East Coast Journal 4 September 1920

A.A.P.W. MOTOR TAXI SERVICE.   Dickens Street, Napier.   Tel. 1429.

East Coast
ILLUSTRATED
TOWN AND PROVINCIAL
Journal

VOL. 1. – No. 1.   (Registered for transmission by post as a newspaper.)   NAPIER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1920.   PRICE – 6d.

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The
East Coast Journal
Circulates in
NAPIER   PETANE    TE AUTE
GISBORNE   MOHAKA    OTANE
HASTINGS   FRASERTOWN    ONGA ONGA
DANNEVIRKE      NUHAKA   TIKOKINO
PORT AHURIRI   MORERE    PORANGAHAU
WAIPAWA   TARADALE   TAKAPAU
WAIPUKURAU   GREENMEADOWS    WIMBLEDON
WAIROA   PAKOWHAI   WEBER
RISSINGTON   PUKETAPU   TI TREE POINT
PUKETITIRI   HAVELOCK North   MAKARETU
PATOKA   FERNHILL   NORSEWOOD
WESTSHORE   MEEANEE    ORMONDVILLE
ESKDALE   CLIVE   WOODVILLE.

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September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.

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THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

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September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.

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Fruit Growing.

(By “Delicious.”)

The East Coast district closely follows Nelson in the production of fruit and produces the second largest quantity in the Dominion.  Not only is our land right, but the climate is very congenial – two very necessary factors in fruit-growing.  On the rich lands of Poverty Bay and the plains and hills surrounding Hastings fruits grow excellently.  Not only is there considerable commercial industry, but nearly every town section has its few trees for home use.

In introducing these notes a special effort will be made to make them instructive for the amateur and small domestic grower, as well as interesting, if not instructive, for the commercial grower.  At the same time it is hoped to write in such terms as will be readily understood by the amateur, and if at times they seem a little elementary, I must ask for the commercial man’s patience and forgiveness.  My aim is to be helpful to all readers.  In this connection I invite questions and correspondence.  If a non-de-plume is used the writer is asked to send along his name and address, but not for publication.  In asking questions as many details as possible should be sent, so that a reliable reply may be given.

APRICOTS.

These are the first commercial fruits to bloom.  On account of their early blooming they can be only grown in localities that are free from late frosts.  In parts of Poverty Bay, Napier hills, Taradale district, and the Havelock hills they do well.  Although the buds will be well advanced it is not expected that they be in bloom.  They should be sprayed at once with a fungicide for the prevention of fungus diseases.  They are very subject to shot-hole fungus and rust.  If these two diseases get a bad hold they prevent the leaves from carrying out their normal functions, and thereby prevent the proper development of the fruit as well as affecting the following crop.  It is rarely that apricots are attacked by insect pests, but if they are affected considerable good can be done by spraying with lime sulphur solution. It is safe to spray with either of the following mixtures if the blossom buds are balls of pink, even if a few blossoms are full out.  As a matter of fact, this is the best time to spray for fungus diseases.  For fungus diseases spray with Bordeaux mixture, 8 lbs. bluestone, 6 lbs. Roche lime to 40 gallons of water.  By dividing each quantity by eight, 5 gallons of the mixture can be made.  See below for full directions for making Bordeaux mixtures on the market, but the fresh, home-made solution is more reliable.  If insect pests such as San Jose are present on the trees lime sulphur one part to 15 parts water should be used in the place of Bordeaux.  Lime sulphur can be purchased in gallon, four gallons, or cask lots.  Ask for a 32 degree test.  This is the standard solution.  If it is only a 28 degree test 13 parts of water should be used to one part of the solution.  This will then only make it equivalent in strength to 1-15 at a 32 degree test.

PEACHES AND NECTARINES.

These fruits bloom shortly after the apricots.  Unfortunately they are more susceptible to both fungus diseases and insect attack.  Attention to spraying at this season can be said to be imperative.  Neglect it and trouble will surely come.  These fruits are very subject to attack from San Jose scale and Red Spider, both small insects.  Red oil is usually applied earlier in the season to control these pests, but where this has not been done use lime sulphur 1 part to 12 parts of water where the trees show very little bud movement, but reduce it 1 to 15 if the blossom buds show pink.  Lime sulphur applied at this season will also help to keep leaf curl and other fungus diseases in check.  In fact, in some parts it is used for this purpose with fair results, but in localities where the disease is known to be troublesome Bordeaux mixture must be used.  Use the same strength as indicated for apricots.  Bordeaux mixture properly prepared is a far more dependable fungicide than lime sulphur, but is no good for anything else except fungus diseases.

Where pruning of peaches and nectarines is not completed it can still be done.  In fact, many authorities say that if peaches are pruned when the buds are showing pink it will greatly assist in preventing the buds dropping.

BORDEAUX MIXTURE.

As previously mentioned the home-made solution is more dependable and reliable than the prepared mixtures.  It is simple to make – it only requires a little patience.  Dissolve the bluestone in a wooden vessel – not copper, and even tin should not be used.  If it is required in a hurry it can readily be dissolved in hot water, otherwise it can be tied in scrim and suspended just below the surface of the water.  Use good burnt roche lime- not powdered or air-slaked lime.  Place the lime in any king of receptacle and slake it with water.  Just put a little water on at a time, and it will break up quicker.  Hot water is better than cold.  Add half the required quantity of water to each and pour together into a third vessel, stirring well.  It is claimed the latter is very important, the success of the mixture depending on the intimate blending of the chemicals.  Apples and pears will be dealt with in the next issue.

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6   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

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September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   7

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DANNEVIRKE.

Southern Hawke’s Bay – a land undoubtedly flowing with milk and money – is just emerging from a winter which has not been consistently unkind or charitably mild.  It has been a patchy kind of discontent, but compared with past winters there has been little cause for complaint.  To date, only one day when the snowflakes fell, while the rainfall has not been as consistent as is customary.  Stock have wintered well, the factories are now nearly all running, and a profitable season for the cow farmers and the prospects of many more motor cars in this part of the province seem assured.  Just what the price of butter for the coming months will be is impossible to say, but it is a certainty that, like most other things, it’s going up, and based on the prospective value of butterfat the rise must be fairly substantial.

The delay which has taken place in putting the Glengarry estate – acquired by the Government from Major James Armstrong many months ago for soldier settlement – is certainly not creditable to the authorities, no matter what excuses are offered.  By the time this dairying land is thrown open, and the successful applicants have ceased congratulating themselves, it will be too late for them to reap the full harvest which this season promises the butter-fat producer.  There will be fencing, and all sorts of things to do, and the hardest part of all will be to get a decent herd together.  Many of the best clearing and dispersal sales have passed and the culls and scrubbers will probably be all that will be available to select from.  Dairying on dear land with cows which have to be kept instead of keeping their owners isn’t profitable.  A little less Government stroke and a suspicion of enterprise would probably have seen this block opened by now.  Seeing that spring is rapidly coming and going it would be kinder of the authorities to the prospective settlers if they maintained their go-slow and waited until next autumn before the sections were balloted.  Then the ex-warriors would get the opportunity of a fair start.

Cash was never shorter in Dannevirke than in August.  Thus said a shop-keeper to our correspondent, which shows that when the milch cows are having a rest the dairy farmer is not the bloated capitalist so many of his town critics imagine him to be.

In whom shall we trust?  This is the query which is greatly agitating the minds of our sheep and cattle kings and those who live on the fat of the land.  Our farmers last week showed their decided dislike for the “Big Five” and preferred to pin their faith, for the time being, to the persuasive and penetrating member for Gisborne.  Just why they should trust the Poverty Bay benefactor any more than the Armours and their satellites wasn’t made apparent to them or anyone else.  The former’s advocacy of throwing over the mercantile firms which have brought the squatters to their present financial stability and affluence just because the advice of their clients might be tainted with the flavour of the trusts and combines is problematically sound.  On the other hand it might be disastrous.  In the meantime the problem of extracting the uttermost farthing from the wealthiest market for the sole benefit of the farmer still remain unsolved, and will probably remain so until the wool from many millions of sheep have passed through the shears.

Makotuku has the proud distinction of having the only lady member of the Southern Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Union residing in their midst in Mrs Jonathan Holden.  This body has emerged from a promising babyhood and bids fair to achieve a bigger measure of distinction now it has discarded its swaddling clothes and is gaining that confidence which is the usual accompaniment of age and experience.

There was much jubilation amongst the staff of the Dannevirke post office when back pay under the recent new award was distributed amounting to over ₤500.  Some of them, it is said “hit the roof.”

“The Bells of St. Mary’s” have been so often heard here that the charm has worn off, but there is a prospect of an acceptable substitute shortly in “The Chimes of Dannevirke.”  A proposal is afoot, and is approved of by the energetic member for the district, Mr. A. Nicol, and the ex-Mayor of our progressive town, to have a chiming clock installed in a tower upon our new post office.  The Minister of Public Works is willing, provided the citizens pay the piper.  Mr. Ransom, the former wearer of the Mayoral collar, has publicly suggested that the money in hand for the soldiers’ memorial – certainly not a formidable amount – should be devoted to this object, otherwise, as he says, “it is evident that if something definite is not soon done the only memorial we are likely to have in Dannevirke is the one already erected – the Soldiers’ Institute.”  The local public, noted for their generosity during the war period, have certainly not enhanced this reputation so far as their support to the war memorial is concerned, but a good deal of their apathy can undoubtedly be attributed to the way in which those responsible for the appeal to their generosity have bungled the affair.  It has been a fine example of lack of enterprise and how not to ask for money.

Over ₤5 a week for delivering letters.  Such is the remuneration of a single Post Office carrier in a town in Southern Hawke’s Bay.  His rises this year amount in the aggregate to over ₤100, so evidently the civil service isn’t so bad after all.  If all work was paid in the same proportion to its responsibility we would all be able to have a cheque book – if we didn’t go to the races too often.

The purse of our pleasure loving public was sadly depleted last week.  How’s this for variety in a country town – two picture shows running nightly and a matinee each, a visit of Australian Diggers, a pantomime with expensive prices, a boxing tournament with seats ranging from ₤2 2/- downwards, mid-week football, and an evangelistic mission daily and at night.  Moreover, all have been well patronised, the panto and punch especially, while the mission has sown seed which promises to bear a rich harvest.  But what a contrast to the bush days, when our pioneers went out into the main “street” – a muddy, sloppy, slippery path – with a lantern to seek solace at the “pub” because there was nowhere else to go!

Mr “Dick” Martin, son of the late Mr “Percy” Martin, of Napier, is like his father was, a good sport.  Soon after arriving in Dannevirke he was prevailed upon to undertake the secretaryship of the Dannevirke Boxing Association, which was undergoing a revivifying process, and decided to “give it a go.”  His efforts were energetic and successful, and now that Mr Martin has taken up his abode in Hastings the Dannevirke Boxing Association has shown its appreciation of his willing help by electing him a life member and also presenting him with a case of pipes and a tobacco pouch, Mr. B. E. Bunny, one of the vice-presidents of the association, rising to the occasion and making an appropriately graceful speech.

Talking of boxing, the local association has distinguished itself since it recently emerged from its war grave by running a couple of fine tournaments.  The Clabby-Cook fight was a fine one and the popular Clabby deserved the victory.  A good deal of controversy was engendered by the action of Senior-Sergeant O’Halloran stopping Desmond from annihilating McGregor in their uneven match.  There was a vigorous outburst of hooting against the man in blue, but I am game to assert that not one of the noise-makers would have sportingly changed places with the unhappy McGregor, under the same circumstances, and gone cheerfully on with the game.  The Sergeant was right in his action – that is, if the exhibition was supposed to be one of boxing and not brutality.  When the contest was stopped it had degenerated into something akin to a bull dog worrying a rat.  That’s not sport.

Dannevirke drunks and other offenders against the law are to have more comfortable quarters in the near future.  The tender of Mr. J. L. Scott, of £3570, has been accepted by the Public Works Department of the erection of more up-to-date police accommodation on a site in Gordon street, almost opposite the present police court buildings.

GISBORNE

There has been controversy of late on the subject of the distance of the route of the electric current mains between Waikaremoana and Gisborne, and some light has been thrown on the subject by Mr. Cyril White, who states that when the telephone to his property at Riverside, Tahora, which lies in a direct line between Gisborne and Waikaremoana, was erected, the distance was measured and found to be 33½ miles, over 40 miles of wire being used, and Riverside is 40 miles by road in almost a direct line from Aniwanawa, on the lake.  Mr White asserts that it would not be possible to secure a line from Waikaremoana to Gisborne of less length than 70 miles, and he confirms all that others have said of the difficulty of conveying the large poles that would be necessary over the intervening rough country.

Another link in the East Coast railway is making more rapid progress.  It is stated that during the past few months good progress has been made by the Public Works Department with the work of constructing and placing in position the concrete cylinders of the railway bridge across Tauranga harbour.  A satisfactory foundation for the cylinders was secured all the way across the harbour.  Work associated with the thirteenth pair of cylinders is now in hand.  When this set is completed there will only be two more pairs of cylinders to drive.  The steel work for the super-structure of the bridge is being prepared at the Mount workshop.  The construction of this bridge is one of the largest works of the kind that has so far been attempted in New Zealand.  The work of re-building the Hairini bridge, the longest bridge in the Tauranga county and a very important link in the East Coast main road, is also to be carried out by the Public Works Department.  The old structure will have to do service until the new ferro-concrete bridge has been built.

So far no further light has been thrown on the report of the wreck of a large steamer recently off Gable End Foreland, but interesting remarks regarding wrecks were made by Sub-Inspector Cassells, who said when asked for his opinion that he was unable to make “head or tail” of the affair.  At the same time the fact that no wreckage has been found should not be taken as the signal for dismissal of the theory that a shipwreck had occurred.  In support of his contention he instanced the wreck of the Ohau, which had taken place some ten years ago on a Saturday afternoon in Cook Strait and in full view of the lightkeeper at Pencarrow.  Yet no wreckage from the vessel had ever been found from that day to this.  Then there was the case of the Waratah, which vessel was supposed to have foundered off the South African coast.  Wherever the vessel had actually been wrecked the fact remained that not a vestige of wreckage had ever been found.  Although in the present case no tangible evidence of a wreck had been discovered, the fact remained that a number of reputable people had positively declared that they had observed a vessel in distress, and were still prepared to stand by that statement.  In fact, he had just been in communication with the constable at Tolago [Tolaga] Bay, who strongly inclined to the opinion that the report was not without foundation.

Mr William Clark, of Opou estate, has offered his property to the Government on what are stated to be most generous terms.  Tourist resorts on the East Coast are receiving more attention from the Department in charge.  Much has been said, from time to time recently, of the great benefit which would be derived from the erection of a commodious and up-to-date hostel at Te Puia, together with the providing of adequate facilities for utilising the curative springs for which Te Puia has become famed.  Votes have appeared for several years past on the Estimates for the erection of a new building at Te Puia, but on tenders being called last summer it was found that the money was totally inadequate in consequence of the greatly increased cost of building.  According to the assurance given by the Minister in charge (the Hon. W. Nosworthy) it is intended to provide a vote of £5500 this session in order that the plans supplied by the district engineer may be given effect to.  Shortage of funds have also held up the programme of improvements at Morere, but members of Parliament have been assured that the work will go on this summer.  Various minor improvements are being carried out at Lake House, Waikaremoana, to which a new caretaker has been appointed, and under whose supervision the grounds and buildings are being placed in good order.

AN EXPERIMENTAL FOREST.

New Zealanders have been familiar for a long time with the words “experimental farm,” and while the heading of this paragraph may seem a little new to New Zealanders, it will be shown that what good work which Canadian experimental farms have done for agriculture experimental farms are likely to do for forestry.  The people of Canada now realise that a large proportion of the country is admirably suited to the growing of timber, but is not suited to the growing of ordinary field crops.  Rough, hilly land, sandy plains and ridges, and ridges strewn with boulders are types of soils better suited to growing trees than to growing anything else.  At the same time the increasing price of lumber all over the world proves to Canadians that the forests growing on these non-arable lands will continue to form one of Canada’s greatest resources.  In the upper Ottawa country and in many parts of Canada there are districts from which a crop of timber has been taken by the lumber-men, but which have not been occupied since that time by settlers.  These districts are now being covered again with a new growth of timber, but in many cases it is not as good timber as that taken off thirty or forty years ago.  It is here that the knowledge and skill of the forest engineer comes in.  He can by weeding out the inferior trees give the better species like pine and spruce a chance to develop and to cover the country.  Details of such work have been reduced to a system in Europe, as many Canadians learned when they served in the trenches in France, but experience in regard to European forests cannot be taken as a guide in a country like Canada, where many conditions are different.  To study this problem of how to reproduce good forests as quickly as possible on cut-over or burned-over lands, the Government of the Dominion of Canada, at the request of the Honorary Advisory Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, instructed the Forestry Branch of the Department of the Interior to establish an experimental forest on part of the military reservation at Petawawa.  The tract is an ideal one, as it presents conditions as they appear over a large part of Ontario and Quebec.  Three working seasons have now been spent on the experimental forests at Petawawa and already much information has been gained as to the rapidity of tree growth.  With these studies continued and extended, Canadians will in years to come know as much about their forests and how to handle them as the French know about theirs.

8   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

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Outdoor Sports

HOCKEY.

LADIES.

(By “Review”)

It is pleasing to note the return of so much enthusiasm in ladies’ hockey circles after the lapse of four years during the war period.  That the general standard of hockey has been revived one cannot deny after witnessing some of the games played in competition this season.  Certainly there are weaknesses, but that is only to be expected, but as junior players develop into senior players with a knowledge of the game derived from the lower grade, so will the standard of play generally be improved.

The representative team selected to play at the New Zealand hockey tournament is certainly not as strong as one may have wished for, but the individual players are keen and in good fettle, so that that factor may certainly overcome other weaknesses.  The recent visit of the Southland ladies has put a decided stimulus into the play, and if the evidence of the visiting players can be taken into account, the Hawke’s Bay girls play as clean hockey as can be witnessed anywhere.  This only denotes two factors, the coaching must be good, and the refereeing strict and in accordance with rules.  We all know that this is not so in every province.

One often hears remarks condemning hockey for girls, as the game is too strenuous and dangerous.  I would rather see a girl with marks of hard-fought games and robust and healthy, than the type with the hundreds of aches and pains that one generally finds as evidence of such an existence. Hockey is a winter sport that should be encouraged amongst girls.  It develops keenness of sight, quickness, of mind, and brings into operation all the physical powers for the development of a healthy body.  It also encourages that grit and determination that so materially helped the British Empire to maintain its supremacy in the last great struggle.

My advice, therefore, to all parents and guardians is to encourage their girls to be sports, and so help them to develop a healthy mind in a sound body.

The final of the ladies’ championships puts the Te Awa Club top of the tree both in the senior and junior competitions.  This is a very creditable performance indeed.  Neither of these teams had old players to assist them, so that they have climbed the ladder of hockey to so successful and issue by mere dint of hard work and practical training.

The Hastings Club have received a very severe blow in losing the services of Miss J. Burden.  Miss Burden, who has recently been married, is possibly one of the oldest and finest hockey players in the Dominion.  She started in representative play when only 13 years of age, and since that time until just recently has always held the position of left back.  May good fortune always attend her in her new sphere of life, for whatever else she may have been all that knew her freely classed “Joe” as a real good sport.

Following is the result of the ladies’ senior competition:-

SENIOR COMPETITION.
P.   W.   L.   D.   Pts.
Te Awa   7   6   ..   1   13
Hastings   7   5   1   1   11
Napier A   7   2   4   1   5
Napier B   7   1     5 1   3
Fernhill   7   ..   ..   ..  ..

In connection with the above results it is creditable to note that during the seven games played by the Te Awa team they scored 30 goals, while only 6 were registered against them.

JUNIOR.
P.   W.   L.   D.   Pts.
Te Awa   10   10   ..   ..   20
Napier   9   3   5   1   7
Port   10   3   7   1   6
Hastings   9   2   6   1   5

In this grade the Te Awa team have established a record, having secured 38 goals to their credit, whilst their goal defence was only penetrated twice.

MEN’S.

Although the game was extinct in this district for a number of years, the men’s games are rapidly assuming their pre-war standard, and the competition this season, although in an incomplete stage, is exceptionally keen and interesting.  Each Saturday brings fresh surprises, first one team and then another filling the premier position, but never the same one for any lengthy period.  At the present time St. Matthews A have a lead of one point over the next three teams, they have a total of 14 to their credit, while Napier, St. Matthews B, and Kohinoor A each have 13.  Mahora have also to be reckoned with, they having 12 points to their credit.  It can readily be seen then what enthusiasm prevails, for a defeat for any of the aforementioned teams may mean their loss of the championship.

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FOOTBALL.

HISTORY OF THE LEAGUE GAME

(By George Frater).

When I was asked to write up the history of the League game, the original idea was to begin with the inception of the game in Napier, or to be more correct, Hawke’s Bay, but I am quite certain that it would be very interesting to followers of the League code to know just how the game started in England some twenty-five years ago.  Though I was not residing in England at the time, I was probably the first imported player to the Northern Union and therefore I claim to know a little of its history.  Some two years before I went to Oldham the English Rugby Union had been inquiring into the workings of some of their rich North of England clubs because of a great many prominent Welsh players leaving their clubs and finding employment in these North of England towns, and consequently playing for the clubs.  There was no doubt that “veiled professionalism” was rampant  and the English Rugby Union came down heavily on three of the clubs.  I should like to make it clear that the players playing for these clubs were practically all working men, and it was the over the paying of these men’s loss of time that the bother started.  When the English Rugby Union suspended the three clubs it was felt that it was hard on these clubs to be singled out where all were guilty, so a meeting of all the prominent clubs was held in Manchester, and at that meeting it was decided to break away from the English Rugby Union and form a Union of their own, to be called the Northern Rugby Union.  I would here just like to tell a little story connected with the Oldham Club, and for which I can vouch for the accuracy, having had it from the secretary of the club’s himself.  The English Rugby Union notified the club that they were sending an official to look into the club’s books on a certain date.  The day arrived, and late in the afternoon the official came along.  The secretary, treasurer and chairman of the club met him at the station and escorted him to the club’s headquarters,

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.

which was a prominent hotel, where before having tea a few “spots” were indulged in.  Eventually tea was served, and, of course, more “spots” which consisted of a pint bottle of champagne at each plate, and after tea the cigar box and more “spots”.  When the secretary suggested seeing the books, “ Yes, just another drink and then we will proceed to business.” However, the refreshment was more to the point than the books, and late that night it was a very jovial official that was put on the Manchester train, and in the course of a week or two the club were notified by the English Union that the official had reported that the club’s books were all right.

Now, it must not be imagined that professionalism in Rugby football was solely confined to the North of England.  Before I left Scotland I had known of instances where money had passed between officials of clubs and their players, one being the case of my own brother, who had been hurt when playing.  The secretary of the club when paying him a little remuneration for his loss of wages, begged him not to say a word to anyone, for if it got to the ears of the Scottish Rugby Union there would be trouble for him particularly, and for the club generally.  Another case concerned a player of another club, with whom I was very well acquainted.  The match was between two well-known border clubs, and was always regarded as a real “Derby” struggle, and the player was the means of scoring the only try of the day after a great run from half-way, and consequently won the match.  In coming off the field he was handed three sovereigns by an official of his club with the remark, “Well done, Jack!” and afterwards told me that it was not the first he had received.

But to return to the North of England clubs.  Many amusing methods were used in the paying of talent money before the split occurred, and I would like to give just one illustration.  A player, who had not been playing many times for the first team, gave a very fine display, and after the match, on putting on his boot he felt something hard inside.  He immediately took it off, and giving it a shake out rolled a sovereign.  He had got so far as  – “Hi, has any one lost  ..” when he received  nudge from his neighbour with the remark, “Shut up, you fool.  Put it in your pocket and play for another one next Saturday.”  Now the question of professionalism in Rugby football has caused many a bitter argument, and I know of officials of the League game in New Zealand to-day who would sever their connection with the game if professionalism was recognised, and I may say here that I thoroughly believe that the New Zealand Council are carrying the game on under the strictest rules of amateurism.  But I have been a professional, and from my experience I am quite ready to argue and stand by my contention that you have the cleanest sport where professionalism prevails.

Let me give just one case in point.  In the great Soccer game in England, Manchester City were fighting to keep their place in the first division, and when playing Aston Villa at Birmingham, some of their players approached the Villa players to run what is known out here as a “slinter.”  The facts came to light.  It was proved that such was the case, and the Soccer authorities suspended the City players for one year fined 5 of them £100 each, the remainder pound £50 each, and cancelled their registration with the club, which meant that at the end of their suspension they could not play for their old club, and had to seek fresh quarters.  Could such a severe course be taken under amateurism, for I think no one would like to argue that “slinters” are not common in amateurism as well as professionalism, in fact more common, for the amateur has very little to lose, where the professional has a great deal.

Another argument in favour of professional football is that players are compelled to do a certain amount of training to keep in the very best of condition, and I contend that if the public are paying to see the game it is due to them that they get the best from the players, and that they do not get from the untrained amateur.  Then again, the young man who has a talent for football has just as much right to make the utmost of it as the man you has a talent for music, etc.   And just to show that the general public as a body recognise that they get better satisfaction from the professional in all cases than from the amateur you have only to compare the crowds that go to see the former in preference to the latter.  I am quite sure that many in this district who like to think that they are advocates of pure amateurism were present at the boxing match between Clabby and Uren, when at the championships of New Zealand held in the same place they were conspicuous by their absence.  Why?  Because in the professional bout they knew they would get their money’s worth.  Now I have somewhat strayed from football matters, but hope next week to give a few of the instances leading up to the alteration of the playing rules.

(To be Continued).

[…]

RUGBY FOOTBALL.

REVIEW OF THE SEASON.

The season now drawing to a close has been the most successful Hawke’s Bay has experienced for many years.  The competition in the various grades has been keen, and the final result in the senior and junior grades is still in doubt.  Marist Bros. Old Boys went right through the season with an unbeaten record in the third grade and wound up easy winners of the cup.

By their victory over Technical College last Saturday Pirates have practically won the Fourth Grade premiership.  The class of Rugby shown this year has been immeasurably superior to that of the previous five years, and the prospects for next year look very rosy.

I cannot remember a more interesting junior competition than this year, Hastings, Waimarama, Havelock N., and High School being neck and neck.  By drawing with Hastings last Saturday High School have spoilt their chance of winning the championship, and Waimarama or Hastings must now get the cup.

The High School boys, though considerably lighter than the majority of their opponents, played the better football, and their displays speak well of the coaching of the sports master, Mr. Hardy.  Next year I expect High School to be even better, and they should win the junior cup besides evening up scores with their old rivals, Palmerston North High School.  The province this year has a representative fifteen that has more than held their own in the Rugby world.  Though perhaps on the light side the team has on every occasion played open and dashing football, the forwards being exceptionally fast, and always a thorn in the side of their opponents.  With the experience gained this year it can be safely expected that the Hawke’s Bay representatives of 1921 will improve on this year’s record.

The programme of representative games played this year is as follows: – Against Wairarapa at Napier, won by 14 to 12; Wanganui, at Wanganui. Won by 11 to 3; Taranaki at New Plymouth, won by 8 to 6; Wairarapa at Carterton, lost by 12 to 5; Wellington at Wellington, lost by 20 to 5; South Island Country at Napier, lost by 12 to 6; Taranaki at Hastings, won by 9 to 0; Wellington at Napier, won by 17 to 3; Waiapu at Hastings, won by 12 to 3.

In addition a Northern v. Southern Hawke’s Bay match was played at Hastings, the North winning by 6 to nil.

The Management Committee have worked hard throughout the season, and it is but fitting that their efforts should be crowned with success.

As Hon. Secretary Mr. J. M. Brown has proved the right man in the right place.  Long may he hold the position.

The Napier Primary Schools’ football representatives met the Gisborne Main School representatives at Gisborne on Monday, and gained a victory after a good game by three points to nil.

[…]

GOLF.

GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP.

The Hawke’s Bay amateur championship was concluded on the Waiohiki links Friday of last week when H. E. Crosse beat Kapi Tareha.  The match was keenly contested, and only during the last nine holes did the winner make a marginal advantage.

BOXING.

(By “Straight Left.”)

The Hawke’s Bay Boxing Association have received many letters from various associations throughout the Dominion congratulating them on the way the delegates and competitors were treated by them at the New Zealand Championships held in Hastings last month.

The Championship Meeting resulted in a net profit of over £30, half of which goes to the New Zealand Boxing Council.  The prices of admission were very reasonable considering the high standard of boxing displayed by the different aspirants for championship honours.

Visitors were loud in their praises for the manner in which the numerous bouts were disposed of.  There was an absence of delay between the bouts;  no sooner was one pair finished, than another was ready to step into the ring.  Everything in connection with the tournament went off like clockwork, and the executive are to be congratulated on their efforts.

Hawke’s Bay has made a name for itself in the boxing world, the parent body having started the boom in the Dominion by importing Jimmy Clabby last November, and have not looked back since.  The Dannevirke Association are also well in the boom.  They have had two contests lately that would have done credit to any of the big centres.  The last contest, Clabby v. Cook, was a treat to see.  The admirable way in which the two big men handled themselves was a lesson to all who witnessed it.  Clabby, of course, won, but he could not take any chances with his big opponent, who should have a good future against some of the Dominion heavyweights.  The contest was well carried out, but the managers should endeavour to get the preliminary bouts started to time.  Some good amateur bouts had been engaged, but from various causes they fell through, and the public were entertained with some interesting exhibition bouts by Digger Evans, Fritz Holland, and others.

It is doubtful if a more distinguished gathering of boxing celebrities was ever seen in the Dominion before than was seen at Dannevirke on August 25.

It is rumoured that Clabby and Holland are to meet in Dannevirke in the near future, but as Clabby has had an argument with the New Zealand Boxing Council, unless something unforeseen happens the proposed contest must fall through.

The Waipawa Boxing Association held a tournament on Saturday last.  It was one of the best conducted contests that has been held in Hawke’s Bay.  The preliminary bouts were started punctually to time and went off without a hitch.  The amateur bouts were some of some of the best that have staged.  Harrison and Overend, both of Hastings, put up the best exhibition of boxing that has been seen for a long time.  I could not quite agree with the referee (Mr. Russell) with regard to his opinion of in-fighing.  There is a big difference between in-fighting and clinching.  As long as a boxer has both hands free he can fight away to his heart’s content.  Mr. Russell’s decisions were rather inclined to stop in-fighting altogether by the way he called “break” as soon as the competitors got to close quarters.

The contest Modrich v. Evans was good, what there was of it, but it turned out to be a repetition of the Beckett-Carpentier contest, all over in about two minutes.  Modrich has a good punch, and his style has much improved.  I should like to see him up against Tom Heeney or Pooley.  It would be a good contest for some association to put on.

NAPIER

At Nelson Park on Saturday a sports carnival was held, the different bodies combining under the direction of the Napier Thirty Thousand Club for the purpose of providing gates for the Jull street entrance to Nelson Park.  The attendance was very satisfactory and the financial result should be substantial.  A feature of the afternoon was a procession from the Post Office to the Park.  The procession was headed by the combined bands, ever willing to lend their services on such occasions.  In the hockey section, the big event was the ladies’ match, Hawke’s Bay v. Southland, in which the visiting team was defeated by the narrow margin of one point, the scores being 4 to 3.  The game was a fast and open one.  Fourth grade teams from the Pirates Club and the Technical College met on the grounds devoted to Rugby, Technical College winning by 13 to 5. A hard-fought game was the match between Te Aute and M.A.C.  M.A.C. secured victory by 11 points to 0.  In the Northern Union section the honours in the third grade contest Westshore v. Taradale went to Westshore by 6 points to nil.  A combined Clive and Ahuriri senior team beat  a City team by 23 points to 10.  A costume match between Napier and Port Fire Brigades created an immense amount of amusement.

Spring seems to have arrived after an unusually mild winter, with but few frosts, though the cold was at times as intense as the oldest inhabitant can remember.  Gardeners are putting in their early vegetables and the voice of the birds is loud in the land.  The winter sports are drawing to a close and the devotees of the beaches, cricket and tennis are preparing for the season.

It was to be expected that Mr H. E. Crosse, the New Zealand amateur golf champion, would be the winner of the local championship, and such proved to be the case.

The usual “season” of entertainments in the Municipal Theatre has commenced.  It has been often remarked that for weeks at a time the theatre remains unlet, and then half a dozen touring companies follow one another in close succession.

The Borough Council at its meeting on Monday night last decided upon submitting the following loan proposals to the ratepayers for their approval or otherwise:-  Roads – Widening of Dalton street, £9000;  Faraday street extension, £1500;  Ashridge road extension, £2550.  Tramways and Electricity – Power plant extension, £23,000;  service meters, £4150;  deferred payment installations, £3000;  Hastings street tramway extension, £18,850;  additions to battery, £1000;  electricity extension to Taradale and Awatoto,  £17,000.  A list of the streets which require re-construction or widening, a list of road-making plant needed, and an estimate of the cost are to be prepared by the borough engineer.  He will also furnish an estimate of the cost of water supply extension in Napier South.

Borough maintenance retrenchment was the subject of a report made by the borough engineer (Mr.  E. A. Williams) at the last meeting of the Borough Council. He reported:- “I can only suggest that we curtail the labour, provide sufficient equipment to enable us to cut out hiring of carts and horses, which would also enable us to get over the work in a more systematic and expeditious manner.  The work at present being done by hand should be done by mechanical means, but until efficient plant is obtained, should it be decided to curtail the staff, the roads will without a doubt deteriorate to a still further extent, as they are now, with a few exceptions, simply composed of quarry mullock and shingle in some instances protected by a coating of tar.  Carlyle street reconstruction is being done out of maintenance, there being no extra labour or hiring of carts.  Mr Williams also stated interalia that for many months past practically the whole of the labour of four men has been occupied in cleaning drains and sewers – this time should not be charged to roads.  At the present time numerous roads and footpaths are and have been formed in Napier South where none previously existed. If this work is to go on as at present this should be charged against future loan for same.  With regard to lighting, the sum of £600 appeared too excessive for lamps and fittings, as once they were installed this cannot be a recurring charge and should come out of loan, except small amounts for renewal and upkeep.  The report was referred to the Public Works Committee.

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10   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

The Turf

FIXTURES.

Sept. 4 – Otago Hunt Club
Sept. 8 – Manawatu Hunt Club
Sept. 11 – Amberley Racing Club
Sept. 23, 24 – Ashburton County Racing Club
Sept. 25, 29 – Avondale Jockey Club
Sept. 27, 28 – Otaki Maori Racing Club
Sept. 30, Oct. 1 – Geraldine Racing Club
Oct. 2 – Napier Park Racing Club
Oct. 6 – Hawke’s Bay Jockey Club
Oct. 7 – Kurow Jockey Club

JOURNAL’S SPECIAL TURF LETTER

Formona, by Formative-Etona, was numbered among the defunct last week, when she succumbed to an internal complaint.  At the time of her death she was carrying a filly foal by Demothenes.

Bagdad was given his first lesson over hurdles on Tuesday last, when in company with Buckeye, he made a very creditable showing.

Ken Quinlivan is now training Sygnisian, while Arch Salute and Fist Salute are shortly to join the same stable.

Miss Girons, which at one time was trained by T. F. Quinlivan, is to be given another chance to make good, and is now under Donovan’s care at Hastings.

H. Hickey is now back at Hastings, and will shortly bring the rest of his string from Gisborne.

Joe Oldfield recently had his team strengthened by the arrival of Pao, the half-brother by Hymettus to Chant Royal.  Cantabile and a couple of others, the property of Mr Lawrie, are due at any time from Gisborne.

Sam Lindsay, I understand, is also expecting a couple of additions to his team shortly.

[…]

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NAPIER PARK RACING CLUB.

PROGRAMME FOR SPRING MEETING.
To be held on
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2nd, 1920.

President: J. V. Brown, M.P.  Vice-President:  R. L. Williams. Stewards:  P. Barry, C. W. Badley, J. I. Cato, W. Hill, G. W. McDonald, M. H. Strachan, R. D. Sweetapple, C. E. Twist, F. C. Williams, T. E. Whelch, Judge:  R. H. Aldworth. Treasurer:  J. V. Brown, M.P.  Handicapper:  H. Coyle.  Timekeeper:  W. Cooper.  Starter:  A. G. Wood.  Clerk of Scales:  H.M. Bishop.  Clerk of Course: A. O’Dowd.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2nd, 1920.

1.   GREENMEADOWS HACK HANDICAP HURDLES of 150 sovs; second horse to receive 20 sovs. Third horse 10 sovs. from the stake. Nomination 1 sov.  Acceptance 2 sovs.   One mile and a half.
2.   TRIAL HACK HANDICAP, of 125 sovs., second horse to receive 20 sovs. third horse 10 sovs. from the stake. For horses that have never won a race exceeding 20 sovs. in value at time of start. Nomination 1 sov.  Acceptance 30s.   Five furlongs.
3.   AHURIRI HACK HANDICAP, of 125 sovs., second horse to receive 15 sovs, third horse 10 sovs. from the stake. Nomination 1 sov. Acceptance 30s.   Six furlongs.
4.   PARK STAKES HANDICAP, of 300 sovs.; second horse to receive 40 sovs. third horse 20 sovs. from the stake. Nomination 1 sov. Acceptance 4 sovs.   One mile and a quarter.
5.   TARADALE HANDICAP HURDLE RACE, of 250 sovs.; second horse to receive 30 sovs., third horse 20 sovs. from the stake. Nomination 1 sov.  Acceptance 3 sovs.   One mile and three-quarters.
6.   PRINCE OF WALES STAKES, of 150 sovs.; second horse to receive 20 sovs, third horse 10 sovs. from the stake. For two-year-olds, Colts and geldings 8st. 2lb., fillies 7st. 11lb. The winner of any race after August 1st, 1920 to carry 7lb. extra.  Nomination 1 sov. Acceptance 2 sovs.   Four furlongs.
7.   RAILWAY HANDICAP, of 200 sovs.; second horse to receive 25 sovs., third horse 15 sovs. From the stake. Nomination 1 sov.  Acceptance 50/-.   Six furlongs.
8.   COUNTY HACK HANDICAP, of 150 sovs.: second horse to receive 20 sovs., third horse 10 sovs. from the stake.  Nomination 1 sov.  Acceptance 2 sovs.   One mile.

DATES OF NOMINATIONS, WEIGHTS, ACCEPTANCES, ETC.,
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17TH, 1920.
Nominations close at the Club’s office, Herschell street, Napier, at 8 p.m., for All Events.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27TH, 1920,
WEIGHTS for All Events will be declared.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29TH, 1920.
Acceptances for all Events close at 8 p.m.

Hack Definition – No horse shall be eligible to start in a “Hack” Race which has won a race of the value of 250 sovs., or races of the collective value of 500 sovs. at the time of nomination.  The amount won by any horse in flat races, hurdle races, or steeplechases, respectively, shall not render such a horse ineligible except in the special class of race in which it has won such amount.

PENALTIES.

Flat Races – The winner of any flat race after the declaration of weights to carry a penalty of 6lb.  Horses handicapped at 8st. 10lb. or over to carry only half the above penalties.

Hurdle Races – The winner of any hurdle race after the declaration of weights to carry a penalty of 7lb., of two or more races 14lb.

1.   All nominations made by telegram must be confirmed by letter immediately afterwards.
2.   All entries to be addressed to the Secretary, with entrance money enclosed, giving the name, age, description, pedigree, name of trainer, and colours of rider (unless registered).
J. E. GLEADOW,
Secretary, N.P.R.C.
Telephone:  No. 241.
Office:  Herschell Street, Napier.

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   11

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Lawn Mowers.
NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY.
WE HAVE SPLENDID STOCKS.
RELIABLE MAKERS.
WHOLESALE PRICES.
Call and See These Machines.
The Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Co-Operative Association Ltd.
Napier, Hastings, Waipukurau, Dannevirke, Wairoa.

GREENMEADOWS
A GOOD SPECULATION.
2¾ ACRES FREEHOLD, with big frontage; well-built and attractive 6-roomed house and conveniences, outbuildings, septic tank, etc.; situate in the best locality and absolutely free from
flood water.
DELIVERY ALMOST IMMEDIATELY.
Price   £1800   Price
W. A. Edwards And Co.
LIMITED.
LAND AGENTS AND AUCTIONEERS,
15 TENNYSON STREET   NAPIER.

FOR SALE
SEASIDE HOME TO TAKE LIFE EASILY ON, OR A HOLIDAY RESORT FOR A COUNTRY FAMILY.|
36 ACRES FREEHOLD, 20 ACRES LEASEHOLD; large sound residence, 4 bedrooms, 2 entertaining rooms, kitchen, bath-room, hot and cold water, pantry, wash-house, etc.; cowshed, motor shed, fowl-house and piggery.  Ideal climate grand view and considerable prospective value.  Price, £2300.  Terms, £500 cash; Leasehold given in.
A SOUND INVESTMENT.
1457 ACRES FREEHOLD; 24 well fenced and watered paddocks; 7-roomed house, cottage, woolshed, yards, dip, etc., winters 2500 sheep (Lincolns) and 200 cattle.  Near a port.  £11 per acre, £3000 cash.
H. Latham,
TENNYSON STREET   NAPIER.

ON E.C. RAILWAY
700 acres freehold.
HANDY TO NAPIER.
MOSTLY LOW HILLS AND FLAT COUNTRY.
Practically all ploughable.  Well subdivided and watered.  Grows good crops of Oats and Swedes.
Capacity – 1½ Sheep and Cattle on Grass.  Comfortable Dwelling and Outbuildings.
THIS PROPERTY HAS A GOOD PROSPECTIVE VALUE, BECAUSE OF ITS SITUATION.
PRICE – £18/10/- per acre.
Terms Arranged.
FOR FARM LANDS & HOUSE PROPERTY OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS APPLY TO
Hunter and Clark Thomson,
TENNYSON STREET, NAPIER.

LAND INSURANCE   STOCK & GENERAL
H. B. Tennent
COMMISSION AGENT,
Hastings, Hawke’s Bay.
OFFICES – QUEEN ST.,   Phone 1241.
STORE & SHOWROOM – HERETAUNGA ST.,   Phone 256.
PRIVATE PHONES – 580 & 1172.
P.O. Box – 272.

Paterson, Mossman & Co.
7 Market Street – Napier.
Telephone 234.
BUSINESS MEN CAN GET TEMPORARY ACCOMMODATION INSTANTLY.  ALL DOCUMENTS KEPT IN OFFICE.  ABSOLUTELY CONFIDENTIAL.
MONEY ADVANCED TO PAY OFF LOANS ELSEWHERE.  OUR RATES ARE SAID TO BE THE FAIREST IN NEW ZEALAND.
OPEN SATURDAYS TILL 12.
Paterson, Mossman & Co.
GEORGE STUBBS,
Managing Director.

Dalgety & Co. Limited
AUCTIONEERS, WOOL AND STOCK BROKERS, LAND AND COMMISSION AGENTS.
Napier, Hastings, Waipawa, Waipukurau & Dannevirke
For Sale –
1575 ACRES FREEHOLD L.T., 20 miles from Napier by good motor roads; all in grass, undulating and hilly; subdivided into 6 paddocks, and watered by permanent springs and creeks; at present carrying 2000 sheep and 150 cattle.  Buildings consist of 4-roomed house, etc.; sheep yards.  Price, £10/10/- per acre.  Terms, £4000 cash.  Balance arranged.   325
7200 ACRES FREEHOLD, situated about 30 miles from Napier by good roads; half ploughable, balance good grazing country.  Buildings consist of 2 dwellings, woolshed, stables, men’s quarters and yards.  Price, £10 per acre.   338
6500 ACRES FREEHOLD, situated 35 miles from Napier by good roads; healthy rolling pastoral country; good fences and natural river boundaries; two huts.  Price, £5 per acre.

12   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

[Advertisements]

FOR SALE
5-ROOMED HOUSE, washhouse, copper and tubs and drainage; gas throughout; good section.  Price, only £650; terms.  Property has prospective value apart from being built of heart timbers.
4-ROOMED HOUSE, wash-house, copper and tubs and drainage; gas; good section on proposed tram route; all heart timbers.  Price, only £650.
4-ROOMED HOUSE, wash-house, copper and tubs and drainage; gas; good sections on proposed tram route; all heart timbers, in splendid condition.  Price, £700; terms.
All the above properties are for quick sale.  Inspection can be arranged by the Sole Agent –
J. H. OLDHAM,
LAND AND PROPERTY AGENT,
TENNYSON STREET, NAPIER.

FOR SALE.
A FINE PROPOSITION.
GOING CONCERN.
70 ACRES FREEHOLD.  2 miles from a good town, school opposite, factory handy, up-to-date homestead, good sheds, well fenced, grassed and watered.  This year wintered 48 cows, 4 horses and young stock, all now on the property.  Everything except furniture in house.  £90 per acre; £2000 cash required.
58½ ACRES FREEHOLD, close to Napier, heavy soil, close to factory, good house, well watered by springs and nice dairy farm.  Price, £100 per acre.
90 ACRES FREEHOLD, 3 miles from Napier, good house and sheds; now carrying 30 cows and other stock and supplying milk in town.  A good proposition at £6000.
Further particulars from
A. Merson and Co.,
LAND AGENTS, DALTON STREET   NAPIER.

Williams & Kettle
LIMITED.
Pastoralists’ and Farmers’ Agents, Wool Brokers, Auctioneers, and General Merchants,
NAPIER, HASTINGS, WAIPAWA, DANNEVIRKE, WAIROA, & GISBORNE
AGENTS FOR COOPER’S DIPS.
AGRICULTURAL SEEDS:
HURST’S BEST QUALITY (Specially Selected and Tested),
RAPE, TURNIP, MANGOLDS, &c.
MANURES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
WOOLPACKS & SHEARING REQUISITES.
LAND SALES DEPARTMENT:
WE HAVE PROPERTIES OF ALL SIZES FOR SALE.
Enquiries invited from intending Purchasers.
We shall be glad to have particulars of Property from Farmers wishing to sell.
AGENTS FOR REID & GRAY’S FARM IMPLEMENTS.
SALES OF WOOL, SKINS, HIDES & TALLOW.
AUCTION SALES OF STOCK EVERY WEEK.
Williams & Kettle
LIMITED.

RING THE BLUFF HILL STORE.
ANDERSON’S – COOTE ROAD.   Tel. 607.
Goods delivered free.  Special Orders any time.  Town Prices.  Highest Class Goods.
TAXI AT ANY TIME.

[…]

C. d’A. EVERARD,
LAND AGENT,
AUCTIONEER, INSURANCE, MERCHANT.
204 ACRES, all ploughable, subdivided into 5 well-watered paddocks; 1½ miles from P.O., School, Sale Yards and Creamery; good five-roomed House and Outbuildings;  28 miles from Auckland.  Price, £9/10/- per acre.
267 ACRES; 260 grass, 7 in standing bush; half ploughable; fencing good; will carry 200 sheep and 40 cattle; watered by permanent springs; new six-roomed House; Sheep Dip and usual outbuildings; 2 miles from Woodhill.  We have personally inspected this and know it to be good, and you can get in easy.  Price, £12 per acre.  Cash £800.
371 ACRES, handy to station; 250 have been ploughed and sown in grass; well sub-divided and watered; fencing good now carrying 100 head Cattle, 300 Sheep; Good 5-roomed House, with plenty of buildings – Barn, Stable, Cow Sheds.  Can recommend this.  Price, £13 per acre.
P.O. Box 311.  Phone 1433.

GILL BROS.,
LICENSED LAND AGENTS, AUCTIONEERS AND GENERAL MERCHANTS.
STATION STREET   HASTINGS.
WE SPECIALISE in the subdivision of Land and Estate, and our Land Salesroom is at the disposal of Clients.
Expert Valuators of Hastings and District Properties, and this experience is at the service of Clients.
Competent Staff for Land Sales by Auction.  Clearing Sales by Auction and Private Sales.
Address all Communications to P.O. BOX 102, HASTINGS.
RING PHONES –
380 – Office.
1248 – T.H. Gill, House.
298 – Seymour Bone, House.
522 – Jas. W. Shaw, House.
GILL BROS.
(OPPOSITE RAILWAY STATION).
HASTINGS.

Hoadley, Son & Stewart Ltd.
Managing Directors:
H.V. HOADLEY   H. N. STEWART.
LAND SPECIALISTS, AUCTIONEERS,
STOCK & STATION AGENTS,
WOOL BROKERS & GENERAL MERCHANTS.
HERSCHELL STREET, NAPIER.
KARAMU ROAD, HASTINGS.
Hoadley’s
is the oldest Land Agency on the East Coast.
Established nearly half a century.
ALL ENQUIRIES RECEIVE OUR BEST ATTENTION.
Managers for Hawke’s Bay for the Commercial Union Assurance Co. Ltd.
Risks of every description accepted at current rates.

Beard, Bullen and Co.,
AUCTIONEERS,
LAND & COMMISSION AGENTS,
Hastings.
REGULAR SATURDAY MARKET SALES.
Poultry – 11 a.m.
Pigs – 11.30 a.m.
Dairy Stock & Horses – 12 noon.
CLEARING SALES OUR SPECIALITY.
FARMS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS AND HOUSE PROPERTIES AND SECTIONS FOR SALE.  AGENTS FOR GUARDIAN ASSURANCE COMPANY Ltd.
Telephone 509.   P.O. Box 232.
Bankers:
NATIONAL BANK OF NEW ZEALAND.

Richardson & Co.,
LIMITED.
SHIPOWNERS.
HEAD OFFICE: PORT AHURIRI, NAPIER.
FLEET:
MAKO, RIPPLE, PUTIKI, AWAHOU, FANNY, TANGAROA, KOAU, RURU, KOUTUNUI, KIRITONA, TE AROHA, TU ATU.
MAIN REPRESENTATIVES.
WELLINGTON – JOHNSON & CO. Ltd.
PORT AHURIRI – RICHARDSON & CO. Ltd.
WAIROA – RICHARDSON & CO. Ltd.
GISBORNE – WILLIAMS & KETTLE Ltd.
AUCKLAND – RICHARDSON & CO. Ltd.
TELEPHONES:
OFFICE – 878 & 879.
PRIVATE –
Traffic Manager   1037
Chief Shipping Clerk   975
Captain of Tangaroa   297

UNION STEAMSHIP COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND LIMITED.
(Time-table subject to Alteration without notice.)
FROM NAPIER FOR GISBORNE.
ARAHURA, every Thursday Night and Saturday morning; also MONOWAI and MOKOIA at intervals.
GISBORNE & AUCKLAND FROM NAPIER.
+ARAHURA, every Saturday Morning; also MONOWAI and MOKOIA at intervals, calling TOKOMARU BAY.
+Omits Tokomaru Bay)
FROM WELLINGTON FOR LYTTELTON.
WAHINE every Monday, Wednesday, Friday at 7.45 p.m.  MAORI, every Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday, at 4.45 p.m.

[…]

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   13

[Advertisements]

Powdrell Bros.,
Market St., Hastings.
MOTOR ENGINEERS.
COACH AND MOTOR BODY BUILDERS.
ALL FARM IMPLEMENTS SUPPLIED AND REPAIRED.
Powdrell Bros.,
Hastings.

Piper & Co., Ltd.
TENT AND SAILMAKERS.
Oilskin Clothing, Tarpaulins, Tents Flags, Rick Covers, Horse and Cow Covers, &c.
VERANDAH BLINDS
A Speciality – Try us.
Port Ahuriri.
Phone 368.

BREACH OF SHOPS ACT.

Arthur Room, the keeper of the Marble Bar at the Municipal Buildings, pleaded guilty at the Hastings Magistrate’s Court on Wednesday to a charge of employing three women after 10.30 p.m. without first obtained the written permission of the Inspector under the Shops and Offices Act.

Mr. Duff, who appeared for the defendant, said the defendant was in an awkward position.  His main business was done in the evening, and most of his trade was obtained from the theatres.  He was entitled to thirty permits a year, and always made a point of getting a permit whenever he had reason to believe that the theatre would not be out till late.  Ordinarily he did not require a permit, but on the night on which the offence was committed a concert was not over until just before 10.30, and the people crowded into his supper room just before closing time.  He had to be very sparing in obtaining permits, otherwise he might find before the end of the year that he was not able to get any more.  That was the unfortunate position he was in.

The Inspector (Mr. Georgeson) said the defendant had been previously fined for a similar offence.  As a matter of fact, the defendant had only obtained six permits this year.

The Magistrate, in fining the defendant £5, said: “If he does it again he will get the limit” (£10).

A WAR REVELATION

The war has revealed how very much of ordinary behaviour is based on a sound instinct. – The Poet Laureate.

[Advertisement]
PEARLOID TOOTH POWDER does polish the teeth, and is delightful to use.  Posted anywhere, 1/3.   A. HOBSON & CO., Chemists, Napier.

NEXT SEASON’S WOOL.

DISCUSSION BY FARMERS’ UNION.

The Hawke’s Bay Farmers’ Union on Thursday discussed the question of the outlook for next wool season.  The following resolution from the Wellington Provincial Executive was considered:-

“That, having in view the fact that on a conservative basis the world’s stocks of wool by the end of the coming season will greatly exceed the pre-war  annual consumption, and in view also of the fact that scoured Argentine wools have already been sold in London at prices ranging from 16½d for 36’s to 20d for 40’s to 48’s, this provincial executive of the Farmers’ Union is not satisfied that the proposal to hold over our wool for twelve months, assisted by a Government advance to growers, will give any adequate relief.  The executive begs to point out that any advance must be based on a percentage of London parity, and that in addition producers will have to provide long storage and interest, also that growers would find themselves next year with two years’ clip on their hands and in possibly a worse position than they are at present.  This executive believes that the advantage of more rapid and less expensive sea transit and the saving in exchange and also in storage would induce American and Japanese buyers to patronise local sales in preference to English sales, and urges the Government to use every possible step to advertise our coming season’s sales in both countries, and to offer special facilities to buyers. Further, this executive suggests that the New Zealand Government should ask the Imperial Government to offer credit on its behalf to Continental manufacturers of repute who may desire to purchase our wools.”

Mr. J. O’Neill said if they were going to let the Government out and hold their wool in the meantime, they would be in the hands of the Philistines.  The position would be that they would be kept with 312,000 bales and half a million bales coming on.  As soon as they let the Government out there would be a collapse, and the growers would be left with two years’ wool.

Mr. B. Chambers suggested that the matter should be held over until they had Mr. Massey’s promised statement, based on the report of the Advisory Committee that had now been set up.

Mr. A. Symes thought that the resolution should be approved.  It would influence the committee to a certain extent.

Mr. G. Priest supported Mr. Chambers’ suggestion.  He said wool sales were going to take place here.  The brokers had already arranged for the hire of the Municipal Theatre for the purpose.  If they found that the sale was all right they could let their wool go; if not, they could pull it out.

Mr. O’Neill and Mr. Ebbett controverted Mr. Priest’s argument, as they might find after the report of the committee that they would not be allowed to sell any wool that was not of high grade.

Mr. O’Neill moved: “That the resolution of the Wellington executive be heartily supported.”

Seconded by Mr. Symes.

Mr. Ebbett said they had to prepare to face bad times until the world’s consumption of wool overtook the world’s production.  Able men had been appointed to the Advisory Committee, men who would have all the information that was available, and he thought they could be relied on to come to the best decision in the interests of the whole Dominion.

Mr. Van Asch agreed with this view.

Mr. Ebbett said the committee had a difficult problem to solve, and would advise Mr. Massey what was the best solution of it.  He did not see what use there was in passing a resolution, or in expressing an opinion.

Mr. O’Neill’s motion was lost.

Mr. Ebbett moved: “That in the opinion of this meeting the proposal of the Wellington executive is worthy of consideration, and that it be submitted to the committee.”

Seconded by Mr. Chambers and carried.

[…]

[Advertisement]
H.B. Motor Tyre Repairing Co.,
118 KING STREET,
HASTINGS.
Phone 836 – Near Everybody’s Theatre – Phone 836.
RETREADS – Big Diamond Goodyear, Firestone Non-Skid, Bar Tread and Plain.
TYRE REPAIRS – Blowouts, Bead Repairs, Liners, etc.
TUBE REPAIRS of every description.
WE CARRY A LARGE STOCK OF TYRES WE CAN RECOMMEND.
P. GIBSON, Manager.

[…]

[Advertisement]
CAMERAS & PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPERS are in good supply at A. HOBSON & CO.’S Pharmacy, Napier.

14   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

[Advertisement]
Magnificent Spring Showing
OF
Overseas & Dominion Productions
IN ALL DEPARTMENTS
At BLYTHES’ Limited.
THIS IS A NOTEWORTHY AND AUTHORITATIVE EXHIBITION OF THE STYLES TO BE IN VOGUE FOR SPRING AND SUMMER.
Prominent are the
EXCLUSIVE FROCKS, DAINTY BLOUSES, CAPTIVATING NECKWEAR, CHARMING MILLINERY, DISTINCTIVE FABRICS, AND MODEST PRICES PREVAIL THROUGHOUT.
This Special Show is all embracing, covering as it does all wanted wearables.  Nowhere could you wish to find present-day fashions more faithfully represented.  We have every confidence in soliciting a visit of inspection.
VISIT OUR MEN’S DEPARTMENT.   VISIT OUR SPLENDID TEAROOMS.
BLYTHES’ Limited   The Leading Drapers and Complete House Furnishers   Napier

East Coast Journal

NAPIER; SATURDAY, SEPT. 4, 1920.

HIGH PRICES AND PROSPERITY.

That the present is a period of high prices is self-evident, and it is also apparent that never before in the history of New Zealand has such general prosperity been recorded.  How far the one depends on the other is a matter for economists to decide, but there can be no question that at this time both are very pronounced.  It is a matter for regret that in certain classes of the community the advance in wages has not corresponded to the advance in prices, an no scheme has been devised to satisfactorily and quickly settle this problem.  Conditions are slowly becoming stable and the problem will in the end settle itself.  Meanwhile labour, especially unskilled labour, is managing to keep wages equivalent to the increased prices and the value for work done – many think that the remuneration for labour is keeping ahead of conditions and the value of work done.  Be that as it may, there can be no doubt that the average working man is well off to-day, or should be if reasonable care is exercised in expenditure.  Industries are generally in a flourishing condition and a common complaint is “Too many orders and not enough material to hand.”  Small businesses report their share of prosperity, and the almost entire absence of bankruptcies (few have been reported in Napier this year, and other East Coast towns have equally favourable reports) speaks volumes.  Last, but most important, the man on the land is prosperous. During the years of war the regular disposal of the produce of his estates, flocks and herds to the Imperial Government at a high, though not an exorbitant price, established a basis of prosperity that was reflected in every other trade and industry.  High prices of land naturally followed, and it was recently shown by Sir James Wilson at the Farmers’ Union Dominion Conference that the present high prices are not “inflated,” as the returns show a good profit.  With the conclusion of the war and the Imperial Government’s purchases some public men feared a slump, but that the world’s markets will give even higher prices than the British Government for New Zealand meat has been proved by the few shipments that have been made to the United States of America.  As was recently recorded, the quality of New Zealand lamb caused a sensation in New York, and the possibilities of the American market alone are enormous.  The profits of this trade alone, when properly developed would suffice to justify high land values.  It is true that wool prices have generally fallen, but this has not caused by a satisfied demand, but by labour an industrial conditions and Government policy.  High prices and prosperity both seem likely to continue for many years, which is fortunate for this country; inasmuch as otherwise the prospects of paying the war bill would be remote.  That being the case it remains for the farmer, the business man, and the customer to accustom their minds to think in terms of the new conditions which have arisen.  Market fluctuations will always occur, but a general drop in prices is not to be expected.  To hold up business in expectation of the drop is bad business.  The ordinary life of the Dominion is now based on high prices and prosperity – other parts of the world base their life on high prices and no prosperity.  On the whole we deserve the title of the Fortunate Isles.

THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.

Between Gisborne and Woodville there is a population of one hundred thousand.  Recent events, more particularly the railway, roads and hydro-electricity questions, have had the effect of uniting the towns and country districts in this section of New Zealand.  The whole of the East Coast has awakened to its common needs.  There can be no doubt that the East Coast has been neglected in the past.  The progress of Gisborne has been remarkable when its long isolation is considered and the difficulties under which it has so long laboured.  Wairoa is another centre the growth of which has not been assisted by local conditions or Government sympathy.  The East Coast railway has been “projected” for about half a century, and is at last under weigh.  Napier and Hastings have the railway, but the service cannot be described as a fast one from the capital, and the Hawke’s Bay line seems to be the repository for all antiquated rolling stock.  Dannevirke is a growing and progressive centre, and the capital of southern Hawke’s Bay.  Its interests have been somewhat apart from the rest of the East Coast, but the failure of the Mangahao electric scheme to supply more than Wellington’s needs has made the Waikaremoana scheme an additional link connecting Dannevirke with the rest of the province.  A representative weekly illustrated paper devoted to the needs of the East Coast, the wealthiest district in the Dominion, is the description which it is hoped will apply to the East Coast Journal.

LABOUR UNREST.

Every now and then a section of Labour grows restive, a dislocation of industry takes place and all the signs point to a widespread upheaval, but at the last moment industrial peace is restored and the work of the country goes on.  There have been several occasions on which this has been the case, and the latest was the watersiders’ strike in Wellington last week.  For a day or two the capital was without light or heat, the trams stopped running, and many factories ceased work.  But the dislocation was practically confined to Wellington and the waterside workers resumed operations with the explanation that “it was all a mistake.”  There have been rumours of a maritime strike for some weeks and many expected that this would be the beginning of it.  How long this unsatisfactory state of affairs will continue is a matter of conjecture.  Another report that is constantly heard is that the employers of labour will sooner or later bring matters to a head and resist further demands and dislocations of industry be a determined stand “settling things once and for all.”  The unrest following on a great war is often given as an explanation, as well as the well high cost of living.  Neither satisfactorily accounts for these sporadic outbreaks, which may or may not be the result of a concerted plan.  The New Zealand Welfare League hopes by a conference of the parties concerned to arrive at some sort of settlement.  But a firm and thoughtful policy by the Government is a sine qua non before industrial peace can be reached.  It is a fact that unstable industrial conditions force manufacturers and

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   15

NAPIER – THE CITY BY THE SEA.

LEAGUE FOOTBALL GAME, NORTH ISLAND v. ENGLAND (Napier 1920).

FIRE BRIGADE’S BURLESQUE FOOTBALL TEAM.

Victory Gates Day at Nelson Park on August 28, under direction of Napier 30,000 Club.

H. E. CROSSE. Hawke’s Bay Amateur Golf Champion.

THE LATE JOSIAH HOWARD, WHO BEQUEATHED SMEDLEY ESTATE TO THE NATION.

KAPI TAREHA.  Runner-Up H.B. Golf Championship.

16   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

BOYS OF THE NAPIER HIGH SCHOOL, 1920.

TECHNICAL COLLEGE, NAPIER.

PUPILS AT WORK IN THE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT OF THE NAPIER TECHNICAL COLLEGE.

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   17

St. John’s Cathedral, Napier.

A UNIQUE VIEW OF THE ONLY CATHEDRAL ON THE EAST COAST.

STATUE ERECTED TO HENARE POHIO AT PETANE.

NAPIER’S PICTURESQUE SOLDIERS’ CLUB.

NAPIER HOSPITAL.

18   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

TE AWA LADIES’ SENIOR HOCKEY TEAM.
Winners of the Hawke’s Bay Ladies’ Senior Hockey Competition and holders of the Mororo Challenge Cup.
Back Row:  F. Simmonds, D. Franklin, K. Knapp, K. Mortensen, M. Limbrick.
Front Row:  G. Raven, W. Adam, E. Parini, V. Ward, I. Corey, R. Mortensen.  Absent:  M. Ayres.

TE AWA LADIES’ JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM.
Winners of the Junior Championship of Hawke’s Bay for Seasons 1919 & 1920.
Back Row:  J. Sleigh, E. Key, M. Sproule, L. Lawrence, R. Tankard, E. Yates.
Front Row:  B. Tankard, I. Adam, A. Bonnor, K. Cameron, M. Stephens, Lawrence, D. Magill.

NORTH ISLAND LEAGUE TEAM WHICH PLAYED ENGLAND IN NAPIER.

HAWKE’S BAY RUGBY UNION’S TOURING TEAM, 1920.

MOASCAR CUP MATCH V.

Te Aute (5 points).

Palmerston North High School (8 points).

[Advertisement]
Hands across the Sea (Napier and Gisborne.)
FRANK LOWNDES & SON,
Shipping, Customs, Forwarding Agents and General Carriers.
Support the Gisborne=Napier Forwarding Agency.
The Largest and Most Progressive Carrying firm on the East Coast.
Our “Yellow and Black” Motor Lorries meet all Steamers and Trains in both Napier and Gisborne.  Hand your Baggage to them.
Gisborne Phones – 400, 1400, 407, 235.   Napier Phone – 1129.

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.  19

[Advertisements]

P.O. Box 21,
GARAGE TELEPHONE, 215.
PRIVATE TELEPHONES –
737 – F. Lowe.
776 – J. C. Hannay.
Lowe & Keesing Ltd.
HERSCHELL STREET – NAPIER.
Hawke’s Bay Agents for – LEYLAND British Lorries
STEEL MULE Tractors
HUDSON, ESSEX, STANDARD ANGUS SANDERSON and DE DION Motor Cars.
Full Stocks of leading TYRES & TUBES, BENZINE & OILS.
Up-to-date Workshops.  Garage Open Day and Night.

New Spring Styles
for Men and Women of Good Taste are shown in great profusion at the store of –
Roach’s Limited,
We have left no stone unturned to secure the most comprehensive selection of all that is new, smart and dainty in Spring apparel.  How well we have succeeded is well evidenced by the DISPLAY IN OUR WINDOWS AND STORE
For Men   SPRING SUITS, SMART LIGHT OVERCOATS, SHIRTS, HATS, UNDERWEAR
For Women   New Blouses, Costumes, Underclothing, Millinery &c
at Lowest Possible Prices.
Roach’s Ltd., Hastings,
Famous for good values for over a third of century
business men to charge higher prices and thus add to the cost of commodities.

[,,,]

PHOTOGRAPHS.

The East Coast Journal will be pleased to receive for publication topical photographs from any part of the district.

[…]

Topics of the  Week.

THE EAST COAST WRECK (?).

Some excitement was caused in shipping circles last week when station hands at Tolago Bay reported that a large steamer had been wrecked.  Police inquiries failed to establish the truth of the rumour, which was a first supposed to be the Kia Ora (Shaw, Savill Line).

It is now definitely established that the steamer Kia Ora was 12 miles off Gable-end-Foreland from noon on Sunday till 6.30 at night.  She then steamed to northwards of the East Cape and there can be little doubt that this was the steamer seen from Rototahi station.  The Kia Ora was at Tokomaru Bay loading on Friday, then, when the storm came up she put to sea, cruising about off Gable on Sunday under easy steam. No whistle was blown.

THE HOWARD BEQUEST.

A deputation from Hawke’s Bay waited on the Premier and Minister of Agriculture recently in connection with the utilisation of the bequest of the late Josiah Howard.  A promise was made that the whole matter would be reconsidered by the Government.

Cabinet has since gone into the position, and decided to adhere to its former decision, viz., to establish an Agricultural College at Weraroa, Levin.

The agitation on the East Coast to have the college established at Tikokino or within the district is not likely to cease in spite of the above decision.

A photograph of the testator, the late Mr. Howard, appears in this week’s illustrated section.

Cabinet’s attitude with) regard to the Howard bequest was later detailed by the Minister of Agriculture as follows: – When the deputation from Hawke’s Bay waited on the Right Hon. the Prime Minister and myself in connection with the utilisation of the bequest of the late Josiah Howard, a promise was made that the whole matter would be reconsidered by the Government.  Cabinet has since carefully gone into the position and decided to adhere to its  former decision, namely, to establish an agricultural college at Weraroa, Levin.

The main object of the testator was to benefit the inhabitants of New Zealand by the establishment of a College of Agriculture.  Assuming that he also desired that the college should be established on the land which he himself devised, that desire was subsidiary altogether to the main desire and charitable intention of his well.  Shortly put, the testator wished to leave his property for the establishment of a College of Agriculture, and left his property to the Crown for that purpose.  But that desire was necessarily subject to the decision of the Government as to the best site for the college, which the testator desired to see established for the benefit of the people of New Zealand.  That being so, there is nothing improper, unfair, or unjust in the application of the proceeds or the profits of the sale of the testator’s property to assist in the establishment of a College of Agriculture in any part of New Zealand selected by the Government, and, in my opinion, it would defeat the charitable intention  of the testator if the Government did not, first, exercise its judgement as to the place where the college should be established, and secondly, apply the testator’s property to the benefit of the college so established.  As to the suggestion that if the property of the testator is considered unsuitable as a site for the establishment of a College of Agriculture, then some other site in Hawke’s Bay should be selected, the answer

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20   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

is that the plain intention of the testator was to benefit the people of New Zealand, and not the people of Hawke’s Bay only.

It is obvious that the Government could not properly establish a college on the testator’s land unless the Government was satisfied that that was the best locality for the establishment.  If it were clear that it would be taking an unfair advantage of the testator’s will to establish a college elsewhere, the alternative would be that the Government should refuse the benefit of the will and allow the property to be divided among the testator’s next-of-kin.

[…]

PRESENTATION.

Mr P. Hereford, who has for the past five years filled the position of sub-editor to the Hawke’s Bay Herald, was the recipient of a presentation from the members of the staff on the occasion of his severing his connection with the firm to enter into a journalistic venture on his own account.  Mr. B.  T. Dinwiddie, in making the presentation, expressed the appreciation of Mr Hereford’s services and their regret at losing him, but hoped that the new venture would prove a success.

HAWKE’S BAY SHOW.

The Hawke’s Bay Spring Show has again come round, and farmers and business men are looking forward to the big agricultural and pastoral fixture, which takes place this year on October 20 and 21 at the Hastings Showground.  Intending exhibitors are already making their preparations, and are reminded that entries close with the secretary, Mr. A. M. Retemeyer,

Box 143, Napier, or with Mr. J. R. Lanauze, Hastings, on October 6.  The schedule is worth perusal by everyone interested in land and stock matters.

SPORTING GOODS.

J. R. Ross and Co., the sporting specialists, inserts an advertisement on the back of the cover of this issue drawing attention to his unique stock of sporting requisites – cricket, football, tennis, hockey, fishing – every outdoor game is catered for and inspection by those interested is invited. *

[…]

NAPIER SHORT OF SUGAR.

It is stated that at present there are no further sugar supplies in sight for Napier.  Even if the sugar works at Chelsea, Auckland, were to be re-opened this week the very earliest chance of any sugar reaching Napier from there is by the Arahura on Thursday of next week.

One grocer said that he had been informed by a traveller for one of the merchant firms doing business here that it may possibly be three weeks to a month before further supplies arrive.

A small quantity of loaf sugar from Sydney was landed at Napier early this week, but this, too, has been sold out.

NAPIER CATHEDRAL.

Two windows which have been placed in the Lady Chapel of St. John’s Cathedral, Napier, one to the memory of the Pakeha and Maori soldiers who died for Queen and Country in the Maori War between 1860 and 1870, and the other in memory of the following sons of clergy in the Diocese who died in the late war:  Henry Palmer Cullwick, Leonard Widluke Dean, Francis Aubrey, Dunstan Martin, Walter David Ruddock, Edward Oliver Ruddock and Hugh Latimer Tuke – were dedicated during the celebration of Holy Eucharist in connection with the opening of the Diocesan Synod.

Archdeacon Williams said that the members of Synod shared the sorrow and the pride of the parents and relatives of the brave boys who had thus given their lives for the cause of the Empire and of right, and pointed out that their devotion and self-surrender offered a noble example for us in our spiritual warfare.

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[…]

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September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   21

[…]

22   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

[…]

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   23

[…]

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24   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

Country News

TAKAPAU.

A very pretty although a quiet little wedding was solemnised in the Takapau Presbyterian Church on Wednesday afternoon, August 25, when Miss Helen Talbot Margaret Vickery, niece of Mr and Mrs W. R. McLeod, Takapau, was united in matrimony to Mr Henry Sidney William Wooley, of Whangarei.

WAIPAWA.

Much regret is expressed at the retirement of Mr. J. C. Taylor, J.P., from public life, owing to ill-health.  Mr Taylor, who has been 56 years in the Dominion, saw service in the Maori trouble in Hawke’s Bay.  Some 25 years ago he was appointed a Justice of the Peace and later coroner for the district.  He also took a part in local and general politics.

Mr. W. C. Pettit, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. McKay, of Argyll, died this week after a short illness.

The Waipawa Savage Club paid a visit to the Pukeora Sanitarium [Sanitorium] on Tuesday night.  Practically the same programme submitted on ladies’ night at Waipawa was given.  In the absence of the Chief Savage, the Deputy Chief, Mr. R. H. Wedde, presided and made some humorous remarks appropriate to the occasion.

The trustees in the estate of the late Mrs. Lissie Rathbone have allocated various sums to charitable and religious institutions.  The trustees have handed over the sum of £7000 for the purpose of building a Boys’ Home in Waipawa.

WAIPUKURAU.

At St. Mary’s Anglican Church, Waipukurau, Mr Henry Frankish, of Marakeke, was married to Miss Agnes Maud Pritchard, of Takapau.  The vicar (The Rev. A. W. C. Stace) officiated.  The bridesmaids were Misses Ida and Jean McLean.  Mr. H. J. Evans was best man and Mr. A. Trevelyan groomsman.  Mrs. Geo. Bryce officiated at the organ.  After the ceremony a reception was held at the residence of Mr and Mrs P. McLean.   At the Catholic Church the Rev. Fathers Minogue and McLoughlan conducted the marriage ceremony between Mr Moss Moriarity, son of Mr M. Moriarity [Moriarty], of Ashburton, and Miss Mildred Myrtle Pawson, daughter of Mr and Mrs Frank Pawson, of Feilding.  The bride’s sister, Miss Ivy Pawson, was the bridesmaid, while Mr Walter Oliver acted as best man.  The wedding breakfast was partaken of at the Ruahine Tea Rooms.

A public meeting was held in the Social Hall to consider a proposal to establish a Soldiers’ Hostel in Waipukurau.  After considerable discussion it was agreed to make an effort to lease a suitable property and furnish it.  It was resolved to establish a rest room in Waipukurau for the benefit of disabled soldiers.  Mr Paul Hunter agreed to move immediately to procure a lease of suitable premises, and to report to the committee at the earliest opportunity.

The Town Band used their new instruments on Sunday afternoon in the District Hospital grounds for the first time.

The senior football team played Onga Onga on Saturday afternoon, and won by 12 point to 6.

St. Mary’s Parish will be represented at the Waiapu Diocesan Synod at Napier by the Rev. A. W. C. Stace and Mr. J. H. Kibblewhite.

TANGOIO.

The roads in the valley and on the Falls-Elbow road are in a scandalous condition. With the cessation of the heavy rains, the unfortunate settler or motorist who is complelled to travel over these roads (?) must plough through a vicious mixture filling [With the cessation of the heavy rains, the] amost bottomless. Complaint is made that the Tangoio hill is being neglected in preference to the Elbow-Wairoa stretch. Since the Tangoio road was metalled some months ago no surfaceman has been employed to keep it in order.

ESKDALE

The annual dance of the Petane Defence Rifle Club was held in the Eskdale Hall on Friday night of last week.  About 45 couples were present.  The hall was tastefully decorated with rifles and flags.  Misses Cox supplied the music.  Extras were contributed by Mrs Nichol and the Misses Kendall, Dean and Hansard.  Mr George Bourke was M.C.  Opportunity was taken during the evening to make a presentation to Mrs Watson and Miss Caughley, who are leaving the district.

WAIKARE.

The woolshed at Waikare station was the scene of a most delightful dance on Friday evening of last week.  The host and hostess, Mr and Mrs James Tait, entertained a large number of guests, including visitors from Napier and Auckland, and former residents of the district and all the prominent local settlers and their wives and families.  Dancing was interspersed with vocal items and a delightful supper was provided.  The gathering concluded with musical honours for the host and hostess and the singing of Auld Lang Syne.

NORSEWOOD.

The Norsewood School Committee has decided to ask the Education Board to have the colours of each school in its district registered and to allocate colours to schools.  Mr Matheson, of Otawhao, has been elected to the committee.  Mr Chicken is to arrange to have the school grounds metalled.  Mr and Mrs Rosacken were tendered a farewell social and dance on the eve of their departure from the district, and received a presentation from the residents.

ORMONDVILLE.

Ormondville spinsters invited the footballers and their friends to attend a ball held in their honour on Friday of last week.  The decorations of the hall were a feature of the function.  A bountiful supper was provided.  Messrs. O. Benbow and Ray Redward acted as M’s.C.  At the conclusion the guests expressed their appreciation of the evening’s enjoyment.

OTANE.

A meeting of the Otane Town Board was held on Monday evening.

The chairman, Mr. G. McKay, announced that the meeting would probably be the last of the existing Town Board, as the biennial election was to be held on September 15.  The chairman spoke in very sympathetic terms of the clerk’s failing health, and regarded his services of over twenty five years as almost a record of faithful continuous attention to the Otane Town Board’s duties, both as clerk and overseer, for he inaugurated the new Weber Street to Waipawa road, and had since concluded its widening and completion to the chain in width.  The chairman would ask the Board to consider the doctor’s advice to Mr. Taylor to relinquish office work as soon as he could, and as a mark of esteem and great appreciation to grant him leave of absence to the end of this year, on full pay.

The leave of absence on full pay to the end of the year was heartily agreed to.

Mr. McKay then thanked the members of the Board for the keen interest they had taken in

Town Board matters.  The higher cost of labour, material, and administration generally had made it necessary, in common with other local governing bodies, to raise the rates for this year, but he hoped, by careful manipulation of the Board’s funds, and the return of normal conditions, that the rates would again be reduced consistent with the steady progress of the town.

A resolution was passed thanking Mr. McKay for his continued efforts to induce the Government to do its duty to Hawke’s Bay in the establishment of an Agricultural College from the proceeds of the Josiah Howard estate, and asked him, as representing the Board, to still press Hawke’s Bay’s just claim.

ELSTHORPE.

The Otane-Elsthorpe mail service has been purchased by Mr R. Grant from Mr.  J. A. Steven.  Mr S. Linton drew a section in the ballot for the Wilder estate at Wallingford.  A very large number attended the Oero and Elsthorpe bachelors’ ball held at Elsthorpe.  The committee, under the chairmanship of Mr Gordon McAulay, with Mr Walter Rowe as secretary, are to be congratulated upon the success which attended their splendid organising work.

WAIROA.

At Frasertown on Saturday the fifth of a series of hockey matches between Waiau (Frasertown) and Wairoa ladies’ teams was played.  The match created a great deal of interest and was a keen, fast game.  Neither side managed to score, and a sixth match will be played.  During the match Mrs. Nicholas dislocated her shoulder. A men’s match was played between Wairoa and Frasertown, and resulted in a win for Wairoa by 4 to Nil.

HAVELOCK NORTH.

It is expected that the net proceeds of the recent bazaar will amount to about £300.  The gross proceeds were about £320.

Considerable interest is being taken in the election of members of the Town Board, which takes place on September 15.  Several new candidates are being mentioned.

The Town Board is awaiting the issue of an Order-in-Council granting permission to take a poll on the question of raising a load in connection with the proposed hydro-electric scheme.  In the meantime the preliminary work in connection with the scheme is nearing completion.

A handsome residence is being erected on a site overlooking the old Te Mata homestead for Mr. Bernard Chambers.  The building trade is flouring in Havelock North.

The Havelock North school has now a roll number of 277, with an average attendance of 236.6 for last month.  The annual examination of the school will take place on September 20.

TOPICS OF THE WEEK.

THIEVING ON SPORTS GROUNDS.

For some time past complaint has been made by football, hockey and cricket players that a considerable amount of petty thieving went on during the progress of games at Nelson and McLean Parks.  A sequel to these complaints was the appearance at the Magistrate’s Court on Monday of a youth charged with theft.  Detective-Sergeant Butler said that on Saturday last a sports meeting was held on Nelson Park, and several football matches were played.  The complainant had participated in a match in the early part of the afternoon, and left a £1 note and a coin in his pocket.  The accused also played in a match, and when accosted by the police said he had 15s in his possession.  When asked how he came to have possession of a coin the accused said it belonged to his brother, who had brought it back from France.  As a matter of fact, the coin was not a foreign one, but one to commemorate an industrial exhibition held in New Plymouth some years back.  After further evidence His Worship said the whole point at issue was the identification of the coin.  He had very little doubt the accused had robbed the complainant, but there was one element of doubt, and he had to give the accused the benefit of that doubt.  It was with great hesitation that he did so, but he would dismiss the information.

[…]

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September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   25

[…]

HASTINGS.

THE USUAL CROSS WORDS.

There has been very little news of the startling nature during the past week except that His Worship the Mayor and Cr. L.W. Fowler crossed words again at the last council meeting.  The council meetings are becoming noted for this sort of thing and next year there should be a rush of candidates for seats on the council to enjoy the monotonous spectacle of Cr. Fowler’s fight for freedom of speech, for speech is all that it comes to.

STRAYING CATTLE.

One resident is regularly drawing the Borough Council’s attention to the numbers of cattle and horses straying about the borough.  A few weeks ago the State and the council were enriched considerably by the proceeds of many fines against owners of straying animals.  The result of the prosecutions was such that stray cattle and horses are almost an asset to the borough.  But the objection is mainly to stock wandering at night on the roads.  There is a real danger, but comparative immunity of capture by the rangers.  The writer had one experience of about ten cows wandering on the road while the owners were holding a confab in the very middle of the road.  A collision with the cow and the other two was narrowly averted.  During the day I have seen cows grazing within one hundred yard of Heretaunga street, the cowboy being many hundreds of yards away.  Still sometimes the ranger wins, for a few days ago I saw him drive a horse and one or two head of cattle a few yards along the road to the owner’s place and then collect a few shillings.  Very heavy penalties should be placed on owners of stock found wandering at night, or the owners might imitate the ancient general who tied torches to the horns of cattle and deceived his enemy.

HAVELOCK ROAD.

The completion of the first portion of Havelock road is in sight, and no one will be sorry except the workmen whose energy is hardly Homeric.  There have been excuses about delay in getting plant and so on.  The opinion is largely held that before the job was tackled the plant should have been on the spot or definitely in sight.  The cost of the experiment should have a heavy bearing on the future roading policy prevailing in a borough which has miles of streets in condition and out of it.  It is evident that the question needs urgent and pre-eminent attention by the council.  The present repair work seems to the throwing of a few shovelfuls of shingle here and there.  The common pick seems to be a rare thing.

THE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

Recently there appeared letters by His Worship the Mayor (Mr. G. Ebbett) and a reply from the Hastings Returned Soldiers’ Association on the question of the memorial funds.  It is a pity that the hatchet should be dug up again, even if a section of the public are disappointed with the Government’s offer.  Those who support acceptance seem to take the attitude of getting what can be got.  The other side seem to wish to get what was expected – and with reason – or nothing at all.  The sooner the authorities arrive here and the whole matter is threshed out the better, and the two issues of a hospital of some sort on the one hand, and a memorial on the other are definitely separated the better.  In the meantime hints at attempted division of the committee serve no purpose other than to create suspicion that there is a division of opinion even if the committee have decided upon a course of action which seems to be one of taking what is offering and asking for more.

CYCLING ON FOOTPATHS.

A number of people have recently been fined for cycling on footpaths on the borough.  At the last Council meeting the point was raised that in view of the state of some roads prosecution was persecution.  There is something in this contention, for the roads after a week’s wet weather are terrible, and the writer would not be surprised to the Inspector use the footpath if his new car broke down and he had to use a cycle.

LAND SALE.

The sale of a number of sections of the Mahanga estate attracted a number of land-seekers and land-holders.  The result of the sale will not have much effect in bringing about closer settlement, but will merely add a few more acres to the domains of some large squatters.

AN OLD MAN’S FALL.

An old man of well nigh 80 summers had a nasty fall in Hastings street on Monday.  In attempting to pick up his kit he fell and cut his face badly about the right eye.  He was taken to Dr. R. de Boisierre’s and given attention.

HALF-HOLIDAY QUESTION.

A somewhat amusing position was revealed in a report that a petition in favour or Saturday closing is being prepared for presentation to the Borough Council with a view of holding a poll.  The report added that the Saturday would not be set aside if Napier reverted to Wednesday.  If the whole case is contingent upon such a condition one is not inclined to treat the matter seriously, because it looks as if the element of “filthy lucre” creeps in, and the public come last.  If the shops shut here on Wednesday, there would still be some wailing when the races come round again.

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26   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

[…]

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   27

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28   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

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Ladies’ Page

POUR LES DAMES.

(By “Margaret.”)

Miss R. Scott, of Christchurch, who has for some time been the guest of Mrs. H.A. Cornford, Napier, left last week for Wellington, where she intends visiting her sister before returning to Christchurch.

Mrs.  Graham Russell, Napier, is entertaining Miss Whitcombe, of Wellington.

Mrs Redgrave, of Dannevirke, is visiting Napier as the guest of Mrs. McAllister, Lucy Road.

Miss R. Moncrieff, music mistress at the G.H.S., Napier, is spending the term holidays with friends in Gisborne.

Mr and Mrs McLellan have left for a fortnight’s holiday in Rotorua and Auckland.  They are accompanied by their daughter Elsie.

Miss Retemeyer is away from Napier on a sketching tour.

Miss B. Toman entertained the Misses Mona and Dorie Middleton, of the “Mother Hubbard” Company during their stay in Napier.

Amongst the guests at the Masonic Hotel are included Mr and Mrs Fenwick and Mr and Mrs Lowndes, from Gisborne; also Mrs. and the Misses A’Deane, from Takapau.

Sir Thomas and Lady MacKenzie are returning to New Zealand by the Remuera.

Wairoa girls’ hockey teams are looking forward to some good matches to be played with the Napier Technical College girls’ team, which goes to Wairoa this week in charge of Miss Plimsoll, M.A.  This team has already beaten both Dannevirke and Napier High Schools, so play up Wairoa.

Mr and Mrs G. McLeod are spending a short time in Napier before going to Wellington, where they expect to reside.

The Napier B.H.S. gave their annual At Home a few days ago, the guests of the evening being the Palmerston North First Fifteen, which had come to Napier for the Palmerston Te Aute Rugby match. A good concert programme and an excellent supper attracted a large number of guests to the gymnasium, which had been made to look its best by the aid of flowers and flags.

One of the most brilliant functions ever given for Hastings kiddies was the School Ball.  Not only children, but adults flocked to it until the spacious Drill Hall was thoroughly filled with a dazzling crowd of fancy costumes and happy faces.  The grand march, for which Mr Pegler, had trained the children, was a picture of Fairyland, and from beginning to end everything proved a great success.  Both committees are to be heartily congratulated on the results of their strenuous work, the entertainment having proved one which will be remembered by all for a long time to come.

Several weddings of local interest have taken place recently.  At St. Luke’s Church Miss Doris Violet Romeril, only daughter of Mr and the late Mrs Anna Romeril, of St. Helliers’ Jersey, Channel Isles, was married to Mr H.E. Phillips, of Havelock North.

Another very quiet wedding was that of Miss Zoe Rosenberg, eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs A. Rosenberg, of Hastings, to Mr Alfred Groome, son of the late Mr. W. Groome, South Tottenham, England.  After the reception the happy couple left by train for the south, where they intend to spend their honeymoon.

A very pretty wedding was solemnised at St. Mary’s Church, Waipukurau, when Miss Agnes Maud Pritchard was united in the bonds of holy wedlock to Mr Henry Frankish.  Misses Ida and Jean McLean acted as bridesmaids, and the duties of best man were performed by Mr. H.J. Evans.

In Havelock a very successful bazaar was held in aid of the Swimming Baths funds.  There was a very large attendance, and business was excellent at the various stalls and tables.

At Raumati a most successful gift auction took place lately.  Owing to the illness of Mr Ancliff bids were recorded by Messrs Gilchrist and E. Svensen.  In several cases the bidding caused great excitement, and the results were satisfactory to all concerned.  During the evening the presentation of prizes to the winners of various euchre tournaments held during the season gave an added interest to the proceedings, which were brought to an end by the handing round of a very excellent supper.

On Tuesday, August 24th, the Gisborne Women’s Club gave a most interesting exhibition of work done by the Art and Crafts Circle.  Invitations were extended to members and ex-members, including a friend in each case, and the afternoon was greatly enjoyed by all.  There were three special stalls – one for goods only, one for work which was for sale, and one for loan collections. Orders were taken for Xmas and wedding gifts, the beauty of the work exhibited bringing many. Amongst other things were beautiful specimens of leather work, marquetry work, beaten brass work, poker work, pen-painting and all sorts of novelties.  The organisers and workers are to be heartily congratulated on the work done and the success of the exhibition.

It may be of interest to our readers to know that a short time ago a very well known American University contemplated holding a course of lectures for women on the correct methods of “making up” without causing injury to the skin.  One so often sees a beautiful face and neck spoilt by injudicious use of powder and so-called “skin foods” which, while serving the purpose for the moment, tend in the majority of cases, to coarsen the skin and take off the natural bloom which – alas – one sees so often marred nowadays.

New Zealand ladies might do well to follow up this course and learn how to make the very best of the complexion given them by Nature and assisted, when permitted, by the beautiful climate of these Islands, and how to use, not mis-use, the many devices of Art for this purpose.

The more your hat shines the more fashionable you are this season.  Size and shape do not seem to matter very much, and you may have any sort of trimming you like almost, so long as you have not too much of it, but your hat must shine, and if possible have some very striking colour somewhere.

[…]

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A & H.

The Mark of Quality.
“THE RECOGNISED HOME FURNISHERS”
is our title – EARNED, not merely assumed, as our complete stock of everything pertaining to home furnishing at moderate prices will attest.
For all that is best in
FURNITURE, CARPETS,
DRAPINGS AND CURTAINS,
LINOLEUMS, SEAGRASS GOODS, &c.,
it will undoubtedly be to your advantage to make our Store your headquarters.
We Are Specialists in Making Oak Furniture to Order,
and our Factory is capable of turning out articles of rare distinction.
Our Slogan – “THE STORE WITH THE FACTORY BEHIND IT.”
CALL IN AND SEE US EARLY, OR WRITE FOR PARTICULARS OF OUR STOCK.
Allen and Harris, Ltd.
Late C. R. Allens, EMERSON STREET, NAPIER.

September 4, 1920.]   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   29

[…]

[Advertisement]
Skudder Car
BALL BEARING
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
– Built of Steel
– For Long, Tough Service
– The Scudder Car will give
– More Wholesome and
– Continuous Fun
– More Fresh air and Exercise
– Than any other Toy ever Built.
– It’s simple and sturdy.
– Just press the footboard
– Alternately fore and aft, and
– Away you go.
– In two sizes – 70/- and 90/-.
AT THE SHOP WITH THE BIG BEAR
THERE ARE ALWAYS WONDERFUL STRONG TOYS FOR THE BOYS AND GIRLS.
Scooters from 6/6 to 50/-; Trolley Cars, 52/6 to 60/-; Coaster Wagons, 80/- to 105/-; Motor Cars to ride in 105/-to £15/0/-; Tricycles from 35/- to 55/-; Auto-Scooters, 50/-; and many others.
Always a Cordial Invitation to Call and Look Round.  We expect you soon.
COTTRELL’S NOVELTY DEPOT.
NAPIER.

30   THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

[…]

THE EAST COAST JOURNAL.   [September 4, 1920.

[Advertisement]
J. R. ROSS AND CO.,
The Hawke’s Bay Sporting Goods Depot, Napier.
Are the Best People to send to for Supplies.
Full and Complete Stocks of
Cricket Goods
Tennis Material
Croquet Requisites
Fishing Tackle
Golf, Football and Hockey Goods.
And all
Indoor and Outdoor Sporting Requisites.
Fresh New Seasonable Goods arriving regularly.
OUR TWENTY-FIVE YEARS’ EXPERIENCE IS AT YOUR SERVICE.
Special Mail Order Department for your Mail Orders.
Send your Enquiries along.
J. R. ROSS AND CO.,
Sporting Goods Depot,
Tobacconists & Hairdressers – Napier.
Printed and Published by G.W. Venables & Co. Ltd., at their Registered Printing Works, Dalton Street, Napier, for the proprietors, Philip Hereford and James Patrick Kerin of Dickens Street, Napier

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 1920.

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Description

Surnames in this newspaper –
Adam, A’Deane, Aldworth, Amos, Ancliff, Annand, Armstrong, Aubrey, Ayres, Badley, Barry, Beckett, Benbow, Bethune, Bishop, Bone, Bonnor, Bourke, Brown, Bryce, Bunny, Burden, Cameron, Carpentier, Cato, Caughley, Chambers, Clabby, Clark, Cook, Cooper, Cornford, Cox, Coyle, Crosse, Cullwick, de Boisierre, Dean, Dinwiddie, Doyle, Duff, Ebbett, Evans, Everard, Fenwick, Fowler, Frankish, Franklin, Frater, Georgeson, Gibson, Gilchrist, Gill, Gleadow, Grant, Groome, Hannay, Hansard, Harrison, Heeney, Hereford, Hickey, Hill, Hoadley, Hobson, Holland, Howard, Hunter, Johnson, Kendall, Kerin, Key, Kibblewhite, Knapp, Knowles, Lanauze, Latham, Lawrence, Lawrie, Lindsay, Linton, Lowe, Lowndes, MacKenzie, Magill, Martin, Massey, Matheson, McAllister, McAulay, McDonald, McGregor, McKay, McKnight, McLean, McLellan, McLeod, McLoughlan, Middleton, Minogue, Modrich, Moncrieff, Moriarty, Mortensen, Nichol, Nicholas, Nicholson, Nosworthy, O’Dowd, O’Halloran, Oldfield, Oldham, Oliver, O’Neill, Overend, Pawson, Pegler, Pettit, Phillips, Plimsoll, Pooley, Priest, Pritchard, Quinlivan, Rathbone, Redgrave, Redward, Retemeyer, Ribbands, Romeril, Room, Rosacken, Rosenberg, Rowe, Ruddock, Russell, Russell, Scott, Shaw, Simmonds, Simson, Sleigh, Sproule, Stace, Stephens, Steven, Stewart, Strachan, Stubbs, Svensen, Sweetapple, Symes, Tait, Tankard, Tareha, Taylor, Tennent, Thomas, Toman, Trevelyan, Tuke, Twist, Van Asch, Vickery, Watson, Wedde, Whelch, Whitcombe, White, Williams, Wood, Wooley, Yates

Some sections of this newspaper not relating to Hawke’s Bay have not been transcribed – these are indicated by […]

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Newspaper

Date published

4 September 1920

Publisher

GW Venables and Company Limited

Accession number

506211

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