 1931.  

HUGE BOULDERS LOOSENED BY THE EARTHQUAKES, CRASH DOWN FROM HILLSIDES IN THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT.

Large stones strewn beside and over the road at Bayview, between Napier and Wairoa. Many motorists and residents had terrifying experiences while endeavouring to avoid falling boulders during the earthquake. 
– Staff Photographer

WELL-KNOWN BUILDING ON THE MARINE PARADE AT NAPIER NOW LEANING AT A PRECARIOUS ANGLE.

A view looking along Marine Parade toward the Bluff after the second serious shake on Friday, February 13, when further slips occurred on the Bluff. The large white building is Dr. Moore’s hospital, which has taken a serious backward tilt. 
– Staff Photographer

NOW STRANDED AT HIGH TIDE: THE HARBOUR-BED AT NAPIER’S PORT LIFTED CONSIDERABLY BY THE EARTHQUAKE.

Small craft at their moorings near the Port Ahuriri Boating Club. The boats were always afloat at high tide prior to the earthquake on February 3. 
– Staff Photographer

EFFECTS OF THE EARTHQUAKE ON ROAD AND WATERFRONT AT NAPIER.


February 25, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   39

“CARRYING ON” IN THE EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN AREA: SPLENDID COURAGE PREVAILS AMONG WILLING HELPERS AND HOMELESS REFUGEES.

1.  “Specials” at Hastings who did excellent work by assisting the uniformed police to maintain law and order.
2.  Girl employees of the National Tobacco Company, Port Ahuriri, cheerfully returning to work despite the wrecked condition of the building.
3.  An open-air kitchen.
4.  One of the many depots for the distribution of free food to those in need.
5.  A resident of Clive, between Napier and Hastings, forced to perform his ablutions in the open.
6.  A little Napier girl safe with her pet.
7.  Cooking under difficulties in a Napier backyard.
8.  A member of the St. John Ambulance Brigade with a lost child.
9.  Special police posted in the centre of the road to prevent motor-cars entering Hastings without official authority.
10.  Refugee children playing at a Napier camp.  
– Staff Photographer


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 25, 1931.  

WILLING HELPERS WHO RENDERED A GREAT SERVICE TO THE STRICKEN COMMUNITY OF THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL.

A group of voluntary Red Cross workers at Napier who toiled ceaselessly to help the injured and homeless refugees. 
– Staff Photographer

IN A HAWKE’S BAY TOWN WHERE CONSIDERABLE LOSS OF LIFE AND PROPERTY WAS CAUSED BY THE EARTHQUAKE.

Looking along the main street of Wairoa, a township situated on the coast about 80 miles north of Napier. This picture strikingly illustrates how the earth tremors caused sections of buildings to collapse. 
– Palmer.

THE CENTRE OF ONE OF THE GRIM EARTHQUAKE TRAGEDIES AT WAIROA.

Hauling away the debris in an attempt to extricate a Chinese fruiterer who was engulfed by the falling front portion of his shop.
– Palmer.

RED CROSS WORKERS IN THE EARTHQUAKE AREA AND PICTURES SECURED IN WAIROA SHORTLY AFTER THE TERRIBLE SHOCKS.


42   February 25, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 25, 1931.   43

EARTHQUAKE HAVOC IN THE BACK COUNTRY OF THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT: PHOTOGRAPHS ILLUSTRATING THE TREMENDOUS DAMAGE TO ROADS, RAILWAYS AND TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS.

The first trip since the earthquake from Napier to Wairoa, by way of the main highway, was accomplished by the AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS motor-car last Thursday. Stoppages and detours were frequent owing to slips and large boulders blocking the road, while fissures and subsidence in several places made passage extremely difficult.

1.  At Bradford’s Bridge, near Eskdale, where traffic was diverted over the railway bridge on the right owing to the traffic bridge being damaged.
2.  A section of a heavy concrete bridge on the Napier-Taupo Road torn apart by the earthquake.
3.  A portion of the severely twisted railway line at Westshore, Napier.
4.  The road through the Matahoura Gorge practically obliterated by two huge slips. This photograph was taken from the railway viaduct (300 feet up), which was the only passage for the motor-car.
5.  Huge fissures on the Napier to Taupo Road. 
– Staff Photographer


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 25, 1931.  

THE DEVASTATED MAIN THOROUGHFARE OF HASTINGS AS SEEN BY THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL DURING THE VICE-REGAL TOUR OF THE STRICKEN AREA.

Lord Bledisloe is a keen photographer and this picture is one of His Excellency’s own snapshots. Heretaunga Street is seen looking east from the railway line.
– By Courtesy of His Excellency the Governor-General.

THE REMAINS OF NAPIER’S ANGLICAN CATHEDRAL.

St. John’s Pro-Cathedral was wrecked by the earthquake and fire completed the destruction. Several persons attending divine service lost their lives. This is another picture taken by His Excellency the Governor-General.

NEW CHURCH REDUCED TO RUINS.

All that remains of St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church at Napier. Construction work on this new church was almost complete at the time of the earthquake visitation. 
– Staff Photographer

DESTRUCTION AND RUIN AMONG THE VALUABLE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS AT THE PORT OF NAPIER.

The smouldering and tangled mass of wreckage which was all that remained of several buildings at Port Ahuriri after the earthquake and fires had wrought tremendous havoc.  
– Staff Photographer

PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN BY THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL IN THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE AREA.


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   March 4, 1931.  

THE SHATTERED REMAINS OF A NAPIER RESIDENCE.

A portion of the splintered furniture and wood from a house which was smashed by the slips on Bluff Hill when the earthquake occurred. 
– P.F. Nash

WILLING HELPERS IN THE EARTHQUAKE AREA.

One of the free meal depots where meals could be obtained at all hours. Standing in the centre at the back is Mr. Cyril Brownlie, the well-known All Black footballer.  
– J.F. Louden.

OLD MAN’S MIRACULOUS ESCAPE FROM DEATH.

Mr. R. Church. Aged 73 years, of Tongoio [Tangoio], Hawke’s Bay, who had a miraculous escape when a half-ton boulder from the adjoining hillside crashed through the wall of his whare and over the bed which he had just vacated. 
– Staff Photographer

ROAD BLOCKAGE CAUSED BY EARTHQUAKE.

Workmen clearing away a huge boulder which blocked the road at the Devil’s Elbow, on the main highway between Napier and Wairoa.
– Staff Photographer

TOILED CEASELESSLY AMONG EARTHQUAKE VICTIMS.

Dr. and Mrs. Fitzgerald, who have remained on the scene right through the period of the Hawke’s Bay earthquake. 
– Post.

THE RUINED CENTRE OF HASTINGS VIEWED FROM THE AIR.

Looking down on the devastated business area of Hastings, where there was considerable loss of life and property. This photograph was taken shortly after the earthquake and fire had wrought such havoc. 
– United Press.

IN THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE ZONE DURING AND AFTER THE RECENT DISASTER.


March 4, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   41

MOUTH OF RIVER RAISED.

The river-bed at the mouth of the Waihua River, which was lifted as a result of the earthquake. The river now flows through a crack in the out-thrust of rock on the right. 
– Staff Photographer

A PHENOMENON OF THE EARTHQUAKE.

Examining fine sand deposit around an “earthquake crater” at Petane, near Napier. Several of these craters appeared in paddocks near the coast in the earthquake area. They are caused by the movement of underlying strata, water and sand being erupted to a height of over 15 feet. 
– Staff Photographer

AN AMAZING EFFECT OF THE EARTHQUAKE: SECTION OF HAWKE’S BAY MAIN HIGHWAY SHIFTED BODILY TO ONE SIDE.

A scene near Wairoa, on the main road to Napier, where the highway for several chains has subsided toward the Wairoa River, alongside. The subsidence occurred from the broken-off section of the road seen on the left. This section of the road did not move. The road on the right is the shifted portion. Note the surface growth and telephone poles still in position. 
– Staff Photographer

UPHEAVAL OF THE SEA-BED CAUSED BY THE EARTHQUAKE AT GISBORNE, POVERTY BAY, ON THE COAST, NORTH OF NAPIER.

Visitors looking at blowholes among the rocks at Sponge Bay on a portion of the sea-bed which was raised above the surface of the ocean when the earthquake occurred. 
– Staff Photographer

FURTHER REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPH FROM THE HW EARTHQUAKE AREA, NORTH ISLAND OF NEW ZEALAND.


March 4, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   March 4, 1931.   42 – 43

PHOTOGRAPHS FROM THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE REGION DEPICTING THE RESTORATION OF COMMUNICATIONS AND THE PROGRESS IN DEMOLITION WORK PREPARATORY TO THE REBUILDING OF THE RUINED BUSINESS CENTRES.

1.  A scene in the main street of Hastings after a sharp earthquake.
2.  [….]


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   March 4, 1931.  

[not earthquake]

PRELIMINARY RECONSTRUCTION WORK IN THE EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: THE TEMPORARY BANK BUILDING AT NAPIER.

The Associated Bank’s premises at the corner of Dickens and Munroe Street, where the offices of several banks are situated pending the construction of new buildings to replace the original structures destroyed by the earthquakes and fires.  
– Goodwell and Rice.


46   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   March 4, 1931.  

WITH THE TERROR OF THE EARTHQUAKES NOW A MEMORY: HOME RESTORATION AND OTHER TOPICS FROM THE STRICKEN AREA.

1.  Off to school once more: Boys belonging to the Central School at Hastings returning to their classes.
2.  Infants in an open-air class at Hastings.owns
3.  Technical College masters and a pupil salvaging books at the door of the school in Napier.
4.  A haulage truck demolishing a building in Hastings Street, Napier.
5.  Repairing the Port Ahuriri railway line around the inner harbour.
6.  The residential area of Napier, showing Nelson Park in the middle distance on the left. Cape Kidnappers can be seen in the distance on the right. Note the number of houses without chimneys. 
– Staff Photographer


March 4, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   47

MAKING ORDER OUT OF THE CHAOS IN THE RUINED BUSINESS CENTRE OF THE CHIEF TOWNSHIP OF HAWKE’S BAY.

A photograph, showing Hastings Street, the main thoroughfare of Napier, after the debris from fallen buildings had been cleared from the centre of the road. 
– Staff Photographer

SOME OF THE MANY WILLING HELPERS IN THE STRICKEN HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE AREA.

A group at an open-air kitchen where free meals were provided for refugees at Clive, between Napier and Hastings.  
– Staff Photographer

THE WELL-KNOWN MARINE PARADE AT NAPIER, PHOTOGRAPHED LAST WEEK.

A view from near the Bluff, showing Dr. Moore’s Hospital on the right. This picture was taken on Sunday afternoon, at a time when, before the earthquake, the parade was always thronged with promenading sightseers and residents. 
– Staff Photographer

AFTERMATH OF THE EARTHQUAKE IN NAPIER TOWNSHIP AND DISTRICT.


48   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   March 4, 1931.  

WHARF NOW STANDING ON DRY LAND: A CURIOUS EFFECT OF THE RAISING OF THE SEA-BED IN NAPIER HARBOUR.

The well-known wharf at the residence of Mr. J. Vigor Brown, Mayor of Napier, at Westshore. Before the earthquake the sea was rarely below a level of about four feet up the wharf piles and at high tide the tyres on the wharf were often submerged. This photograph, taken after the earthquake, shows, on the right, the present highest level of the sea. 
– Staff Photographer

ANOTHER AMAZING RESULT OF THE HAWKE’S BAY UPHEAVAL: TREMENDOUS PRESSURE RESULTS IN A HUGE OUT-THRUST ON THE COAST.

Taken about two miles south of the Mohaka River, this photograph shows how the earth movements forced up both the beach and sea-bed to a height of approximately 70ft., as indicated by the dotted line. Sand and shingle from what was formerly the beach at the base of the high cliffs now surmount this bank. It is considered that this huge mass was thrust out from below the cliff as a result of the rotating movement of the earth during the shake. 
– Staff Photographer

MAIN HIGHWAY BETWEEN NAPIER AND WAIROA COMPLETELY BLOCKED BY SLIPS WHICH FELL DURING THE EARTHQUAKE.

A scene in the Matahoura Gorge, showing rocks and debris shaken down from the cliff face alongside the road. For some time the only passage for traffic was by way of the railway viaduct, which crosses the gorge at a height of about 300 feet. 
– Staff Photographer

EFFECTS OF THE EARTH MOVEMENTS CAUSED BY THE RECENT EARTHQUAKES IN THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT.


March 11, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   49

BEAUTIFUL AND PROGRESSIVE “NAPIER BY THE SEA” AS IT APPEARED BEFORE THE MAIN BUSINESS CENTRE OF THE TOWN WAS LAID IN RUINS BY THE EARTHQUAKE.

Taken from the slopes of Bluff Hill, this photograph shows the beach and Marine Parade on the extreme left, with the main thoroughfare of Hastings Street running parallel to the Parade, one block of buildings further inland. The Public Trust Office with its many pillars is easily located in the centre of the picture, while the Anglican pro-Cathedral appears a little to the left and slightly [….] in the foreground.

THE SAME VIEW TAKEN AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE, SHOWING HOW THE COMMERCIAL AREA WAS WRECKED BY TERRIBLE EARTHQUAKES WHICH WERE FOLLOWED BY DESTRUCTIVE FIRES.

The Public Trust Office in the centre of the picture is the only large structure which appears to have withstood the heavy shakes, judging by this photograph. Only a pile of ashes and debris remained to mark the site of the Anglican pro-Cathedral.  
– T.W. Collins.

EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE TO THE BUSINESS CENTRE OF THE CHIEF TOWN OF HAWKE’S BAY ILLUSTRATED BY AN EXTREMELY INTERESTING COMPARISON: NAPIER BEFORE AND AFTER THE DISASTER.


March 18, 1931.     THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   41

EARTHQUAKE WRECKAGE WHICH HAS YET TO BE CLEARED AWAY: THE REMAINS OF THE PARK ISLAND OLD MEN’S HOME, NAPIER.

This institution suffered as severely as any other in the stricken district. Several men were killed when the first shock occurred, and many others were injured.  
– A. Lavery.

[not earthquake]


REMARKABLE PROGRESS MADE BY RESTORING THE EARTHQUAKE-SHATTERED TOWN OF HASTINGS, HAWKE’S BAY: A PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN FROM AN AEROPLANE LAST WEEK.

This aerial map of Hastings showing the […] business centre in the foreground, and […] in the background, [….] which has already been achieved although much yet remains to be done in the way of rebuilding the large business […]. From the left-hand corner in that order are Nelson St., King St., Market St., and the railway line, while from the right-hand corner are Southampton St., Eastbourne St., Heretaunga St., and Queen St.  
– Air Survey and Transport Company.

THE CAMERA AS RECORDER ON LAND AND SEA AND IN THE AIR: A VARIETY OF INTERESTING TOPICS OF THE WEEK FROM THREE NORTH ISLAND CENTRE[S]


46   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   April 1, 1931.  

ONE OF THE MAIN STREETS OF NAPIER IN THE PROCESS OF BEING CLEANED UP FOR RECONSTRUCTION PURPOSES.

A view looking along Tennyson Street toward Marine Parade, taken from the top of the Central Fire Station. The Public Trust Office appears on the right of the street near the centre of the picture.

CARRYING OUT REPAIRS OF THE WRECKED BREASTWORK AND WHARF AT THE INNER HARBOUR, PORT AHURIRI.

A photograph taken last week after most of the surface damage had been cleared away. The Harbour Board dredge can be seen at work on the extreme right. H.M.S. Veronica was berthed at the near end of the wharf at the time of the terrible earthquakes.

“BUSINESS AS USUAL” IN THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: NAPIER’S TEMPORARY COMMERCIAL CENTRE IN CLIVE SQUARE.

Also taken from the top of the Central Fire Station, this photograph shows the new premises of the Provincial Hotel on the left, the Community Banks building in the centre (in front of St. Patrick’s Cathedral), and the temporary shop buildings in Clive and Memorial Square on the right. 
– Staff Photographer

“BACK TO NAPIER”: LIFE AND SCENES IN THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE AREA RECORDED BY THE CAMERA LAST WEEK.


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   April 8, 1931.  

GUARDING AGAINST FLOODS IN THE EARTHQUAKE-DAMAGED HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: BUILDING A STOP-BANK AT NAPIER SOUTH.

Horse-drawn scoops engaged in building a stop-bank alongside the Tutaekuri River. During the earth movements at the beginning of February the river mouth was raised several feet and it was found necessary to heighten and strengthen the existing stop-banks to guard against floods over the low-lying lands in the vicinity of Napier. The work is now complete and should prevent any floods over populated areas. 
– Staff Photographer

HAZARDOUS SALVAGE WORK AMONG THE RUINS OF A WELL-KNOWN HOSPITAL WHICH IS TO BE DEMOLISHED.

Workmen searching for equipment and articles of value in the ruins of Dr. Moore’s Hospital on Marine Parade. During the earthquakes the building titled sharply backwards and is now leaning at a precarious angle. It was announced by the authorities last week that the building is to be pulled down.

A HAWKE’S BAY INDUSTRY DISORGANISED BY THE EARTHQUAKE: BRICKS AND DEBRIS FROM THE RUINED PAKIPAKI FREEZING WORKS.

The whole main building at the works was destroyed. In preparation for rebuilding the debris has been cleared away and is dumped in the adjoining paddock as shown in this picture. The works will be out of commission until next season, when the rebuilding operations are expected to be completed.  
– Staff Photographer

FURTHER INTERESTING PICTURES SHOWING ACTIVITIES IN THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE AREA.


50   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   April 8, 1931.  

EARTHQUAKE-SHATTERED NAPIER TO BE REBUILT: PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN IN THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL LAST WEEK.

Top: A view showing the cleared site of the well-known Masonic Hotel. In the centre is the temporary hotel building erected on the old site.

Lower left: A workman photographed among the ruins of Dr. Moore’s Hospital, which is to be demolished.

Right: Looking along the street past the temporary shopping centre in Memorial and Clive Squares from inside the Central Fire Station in Tennyson Street. 
– Staff Photographer


April 15, 1931.   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   April 15, 1931.  42 – 43

TWO MONTHS AFTER THE MOST DISASTROUS EARTHQUAKE IN NEW ZEALAND’S HISTORY: AN INTERESTING CAMERA RECORD OF A TOUR THROUGH THE STRICKEN HAWKE’S BAY AREA LAST WEEK.

[….]


FRESH FISH IN KEEN DEMAND AT EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN NAPIER.

Several trawlers are engaged in fishing each day in Hawke Bay, returning to Port Ahuriri in the late afternoon. The upper picture shows one of the trawlers entering the port at sunset, while the fish is being unloaded in the lower photograph. 
– Staff Photographer


THE RUINED CENTRE OF NAPIER NINE WEEKS AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE DISASTER.

An aerial view of the centre of the Hawke’s Bay capital, showing the razed business area and in the bottom right-hand corner the temporary shopping centre in Clive Square. From the left the main streets are Tennyson Street, with the Public Trust Office standing out prominently; Emerson Street and Dickens Street, which is now the main business thoroughfare of the town. 
– Air Survey and Transport Company.


May 27, 1931.   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   39

ANZAC DAY IN EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN HAWKE’S BAY.

A general view of the crowd attending the Anzac Day service in Napier. The ceremony was held at the Cenotaph in Memorial Square, which is now surrounded by temporary shops built pending the reconstruction of the business area ruined by the earthquakes in February. A corner of the temporary building can be seen on the right and behind it is a portion of Clive Square, which is also utilised as a shopping area.  
– T.A. Borton.


AFTERMATH OF HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKES: HOMESTEAD ENTIRELY SUBMERGED IN A NEW LAKE FORMED WHEN LANDSLIDES BLOCKED THE MOHAKA RIVER.

Views of the lake formed at Ngatapa by rocky faces of the Te Hoe Gorge falling in during the earthquakes last February. The lake is situated a few miles below the Mohaka Bridge, on the main road between Napier and Taupo. The dam is estimated to be 250 feet high and is so solid that the water is now flowing over it. There appears to be no danger of the obstruction giving way and flooding the surrounding country. In the picture on the right can be seen the tops of trees projecting from the water. They mark the location of the station homestead which had to be abandoned. On the left is shown the improvised ferry and ropeway used to convey the settler’s effects across the river to a safe location.   – Courtesy Mr. J. Carter.


RECONSTRUCTING STRICKEN NAPIER: A VIEW OF THE MAIN BUSINESS CENTRE NEARLY FOUR MONTHS AFTER THE DISASTROUS HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKES.

An aerial view of the Hawke’s Bay capital, showing the progress made in clearing away the buildings destroyed by the earthquakes at the beginning of February. In the foreground can be seen the roofs of the temporary shopping areas in Clive and Memorial Squares. From left the streets shown are Tennyson Street, Emerson Street, and Dickens Street, which is now the town’s main thoroughfare. The original main street, Hastings Street, is at the back, parallel with Marine Parade.
– Air Survey and Transport Company.


SHIPPING ACTIVITIES AT EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN NAPIER: A SCENE LAST WEEK AT THE HAWKE’S BAY PORT.

A view of the waterfront at Port Ahuriri, Napier, showing the newly-erected port building in the centre and the repaired breastwork at which shipping is now berthed. It was in this vicinity that H.M.S. Veronica was berthed at the time of the earthquakes.
– Staff Photographer


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   June 10, 1931.  

GETTING BACK TO NORMAL AFTER DISASTROUS EARTHQUAKES AND FIRES: A SCENE LAST WEEK IN THE NEW BUSINESS AREA OF NAPIER.

Looking from Dickens Street, Napier, towards the Central Fire Station, past the new shopping centre in Clive and Memorial Squares, a portion of which is shown on the left. Napier is rapidly regaining the reputation it held before the earthquakes on February 3, when it was known as one of the busiest towns in the Dominion.  
– P.C. Sorrell.

THE REHABILITATION OF EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN NAPIER: WRECKED AREA UNDER PROCESS OF RECONSTRUCTION.

A section of the former central business area of Napier viewed from Colenso Hill. In the foreground is the temporary St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church, while in the lower right-hand corner can be seen a portion of the partially-constructed new church which was gutted by fire. The Public Trust Office (right) stands out prominently on the corner of Tennyson and Dalton Streets, and at the back further down Dalton Street is the E. and D. building and Dalgety’s, both of which withstood the earthquakes.

A FINE SPIRIT SHOWN IN THE RESTORATION OF EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN NAPIER, THE CAPITAL OF HAWKE’S BAY PROVINCE, NORTH ISLAND.


June 10, 1931.   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   41

IN NAPIER AND HASTINGS FOUR MONTHS AFTER THE DISASTROUS EARTHQUAKES WHICH WROUGHT SUCH HAVOC.

1.  A panoramic view of Napier from a floodlit tower at the railway station. Bluff Hill appears on the left and at its base is the town’s former main business area destroyed by earthquakes followed by fire on February 3. Dickens Street is in the centre, while on the left of the street can be seen the temporary shopping centres in Clive and Memorial Squares.

2.  A Hastings business man dictating to his stenographer in the open air.

3.  Constructing the bell-tower at the new Nelson Park School.

4.  Looking from the interior of a ruined building along Heretaunga Street, the main street of Hastings. On the right is Roach’s temporary shop. Several girl assistants lost their lives when the original building collapsed.

5.  At a shop in the Clive Square temporary centre, Napier.

6.  Demolishing an upper story wall of the Diocesan Offices at Napier. The ground floor, which is undamaged, is to be roofed to provide office accommodation.

7.  With a damaged typewriter found among the ruins.

8.  A letterbox still in use although charred by the fire and dented by falling debris.

9.  A pretty glimpse of one of the walks at the shopping centre in Clive Square, Napier.

10.  Ripe grapes at a Napier fruit stall. Hawke’s Bay is one of the Dominion’s largest fruit producing districts.

11.  Another view of Heretaunga Street, Hastings.

12.  Squaring old bricks for use in rebuilding chimneys.

13.  Off to school at Taradale, a few miles from Napier. 
– Staff Photographer


RECORD SALE OF SHEEP IN THE EARTHQUAKE AREA: IMPROVED PRICES REALISED AT A HASTINGS SALE.

Views of the saleyards at Stortford Lodge, Hastings, Hawke’s Bay, when approximately 10,000 sheep were in the pens. The sale included a record offering of 4000 fat sheep, which met with spirited competition, a total clearance being effected, with improved prices ruling in most cases.  
– Staff Photographer


EXCELLENT PROGRESS BEING MADE IN CLEARING AWAY SLIPS FROM THE FACE OF BLUFF HILL AT NAPIER.

Thousands of tons of earth were shaken down from the face of Bluff Hill during the earthquakes on February 3 and succeeding days. The waterfront and railway line to the Breakwater and Port Ahuriri were completely obliterated. These photographs show how the debris is being rapidly cleared away. 
– Staff Photographer


36   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   July 1, 1931.

PLACES OF WORSHIP AMONGST THE FIRST BUILDINGS RECONSTRUCTED IN THE EARTHQUAKE AREA: MORNING SERVICE AT THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN NAPIER.

A section of the congregation photographed outside St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church in Tennyson Street, prior to the service. The church was a temporary building, constructed pending the rebuilding of the new church which was nearly completed when it was practically destroyed by the earthquakes on February 3.

WITH THE RUINS OF THEIR FORMER CHURCH IN THE BACKGROUND.

Members of the congregation of St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church, Napier, leaving the temporary building after a service.

ON SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

Marine Parade, Napier, scene of such destruction and hardship several months ago, still maintains its popularity as a favourite Sunday walk.

SACRED GROUND WHERE MANY OF THE VICTIMS OF THE TERRIBLE DISASTER WERE LAID IN THEIR LAST RESTING PLACE AT NAPIER, HAWKE’S BAY.

A scene at the common grave in Park island Cemetery, Napier, where fifty-four victims of the disaster were buried in the first few days after the earthquake. Every Sunday hundreds of Napier residents and visitors from other districts visit the cemetery. 
– Staff Photographer

CALM AFTER TRAGIC STORM: SCENES IN EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN NAPIER ON A RECENT SUNDAY.


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   September 9, 1931.

GAY SCENES IN NAPIER’S MAIN BUSINESS THOROUGHFARE DURING THE OPENING OF “SHOPPING WEEK” ON August 31.

Releasing balloons from among the crowd which thronged Dickens Street on Monday of last week, when the carnival ‘shopping week” was commenced. The carnival is another milestone in the rehabilitation of the town in which such havoc was wrought by earthquakes and fires at the beginning of February. The population is now back to normal and great progress is being made in reconstructing the ruined business centre. 
– P.C. Sorrell.

NAPIER SEVEN MONTHS AFTER THE DISASTROUS EARTHQUAKES AND FIRES WHICH CAUSED SUCH RUIN AND LOSS OF LIFE.

1.  A general view of the town from Colenso Hill. The temporary shopping centres in Clive and Memorial Squares appear to the right of the centre of the photograph. To the left (in foreground) is a portion of the former business area which was almost completely destroyed.

2.  Shoppers at Clive Square.

3.  Marine parade, viewed from near the base of Bluff Hill. The shell of Dr. Moore’s Hospital, formerly one of Napier’s outstanding buildings, can be seen along the street.

4.  Port Ahuriri from the top of Hospital Hill. On the left is the raised bed of the Inner Harbour, which was below sea-level before the earthquake.  
– J. Aston.

ANNUAL ‘SHOPPING WEEK’ HELD IN THE EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL.


THE NEW MAIN THOROUGHFARE OF NAPIER.

A recent view of Dickens Street, which has replaced Hastings Street as the main street in the HAWKE’S BAY capital. Practically all the business premises in Hastings Street were destroyed by the earthquakes and fires last February. On the left of the picture is the newly-completed Gaiety Theatre.
– A.B. Hurst.


BACK TO NORMAL IN THE EARTHQUAKE AREA: THE HAWKE’S BAY SPRING SHOW HELD NEAR HASTINGS.

A general view of the parade of pedigree cattle at the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Association’s Spring Show at Tomoana, Hastings. The attendance was over 20,000 and the number of exhibits a record. 
– J.H. Daroux.


THE REBUILD, FROM 1932 TO 1940

February 3, 1932.   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   February 3, 1932.   38 – 39


TWELVE MONTHS AFTER THE GREATEST DISASTER IN NEW ZEALAND’S HISTORY: SCENES OF REMARKABLE RECONSTRUCTION IN THE HAWKE’S BAY AREA DEVASTATED BY EARTHQUAKES ON FEBRUARY 3, 1931.

[….]


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   April 13, 1932.

EARTHQUAKE-RESISTING BUILDINGS BEING ERECTED IN THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL.

This photograph of the preliminary steel work erected on the new Central Hotel site shows the exceptionally solid construction methods which are typical of all the commercial buildings now being erected in Napier. It is believed that the buildings will be so strongly built that they will turn over on their sides without breaking apart.  
– A.B. Hurst.


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   April 13, 1932.

REBUILDING THE EARTHQUAKE-SHATTERED HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: A PRESENT-DAY SCENE IN THE CENTRE OF NAPIER.

A view taken last week overlooking the site of a ruined building in Emerson Street, Napier. All round can be seen evidence of the reconstruction which is proceeding apace in the town. Only a few sights like the above are left to recall the earthquakes which caused such loss of life and property on February 3, last year. 
– Staff Photographer


July 27, 1932   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   47

REHABILITATION IN THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE AREA: RAPID PROGRESS BEING MADE IN THE RE-ERECTION OF NAPIER’S LEADING HOTEL.

A general view showing the progress of the construction of the new Masonic Hotel in Napier. The old hotel was destroyed by the disastrous earthquakes and fires of February last year. The new two-storeyed hotel is being erected in concrete on the site of the old building, fronting Marine Parade. It is to cost over £40,000 and will provide accommodation for nearly 120 guests when completed in December.  
– P.C. Sorrell.


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   August 3, 1932

FURTHER EVIDENCE OF THE REHABILITATION OF NAPIER: THE RECONSTRUCTED NURSES’ HOME, SCENE OF ONE OF THE WORST TRAGEDIES OF THE EARTHQUAKES

The new nurses’ home at the Napier Hospital which is now in use. The building has accommodation for 56 nurses. It replaces the former nurses’ home, a three-storeyed structure, which was destroyed with a terrible loss of life by the earthquakes of February. 1931.

– P.C. Sorrell.


September 7, 1932   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   49

NAPIER’S SPLENDID MARINE PARADE RESTORED AND IMPROVED

The foreshore at the Hawke’s Bay capital as it appears today. The photograph is taken from the Municipal Swimming Baths and gives some idea of the successful efforts being made to restore Napier to its former attractive appearance. Prior to the disastrous earthquakes last year the Hawke’s Bay capital was known as one of New Zealand’s finest holiday towns. During the anxious days which followed the earthquakes many homeless people camped on the beach, where children can be seen playing. 
– P.C. Sorrell.


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   October 19, 1932

 A NEW AND FINER CITY RISING FROM THE RUINS OF EARTHQUAKE-STRICKEN NAPIER, HAWKE’S BAY

This photograph of Dalton Street, the first reconstructed street in the heart of Napier to be completed, strikingly illustrates the remarkable progress made in the rehabilitation of the ruined business centre of the town. On the left of the street are the E. and D. and Dalgety’s buildings, two of the few large business premises which escaped complete destruction by the severe earthquakes and fire at the beginning of February last year.  
– A.B. Hurst

THE RETURN OF WARM WEATHER TO THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: SWIMMERS AND SUNBATHERS ENJOY THE SUNSHINE AT NAPIER

Brilliant sunshine at the beginning of the month encouraged many Napier bathers to commence the new swimming season. The picture on the left was taken at the public swimming baths on Marine Parade, while that on the right shows the Breakwater beach with H.M.S. Dunedin berthed at the wharf.

WHERE EVERY BUILDING WAS DESTROYED IN LAST YEAR’S EARTHQUAKE DISASTER: RECONSTRUCTION PROCEEDING APACE IN EMERSON STREET, NAPIER

This view of Emerson Street was taken from its junction with Dickens Street. Every building in the street was razed by earthquake and fire last year. The street has been widened by ten feet in accordance with the planning of new Napier.

A WONDERFUL RECOVERY FROM DISASTER: PRESENT DAY SCENES IN REHABILITATED NAPIER, HAWKE’S BAY, NORTH ISLAND


46   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   November 2, 1932

RECONSTRUCTION OF THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL PROCEEDS APACE

A new photograph of Emerson Street, Napier, one of the principal business thoroughfares, showing the good progress made in reconstruction work. All the business premises in the street were destroyed by the earthquakes early last year.  
– P.C. Sorrell


48   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   November 2, 1932

REHABILITATION IN HAWKE’S BAY: A WELL-KNOWN NAPIER HOTEL BEING REPLACED

The new Masonic Hotel, an earthquake-proof building at the corner of Tennyson and Hastings Streets, which is expected to be finished in about a month’s time. The building, which will replace the Masonic Hotel that was totally destroyed by the earthquake in February last year, will have accommodation for 120 guests and the total cost will exceed £40,000.
– P.C. Sorrell


44   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   November 23, 1932

FURTHER RECONSTRUCTION IN THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: A BUSY CORNER IN THE FORMER RUINED BUSINESS CENTRE OF NAPIER

Looking along Dalton Street from its intersection with Tennyson Street. In the centre is the new Central Hotel building, which has just been completed, on the corner of Emerson Street. The foreground of the picture shows how Dalton Street has been widened in accordance with the town-planning of Napier’s business centre. The Public Trust Office, on the right, was one of the few large businesses in Napier to escape destruction of last year’s earthquakes.


46   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   January 18, 1933

A NEWER AND FINER NAPIER: UP-TO-DATE VIEWS OF THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL, WHERE A GREAT CARNIVAL COMMENCES THIS WEEK

Present-day scenes in the business centre of Napier, the Hawke’s Bay capital, where such extensive damage was done by the disastrous earthquakes and fires which occurred on February 3, 1931. The whole business centre of the town was razed to the ground. The extensive work of rehabilitation has been proceeding apace with the result that a newer and finer Napier has risen from the ruins. Commencing at the end of this week, a great carnival is to be held in Napier to mark the completion of the rehabilitation work. The celebrations will be attended by His Excellency, the Governor-General and Lady Bledisloe.

1.. Looking over the town from the slopes of Bluff Hill. Many of the business premises appearing in the photograph are new buildings erected since the earthquakes. Marine Parade is on the extreme left, while in the centre parallel to it is Hastings Street, the former main thoroughfare.

2.  In Hastings Street, showing new buildings.

3.  The new Masonic Hotel, fronting on to Marine Parade. The old Masonic Hotel was one of Napier’s best known buildings. It was completely destroyed in the disaster.

4.  Looking along Marine Parade, showing the playing facilities and beautification works which have been carried out on the waterfront.


31   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   January 25, 1933

NAPIER CELEBRATES ITS RESTORATION: GAY SCENES MARK THE OPENING OF CARNIVAL WEEK

A week of carnival to commemorate the restoration of Napier after the earthquakes was commenced last Saturday, the proceedings being opened by the Governor-General, Lord Bledisloe, who, with The Lady Bledisloe, arrived on the Friday evening to officiate at the celebrations. The town is full of visitors from many parts and the crowds in the streets on Saturday was the largest ever seen in Napier.

1.  The Mayor of Napier, Mr. J. Vigor Brown, salutes the carnival queen, Miss Sheila Williams, after the coronation ceremony.

2.  A happy snapshot of her Excellency, The Lady Bledisloe, talking with Sir Charles Kingsford Smith, who attended the Napier Aero Club’s pageant last Saturday.

3.  A general view of a section of the crowd at Mclean park, listening to the Governor-General’s address.

4.  A section of the grand procession passing up Emerson Street from Marine Parade. Some of the newly-constructed buildings appear in the picture.

5.  Another view of a section of the procession in Marine Parade. 
– Staff Photographer


January 25, 1933   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   35

THE CAPITAL OF HAWKE’S BAY PROVINCE IN GALA MOOD: FURTHER SCENES AT THE “NEW NAPIER” CARNIVAL

Scenes of gaiety marked the opening of carnival week at Napier last Saturday to celebrate the completion of the rehabilitation of the town after the destructive earthquakes of February, 1931. In the afternoon a number of passenger flights were made by Sir Charles Kingsford Smith at the Napier Aero Club’s ground, the flights being held in conjunction with an aero pageant conducted by the club.

TOP: A cricket test burlesque in the procession arriving at Mclean Park. This group caused much amusement among the spectators.

CENTRE: Sir Charles Kingsford Smith’s famous monoplane about to make a landing at the aerodrome after making a flight with Their Excellencies, the Governor-General and The Lady Bledisloe as passengers.

LOWER: The spectacular procession turning from Marine parade into Emerson Street on the way to Mclean Park. 
– Staff Photographer


January 25, 1933   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   43

THE BUILDING OF A NEW AND FINER NAPIER CELEBRATED BY A WEEK OF CARNIVAL IN THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: FURTHER PICTURES TAKEN LAST SATURDAY

The carnival was a fitting and joyous inauguration of the “new Napier”, which has risen from the ruins as a splendid modern town. In the scheme of reconstruction care has been taken to ensure harmony of design, and the result is a model town. The Governor-General and The Lady Bledisloe were present at the opening of the carnival and during this week His Excellency will officially open several public buildings.

1.  His Excellency, the Governor-General Lord Bledisloe (left), being welcomed to Napier by the Mayor, Mr. J. Vigor Brown.

2.  The Queen of the Carnival – Miss Sheila Williams, photographed after the coronation ceremony.

3.  Another fine display is the grand procession.

4.  A general view in Marine Parade (right) just prior to the commencement of the procession to McLean Park. The new Masonic Hotel appears on the left of the picture, while Bluff Hill is in the background.  
– Staff Photographer


February 1, 1933   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   41

QUEEN CARNIVAL IN THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: THE “NEW NAPIER” GALA TO CELEBRATE RECONSTRUCTION WORK

A view of the “court” after the coronation of Miss Sheila Williams as Queen of the Carnival. A record crowd assembled at McLean Park on the opening day of the carnival to witness this ceremony. Standing by Miss Williams is the Mayor of Napier, Mr. J. Vigor Brown, and on his left is Mr A.E. Renouf, the Master of Ceremonies. 
– A.B. Hurst


February 1, 1933   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   41

REHABILITATION OF THE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL

Looking over Clive and Memorial Squares, near the centre of Napier. The temporary community shopping centres erected on the squares after the main business centre of the town had been destroyed by the earthquakes of February, 1931, are shown being demolished. The reconstruction of the business area in permanent materials is now well advanced. 
– P.C. Sorrell


38   July 26, 1933   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   July 26, 1933   38

THE RECONSTRUCTED CAPITAL OF HAWKE’S BAY PROVINCE, NORTH ISLAND OF NEW ZEALAND: PRESENT-DAY SCENES IN NAPIER, WHERE THE COMMERCIAL AREA HAS BEEN REBUILT ON MODERN LINES

[….]


September 6, 1933   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   37

CARNIVAL TIME IN THE PROGRESSIVE HAWKE’S BAY CAPITAL: THE GALA SPIRIT ABROAD IN THE NEWLY-CONSTRUCTED BUSINESS AREA OF NAPIER

Scenes at Napier, Hawke’s Bay, at the opening on Monday last week of the town’s thirteenth annual Shopping Week. A crowd of over 10,000 gathered for the opening ceremony, which was marked by great enthusiasm.

Left: The Napier Citizens’ Band leading the procession along Emerson Street.

Right: Crowds of children awaiting the release of balloons.  

– P.C. Sorrell


WASTE SWAMP LAND NEAR NAPIER BROUGHT INTO SUCCESSFUL CULTIVATION AS A DIRECT OUTCOME OF THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE IN 1931

Under what is known as the Napier Village Settlement Scheme, 38 unemployed men and their families have been settled in 5-acre sections of land which, prior to the earthquake, was practically useless. Owing to the raising of the area by the giant upheaval, the natural drainage of the swamp was so improved that the area, comprising 250 acres, owned by the Napier Harbour Board, has been rendered suitable for cultivation purposes. Roading, fencing, house-building and other necessary improvements have been carried out by means of Government aid and further initial assistance in the matter of stocking has been granted to the successful applicants. This photograph shows some of the fenced sections and cottages fronting on one of the newly-formed roads.  
– Staff Photographer


CEREAL CROPS MAKE PROLIFIC GROWTH ON THE NATURALLY RECLAIMED SWAMP LAND IN THE VICINITY OF PORT AHURIRI, HAWKE’S BAY

Left: A settler and his family beside some tall maize growing on one of the 5-acre plots.

Right: Full-eared barley which made splendid growth in the virgin swamp land. 
– Staff Photographer


February, 28 1934   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS   37

 A NORTH ISLAND TOWN RE-ESTABLISHED FROM THE RUIN AND DEVASTATION CAUSED BY THE HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE DISASTER OF FEBRUARY 3, 1931

Looking across a portion of Napier’s main business centre toward Marine Parade on the sea front. These modern buildings have been heavily reinforced to resist any future earthquakes. Dalton Street appears in the centre of the photograph with the well-known Public Trust Office building on the Tennyson Street corner in the foreground. 
– Staff Photographer

BEAUTIFICATION OF THE NAPIER FORESHORE WHERE MANY REFUGEES SOUGHT SAFETY DURING THE 1931 EARTHQUAKE: MARINE PARADE AT IT APPEARS TODAY

Taken from the Napier baths last week, this photograph shows the progress that has already been made with the beautifying of the foreshore of the Hawke’s Bay capital. Owing to the general uplift of the land, the tide, which in time of storm used to come right up to the old wall on the right, has receded considerably, enabling a second wall to be built further down the beach. The intervening space has been filled with spoil and debris from the earthquake-shattered buildings and the surface has been laid out in attractive sand and lawn plots. A children’s playground has been erected on the plot nearest the camera. A scheme to extend those plots still further along the beach is under consideration. 
– Staff Photographer


NEW CHAPEL FOR MARIST FATHERS’ SEMINARY AT NAPIER

A corner of the picturesque grounds of St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Seminary of the Marist fathers at Green Meadows near Napier, Hawke’s Bay Province, North Island. The new chapel, erected to replace the building demolished during the severe earthquake in February, 1931, is on the left. 
– Staff Photographer


40   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   September 25, 1934

NAPIER’S HIGHLY-SUCCESSFUL MID-YEAR FESTIVITIES: BUSINESS STREETS THRONGED ON THE OPENING DAY OF ANNUAL SHOPPING WEEK

The opening day of the fourteenth annual shopping week at Napier saw the streets of the town more thickly crowded than on any similar occasion in the past, and brisk business was done by Napier retailers. These photographs show sections of the large crowd attending the opening celebrations, which included the liberation of balloons from a lorry.
– P.C. Sorrell


48   THE AUCKLAND WEEKLY NEWS.   October 3, 1934

EARTHQUAKE UPLIFT PROVIDES NEW LAND FOR SETTLEMENT: RECLAMATION BY DRAINAGE OF SEVERAL THOUSANDS OF ACRES IN HAWKE’S BAY

The Government has granted £50,000 for draining and developing the Ahuriri Lagoon, an area of 7000 acres, the reclamation of which has been made possible as a result of the uplifting effect of the Hawke’s Bay earthquake of 1931. Sea water covered practically the whole of this area prior to the earthquake. The former mooring ground of picnic and excursion launches is indicated by a cross in the right foreground. Port Ahuriri is located on the left of Bluff Hill, seen in the centre background. At present approximately 100 men are engaged in draining and generally preparing the land for farming purposes.  – Staff Photographer

PICTURES WHICH ILLUSTRATE THE EXTENSIVE NATURE OF THE DRAINAGE OPERATIONS BEING CARRIED OUT ON THE AHURIRI LAGOON, HAWKE’S BAY

LEFT: Forming one of the lateral drains which act as feeders to the main drain. This channel provides an outlet for the swampy grounds seen in the background.

RIGHT: The large main drain, which is 1½ miles long. It is five feet in depth, 14¾ feet wide at the top and five feet in width at the bottom. 
– Staff Photographer


BEAUTIFYING THE FORESHORE AT NAPIER: LARGE CONCRETE PERGOLAS CONSTRUCTED ON THE MARINE PARADE.

 


AN ATTRACTIVE FEATURE OF NAPIER, CHIEF TOWN OF HAWKE’S BAY: A FINE VIEW OF THE MARINE PARADE

The hot summer weather has made the Napier waterfront very popular, and apart from the excellent bathing, which is a natural attraction, the waterfront has been artistically treated to provide a very pleasant area, while various amenities add to its attractions. 
– P.C. Sorrell


EXTENSIVE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BREAKWATER HARBOUR AT NAPIER, CAPITAL AND CHIEF PORT OF THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT

The extension of the existing breakwater by 424ft., the construction of two new concrete wharves, and the levelling by excavation of an area of two acres at the approach to the harbour, are the main works in a large-scale development scheme at present being carried out at Napier. A tender of £62,722 has been accepted for the construction of the first of the two wharves. These will be capable of accommodating the largest liners trading to New Zealand at present.

UPPER: Excavation in progress for the formation of a new waterfront roadway. The abutments for the new wharves appear on the seafront, one on the extreme left and the other toward the right.

MIDDLE: The dredge Whakarire operating on the site of one of the new wharves.

LOWER: A general view of the port showing the present wharf and breakwater and the extensive nature of the work being carried out on the foreshore.

– P.C. Sorrell


HUGE FALL OF ROCK AND EARTH FORM A PROMONTORY OVERLOOKING THE NEW RAILWAY YARD AT THE NAPIER BREAKWATER, HAWKE’S BAY

Debris from a landslide estimated to contain between 20,000 and 30,000 tons of material overwhelmed the new road giving access to the breakwater harbour at Napier. It broke power lines for a distance of about 40 feet and buried a portion of the plant belonging to the contractor for the breakwater extension and about 50 yards of railway lines. The working of shipping had to be suspended until the slip was sufficiently cleared to enable the resumption of rail traffic. The whole slip will probably take about three weeks to clear away.
– P.C. Sorrell


IN THE PRINCIPAL CENTRE OF THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT: A NEW AND PICTURESQUE VIEW OF NAPIER

Memorial Square appears in the immediate foreground of the picture, with Clive Square just behind it.
– P.C. Sorrell


HAWKE’S BAY EARTHQUAKE DISASTER OF 1931 RECALLED: H.M.S. VERONICA’S BELL AND NAMEPLATE PRESENTED TO THE TOWN OF NAPIER

The presentation last week of the bell and nameplate of H.M.S. Veronica, the ship which was berthed at Port Ahuriri on the fateful third of February, 1931, was one of the most significant ceremonies which has ever taken place in Napier, for it recalled the great service carried out by the officers and men of the Veronica at the time when Napier and other Hawke’s Bay towns were shaken to their foundations by the worst earthquake in the history of the province. This photograph shows Captain O. Bevir, of H.M.S. Leith, unveiling the bell and nameplate, which have been permanently placed in a prominent position on the Marine Parade.
– P.C. Sorrell


A BEAUTY SPOT IN SUNNY NAPIER

A charming view in Clive Square, Napier, with St. Patrick’s Church in the background. The Square is exceptionally attractive at present, the roses and other flowers making a fine display of colour.
– P.C. Sorrell


HARBOUR IMPROVEMENTS COMMENCED AT NAPIER, HAWKE’S BAY

Work is at present being carried out in connection with the Harbour Board’s new £406,000 scheme for the improvement of the harbour at Napier. This picture shows activity on the foreshore, where new railway yards are planned, with the existing wharf and breakwater in the background. 
– Staff Photographer


NAPIER BREAKWATER CONSTRUCTION: A GENERAL VIEW OF THE HARBOUR WHERE IMPROVED BERTHING FACILITIES ARE TO BE PROVIDED

 


FINE MEMORIAL ARCH ON MARINE PARADE, NAPIER

 


PREPARING FOR PROFITABLE CULTIVATION AND SETTLEMENT LAND WHICH WAS ELEVATED ABOVE WATER LEVEL BY THE NAPIER EARTHQUAKE

 


TWO VIEWS ILLUSTRATING NAPIER’S [PROGRESS SINCE THE 1931 EARTHQUAKE]

 


WIDESPREAD INTEREST CENTRED ON AFFAIRS AT NAPIER HOSPITAL, WHERE A ROYAL COMMISSION HAS BEEN CARRYING OUT AN EXHAUSTIVE INQUIRY

 


HARBOUR WORKS: A CRANE LIFTING HEAVY CONCRETE BLOCKS

 


PROGRESS OF A LARGE-SCALE DEVELOPMENT SCHEME: A GENERAL VIEW OF THE BUSY SCENE OF OPERATIONS ON THE WATERFRONT, WHERE THE BREAKWATER IS BEING EXTENSIVELY IMPROVED, THE CONSTRUCTION OF TWO NEW WHARVES AND THE EXTENSION OF THE BREAKWATER ARE THE PRINCIPAL WORKS

 


THE NEW NAPIER: LOOKING ACROSS A [….] AREA TOWARD THE MARINE PARADE

 


THE RUINS OF THE OLD MUNICIPAL THEATRE, DESTROYED IN THE 1931 EARTHQUAKE […] PRELIMINARY WORK FOR ITS REBUILDING

 


CLEARING AWAY DEBRIS ON THE SITE OF THE NEW MUNICIPAL THEATRE

 


WATERFRONT GARDENS IN MODERN NAPIER: A VIEW OF THE ATTRACTIVE MARINE PARADE IN THE HAWKE’S BAY DISTRICT

 


MODERN NAPIER A CITY OF BEAUTY

 


A GENERAL VIEW OF NAPIER HARBOUR IMPROVEMENTS, SHOWING PROGRESS ON NO. 3 WHARF

 


HANDSOME ADDITION TO THE PUBLIC BUILDINGS OF NAPIER

 


NAPIER IN NOVEMBER

 


NEW ARCH ON NAPIER’S MARINE PARADE

 


LEADING CENTRES OF HAWKE’S BAY PROVINCE: NEW AERIAL VIEWS OF NAPIER AND HASTINGS

 


ATTRACTIONS OF THE NAPIER WATERFRONT

 


COMPLETION OF NEW NAPIER WHARF

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