Hastings Citizens’ Band Centenary 1886-1986

HASTINGS CITIZENS’ BAND CENTENARY

1886 – 1986

HASTINGS CITIZENS’ BAND

CENTENARY
CENTENARY
CENTENARY

1886 – 1986

25, 26,27, JULY 1986

COMPILED BY NORMA KEESING ASSISTED BY ANNETTE STENSON

PROGRAMME FOR THE CENTENNIAL WEEKEND

FRIDAY EVENING:   7 PM   GET TOGETHER AT BANDROOM

SATURDAY MORNING:   10 AM   BAND PARADES THROUGH TOWN

SATURDAY AFTERNOON:   1.30   JUNIOR BAND PLAYS AT THE CHEVAL ROOMS, RACECOURSE

2 00   99TH ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

3 30   AFTERNOON TEA

SENIOR BAND PLAYS

SATURDAY EVENING:   6 00   COCKTAIL HOUR

7 00   DINNER AND DANCE

SUNDAY MORNING:   10 30   CHURCH PARADE AT SALVATION ARMY CITADEL

FOLLOWED BY LUNCH

CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE:
Mr B Bennett (Chairperson)
Mrs A E Stenson (Secretary)
Mrs N E C Keesing
Mr J Snowling
Mr D Myhill

MAYORAL MESSAGE

It gives me very great pleasure to offer heartiest congratulations to the Hastings Citizens’ Band on achieving one hundred years distinguished service to the City. The band has always been a source of pride and a wellspring of pleasure for the citizens of Hastings, and the closeness with which the band’s centenary follows the City’s demonstrates how important the band has always been in the scale of the people’s priorities.

The Hastings Citizens’ Band has always consisted of a wide spectrum of the City’s residents, and has therefore been able to claim to be truly representative- yet another reason why the band has occupied a special place in the hearts of the citizens.

The band sets high – and constantly climbing – standards of excellence, a fact which is nationally recognized. Today’s band members are building on the traditions set by the pioneers, and you may be sure that they will applaud your efforts and achievements.

And, on behalf of the City, may I offer an especially warm welcome to all former band members and visitors from outside the City. I hope you all thoroughly enjoy the centenary celebrations.

Finally, may I wish the Band well with your recent project of extending the bandrooms, and wish the Hastings Citizens’ Band every good fortune as you embark on the next one hundred years.

Signed

J. J. O’CONNOR,
MAYOR.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE CHAIRPERSON’S MESSAGE

It has been my privilege to have been involved with the Hastings Citizens’ Band for the past six years having been invited to become a Vice-President by Mrs W Barrett, Senior, – herself a Vice-President – after I had told her how much I enjoyed hearing the band play.

After meeting the bandspeople I realized that I would like to become more active within the band than perhaps a Vice-President’s position would entail. I was duly elected to the Executive Committee and from there to Chairperson.

Being chairperson has bought all the usual headaches and heartaches along with the joys and pleasures that this position brings. The good times must have outweighed the rest, however, because my father, Ray Bond is now a Vice-President and my husband, Ross, is on the executive committee.

I have been very fortunate in having an excellent committee, easy to work with and with most of the problems arising being discussed and settled in an amicable manner.

The Hastings Citizens’ Band has many tireless workers and over the years this has been proved time and time again.

The moving of the bandroom to its new site in 1977 and the re-equipping of the band with instruments and uniforms following this was a mammoth task.

This year, because the band has outgrown the bandroom, has seen the addition of a new committee room, three practice rooms and a library, new facilities for the ladies and a revamped kitchen.

This has all cost time, money and effort but the band members, their families, supporters and friends have risen to the occasion and we now have a bandroom to be proud of.

Under the skilled leadership of John Snowling the band has performed very well at National and Provincial Contests and at some contests have taken every prize in their grade.

The Junior Band competed for the first time in 1985 at the Central District’s Contest and gained more points than two senior bands which were also competing. This is a tribute to Archie Shaw and his helpers who give their time and effort so willingly.

I would like to wish the Hastings Citizens’ Band all the very best as we enter into another hundred years.

I have thoroughly enjoyed my association with the band and hope it will continue for many years to come.

Signed

N E C KEESING,
CHAIRPERSON.

HASTINGS CITIZENS’ BAND – BAND OFFICERS

CONDUCTOR:   JOHN SNOWLING

DEPUTY CONDUCTOR:   WAYNE MYHILL

DRUM MAJOR:   JACK BAIRD

SERGEANT:   CLIFF HARRIS

CORPORAL:   RON RAY

LANCE CORPORAL:   CHERYL GODWIN

BAND SECRETARY:   RUSSELL BENNETT

BAND REPRESENTATIVE ON THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:   MARTIN HARRIS

BAND REPRESENTATIVE TO CENTRAL DISTRICTS BRASS BAND ASSOCIATION:   BILL BARRETT

HASTING CITIZENS’ BAND EXECUTIVE

PATRON:   D BUTCHER MP

PRESIDENT:   J J O’CONNOR MBE

VICE PRESIDENTS:

J Whittaker   H Barden   B Bennett
C Blackmore    G Wattie   R Wattie
Ross Jones   Richard Jones   Bryce Jones
J Redgrave   H B Poppelwell   J W Fransen [Franssen]
S Cushing   N Baird   V Harris
Raymond E Bond   M McKearney   R Robinson
R V Giorgi   L Moloney   D Apperley
M Thomson   D Robinson   Dr A W Reeves
Mrs W Barrett   Mrs A Bennett
Mr and Mrs J S Gimblett

HONORARY AUDITOR:   Mr B Fowler

SECRETARY/TREASURER:   Mrs A E Stenson

COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVE:   Mr A McI Grant

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:   Mrs N E C Keesing (Chairperson)
Mrs M Harris, Dr D Davidson, Messrs L Cash, P Godwin and R Keesing.

IN THE BEGINNING

In 1886 the 17 members of the Hastings Citizens’ Band posed formally for their photograph.

This photograph has kindly been given to the band by Mr A George, a grandson of the first conductor of the band.

However, apart from this photograph, who they were, when they first met, where they practiced and gave concerts is a mystery, for no documentation has come to light despite persistent research and inquiry.

Indeed, nothing much is known about the band until 1921 when some sketchy minutes of meetings shed a little light.

The first available records show that the band has experienced the usual checkered history of any organisation with many ups and downs, high and lows.

It has only been in fairly recent times that careful and accurate records have been kept and this booklet has been compiled with what little information has become available.

Thanks to David Myhill, a long serving bandsman and Graeme Stewart, a bandsman from, 1955-70 and others for their help in researching the material for this booklet.

BANDROOMS

The Warren Street bandroom had been home to the band for 50 years when it was notified that the Hastings City Council required the land for a new Civic Administration Block. Wanting only the land, the bandroom was burnt down by the Fire Brigade. A very sad occasion for the band.

The Buffalo Hall was then used for band practices until, after 16 months, this hall was also demolished by the Council leaving the band homeless once more.

The Nelson Park Grandstand was one of the premises offered to the band as temporary accommodation but ultimately was only used for storage.

The Parkvale School Hall was chosen as the most suitable place for practices. There were no storage facilities here however, and each bandsman had to be responsible for his own music and stand. This, of course, caused problems and during practices at Parkvale School there was often a mad dash during the evening to the grandstand to get music.

Unfortunately the storage at Nelson Park was not satisfactory as the front door didn’t fit properly and in wet and windy conditions the rain blew in making everything wet.

This was all very unsettling for the band and occurred whilst the band was practicing for the Central Districts Contest in October of that year, 1975, and for the National Contest which was held in Wellington the following year – 1976.

The band competed successfully in both these events.

In November 1976 the band was fortunate in obtaining the Hastings Bridge Club’s old Railway Road Clubrooms and applied to the City Council to move them to Council owned land in Orchard Road. Objections to this proposal were received from residents living 70 metres from the site who were concerned that their peace would be disturbed; that there would be increased traffic; and there would be “undesirable people” frequenting the bandroom.

A band spokesman assured the Town Planning Hearing Committee that bandspeople were not “undesirable people” and after the usual inevitable delays the Council, in February 1977, recommended that the band be granted conditional rights to place the rooms on the site. This was subject to several conditions regarding hours of use; offstreet parking; landscaping and the appearance of the building.

At last, after many delays and a lot of hardwork by the Chairperson, Mrs Shirley Barrett, the Hastings Citizens’ Band was to get its very own rooms. At sunrise on the fine morning of the 31st March 1977 the band, led by Drum Major Jack Baird, under the Conductorship of Phil Jennings, proudly escorted their new home, which was on a transporter, to its new site.

This trip, however, was not without difficulty. At the eleventh hour it was found that the building was too high to be taken under the power lines along the route so the roof had to be taken off. Linnell Builders (Mr Linnell was a Council Representative on the Executive committee at the time) kindly supplied the tarpaulins to cover the gaping hole, and many a silent prayer was offered for the weather to stay dry.

The rooms were taken on a roundabout route to cause as little disruption to other traffic as possible.

Which was just as well because in Tollemache Road progress came to a halt while adjustments were made to the overhead wires to prevent arcing which would have caused most of Hastings to be without breakfast.

The problem was overcome and the bandroom eventually reached its destination. The cost to purchase the rooms was $3 500 with a further $3 500 for transportation.

Other expenses incurred were for plumbing, sewerage, piling, electricity connections and other usual services making a total of $12 000.

A very worthwhile project.

The band members and supporters spruced up the rooms and laid out the grounds after which His Worship the Mayor, Mr J J O’Connor, who had been extremely helpful with the project, cut the ribbon to officially declare the bandroom open on 25 June 1978.

Within a few years, however, the bandroom had become overcrowded with enthusiastic learners, a flourishing junior band and a well-attended senior band competing for space with other various band related activities also taking place.

After much discussion it was decided by the executive committee to build onto the existing bandroom. This, with a lot of hardwork by the fundraising committee and members of the band and supporters, has been achieved.

Thanks to the Clerk of Works Archie Shaw and Bill Barrett and their willing workers these rooms will be in use in time for the Centennial Celebrations.

The problem of finding a new bandroom was important enough to earn mention in Violet and Geoffrey Brand’s

book ‘Brass Bands in the 20th Century’:

“ …… The life-blood of the New Zealand brass band movement is the enthusiasm and hard work of the many bands in towns and villages throughout the two islands.

“This perhaps can be epitomized in the story of the Hastings Citizens Band. Founded in 1886, the band needed a new band-room in 1977 – and discovered one. Unfortunately, it was on the wrong site. The band’s own site was on the opposite side of the town. It was decided to hire a transporter and transfer the band-room intact! Curtains, carpets, kitchen fittings all remained merely the roof came off to save damaging telephone wires in transit.

“Praying that there would be no rain, the band played its band-room off the old site and on to the new one, at daybreak on March 31, 1977.”

A wonderful tribute to the many hours of hardwork, planning and organizing by dedicated bandspeople.

INSTRUMENTS AND UNIFORMS

The first mention of the band obtaining more instruments is in 1925 when it was recommended at a band committee meeting that two tenor horns be purchased for £6 and £8/10/- respectively. Following minutes give no indication as to whether they were bought.

In July 1957 when the band was under the conductorship of Mr R W Lee the executive committee agreed that 25 new instruments should be purchased to replace the existing ones which were over thirty years old. The estimated cost was in excess of £2 000.

Following delays with import licensing and lack of communication between the two retail stores involved the new instruments eventually arrived.

The Chairman, Mr H G Jones, reported in 1959:
‘First the appeal for our new instruments was a great success. The arrival of the instruments in February and their public presentation in Nelson Park were important events, made the more so I think, when the Deputy-Mayor was able to announce that thanks to the generous response of business houses and the public of Hastings and district, we had sufficient funds in hand to pay for them completely.

‘To all those who gave, either in donation or services I wish to express my sincere thanks – especially to the Chairman and Members of the Appeal Committee, Mr H G Apperley and his helpers. I also wish to thank the City Council for its generous special grant towards the appeal.’

An extremely busy year for the band with other achievements being the complete outfitting of all bandsmen, junior members and the drum corps with uniforms and the raising of sufficient funds to enable the band to attend the New Zealand Brass Bands Contest in Wellington – the first contest the band had attended for 11 years.

In 1977 it was again time to renew the instruments and uniforms. Mrs Shirley Barrett, the first woman to be chairperson in the band’s history, told the Herald Tribune in July that year that the instruments and uniforms had to be replaced at an expected cost of $30 000 and over $3 000 respectively because of their age and the bad intonation of the instruments.

This necessary replacement came at a bad time for the band as it had just acquired its new bandroom in Orchard Road and was depleted of cash resources. Various projects were undertaken and with public performances, a sports and recreation grant and with much fundraising by the Ladies Committee, band members and other supporters the sum was eventually realised.

At the time the senior band was at its highest playing strength with a membership of 35, a number of whom were top musicians usually well place in solo competitions.

A junior or auxillary [auxiliary] band had also been established with a membership of 20. To provide both instruments and uniforms for this number of players was a massive undertaking by a voluntary organisation.

“It’s ‘hard yacker’’, said Murray Warrington, a long time bandsman and band secretary at the time, to the Herald-Tribune.

Surely the understatement of the decade!

The New Zealand Mouthpiece, September 1980 published this item sent in by Colin Bunnett, Publicity Officer at the time:

‘Our bass section has now been fully re-equipped with new instruments and looks very impressive. We have also purchased a set of timpani from Invercargill and the delivery is worth a mention. On 4 September we attended a concert by the Enfield Band in Hastings. The concert was due to start at 8 pm and the timpani provided for the Enfield were totally unsuitable. After several toll calls and exactly one month in transit our timpani arrived at the front door of the Municipal Theatre at 7 50 pm, were wheeled in straight onto the stage and played in an excellent concert by Brian Cuthbert. The tour leader Major Idwal Evans told the audience that people who did not believe in miracles had just witnessed one.      

The biggest changes over the last two decade have been in percussion requirements, for instance, at the band’s last contest in the Waikato Provincials, timpani, glockenspiel, tubular bells and hand held cymbals were required as well as the standard bass drum and side drum which were also needed.   

FUNDRAISING

Over the years many and varied have been the ideas for raising funds. The band has been fortunate in receiving grants from the Hastings City Council but with the high cost of running a band other income is essential and at times special committees have been set up for this purpose.

Fund raising has included hangi’s, coffee mornings, picking up and selling pine cones, car washing, garage sales, jumble sales, cake stalls, raffles, housie, card evenings, casino nights, progressive dinners/luncheons, socials, balls, Tinhat concerts, selling mystery envelopes, novelty sports meetings, catering for private functions, – every suggestion has been looked into even to estimating the weight of a sheep.

An excerpt from the executive committee meeting dated the 15 February 1939:

“It was decided that the sheep donated to the band by Mr Donald Campbell of Horonui be used in a weight estimating competition in aid of the Band’s Queen of Health, the weight to be that of the carcase while still hot”!

It was reported at the next meeting of the Executive on the 24 March 1939 that £2/9/6 had been realised from the venture.

Fundraising by the band has included carolling each Christmas and this is looked forward to by the band and public alike.

In 1985 the band combined with the Orphans Club for a most successful and memorable Wheeltappers and Shunters evening.

Another very popular form of fundraising are the Beer Festivals where, with Win Heuser as Liedermaster and the band renamed the Hawkes Bay Oompah Band, the band has not only raised money but provides a great nights entertainment.

The band now has a permanent fundraising committee under the guidance of Shirley Barrett, with Annette Stenson, Shirley Cash, Margaret Harris, Norma Keesing, Kevin Christieson and their usually willing spouses and co-opted senior and junior bandspeople, supporters and friends.

Fundraising has been a lot of hardwork at times but has also been a lot of fun, as well as strengthening the ties of friendship over the years. In fact, it could be really a case of FUN (D) RAISING.

In banding there is always a job for everyone – someone has to find and catch the slater bugs needed for the casino evenings!

A FAMILY AFFAIR

One of the strengths of the Hastings Citizens’ is because it is family oriented. In some cases a family’s involvement has spanned decades and in other cases entire families have been involved at the same time either as playing members, members of one of the various committees or as a supporter.

A case of ‘if you can’t lick ‘em – join ‘em’

WAR TIME

The Second World War, as could be expected had a devastating effect on the band with many of its members called up to serve their country in the Armed Forces. Bandsmen being the dedicated people they are continued to play their respective instruments whilst at Trentham Military Camp and in overseas Brigade Bands.

The remaining members of the band played at the Railway Station when the troops were leaving for overseas, at times combining with the Salvation Army Band.

Sad and emotional times for the bandsmen.

The band also played for the happier homecomings of the troops and in Heretaunga Street on VE and VJ days.

The band took a long time to recover from the upheavals of war. The Conductor, Charlie Bryant, lost a son, Ralph, overseas and the returned bandsmen too, were trying to re-establish themselves into civilian life once more.

When concerts and playouts resumed the band often used to play in the band rotunda in Queens Square.

One of the highlights of these concerts was the playing of ‘Alpine Echo’. While the band played, a bandsman would be up a tree playing the echo.

When the band played at the Sound Shell in Napier the echo played from the Masonic hotel balcony.

This item was well received by the public.

1886 – THE ORIGINAL HASTINGS BRASS BAND.

1947 – HASTINGS CITIZENS’ BAND

1986 – THE HASTINGS CITIZENS’ BAND

LIFE MEMBERS

Back row:   John McAlpine, David Myhill
Front row:   Shirley Barrett, Jack Monks
Insert:   William Cate

CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE

Back row:   John Snowling, David Myhill
Front row:   Norma Keesing, Annette Stenson
Absent:   Brian Bennett, Chairperson

Absent:   P. Godwin, D. Davidson

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Top row:   R. Keesing, L. Cash, Councillor A. Grant, M. Harris, R. Bennett
Bottom row:   M. Harris, J. Snowling, N. Keesing, A. Stenson

NATIONAL SOLOISTS

Wayne Myhill, trombone, Grant Myhill, percussion, Graeme Harrington, flugel horn

OUR CONDUCTOR – JOHN SNOWLING

OUR DRUM MAJOR – JACK BAIRD

1984 – OUR JUNIOR BAND

BANDROOM ON THE MOVE – 31 MARCH, 1977

By courtesy of the Herald-Tribune

PAST CONDUCTORS

Top row:   C. Bryant, C Fitzwater
Bottom row:   L. Moloney, P. Jennings

ANZAC DAY

During the first few decades after the war Anzac Day parades were well attended by the public and it was a very big day for the band.

The morning parade was held in Havelock North followed by an afternoon parade in Hastings. The band would assemble at the bandroom in Warren Street and march to the Cenotaph for a service, which was followed by hymn playing on stage at the Municipal Theatre.

The Parade then reassembled outside the theatre to march back to the Cenotaph for wreath laying, prayers and the Last Post.

A well deserved afternoon tea followed at the Assembly Hall.

At night a very popular Anzac Concert was held in the Municipal Theatre with the band again contributing. A very strenuous day for the band.

A mishap occurred during one Anzac Day parade, when two bandsmen, Bruce Wilson playing the euphonium and Harold Robinson on the B flat bass, not able to see each other over their large instruments crashed together in a flank-to flank counter march with disastrous results for both men and instruments.

The Hastings Citizens’ Band has always taken pride in participating in, and has been well represented at Anzac Services and although public participation has changed over the years Anzac Parades still play an important part in the band’s calendar of events, with Dawn Parades now taking the place of the afternoon services.

PUBLIC OCCASIONS

The band has been available to play at most civic events which it has been asked to attend. This includes playing for Royal Visits, visits from Governors-General, opening of the Civic Administration Building and the Cultural Centre.

Other events for which the band has played have been fairs, fetes, galas for schools, churches, and other organisations, playouts at race meetings – popular with racegoers and bandspeople, the Highland Games, Blossom Parades, Telethon, sporting fixtures, church services, the Rose Society Rose Day, the opening of the all-weather track at Nelson Park, and providing music for the Army either for a Charter Parade or Reunions.

Most occasions have been enjoyable but once in a while the weather plays havoc with the arrangements like the time the entire band was crammed into a garage to play at the opening of a new housing venture.

JUNIOR BAND

It appears from the information available that there has usually been junior players involved with the band. Some learners have been able to cope with the challenge of learning a brass instrument and we are fortunate to have a steady flow of capable young people graduating to the senior band.

Our present junior band is under the conductorship of Archie Shaw and has taken part in a number of playouts which have been very well received. The band has continued to grow from strength to strength with the older bandspeople giving their time and patience on a Monday evening to help teach the youngsters.

The highlight of the junior band’s progress to date was surely in 1985 when at the Central District’s Contest held in Levin and, competing for the first time, managed to gain more points than the two senior bands competing.

A great tribute to Archie Shaw and his helpers.

JUNIORS OF DISTINCTION

Over the years four junior players have been selected for the New Zealand National Youth Band.

Murray Warrington, Wayne Myhill, Jonathon Krebs and Grant Myhill were of a high enough standard to be chosen.

In 1975 for the first time since the war three junior players entered the solo competitions at Auckland with Wayne Barrett being placed second in the B flat bass contest and first to win a medal as a junior in the band in this time. Wayne and Grant Myhill also competed.

NATIONAL JUNIOR CHAMPIONS         

Wayne Myhill   NZ Junior Trombone Champion   1978
Second Junior Champion of Champions   1978

Jonathon Krebs   NZ Junior Amateur Cornet Champion   1981

NATIONAL CONTESTS

B GRADE   1929   1st NZ Marching Championship   Wanganui

1930   1st NZ Marching Championship   Dunedin
2nd in two Test Selections
2nd NZ Championship

1932   1st in First Test Selection   Wellington
2nd in Second Test Selection
2nd Marching Championship
3rd Hymn

1933   B Grade Champion Band   Dunedin
1st First Test
2nd Marching Championship

1936   1st NZ Marching Championship   New Plymouth
3rd NZ Championship

1937 3rd NZ Championship   Nelson

1938   No placings   Palmerston North

1948   No placings   Dunedin

D Grade   1959   No placings   Wellington
First time competing for 11 years.

1961   3rd Hymn   Auckland
3rd Test
3rd Quickstep
3rd Aggregate Points

1969   No placings   Rotorua

1973   1st Hymn   Wellington
1st Quickstep – won by 28 points

1974   1st Street March   Dunedin
3rd Aggregate
2nd Hymn
3rd Own Choice
Quickstep rained out.

The band did extremely well in the Street March

1975   1st Street March   Auckland
1st Test
2nd Aggregate
2nd Own Choice
2nd Quickstep

For the third year in a row missed aggregate by one point

C Grade   1979   2nd Hymn   Hamilton

1981   1st Street March   Wellington
1st Quickstep

1982   BRASS BAND CENTENARY   Christchurch
Unable to attend

1983   1st Street March   Auckland
1st Quickstep
3rd Own Choice

1984   1st Street March   Nelson
1st Quickstep

1985   1st Hymn   Wanganui
1st Street March
1st Quickstep
3rd Test

NATIONAL CONTESTS

The first National Contest attended after the war was in Dunedin in 1948. The band travelled by train to Wellington with an overnight trip by ferry to Lyttleton to catch another train to Dunedin.

A very long tiring trip for the bandsmen.

This was the year of the ‘polio’ epidemic and youngsters under the age of 16 years were restricted in where they could travel. Certainly travel between the North and South Islands was not permitted and as a result two keen young bandsmen were sadly left at home.

They were David Thomas and David Myhill who were later presented with “Arban’s Tutor” as a consolation for missing the trip.

NATIONAL SOLO CHAMPIONS

1908   F TOMKINS [TONKIN?]   Bass drum
1934   H C UNWIN   B flat bass
1935   H C UNWIN   B flat bass
1982   G D MYHILL   Side drum
1984   G D MYHILL   Side drum

LIFE MEMBERS

1908   W A COLWILL
1909   A E HORNE
1909   A J POTHAN
1909   F J TONKIN
1912   MRS A J ELLINGHAM
1928   G A MADDISON
1929  T DONOVAN
1950   W CATE
1950   A E BROOKER
1951   C BRYANT
1957   A YOUNG
1962   R M FLEMING
1963   H G APPERLEY
1963   H G JONES
1967   H M LOCHHEAD
1970   P G MAY
1974   J W MONKS
1980   D L MYHILL
1982   MRS S E BARRETT
1983   J V McALPINE

Two Life members who completed 50 years in banding are:

ALF BROOKER and JACK MONKS

THE BAND’S CONDUCTORS

1   A A GEORGE
2   S K KNIGHT
3   PERCY TOMBS
4   LOUIS FOX
5   CHARLES BRYANT
6   ARTHUR YOUNG
7   CES WIGGINS
8   VIC McPHERSON
9   BOB LEE
10   BOB FLEMING
11   CES FITZWATER
12   LAURIE MOLONEY
13   CES FITZWATER
14   PHIL JENNINGS
15   JOHN SNOWLING

OUR CONDUCTOR – JOHN SNOWLING

John, a very keen and talented bandsman emigrated to New Zealand from Ipswich, England with his wife Madge, son Mark (who is also now a member of the band) and their daughter, Helen, in 1978.

John has been playing in brass bands since the age of seven when he was taught by his father and encouraged to join the Salvation Army sections. He stayed in the Salvation Army banding until he enlisted into the Coldstream Guards where he served for six years, rising to the rank of Lance-Corporal and principal cornet.

During this period he also played for the Red Shield Band (Salvationists Forces Personnel Band), the Hammersmith Borough Band and did a small amount of orchestral work.

Completing his tour of duty with the Coldstream Guards in 1971 he then went on to form and conduct the Orwell Brass Band in Ipswich, Suffolk as well as teaching private pupils.

Ipswich is not noted as being a “brass band area” as in the North of England so it was a real achievement, with a lot of determination and hard work on John’s part that the band, within a year or two were runners-up in the Suffolk Championship, third in the East Anglian Contest and also had good firsts in local solo and quartet contests. The band was very successful at contests and became, under John’s leadership, one of the leading bands in its grade.

When John took over as conductor of the Hastings Citizens’ Band in 1978 it was a good D Grade band with plenty of potential. With his enthusiasm, skill and talent he has bought the band to the top C Grade band, and under his guidance and direction who knows what the future holds for the band.

OUR DRUM MAJOR – JACK BAIRD

Jack as a youngster, along with his two brothers, Noel and Malcom [Malcolm], joined the Second Hastings Boys Brigade Company where he took up drumming and soon became the Brigade’s side drummer. With Jack’s interest in drumming he eventually joined the Hastings Scottish Society Pipe Band in 1938 as a drummer. With the outbreak of war, Jack along with a depleted band, were left to carry on. They continued to play at various war effort functions and on several occasions marched troops going overseas to the Railway Station.

Jack continued to maintain his interest in the Pipe Band and gained valuable basic drill knowledge from the late Sergeant Major E A Moseley.

The occupation of Japan by the New Zealand Forces – called the J Force – saw Jack enlist and given the job of bass drummer in the Brigade Army Band. This band was involved in numerous parades and guard changes at the Imperial Palace. When he returned to Hastings after 12 months service the Scottish Society Band offered him the position of Drum Major which he proudly accepted.

As time went by Jack could see the city needed another independent competing band, so along with his two brothers and another bandsman in 1948, they formed the Hawkes Bay Scottish Pipe Band. This band went on to win the National A and B Grade Titles. The band served the city for 24 years before going into recess.

Jack also at this time trained several marching teams with success and assisted the Hastings Citizens’ Band at the Dunedin Contest.

At one stage Jack decided he needed a break from banding. He joined the local aero club and learnt to fly.

In 1965 the Pipe Band invited him to take over the reigns [reins] as Drill Instructor/Drum Major.

In 1971 Jack again helped out with the Hastings Citizens’ Band as Drill Instructor. He was made Drum Major/Drill Instructor in 1973. In that year the band attended the National Contest in Wellington. Although not musically successful the band gained first place in both the quickstep and the display events, winning the quickstep by 28 points, which was a tremendous amount to win by. A very proud band bought home two cups, thanks to Jack.

This gave the Hastings Citizens’ Band its first quickstep win in 37 years.

Jack has stayed with the Hastings Citizens’ Band and with his instruction over the past 15 years they have won 12 National and 10 Central District marching titles.

Winning is a team effort of which Jack is very much aware, and he would like to take the opportunity to thank all past and present members for their outstanding contribution to the band’s success.

Jack’s time and skill is in great demand which he gives freely to brass and pipe bands. He is one of the longest serving competitive Drum Majors in New Zealand and has recently been elected to the Pipe Band Association Judging Panel – a demanding but rewarding position.

Jack is a great asset to the Hastings Citizens’ Band.

PROUD MOMENTS WORTH REMEMBERING

The Hastings Citizens’ Band…

….was represented by Percy Tombs when the first New Zealand Band, the ‘Hinemoa Band’ toured England in 1903.

….were winners of the National Quartet in 1904.

….in 1930 when contesting at the National Contest in Dunedin won the Elan Prize for the best turned out band, which included how the bandsmen were presented even while walking in the street.

….whilst competing in Dunedin in 1933 was New Zealand’s top B Grade band.

….had an Australiasian [Australasian] Champion of Champions in its ranks – Charlie Bryant.

….was honoured at one of the contests in 1933 when the band was fortunate to win their grade’s quickstep. As a tribute to such an outstanding performance they were escorted from the Quickstep Park by the two leading A Grade bands, a feat rare in its time and unheard of today.

….proudly hosted the National Band of New Zealand in August 1976 for its very first evening visit to Hawkes Bay.

….have been first or second in the Street March and Quickstep every time they have entered since Dunedin in 1976.

….have had nine consecutive wins in the Street Match in Provincial Contests.

….had just been promoted from D Grade to C Grade and were contesting at the Central Districts Contest in Marton in 1979 with the following spectacular results:

1st Hymn, 1st Stage March, 1st Street March, 1st Own Choice, 1st Aggregate Points – winning every prize in the C Grade – a total of five.

….were also the first to win the new Marton Centennial Challenge Plate, in 1979.

….won the Marton Centennial Challenge Plate again in 1981 and again in 1985.

… when competing at Cambridge in 1986 beat all comers – A, B, C, and D Grade Bands with the following remarkable results:

1st Aggregate, 1st Quickstep, 1st Marching Display, 2nd Hymn, 2nd Stage March, 2nd Test Selection and 3rd Street March.

NZ MUSICAL MONTHLY

After this booklet had been prepared for printing, two bound copies of the NZ Musical Monthly for the years 1889 and 1890 have been given to the band.

Some changes to the layout of the booklet have been made to be able to include one or two excerpts from these historical publications.

The following is an extract from the March 1890 issue. The article is headed ‘Hawkes Bay Jottings’ by “Double Pianissimo”, whom it is believed, was A A George, the band’s first conductor.

‘On the 7th I accepted an invitation to a splendid turn-out got up in honor of the fourth anniversary of the Hastings Band. The assemblage was a brilliant one, and the proceedings past off with éclat. Apologies were received from Bandmaster Tankard, his Worship the Mayor, and one or two others, regretting their inability, through other engagements, to be present, and wishing the band every success.

The entertainment was on the invitations termed a “social”, and it certainly in every way was true to its name. During the early part of the evening the band played a selection from “Maritana”, and also gave “Night and Morn” as a vocal and instrumental item with capital effect. Miss F R George played a pianoforte solo, and these with other interesting items, whiled away a couple of hours.

Supper was then announced, and about 70 ladies and gentlemen sat down to a first-class spread prepared by Bandsman W H Compton. After the viands had been satisfactorily disposed of, an adjournment was again made to

the ballroom, where dancing and singing were indulged in until about 4 am. During the evening I was informed it is four years and a few days since the band first started and during that time it has had to encounter many difficulties. Out of the 22 who were first invited to blow G only two are still members, the others being principally new hands who have joined at different periods.

Under such circumstances it is very difficult to keep a band up to anything like efficiency, but it is admitted on all hands that this band are deserving of all praise for their energy and perseverance.

By way of statistics I learned that their instruments cost £130, uniforms £80, music and other necessaries about £25, and that all their debts are paid, and they have a decent balance in the bank. This is indicative of good management.

February 16.

The October, 1889 records:

‘The Hastings Band has , as usual, been engaged to play at the biggest annual show in the province – the Hawkes Bay A and P Society’s show.’

However, the November, 1890 issue gives this account:

‘There was no band at the Hawkes Bay A and P Society Show this year. Fancy 6000 people trying to imagine they were happy looking at a flock of sheep or an army of agricultural implements. Then fancy a committee with £2000 to spend during the year and could not afford £10 for a band.’

TOLDEROLDUS TO HIS TROMBONE

Don’t babble to me of the tootlesome flute,
The petulant pipe, and the languishing lute!
Don’t hint at the harp, or the twanging guitar,
But give me sweet music that’s better by far!
Search the orchestra through, there is nothing I own
That is fit to compare with my trusty trombone.

Let other folks go out to dance and to dine,
And talk too much nonsense, and take too much wine;
But let me sit down, and give my arms enough room,
I’ll drive away care, and I’ll banish all gloom;
With a cup of strong tea and a fresh buttered scone,
I will cheer you all up with my trusty trombone.

From the NZ Musical Monthly, May 1889.

Also from the same publication, April 1889.

‘A rather laughable criticism was passed by a gentleman whose knowledge of music must be rather scant.

The selection on which the critic was descanting abounded in cadenzas, and also had an unaccompanied passage for 1st and 2nd cornets. “Call that playin’,” said the onlooker; “why they all stopped, but one four or five times, and another time two of ‘em kep’ it up while the others found their place.”

ERRORS AND OMISSIONS

Apologies to anybody who feel they have been ‘missed out’ or think ‘why wasn’t this or that’ mentioned in this booklet. Limited space and lack of records means that this really is only a glimpse into the history of the Hastings Citizens’ Band.

To all the bandspeople whether they have been or are, playing members, committee members, supporters or friends who over the years have put so much time, energy and effort into the band a very heartfelt thank you.

Without you all, the band could not continue to function and Hastings and district would lose a very valuable asset.

To the wives, husbands, mothers and others who have so patiently supported the bandspeople in their family – thank you.

The band brings a great deal of pleasure in many ways to a lot of people and our lives would be very much poorer without the

HASTINGS CITIZENS’ BAND.

THANKYOU FOR ATTENDING OUR CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS.

WE HOPE YOU HAVE HAD A WONDERFUL WEEKEND.

HAVE SAFE JOURNEY TO YOUR HOME.

Original digital file

WarrenBD858_HastingsCitizensBandCentenary1886-1986.pdf

Description

Names in book –

David Apperley, H G Apperley, Jack Baird, Malcolm Baird, Noel Baird, H Barden, Bill Barrett, Shirley Barrett, Wayne Barrett, Brian Bennett, Mrs A Bennett, Russell Bennett, C Blackmore, Raymond E Bond, Alf E Brooker, Charlie Bryant, Ralph Bryant, Colin Bunnett, David Butcher, Donald Campbell, L Cash, Shirley Cash, William Cate, Kevin Christieson, W A Colwill, S Cushing, Dr D Davidson, Mrs A J Ellingham, Major Idwal Evans, Ces Fitzwater, R (Bob) M Fleming, B Fowler, Louis Fox, J W Franssen, A A George, Mrs F R George, J S Gimblett, R V Giorgi, Cheryl Godwin, P Godwin, A McI Grant, Graeme Harrington, Cliff Harris, Martin Harris, Mrs M Harris, V Harris, Win Heuser, A E Horne, Phil Jennings, Bryce Jones, H G Jones, Richard Jones, Ross Jones, Norma E C Keesing, Ross Keesing, S K Knight, Jonathon Krebs, R (Bob) W Lee, H M Lochhead, G A Maddison, P G May, John V McAlpine, M McKearney, Viv McPherson, Laurie Moloney, Jack W Monks, Sergeant Major E A Moseley, David L Myhill, Grant Myhill, Wayne Myhill, J J O’Connor, H B Poppelwell, A J Pothan, Ron Ray, J Redgrave, Dr A W Reeves, D Robinson, Harold Robinson, R Robinson, Archie Shaw, Helen Snowling, John Snowling, Madge Snowling, Mark Snowling, Annette E Stenson, Graeme Stewart, David Thomas, M Thomson, Percy Tombs, F J Tonkin, H C Unwin, Murray Warrington, G Wattie, R Wattie, J Whittaker, Ces Wiggins, Bruce Wilson, Arthur Young

Business / Organisation

Hastings Citizens' Band

Date published

1986

Format of the original

Booklet

Accession number

858/969/44772

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