Hawke’s Bay Photo News January 1967

HAWKE’S BAY Photo News
Number 99
28 JANUARY 1967

[Cover photo – This month’s cover shows a radiant Mrs. Barbara Crawford of Havelock North. When the cover was shot, Barbara was still single and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L.M. Elliott of Waipau. Now that Barbara is married she will continue teaching in Hastings. Her hobbies, besides her husband Malcolm, are reading and music.]

BEST TOBACCO MONEY CAN BUY
There is a good reason why Rothmans is the World’s largest selling – most wanted King Size Virginia. It’s simply that Rothmans extra length, finer filter and the best tobacco money can buy, give you a cooler, smoother, more satisfying taste. Try them yourself and you’ll agree.
ROTHMANS KING SIZE REALLY SATISFIES

Page 3

HAWKE’S BAY PHOTO NEWS

Published Monthly by
H.B. PHOTO NEWS LTD.
NAPIER
Telephone 4857, P.O. Box 685

Photographer-Editor BRUCE MacCONNELL
4857, Napier; 4026, night

Sub-Editor RAE McGILL

Hastings Agent
BATCHELORS STUDIOS
231 Heretaunga Street West
88-766, Hastings

DISTRIBUTION

Napier
MacConnell’s Photo Services
Top Hat Bldg., Dickens St.,
Telephone 4857

Hastings
Batchelors Studios
231 Heretaunga Street West
Telephone 88-766

District
H.B. Books (Wholesale) Ltd.
Telephone 39-479, Napier

MAIL ORDER SERVICE
“HAWKE’S BAY PHOTO NEWS”
mailed to you on receipt of 12-issue subscription of 39/-

PHOTOGRAPHS in “HAWKE’S BAY PHOTO NEWS” may be obtained through:
The Editor, H.B. Photo News Ltd.,
P.O. Box 685, NAPIER.

Please state clearly page number on which photograph appears, and a full description of photograph.

Enclose Postal Note to value of:
5/- for 6 x 4
7/6 ” 8 x 6
10/- ” 10 x 8
(Above prices include postage)

PHOTOGRAPHS APPEARING IN THIS MAGAZINE
(other than Readers Pictures and those credited to other photographers)
MAY BE OBTAINED FROM
MacCONNELLS PHOTO SERVICES
NAPIER
OR
THE U.F.S DISPENSARY, HASTINGS.

CLUBS AND ORGANISATIONS – THE EDITOR WILL BE PLEASED TO HEAR FROM YOU AT ANY TIME – IF THERE IS SOMETHING “COMING UP” CONTACT US!

OUR COVER

This month’s cover shows a radiant Mrs. Barbara Crawford of Havelock North. When the cover was shot, Barbara was still single and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L.M. Elliott of Waipau. Now that Barbara is married she will continue teaching in Hastings. Her hobbies, besides her husband Malcolm, are reading and music.

BACK COVER:

Is the newly formed “Marine Guards” Marching Team, who look most attractive in their ming uniforms.

BACK NUMBERS OF H.B. PHOTO NEWS, MAY BE OBTAINED BY ANY OF THE FOLLOWING RETAILERS:
MACCONNELLS PHOTO SERVICES – NAPIER
PAXIES CAFE – NAPIER
BATCHELORS STUDIOS – NAPIER & HASTINGS
DARROCKS MILK BAR – TARADALE

FROM MALTA TO NAPIER

Mrs. Lynne Abela (nee Mattson), a former resident of Hawke’s Bay and now living in London, requested that we publish this photograph of herself and her 17-months-old son Martin, which was taken during a visit to her husband’s family in Malta last August.

Page 4

BUILD ME A CASTLE

Build me a castle, not necessarily in the sky, but at least there were some superb castles and other sand designs at Waimarama Beach during the Christmas break.

The Sand Castle Building Competition, which was sponsored by the Weekly News, and run by the Hastings Jaycees was an enormous success with entrants coming from as far as Waipukurau and Waipawa specially for the competition.

Waimarama Beach was transformed into a mighty sculptors’ studio, with each entrant’s section marked off.

Miss Angela Power, 12 years old, of Waipukurau, won first prize in the senior section for her “Mermaid”.

Left: Is Angela

Below: This “Maori Meeting House”, by Alistair McCow, won him 3rd place in the senior event. Alistair is 12 years old and from Hunterville.

11-year-old Gordon Reid of Hastings plunges into his creation with enthusiasm.

Right: Hastings girl, 12-year-old Glenda Palmer’s “Sphinx” is taking shape.

Page 5

“THE BOY MOZART”

An Operetta, set in 1756, and composed by Mozart, called “The Boy Mozart” was performed recently in The Little Theatre, Napier, by pupils of St. Patrick’s Girls’ School. The Operetta is centred around the friendship between Bastien and Bastienne, a charming story, portrayed with excellent acting, lovely scenery and beautiful costuming.

Left: Bastien (Catherine Rouse) and Bastienne (Kathleen O‘Rourke). Bastien suggests a “bald experiment” to his loved one, Bastienne.

Below: The Minuet performed at the Court of the Emperor and Empress.

Bottom: The full caste.

Page 6

NEW BUILDING OPENED FOR MOTORWAYS

A ceremony, demonstration, and supper marked the opening of the new building for Motorways on the corner of Queen and Hastings Street, Hastings.

Left: Mr L.R. Robertson, branch Manager for Hastings, speaks during the opening ceremony. He is flanked on either side by, left, Mr D. Laugesen, Chairman of Directors for Motorways, and right, the Mayor of Hastings, Mr R. Giorgi.

Below: Group of guests listening to opening speeches.

Bottom left: Bill Rockett, the Factory Manager, is watched as he puts rims in tyres before retreading them.

Mr Les Hayward demonstrates to interested onlookers, the process of buffing.

IF IT LOOKS LIKE A NEWS PHOTO RING PHOTO NEWS

Page 7

MOTORING WITH ROBBIE

OIL CAN WITH TOP CUT OUT, SCREWED TO WALL
SPARE BULB
SCREW HOOK
LOOP HELD BY FRICTION TAPE

KEEP your trouble light trouble-free by coiling it loosely over a tin can nailed to the wall. The can will also hold a spare bulb. Form a loop near the end of the wire and hang it over a hook to keep from accidentally pulling the plug.

SPRING HOSE CLAMP
½” COPPER TUBING

SPRING type hose clamps on lower radiator connections are difficult to hold open when connecting. However, if you squeeze the clamp open and force a short length of half inch copper tubing over the ends as shown here it will hold the clamp open.

TAKE READINGS AT EYE LEVEL
HOLD TUBE VERTICALLY
DO NOT DRAW IN TOO MUCH ELECTROLYTE
FLOAR MUST BE FREE

TO CHECK the state of charge of your battery, use a hydrometer which will show you the specific gravity of the electrolyte in the cells. When the battery is fully charged the reading will be 1250. If it’s flat, the reading will be about 1100.

FRUIT JAR RING
COAT HANGER

IMPROVISE a coat hanger bracket by closing a rear window on a rubber fruit jar ring. The ring will support several garments and will leave no marks or scratches on the window, A ring cut from an inner tube will serve just as well.

2′ x 8″ x 16″ WOOD
POINTED ANCHOR BOLTS

A PAIR of rounded wooden blocks anchored to a sloping driveway will keep a car from rolling away ….the blocks should be gently rounded so that they are easy to run over yet at the same time just steep enough to hold the car when it is parked.

Grease

YOU SHOULD lubricate the speedometer cable every 10,000 miles. Withdraw the inner shaft and apply the grease sparingly. Feed the shaft back into its casing. Then withdraw about eight inches and wipe off the surplus grease otherwise it will work its way into the speedometer head.

CLUBS AND ORGANISATIONS – THE EDITOR WILL BE PLEASED TO HEAR FROM YOU AT ANY TIME – IF THERE IS SOMETHING “COMING UP” CONTACT US!

COURTESY IS LIKE AN AIR CUSHION: THERE’S NOTHING IN IT, BUT IT CERTAINLY EASES THE JOLTS.

Page 8

MISS H.B. CONTEST

Just a brief glimpse of a few of the entrants, and the place getters.

Left: The winner, Miss Diane Gollop of Napier, with Miss Colleen Jordon, of Napier, and Miss Christine Carmine of Wellington, 2nd and 3rd respectively.

Page 9

WHAT’S BEEN GOING ON?

Nineteen schools participated in the concert given under the Primary Instrumental Tuition Scheme at Wycliffe Intermediate Assembly Hall on the 3rd of December. Items by massed and individual groups varied from light opera, light classical and classical pieces. View of part of the young orchestra during a performance.

ROY’S HILL ARMY SHOOT

The windy conditions and dust-laden air at Roy’s Hill on Saturday the 3rd December didn’t hinder the shooting from the entrants in the Coleman Shield Inter-School Championship shoot. Hastings Boys’ High School won most of the major events, and left is Mr Coleman presenting yet another trophy to a member of the Hastings Boys High team.

Present at the shoot was Brig. General Bullot, the O.C. Central Military District.

Page 10

NEW TRAIN FOR WESTSHORE

The new, as yet, unnamed train built by Mr A.E. Blanchard of Napier, for the Westshore Development Associations Miniature Railway, is to replace the old, but well-known replica of an English train called the “Maid of Kent”.

The new train is a scale model of a modern Diesel, but is a 2¼ horsepower, 2 stroke petrol engine which will reach speeds of 10 to 15 m.p.h.

Mr Blanchard, who is fond of model making, has been an engineer for 51 years. It took 10 weeks to complete the new engine.

The “Maid of Kent”, which is a steam train, was built by two Napier men, Mr R. Finlay and Mr T. Frater, and has been running for the last five years.

Above: The old and the new. The new train, driven by Mr Blanchard, is pulling the old train behind. Passengers are Mr Trevor Hooper, ex-driver of the old train, and the first “lady” passenger to ride the new one.

Below: Mr Blanchard, with four boys who will be running the train service during the holidays. They are, from left: R. Boniface, T. Ward, W. Mills and R. Ross.

Page 11

COUNTRY AND WESTERN SHOW

Allan’s better half “Jazzbo”, takes the spot.

On December 6th, the Stars of the Big Country and Western Show played to a packed house at the Municipal Theatre, Napier.

Above: Maria Dallas swings into one of her numbers, encouraged by her enthusiastic audience.

After the show the performers were besieged by autograph hunters.

Above left: Garner Wayne, Country and Western singer, turns on a bright smile as he signs for two of his fans.

Above: Jazzbo and this wee chick are sharing a joke.

Left: Surrounded by fans of the fairer sex are Ken Lemon and Allan.

Page 12

SENIOR CITIZENS

From Waipawa

Instead of our normal one Senior Citizen, this month we are lucky enough to feature several, all of whom attended the Waipawa Senior Citizen’s Committee’s Christmas party.

Above left: The oldest member, 92 year-old Mrs Pellow, cuts the cake, assisted by Mr John Minty.

Above: Pictured with Mrs V. Towers (left) and Mrs E.R. Hutchings (right), is not such a Senior Citizen, photographer Bob Partridge.

Far left: Is Mrs King, and beside her, Mrs Bishop, enjoying a spot of fruit salad.

LIFE MEMBER

Our Life Member for this month is Mr W.G. (George) Denford of Napier, who was made a Life Member of the Napier Harriers Club in 1961, when he was presented with a Gold Badge at a special function.

After a very full and, active membership in both the Harrier’s and H. B. Poverty Bay Athletic Centres, Mr Denford still takes great interest in athletics and cross country running, mainly at club level.

He was a Foundation member of the Napier Harrier Club, which was formed in 1934, when the first president was the then Mayor of Napier, Mr C. O.Morse. Mr Denford was a member of the Harrier Sub-Committee from 1934 to 1964, and a member of the Hawke’s Bay Poverty Bay Centre, from 1947 to 1965, was chairman of the committee which organized the Wellington-Napier Relay, run at the time of the H.B. Centenary; also a past President of the Napier Harrier Club as well as the H.B. Poverty Bay Athletic Centre.

Congratulations to a lifetime of long service.

Page 13

NAPIER – TAUPO ROAD OF OLD

Perhaps there may be a few of our senior readers who will be able to remember the Napier-Taupo Road as it was in this picture, which was taken 70 years ago. There has been quite an extensive change since then – by the look of the construction work on the road at the present time.

Page 14

PHOTO NEWS Sunshine Girl Contest
WINNER WILL RECEIVE
An Air Ticket from H.B. to any N.A.C. Centre in N.Z.
£20 Cash from Photo News
PLUS AN EXCITING NEW SLIMLINE G.E.C. ALL BAND TRANSISTOR RADIO – FROM
DUCKWORTHS OF NAPIER…

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
SEND A 3 x 4 GLOSSY BLACK AND WHITE PRINT:
to Photo News, Box 685, NAPIER.

The judges’ decision will be final, and no correspondence entered into.
Photo News reserves the right to publish any, or all, Photographs submitted.
Closes March 12, 1967.

BEST COLOUR SHOT
When sending in your Sunshine Girl Contest photo, send along a 2¼ square colour transparency, (Ektachrome X) – you could win: £15.0.0. worth of goods, from:
Goldmans Pharmacy
In this special colour section – If published on cover of Photo News, you will receive £5.0.0. as well as the above prize.
YOU COULD WIN BOTH SECTIONS.

Plus – Place getters will receive Consolation Prizes to approximate value of: 2nd £30, 3rd £20, 4th £15, 5th £10 and 6th £5 FROM –
THE ITEMS, KINDLY SPONSORED BY THE FIRMS LISTED BELOW.

MARJORY HARRIS GIFT SHOP.   SPECIAL………..ZIP Three-Compartment Food Warmer… £18.0.0

LOVELL-SMITH,
Photographer, Heretaunga St. HASTINGS:
Sitting and coloured enlargement to the value of £6.10.0.

MCARAS LTD., Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Voucher to the value of £5.0.0.

JACK REIZER, Jeweller, Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Jewellery to the va1ue of £5.5.0.

BON MARCHE, Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Garments to the value of £5.5.0.

McCONNELLS PHOTO SERVICES, Dickens Street, NAPIER.
Goods to the value of £5.0.0.

SHOE FASHIONS LTD., Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Shoes to the value of £5.0.0.

BEST & CO., Dalton Street, NAPIER.
½ dozen Pottery Coffee Mugs to the value of £3.17.0

REMBRANDT BEAUTY SALON, Kennedy Road, NAPIER.
Cold Wave to the value of £3.15.0.

Page 15

RAY HUTCHISON LTD., Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Small furnishing to the value of £3.3.0.

FINES LTD., Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Ladies’wear to the value of £3.3.0.

JANS BEAUTY SALON, Dalton Street, NAPIER.
Re-style – Permanent wave to value of £3.3.0.

STORTFORD LODGE HOTEL, STORTFORD, HASTINGS.
Dinner for two. £2.15.0.

ROSSER & COLES LTD., Jewellers, Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Jewellery to the value of £3.0.0.

EARDISLEY HOTEL, HAVELOCK NORTH.
Dinner for Two.

RAMON BANKS SALON, Heretaunga St. HASTINGS.
Hairstyling to the value of £3.3.0.

SABA FASHIONS, Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Voucher to the value of £3.3.0.

JAMES BANQUET LOUNGE, Dickens Street, NAPIER.
Dinner for four (complete menu).

RUSSELL ORR LTD., Box 181, Karamu Road, HASTINGS.
Free sitting and 8 x 1O print to value of £2.2.0.

F.W. JENKIN & SON, Jeweller, Emerson Street, NAPIER.
To the value of £2.2.0.

MAYFAIR HOTEL, Karamu Road, HASTINGS.
Dinner for two.

DENTON-WYATT LTD., Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Book to the value of £1.10.0.

FOSTER-BROOKS, Booksellers, Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Book voucher to the value of £1.10.0.

HAND BAG HOUSE, Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Gloves and stockings to the value of £1.10.0.

MARSDENS, Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Fountain Pen to the value of £1.10.0

FRENCH GLOVE HOUSE, Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Box of stockings to the value of £1.10.0.

MILADY FASHIONS, Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS.
Voucher to the value of £1.10.0.

GASSON PHOTOGRAPHY, Gloucester Street, TARADALE.
Free sitting and 10 x 8 enlargement, £1.7.6.

CORBETTS THE JEWELLER, Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Jewellery to the Value of £1.1.0.

BATCHELORS CAMERA HOUSE, Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS and Tennyson Street, NAPIER.
Photographic Services to the value of £2.2.0.

McCLURGS, Hastings Street, NAPIER.
Jewellery to the value of £2.2.0.

CRITERION HOTEL, Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Dinner for two

SYD TAYLOR & CO. LTD., Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Lamp shade to the value of £2.0.0.

WHITE HERON, (Napiers most exclusive restaurant) Browning St., NAPIER.
Deluxe executive luncheon for two.

BISSELL ELECTRIC, Dickens Street, NAPIER.
Goods to the value of £2.0.0.

RUSSELL & SMITH LTD., (Your favourite record shop) Heretaunga St., HASTINGS.
Long Playing Record £1.19.6

R. F. WHITAKER LTD., Lower Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Book token to the value of £1.0.0.

ROBT. G. NEWELL LTD., Lower Emerson Street, NAPIER.
12″ L.P. Record £1.19.6.

BECKS PHARMACY LTD., Emerson Street, NAPIER.
Dana French Perfume or Yardley Cosmetics £1.0.0.

YET ANOTHER SPECIAL……
THE LA RONDE RESTAURANT PRIZE. – to the girl who receives the most votes each month:
A DINNER FOR TWO AT: LA RONDE RESTAURANT, (War Memorial Bldg) Marine Parade, NAPIER

READERS: The judges would appreciate your opinion – cut out this official voting form to vote for “Your” choice – post to:
P.O. Box 685, NAPIER .
I, vote for ……………….
Photo News Issue No. ………..
Signature …………

Page 16

SUNSHINE GIRL CONTEST ENTRANTS

Our first entrant for the Sunshine Girl Contest is Miss Lorraine Herries a 17-year-old hairdresser of Hastings.

The second entrant, Miss Rosemary Mackie of Napier, is an 18-year-old clerk.

Page 17

Above: Miss Robyn Wolfe, a 17-year-old receptionist, comes from Napier.

Below: 21-year old Miss Lorna Miller is a bank clerk of Napier.

Page 18

MAKE SURE OF YOUR P.N.

Miss Biddy Sproule, our 5th entrant, is 21 years old – a school teacher from Napier.

Entrant. No 6, is Miss Tina Cheyne, a 17-year-old, photo finisher from Napier.

Miss Faith Mouritson, is a 17-year-old Napier draughtswoman.

Page 19

SOCIAL NOTES

Coming of Age

At the Ex-Navalmen’s Hall, Napier, Denis John, only son of Mr & Mrs William Kirkpatrick, celebrated his 21st Birthday.
BATCHELOR’S. NAPIER.

Engaged

The engagement of Judith Anne, daughter of Mr & Mrs Derek Turnbull of Kanuraniki, was announced recently to Wayne Edward, son of Mr V.H. Sawers of Hastings.
MACCONNELLS PHOTO SERVICES.

Wedding Bells

THOMPSON – DAVIES.
At the Maori Anglican Church, Porangahau, Maxine Joan, daughter of Mr & Mrs K. Davies of Wellington, was married to Brian, son of Mr & Mrs N. Thompson, of Hastings.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU.

The Shondells
DANCE BAND
FOR ALL YOUR SOCIAL GATHERINGS
Phone 84-588 Hastings

Page 20

MORE CHRISTMAS PARTIES

Above are Members of the Waipukurau Kindergarten, all dressed to perform a Nativity play, which they put on after their tea party at the Kindergarten’s breakup.

Left: FOOD!! No time to look at the photographer, not with all those delicious goodies within their reach.

Back to Napier, and a glimpse at the happy smiling faces of the children from the Chinese Community. Their party was held in the Trinity Hall, Napier.

Make sure of your PHOTO NEWS
Place a regular order NOW

Page 21

CABARET TO END SCHOOL YEAR

The senior pupils of the C.H.B. College wound up their school year in a right spooky manner, by holding a cabaret evening in the College hall which was decorated like a giant witch’s cave, complete with enormous spiders hanging from the ceiling. One student in particular will remember the evening, and she was the American student Kathy McKillop who returned to California shortly afterwards.

Left: Mr & Mrs Dickinson and Mr & Mrs Nielson inspect the Witch’s cauldron

Thoroughly enjoying themselves were Mr & Mrs E. C. Ellison. Mrs Ellison has now retired from being senior Assistant Mistress of the College and is looking forward to a long holiday in Scotland.

Above Right:

This line-up of attractive young ladies are, from left: Nicholette Howard, Scarlet Thomsen, Pauline Graham, Kathy McKillop, Louise Knobloch and Jill Williams.

Smiles from Pam Leach and Gerald Nairn.

Katharyn Wilson and Brian Jones also had a ball.

Page 22

CRIPPLED CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY CAMP

The Crippled Children will once again return from Mr and Mrs John Alexander’s Emerald Hill, Waihau, refreshed and happy after their Annual Camp. These pics will give you a rough idea of what the children do, when at the camp.

Above: An evening of T.V. for, Back row: Ian Alexander, Clare Briasco, Anne Freemantle, Leslie Pollock, Russell Herth, Lynn Alexander, Bill Sargisson, Maureen McMinn, and at Back, Nerida Forward.

Middle Row: Jayne Marshall, Glenys Clark, Dawn Holly, Karen Alexander and, Front row: Joseph Rongotoa, Ian Johnson, Lloyd Bott, Vicky Madden, Barry Wilkins, Peta Easterbrook and Mary Johnson.

Below: Ann Freemantle smiles as she pushes Secretary Tom Johnson under for the third time.

Left: With such a lot to do the children must have found it hard to choose, but here is Ann again, this time on a horse. She is assisted by Lynn and Brent Alexander and Janet Johnson.

Page 23

THE BIG FIGHT

Excitement ran high at the Municipal Theatre the night Carmen Rotolo, the Australian Welter Weight Champion, met Manny Santos, the New Zealand Lightweight Champ.

Originally the match was to be held at the Napier Skating Club’s rink on the Marine Parade, but a gloomy weather forecast made the venue change to an indoor match.

Above: Rotolo attacks Santos as Santos backs against the ropes.

Left: A flurry of blows in centre ring between the shorter but heavier Rotolo (left) and Santos.

Page 24

Above left: Carmen Rotolo listens to a few words of advice from Paddy Donovan of Napier, as he sits waiting before the tenth and final round. This round proved the most exciting, with Rotolo well on top of the Champion Santos.

Above right: Manny Santos, alone with his thoughts, after the ninth round.

Below: Bomber Wells, Announcer for the Napier Boxing Assoc., raises the winner, Santos’ hand, at the end of the fight. Santos claps a hand around Rotolo’s shoulders as Rotolo holds the winner’s hand up.

Page 25

Coming of Age

The Merchant Navy Hall was the venue for the 21st birthday celebrations of Barbara Helen, daughter of Mr & Mrs Ivan Dunstall of Napier. Barbara is pictured with her parents.
MacConnells Photo Service.

Ernest, only son of Mr & Mrs Eric Newman, celebrated his 21st Birthday at the James Banquet Lounge, on the 29th October, 1966. Ernest is seen here with his parents.
BATCHELOR’S. NAPIER.

The 21st Birthday celebrations for the daughter of Mr & Mrs K. Falvey, was held at her parents’ home in Napier recently.
BATCHELOR’S NAPIER.

John, son of Mrs M.A. Kelliher, celebrated his 21st Birthday in the Red Cross Hall, Napler, on the 10th December 1966.
BATCHELOR’S. NAPIER.

Page 26

AROUND AND ABOUT

ST. AUGUSTINES SCOUTS’ PAPER DRIVE

Scout Master Ian Sayer will have to make sure no Scouts are left behind when this woolpress, which is being utilized as a paperpress, is closed down. The Scouts had spent the morning on a paper drive, collecting papers which will be sent to the Whakatane Board Mills, the proceeds of which will be put to funds for General Purpose Equipment.

When Photo News pulled up, the boys had collected approximately 24 bales of paper.

CONFIRMATION DAY

Holy Communion was held at St. Vincent’s Church, Takapau.

Top Row: P. Frings, T. Mooney, J. Minihan, A. Ross, D. Perkins, B. McKay, N. Mullin, and

Bottom Row: B. Bedford, D. de Stacpoole, J. O’Ha11ahan, T. Waigth, Susan Allen, B. Power, A. Walsh, and P. Burgess, pictured with Mother Mary Aquinas.

WHO’S WHAT!

A group of beautifully costumed children at the Omakere School break-up, when they celebrated the end of the year with a fancy dress party.

Page 27

STAN HACKETT AS A HOLIDAY DRIVER

By David Hanger

Christmas has come and gone; the New Year is already beginning to age at an alarming rate – and a dozen or so more mothers, fathers, brothers and sisters have been slaughtered in the process of pleasure seeking. Stan Hackett, who, with spouse Kathlene, had fought his way from Napier to Auckland on Boxing Day, marvelled at the sheer miracle of it all. Only a dozen or so!

Now, Stan did not place himself among the top bracket of car drivers, but he did claim to take the business of getting from point “A” to point “B” by motorised transport as being a full time occupation during the course of the trip. So astounded was he at the number of part time drivers and their almost suicidal antics, that he had telephoned me immediately on his return to weep on my shoulder for a solid hour and a half.

After he had first filed his complaint about the state of the Christmas/New Year atmospheric conditions and the unnecessary length of the school holidays – on behalf of his wife – Stan launched into his long and involved tirade against his fellow drivers. It seems Stan and Kathlene had found themselves with the opportunity of spending a few days between Christmas and New Year in Auckland, but that this opportunity was conditional on his completing the north bound leg on Boxing Day even though he was well aware of the folly of tangling with the once-a-year, “I’m-the-only-one-on-the-road-who-is-worth-considering”, self-righteous exponent of motor-vehicle control.

An early departure from the comforts of an innersprung helped to salvage part of the morning after a chaotic packing scramble and distribution of offspring to fortuitously generous and long-suffering relatives, but it was still well after 10 o’clock when the Hackett car, gassed, oiled and tire checked, sped merrily past the Hawke’s Bay Airport on its way north.

By some quirk of circumstance, very few travellers had left their departure so late in the morning and Stan began to hope, rather hysterically, that everyone else had stayed at home to recover from the Christmas Day orgy. Whatever the reason for the relatively deserted road, Stan and Kathlene progressed at a steady carefree rate. Approaching the Taupo-Wairoa fork Stan tagged on to the end of a half-dozen-long queue but miraculously, all the preceding vehicles carried straight on up the Wairoa Road, leaving Stan to whistle back up into the red band on his speedo; on past the Eskdale Park; up the Saddle; past the Lake View Hotel – some Lake! – and up and over Titiokura in grand style. An exhilarating swoop down and over the magnificent Mohaka Bridge and a brief glimpse of the Summit Kiosk as it sped past on the left saw Stan beginning to wonder if the family had perhaps celebrated Christmas Day a week early. “At this rate,” chortled Stan, “we’ll be in Rotorua for a late lunch, thanks to the wide open spaces and the ingenuity of the Ministry of Works.”

Tarawera had become a dim memory when the full-of-good-cheer Stan jetted up behind every trailer, boat, caravan and vintage car that had departed Hawke’s Bay that morning. Just at this point the whole convoy rounded a bend and started up the long steep pull that heralds the beginning of the eight-mile stretch of metal road still left on the once formidable Taupo Road. As Stan peered through the billowing dust, which progressively built up on his beautifully waxed car and infiltrated through the supposedly sealed off doors, the peace and goodwill feeling that had reposed within his breast began to be replaced with uncharitable thoughts towards mankind. When he noted that the two leading car-caravan units were sticking stubbornly to their three-quarters of the road his generally genial and goodnatured demeanour was surplanted by a foreign force, a manifestation of which was the appearance of two short horns curving out from each temple.

The next sign of Stan’s transformation was that he began muttering to himself about licensed idiots let loose with a caravan. Kathlene, all too familiar with the signs, gritted her teeth and wisely said nothing, for as yet, the transformation was only at a mild stage and there was a couple of hundred miles ahead yet. Upfront, a frustrated motorist had had enough and, seeing a reasonably clear stretch, pulled out and shot past the leaders. This had the effect of galvanising everyone else into action and before long Stan found himself staring at the rear end of a dust producing caravan. Naturally, three or four other cars had ranged up behind, thus hemming him in nicely, and there were still four miles of metal road to go. Eventually he spotted his chance and whistled out to sandwich himself between the

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two car-caravan units – only trouble was, this particular sandwich already had a filling, as minute as it was. By dint of a bulldozer-like manoeuvre, Stan managed to squeeze in behind the small car, an action which drew forth electronic reaction from the caravan tower by means of a horn button and facial contortions. However, “one down, two to go,” thought Stan.

The next act in this little mobile tableau was for the driver in the car in front of Stan to decide then and there that this newly arrived upstart was not going to get past him, no matter what the cost. At the first available opportunity this driver pulled out and passed the caravan unit in front, with Stan hot on his tail with the idea of continuing on past this new tormenter when that driver pulled back in front of the caravan unit. But Mr. X had no intention of pulling over and stayed out in the middle until the next corner loomed up, which was very quickly. Stan began to mutter again and stuck like glue to the rear bumper of Mr. X’s car. On the next short straight, Mr. X slammed his right foot hard to the floor and coaxed every little horse power out of his vehicle; including the hitherto unsuspected foal or two hiding under the bonnet. Stan’s eyes began to take on a wild-eyed look while Mrs. X in the racer currently holding first place wondered, fearfully, what on earth had happened to her invariably mild mannered husband. Whereas he had always sat behind the wheel in a reasonably relaxed manner, here he was hunched over like a grand prix racing driver, both hands gripped so tightly on the steering wheel that the knuckles were turning white, all the while causing almost animal-like rumblings to ensue from his frothing lips.

Round the next bend careered Mr. X, twisting wildly on the wheel to regain control of the veering family car, and still that battleship of a car, driven by an escapee from a mental asylum, was blotting out his rearview mirror. In the rear car, Stan peered through the dust laden murk and commented calmly, an emotion he was far from experiencing, that the idiot in front was scaring hell out of his wife, just to stop him from passing. Inevitably, a relatively steep incline foiled all attempts by Mr. X to keep up the hot-rod pace and Stan roared past in dust covered splendour. With a “By jove, I gave that nut a run for his money,” Mr. X promptly slowed down to a walking pace and awaited the inquisition which he knew would now be directed at him by Mrs. X.

By this time there was only half a mile of metal road left and Stan mulled over the proposition that he would probably have been better off dropping back behind that vindictive maniac until they had quit the hills. Never mind, what was done was done; on with the job at hand. In short order the speedo was giving off a cheering red glow and the Hacketts were making up time across the Rangatiki Plains, for now, naturally, all the traffic had disappeared again.

At Taupo, Stan came down to earth with a thump. From here to the Runciman-Auckland motorway it was a case of sit tight and watch the other fellow like a hawk, and the “other fellow” seemed to have completely ignored all the good advice that had been handed out in large doses by the Transport authorities. On the Taupo-Tokoroa stretch, Stan had eased up behind a “Thunderbird” battlewaggon which had been cruising along at a slightly slower speed than Stan. The road at this point being beautifully straight and clear, Stan had quietly pulled out and drifted past without any inconvenience to either party. .

Back on his own side, Stan glanced in the rearview mirror and noted that his passage had started off another drama: This time, a younger Mr. X, who had been dreamily contemplating a long cool drink in the luxury beach front motel which constituted journey’s end, had been startled by the sudden appearance of a lesser power pack alongside and had reacted with considerable force to the impudence of the usurper of his reverie: “Just who the devil does he think he is?” he blurted out indignantly, desperately trying to reason out how he was going to revenge the slight upon his person. By pure reaction, he had pushed down a little on the accelerator and was thus now keeping pace with Stan. Stan, of course, had noted this all too familiar reaction of young drivers of high power cars and waited patiently for the next move. It wasn’t long in coming: The young Mr. X summoned up the sleeping half of his horsepower and rocketed past with powerpacked ease and disdain, causing Stan’s car to sway in the slipstream. Once having stationed himself a couple of hundred yards in front of Stan, the younger Mr. X maintained station with meticuious precision for the next 20 miles, then pulled up for lunch at a wayside eating house with all six occupants of the car leering triumphantly at Stan and Kathlene as they cruised past. Stan, with admirable control, studiously ignored their presence and gazed fixedly ahead until they were well clear, then he too started to look for a likely picnic spot for their lunchtime stopover.

Having stretched his legs, stayed the pangs of hunger, and enjoyed a piping hot cup of coffee from the thermos, Stan actuated the starter and pulled out into the now relatively heavy traffic flow.

Before he arrived in Auckland, Stan had encountered just about every frustrating traffic situation in the book; half-a-dozen cars skimming along the centre line with uncanny accuracy; a

Page 29

sudden stop by the vehicle in front for no other reason than that the driver wanted to consult a road map; a car pulling off from a roadside cuppa, just close enough in front to cause concern, then proceeding at a snail’s pace, completely oblivious of having so much, as come into the view of any other traffic; a mass slowing down of traffic, from 40 to 30 at the sight of a black and white, red domed patrol car, which immediately doubled the length of the convoy; a following car sticking six feet from the bumper – usually cured with a couple of stabs at the footbrake; and gross impatience on the part of Stan himself.

So ridiculous were some of the antics, of everyone else, that Stan had stopped for a social chit chat with a parked Traffic Officer, at a time when he was well and truly hemmed in in an apparently endless convoy, and after discussing the weather had plunged into a discussion on that officer’s view of traffic manners.

This representative of a much maligned race had proved to be most sympathetic to Stan’s point of view, but pointed out that the top brass couldn’t do much more than they were already doing. “Radios blare forth a dozen times a day on the ‘keep left’, ‘don’t follow too close’, ‘slower traffic pull over and let faster traffic go by’, slogans,” he said, continuing, “but it just doesn’t seem to make any difference. In heavy traffic our movements are more than somewhat restricted and, anyway, with these startling publicity conscious cars, we see a great deal less than you do.”

Stan, seeing that his newfound friend was warming to his subject, taxed him with the most frustrating problem of them all: The little group of isolated dreamers who queue up and eflectively block the progress of hundreds of faster cars.

“Mr. Hackett,” (Stan had thoughtfully introduced himself) said the Traffic Officer, “I know exactly what you mean. but who is really at fault? The first car? After all, he was probably ambling along without causing any undue trouble to faster traffic until another car, driven by a cautious, less than competent driver, had quietly attached itself to the first car’s rear end. Now we have two cars drifting along, probably one foot from the centre line and six feet from the left hand line. Still not anything to worry a good driver with a reasonably powerful car, but next thing you know, a car and trailer unit has joined the convoy, quite content to stay right where he is. At this stage, you have the beginnings of a lovely pile up of traffic, yet the front car, apart from not keeping over, is not doing a thing wrong. It’s not his fault that the cars immediately behind won’t pass, is it?”

“Sure, I know that the whole thing could be avoided if each one of the slow drivers backed off a bit and left room for manoeuvre between them, but they simply haven’t the experience to realise that. Not only that, they’ve probably been caught out before with two or three cars progressively ‘queue jumping’ in the gap they have left and then not moving on out of the way. Strangely enough, if the slower drivers did spread out, and the faster drivers worked their way past them, they’d all spread themselves out along the high-speed without any hold ups anywhere, but I suppose that’s too much to ask for. What does happen,” he said with obvious resignation, “is that sooner or later a faster driver gets fed up and tries to take on a line of five or six cars and he just hasn’t the clear space to do it in. All too often, this is the fellow who cops a ticket or lands in difficulties with oncoming traffic – which, of course, wouldn’t think of moving over to let him through.”

“O.K.” said Stan. “what about roping in the characters who sit out in the middle?”

“Sounds fine in theory, and in ‘letters to the editor’.” replied the Traffic Officer, “but, when there’s a line-up of a dozen or so cars, all trying to see past the right hand side of the car in front – even though they have no intention of passing – who do we go for? One is no more or less guilty than the other. lf we attempted to stop the lot and go down them all on a lecture tour, we’d finish up by snarling up trafiic all the way down to Wellington.”

Much the wiser for his talk with the law, Stan settled in the driving seat and injected himself back into the traffic train, just a little saddened at the fatalistic nature of it all. Half the population would continue to look on driving as a pleasant hobby: a time for a friendly chat with the family: a time to take in the passing scenery with forward progress regulated by the attractiveness of the said scenery. Five hundred thousand solid citizens stricken with motor madness, all with their own, individual standards – all confined to 12 feet or so of tar seal. What a hopeless mess!

Then Stan offered a remarkable, but true comparison: Twelve months of war in Vietnam and not more than half a dozen New Zealanders had died, but, we are informed in a statistical running commentary, well over 500 had died on the roads in the same period and many hundreds more had been “wounded” or hospitalised, yet the Vietnam conflict looms larger on the political scene. The anti-Viet Namesers demonstrate with news attracting force, but no one gets emotional about the highway battlefield. The possibilities of failing to balance the national budget causes a greater stir.

“Perhaps it is more important to keep out of Vietnam and stay solvent than to stay alive on the roads.” was Stan’s sad conclusion before quietly replacing the telephone on the hook.

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Wedding Bells

SPEERS – HAMLIN
At St.Luke’s Church, Havelock North, Judith Nina, elder daughter of Mr & Mrs A. J. Hamlin of Havelock North, was married to Donald Bruce, second son of Mr & Mrs G. J. A. Speers of Hastings.
LOVELL-SMITH. HASTINGS.

RATCLIFFE-EVANS:
At St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church on 31st December, Jennifer Ann, daughter of Mrs F.M. Evans, Frasertown, married Colin Rex, son of Mr & Mrs C.Ratc1iffe of Gisborne. Left to right: Miss L. Price, Chief Bridesmaid, Mr W. Jones, Bride & Groom, Miss Margot Evans, Mr A. Lloyd, Miss L. Evans, Mr K. McBreen and flower-girl, Miss Ann Crofsky.

The engagement of Jennifer, daughter of Mr & Mrs R. Bicknell of Hastings, to Ken, eldest son or Mr & Mrs R. G. Moffatt of Waitaia, Southland, was celebrated at the home of Mr & Mrs Bicknell.
LOVELL-SMITH. HASTINGS.

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HIGH ALTITUDE DRAUGHTS COMPETITION

Why play in a Draughts Competition in a home or a hall like everyone else. Why not do a 2-day trek to some remote area in the Ruahines, like Venturer scouts from units in Takapau, Hastings and Greendale did? The only difference is that besides being mentally exhausted after play you are also physically, before you even start.

The Greendale Venturer Scouts Unit organized a draughts tournament inviting Scouts from other units to compete, and meet at an appointed spot in the Ruahines on New Years Day. Two Scouts from each of the above mentioned units met with Wellington units at the Remutupo Hut where the Hastings boys won the Draughts Tournament.

Left: Five members of the party crossing the Makaroro River. From left: John Barnard (St Matthew’s Venturers), Kelvin Walls (St. Mathew’s), Gary King (Takapau), Gordon Ellmers (Takapau) and Brian Larson (Greendale).

IT MUST HAVE BEEN CHRISTMAS

Once again “Guess Who” is surrounded with children, who attended the N.Z.R. Shunters Christmas party.

FANTASYLAND MOVES AHEAD

Work on Fantasyland is progressing at a steady pace, with a large portion of the railway line, which runs around the outside, in place. At close inspection, one may be able to pick out the new bridge which we featured when still in the rough a few months ago. The position is at centre top at the end of the left-hand loop.

Directly up the centre, flanked on one side by trees, will be the lake, in which the Castle will be positioned. In the foreground, just right of the trees, is the site of the Railway Station.

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Coming of Age

Lesley, youngest daughter of Mr & Mrs P. Burns of Tokomaru Bay, celebrated her 21st Birthday in the Old Folks’ Hall, in Hastings, on the 12th of November, 1966.
RUSSELL ORR STUDIOS. HASTINGS.

Wedding Bells

ELMER – WATT
Mr & Mrs Watt of Napier were married on the 22nd October, 1966 and were attended by, from left: Miss S. Walch, Mr A. Hanlon, Miss L. Herd (flower-girl), (Bride and Groom), Miss A. Baxter, Mr P. England, and Miss J. Walch.
BATCHELOR’S. NAPIER.

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THE JAYCEES ARE AT IT AGAIN

As always, the Jaycees, no matter where, are busy.

Right: Mr Stewart Haynes, Chairman of the Wairoa Hospital Board, is receiving, on behalf of the board, a T.V. set, presented by the President of the Wairoa Jaycee, Mr T. P. Parker.

Below: Wairoa Jaycees were putting the finishing touches to their illuminated fountain float, just before the Xmas Holiday period.

WHO’S FOR A YARD OF BEER?

Can you do this? There were various contestants who showed the others what they could do, by attempting to drink a Yard of Beer in the recent Queen Carnival.

A CHRISTMAS BABE

Mrs Ranginui, of Tukemokihi, is pictured with her baby which was born on Christmas Day.

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Page 34

JOCKEY CLUB’S TRAINING STABLES

Who wouldn’t be a horse, be it Arab Stallion or Old Grey Mare, when one sees the modern spacious concrete block Training Stables, which were built by the H.B. Jockey Club, for lease. There are 3 separate units, with 8 horse boxes to each unit, plus feed and harness rooms.

Above: View of one of the units.

Below: Trainer Mr. Tony Lyndon, one of the leasees seen with “Claphands”, a 2-year old filly and “Happy Billy”.

This shot shows just a small portion of the well-equipped feed room.

Below: General view of the well laid out yards.

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GOVERNOR-GENERAL VISITS WAIROA

Above: There was big excitement with the recent Vice-Regal visit to Wairoa and District. His Excellency the Governor General and Lady Fergusson, escorted by Mr. & Mrs. Gordon Ormond, meet ex-servicemen on the occasion of their recent visit to Kaiuku Marae, Mahia Peninsula.

Below left: His Excellency speaks to a large crowd gathered to witness the opening of the new extensions to the Wairoa Airport.

What a thrill for Jan Cooper and her friends, when they had an introduction by the Mayor to His Excellency the Governor General.

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H.B. SURF LIFESAVERS AT OHOPE

An awaited event for any Rep. Surf Life Saving Team is when they compete against Reps. from other districts, and recently the Hawke’s Bay Representative Team went to Ohope, Whakatane, for the N.Z. Inter-District Surf Life Saving Championships.

Right: Brief last-minute instruction for the H.B. team, from Instructor Ivan Wilson to, from left: John McKerras, Allan Thompson, Chris Williams, Brian Wilson, and the “bod”, in this case Allan Christie.

Below: These boys are participating in the Inter-Districts beach sprint – H.B. runner second from left.

Right: H.B. Junior Beltman, Brian Wilson, gave the Aussies, who were also competing, a run for their money.

The H.B. Senior Six man Rescue and Resuscitation team were being judged prior to the beginning of their event. Men in white are official judges. Team was, from left: Chris Williams, Brian Wilson, Allan Thompson, Angus Martin, John McKerras and Gary Fraser.

The boy charging up the beach is 16-year-old Allan Christie who represented H.B. in Surf Life Saving for the first time.

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So to Gisborne

And Midway Beach, where the boys competed in the International and Inter District Carnival, after leaving a most successful carnival at Ohope.

Left: A little more instruction from Instructor Wilson.

Below left: The H.B. Team enters the water for the Four Man Rescue and Resuscitation Alarm Event.

Gary Fraser races up the sand, surf board tucked under his arm, whilst competing in the Iron Man relay.

And the big event of the day – the March Past. A proud moment for all competitors.

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BACK TO THE BAY – AND THE CARNIVAL WITH THE AUSSIE TEAM

The H.B. Rep Team arrived back, and made ready for the a visit of the visiting Australian Surf Life Saving Team.

Above: The Aussie team were met outside the Westshore Surf Life Saving Club House, where they chatted amiably with members at an informal reception.

Below left: Napier is the first place in which they have competed where they received a Mayoral reception, and here are a few speaking with H.B. members. From left: Hayden Kenny of Queensland, Bob Pratt H.B., John Costello, H.B., Syd Jago, H.B., Brian Wilson, H.B., Chris Bradford of N.S.W., Allan Christie H.B., Peter Francis, Victoria, Angus Martin H.B., Barry Dennehy, Capt. H.B. Team.

Below right : Smiling H.B. Instructor Ivan Wilson, and Australian Chief Instructor, Jack Dearlove.

Left: The Captain of the Australian Team, John Ryan (left), presented the Mayor of Napier, Mr Peter Tait (centre), with a boomerang which was specially engraved. With them is Barry Dennehy.

Right: Jack Dearlove, B. Dennehy Snr. Liaison Officer for H.B. S.L.S Assoc. who is travelling with the Aust. Team with Kevin Weldon, Australian Team Manager.

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Unfortunately the whole of the H.B. Carnival was quite ruined, due to the foul weather and rough seas, as you will see by the above pic. Though a large crowd attended they were driven away by the rain and cold. After the Carnival the H.B. Surf Life Saving Assoc. put on a dinner for the visitors at the Bon Estha Lounge, and a gathering later at the Westshore Surf Club.

Left: Publicity Officer for the Westshore club, Syd Jago, pops the odd champagne cork at the dinner.

Below: One of the Australian-New Zealand tables, at the dinner.

Below: At the social were Mrs N. Hatton, Mr Noel Hatton, Mr R.K. Smith, Syd Jago and Mrs R.K. Smith.

Right: Aust. Manager shows great interest in this life saving reel which appeared on Marine Parade Beach, Napier, in 1910. It was originally purchased from Manly, Sydney. With Mr Weldon is Mr B. Dennehy, senior.

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Wedding Bells

McCARTHY – HISCOX.
At St Mary’s Church, Waipukurau, Lorraine, daughter of Mr & Mrs R. A. Hiscox of Waipukurau, was married to Terrence, son of Mr & Mrs M. McCarthy, of Martinborough.
A reception was held at the Masonic Hall, Waipukurau.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU.

HINCHCLIFFE – JOHNSON.
Christine, daughter of Mr & Mrs C. Johnson of Swinton, Lancs. England, was married to Allan, son of Mr & Mrs A. Hinchcliffe, of Warrington Lancs. England, at St. Mary’s Church, Waipukurau. A reception was held at the Waipukurau Hotel.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKARAU.

Coming of Age

Celebrated at the Masonic Hall, in Waipukurau, was the 21st birthday of Barbara, daughter at Mr & Mrs D. K. Halford of Waipukurau.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU.

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PRESENTATIONS TO DIGGERS

Takapau and District R.S.A. held their annual social at their Takapau clubrooms, where the highlight of the evening was presentations of life membership certificates to those Diggers who were able to be present. Mrs Len Carberry, wife of the President, presented the certificates to, Above left: Charlie Person, N.Z. Rifle Brigade,

Centre: Digger Jack Smith, 3rd Binks, France, M.Heeney, 23rd Batt. Egypt.

Below Left: Norman Paulson, 4th Batt, Rifle Brigade, France.

Centre: Allan Norris, Rifle Brigade, France, and Jack Brinson, Wellington, East Coast Regt. Mounted Rifles, Egypt and Palestine. Diggers unable to attend were: Bob McSporran, George Paget, Alf Allen, E. Stewart, Duncan McSporran, Paddy Mullens and A. Jensen.

“THE FOLK FOUR”

This Folk Group which was formed in Waipukurau have been doing extremely well, performing at local charity concerts and have made quite a number of radio broadcasts. They are: Bill Lumsden, Wayne Renner, Jo Anderson and Katharyn Wilson.

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Page 42

36 YEARS AGO

Thirty-six years will have passed on the 3rd February, 1967, since the horrors of the Napier earthquake struck with merciless venom. For many that day has been tucked away into the back of their minds. For the new generation these pictures will convey the destruction the quake left in its path.

Right: Though it is hard to recognise, this is the Municipal Theatre, which now stands in Tennyson Street, after being rebuilt.

Left: View of the “Veronica” as it lay at the collapsed wharf. The ship entered Port Ahuriri to assist the people.

Below: “Where do we start?” Men sitting on the rubble of the Tobacco Factory at Port Ahuriri.

Below left: The somewhat twisted railway line, at the Westshore embankment.

Bottom : Looking towards Marine Parade. Note the temporary Criterion and Masonic bars.

THE PLACE TO STOP for COMPLETE
MOTORING and HOLIDAY SERVICE
FIRMANS
For Warrants of Fitness, Lubrication, General Repairs and all parts service with
The Greatest of ALL PETROL BORON
AND
THE CARAVAN CENTRE
The Most Up-To Date Service in New Zealand
See the array of CARAVANS
OXFORD
ANGLO
PULLMAN
AIRFLO
LUXURY
MINITOUR
BELLBIRD
CARAVANS FOR SALE and FOR HIRE
ALL ACCESSORIES FOR THE HOLIDAY MAKER!
Primus Cookers, Refrigerators, Filling Service, Rockgas, Lights, Portable TV., Kettles, Heaters, Radios, Toasters.
YOU MENTION IT – FIRMAN’S HAVE IT!
IF FIRMAN’S CAN’T GET IT – FORGET IT!
OPEN ALL DAY EVERY DAY
FIRMAN’S SERVICE STATION
and
FIRMAN’S CARAVAN CENTRE
HYDERABAD ROAD – Phone 39-057, After Hours 37-022, 7756 – NAPIER

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PRIZE GIVING

Mr Brisco, chairman of the board of governors of the Central Hawke’s Bay College, addressed a large gathering of parents and pupils at the annual break-up and prize giving held in the Municipal Theatre, Waipukurau.

Left: Mrs Ellison presents T. Ward and K. Wilson with the Katharyn Wilson cup for inter-house swimming sports.

Below: Richard Hunter receives the Bowman Cup for Sportsman of the Year, from Mrs R.G. Frean. Watch this boy in N.Z. Athletics.

Bottom Right: The 1966 Dux of the Central Hawke’s Bay College, Elizabeth Hurford, receives the Dux Medal from Professor R.G. Frean of the English Dept. Massey University.

The American Student, Kathryn McKillop, received the Waipawa Rotary Essay Contest prize.

Jocylin Anderson is seen here accepting the Head Girl’s prize.

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WHAT ARE PEOPLE DOING FOR THEIR VACATIONS?

SOME. . . are watching over little ones paddling round the paddling pool on Marine Parade, also having a paddle themselves. The wee tots are making the most of the belated sun –

OTHERS . . . are, like Below left: picnicking on the Parade. These people are, from left: K. Knight, Sylvia Duncan, Mrs Lily Duncan, and Sandra Duncan, THEN THERE ARE THOSE….. who just swing! The swingers in this case are Jennifer Toki and Ian Appleby. Jennifer is 12 and from Woodville, Ian is 13, from Waitara.

Bottom: Not the paddling pool fans, but surf enthusiasts. Whether they ride the waves, dabble their toes, or just crash round, they love the sun and surf.

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A FEW . . .

Like to go round and round during their vacations – especially on the Merry-Go-Round on Marine Parade.

THEN AGAIN . . .

Lots of boys like the quiet relaxation and excitement of fishing, more often than not perched on a precarious ledge or the like. These boys on the Westshore Bridge are: Ian Bolten, Terry Yeo, Eddie Walker, Byron Buchannan [Buchanan], Patrick Whakataka, Simon, Xavier & Matthew Lynch, and looking on is Barry Hawkins.

BUT…..the joys of swimming in the Onekawa Olympic Pool.

Page 47

Wedding Bells

CRAWFORD – ELLIOTT.
At her home at Waihau, Barbara June, elder daughter of Mr & Mrs J. E11iott of Waihau, was married to Malcolm Leonard, elder son of Mr & Mrs L. N. Crawford of Hastings. Pictured with the bride and groom are, from left: Lindsay Crawford, Hastings, Mr & Mrs L. M. Crawford, (Groom and Bride) Mr J. Elliott, Miss C. Elliott, Mrs J. Elliott, Mr John Elliott and Rev. C. Brown who married the couple.
MACCONNELLS PHOTO SERVICES. NAPIER.

Married recently at St. Columba’s Church, Taradale, were Mr & Mrs Gary Andrews. The couple were attended by, from left: Mr A. Andres, Miss A. West, (Groom & Bride) Miss S. Thereson, Mr B. Steed, Miss G. Andres, Mr J. Crouch and Miss G. Sweeney.
BATCHELORS. NAPIER.

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Wedding Bells

STEPHENSON – LAIDLAW:
At the Methodist Church, Waipawa, Eleanor Mary, second daughter of Mr & Mrs. A. Laidlaw of Waipawa, married Anthony John, eldest son of Mr George Stephenson of Waipawa and Mrs J. Maaka of Otane.
LOVELL-SMITH. HASTINGS.

STAYNER -ROUSE
At St. Patrick’s Church, Napier, Nancy Rouse was married to Michael John Stayner on the 31st of December, 1966.
BATCHELOR’S. NAPIER.

HOLDERNESS -GARDINER:
Audrey Jean, only daughter of Mr & Mrs E. Gardiner of “Candacraig”, Hawke’s Bay, was married to Brian John, second son of Mrs & the late Mr. N. F. Holderness, of Napier, in St. Martin’s Chapel, Iona College.
LOVELL-SMITH. HASTINGS.

Page 49

McKENZIES SOCIAL

McKenzie’s, Napier, had rather a belated Xmas party in the Manchester Unity Hall on the 14th January. This was due to the fact that they had just opened their renovated premises prior to Xmas. Nevertheless, they had a mighty party, with mad mad games to add to the fun. Games, Musical Chairs, Knees, and dancing with a lone “Mop”.

Left: Mrs Ellison and Mr J. McGee were the winners of the “Clothing Musical Chairs”.

Right: The “Mop” is partnered by Miss Jordan who unfortunately was the dancer left out in that game.

Below left: “Knees up and all that”. Undoubtedly there would be screams and yells while this game was in swing.

Back to the more serious side of proceedings and on with the dancing. This couple are Mr & Mrs Judd.

Three lovely young ladies are, from left: Misses Wyatt, Flintoff and McEwan.

Having a jolly good time are, from left: Mr Woods, Miss Yarrell, with Mr & Mrs Macdonald.

Page 50

YOUR BIRTH STAR INFLUENCES
An introduction to Astrology with the signs of the Zodiac by “Lenah”

FEBRUARY CALENDAR

ARIEA[ARIES] – March 21st to April 19th.
Something best kept a secret could elate. Resist temptations to talk about plans and special promising projects. Behind-scene activities later pay off. Some disappointment-things not moving fast enough for you. The revisions and preparatory work or planning are more helpful for your destiny than you may now believe. Need for caution with partners or mates. Curb temper. Try to win over others. Even irritation delays prove lucky.

TAURUS: April 20th to May 20th.
Midmonth Mars, planet of strife moves to stimulate oppositions or antagonisms. Partners and the world in general may seem rather rebellious or irritatingly argumentative. An extraordinary situation may develop between you and someone who lives at a distance. Letters and messages are vital. Be sure you read all yours correctly. Give others the assurance of your genuine intentions. Don’t overpromise, many things need smoothing out or talking over.

GEMINI: May 21st to June 21st
Something may cause you to wish you had not accepted certain invitations. Pressure, tensions, are likely, especially in social life. Keep your mind on financial matters, prevent losses by vigilance. Could be swayed by vanity, a desire to be all things to everyone. Don’t let your nerves and health problems grow worse because of an inner vacillation and inability to come to strong conclusions. Decisions would free your mind and let you relax. Some limelight for you. Everything you do will come into the public eye. You will be unable to hide your light under a bushel.

CANCER: June 22nd to July 22nd.
Venus is leading your mind in green pastures in terms of distance, travel and wanting to get away from your environment. Make plans quietly and do not tell what you are scheming until it is packaged, ready for action. You will want to make new starts. Your alert mind can settle things others believed beyond you. There will be a steady buildup of attractiveness and popularity. Others seem quarrelsome, and you will be called upon to exert a soothing influence. You will have to make a choice or sacrifice. Will express your feelings in no uncertain terms.

LEO: September 23rd to August 23rd
Partners and associates are talkative and some what iritable as they insist upon delays you believe unimportant. There will be a chance for a private conference that might reflect happily in your far future. You will probably have to take the reins and exert your influence strongly this month. Will be expected to settle other people‘s problems. You seem to have secret support however. Intimate conversations and behind scenes information aid you in an important confrontation near the end of the month, so brush up on something in the background.

VIRGO: August 24th to September 23rd
May need a favour from partner. You will have charm and magnetism, can put your ideas across and get some one else to agree. A splendid period for launching something requiring the goodwill of outsiders or your life partner. Will have advantage over competitors. Try to push the advantages you have gained. If necessary, visit someone in person rather than take second hand information at face value. Some plans might be delayed.

LIBRA: September 24th to October 23rd
Venus at the 6th angle should aid you with health problems and with relationships with co-workers. It can be a great boon to those who want new jobs or improved working conditions. You will have a boost with ideas that helps you put them across. Don’t go to extreme. Attempt to settle money matters. You can contact people living at some distance. Short trips and visits could be of advantage. Your relationships will be accentuated with partners or those working near you. Health, your own or someone elses, might be important.

SCORPIO: October 24th to November 22nd.
This month Venus, the planet of love, is in harmony With you, and could take your mind off heavier matters. Be sure you are not taken in by a child or dear one (or someone charming and much younger), who could talk you into foolishness. The 6th-10th is made to order for your own schemes and working things out with those loyal but slow personalities who cannot think as fast as you. You will have energy and possibly temper at the wrong time. Try to curb tendencies to speak too quickly and with the wrong people. Guard a tendency to tell too much..

SAGITTARIUS: November 23rd to December 21st.
Your ruling planet Jupiter will help you discover something that you might have overlooked in the past. You can be saved just in time from making a mistake regarding property, sales or things owned. Will have a chance to put things in order in your household. Especially where gadgets, machinery or possessions are concerned, be cautious. Secret activities and background problems in your life. Some exciting episodes could draw you into other people’s affairs. Some turmoil and possibly even a quarrel with someone in a high place. Your charms are deepening and strengthening with regard to the Opposite sex.

CAPRICORN: December 22nd to January 19th.
Venus will bring you news and also will make those you love talkative so that you can learn things you have been wanting to hear. You should devote time to your partner or the closest person in your life. Something will strengthen this tie if you let it. Mars enters an angle of your chart that helps you control your temper, and yet it may also bring you into a kind of listening position with your warring friends. You might have to play the role of mediator. Everyone seems to be in turmoil turning to you for decisions.

AQUARIUS: January 20th to February 18th.
You are still in control of some situation because of advance information. Whispered gossip and all kinds of news will put you ahead of other people. Yet you may hesitate to use your new knowledge. Don’t overspend. You seem more concerned with dependents. There will be a bewildering period when many things go against you. Do not try to buy your security or some one’s affections at this time. The strange feeling of being alone might assail you. But at the full moon cycle, you ought to have luck even though other people can erupt in all kinds of histrionics and make confession. A visitor or contact.

PISCES: February 19th to March 20th.
Many human relationships that have become snarled may become smoother through your charms. Heed warnings that a talkative person could be dangerous. Button your lips. Show your true talents and abilities by mov1ng more quickly than others expect you to. Exciting time – travel interests and messages from afar, all things connected with distance, might be stimulating and brings you news long awaited. Don’t expect to accomplish much. Guard against overspending and extravagance.

Page 51

HOW TO GET RID OF YOUR SISTER

No, not really Bruce’s intention, but he was still on the cricket field when he should have been home dressing for his sister, Darielle’s wedding, consequently he bowled up to the church to greet her stepping from the cab, brandishing his cricket bat in his hand.

Darielle Jean, daughter of Mr & Mrs W. R. Tucker of Napier, was married to Adrian Howard, son of Mr V. and the late Mrs Skidmore, also of Napier, in St. Paul’s Church Napier.

They were attended by, from left: Bill White of Wellington, Janet Skidmore, Napier, (Groom & Bride) Len Brown of Christchurch and Monica Lau of Wellington.
HURST STUDIOS. NAPIER.

Page 52

“STARS” IN TOWN

Earlier this month a few of New Zealand’s prominent stars who were in town for a Country and Western Style Show, were busy entertaining and signing autographs at Columbus Radio Centre in Emerson Street, Napier. The N.Z. Gold Disc winner, Maria Dallas, together with the runners-up, Jay Epae and Jim Lemon.

Left: Bruce Dymond of Napier seems pretty happy about Maria signing record.

Below: The hilarious comedy team “Jazzbo and Allan’.

Below left: Country and Western singer Garner Wayne warbles to a toe tapping crowd who were outside the shop.

Bottom left: Jazzbo’s other half, Allan.

FOR A GLIMPSE OF THE BIG COUNTRY AND WESTERN SHOW TURN TO FLIP SIDE OF THIS PAGE

Page 53

Do You Know What These Signs Mean?

TRAFFIC signs are a familiar sight on the roads. They are largely self-explanatory and the symbols easy to perceive. But, occasionally, one sees a sign that needs a second glance. Below are reproduced some of our symbol signs. Do you know what they mean?

Here are two familiar shapes. What wording would you expect to find on these?

ANSWERS:
1. Indicates a reduction from three-lane to a two-lane highway
2 A roundabout on the road ahead.
3 A railway crossing on a side road.
4 A pedestrian crossing with a school nearby
5 Overhead clearance of 12ft 6 inches
6 A “Limited speed” Zone.
7 The word “Stop”
8 The words “Give Way”

Page 54

Wedding Bells

HENDERSON – STEPHENS:
Recently married at St.Mary’s Church, Waipukurau, were Edith Joyce, daughter or Mr & Mrs A. C. Stephens of Waipukurau, and Ross Alexander, son of Mr & Mrs S. R. Henderson of Waipukurau.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU

CRESSWELL – DRANE:
At St.Mary’s Church, Waipukurau, Maureen, daughter of Mr & Mrs J. Drane of Waipukurau was married to William, son of Mrs and the late Mr H. M. Cresswell of Waipawa.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU.

James Douglas (Jim), second youngest son of Mr & Mrs J. S. McKay of Hastings, recently became engaged to Judith Ann, only daughter of Mr & Mrs A. W .F. Manning of Hastings.
CANDID CAMERA STUDIOS. HASTINGS.

Page 55

MAORI CULTURE DISPLAY AT HAUMOANA SCHOOL

The shelves in the new Library at Haumoana School will be well stocked with new and interesting books probably by the time the children resume school in the new term. The purchase of these new books was aided by Maori displays given by Std. 2 and 3 children, a hangi and speech finals which were attended by parents, who during the course of the evening bought a book or books which were on display, to be donated to the library.

Above right: These children, who were tutored by Mrs Tauroa and Mrs Unahi of Haumoana, perform a Poi Dance for the parents present.

Left: Bella Whatarau, Tuaine Tera, Huia Ormsby and Betsy Unahi engrossed in a Stick Game.

Right: Opposite the four girls at left, were Helen Thompson (right) and Gillian Banberry.

The boys swing in to a Stick Game. Parents took delight in the polished performance from all the pupils. They are, from left: Graham Banberry, Heta Edwards, Warwick Holder, Kris Steevens, Raymond Weekes, David Werrey, Paddy Anderson and Chris Wiffen.

Page 56

Above left; After the outside displays, parents moved into the library where the speech finals took place, and also a display of projects by children from Primer 4 up, with the books which parents could buy and donate alongside. The speech winners were Emma Scott and Phillip Hansen. They spoke on Ghana and Canada respectively.

Above right: Mrs Unahi is presented with a book by Faye Lean from the school in appreciation of the hard work which went towards the display.

Below: Part of the dividing unit consisting of shelves, in the new library. These swing open, by a mechanical operation, so enlarging the area to one large room.

Heta Edwards presents Mrs Tauroa with a book also.

Bottom Left: Concentration covers the faces or these boys during their performance of a Canoe Game.

Page 57

Left: The books which were on display.

Below: Eager faced children and adults watch the big “Steam up” as the Hangi gets under way.

Bottom left: Nothing wrong with this Kai, judging by the contented grins and full mouths.

Bottom right: “Not too foul, – hey boy”

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PHONE 7017

Page 59

CLUB OFFICIAL OPENING

The official opening of the H.B. Game & Offshore Fishing Club, which came into existence some 2½ years ago, was officially opened by Mr Kirkpatrick, Chairman of the Harbour Board, recently. The Club’s 400 members will put to good use the modern club house facilities and the new launching ramp, which was opened by the President’s wife, Mrs A. Finch.

Top: Opening scene, with Clubhouse on the right.

Above: Mrs Finch and Mr Kirkpatrick watch the first boat to be officially launched after the cutting of the ribbon.

Left: The Club Vice-President, Ray Wiig, is seen hoisting the flag.

Page 60

TEACHERS’ OPERA

On the 13th December, the Hastings Boys’ High School held their end of year concert in the Assembly Hall. The above pictures are shots of the “Teachers Opera” item.

CARLYLE KINDERGARTEN RAFFLE

Recently, in Napier, the Carlyle Free Kindergarten held a raffle with the aid of several Napier shops which donated, most of these being situated around the Balmoral Shopping Centre.

The donors and prize winners are pictured above, from left: Mrs Shirley Reading, chairman of the Kindergarten, Mr P. O’Brian, Garden Centre, Mrs Verschaffelt, winner of the 1st prize, a Go Kart, Mr P. Gitman, Gitman’s Homeware, Mr. Tucker, Balmoral Footwear, Miss B. Arrowsmith, Rembrandt Hair Stylists, Mr Deacon, Balmoral Floral Studio, Mrs N. Dykes, 3rd place getter, Mr Brian Dunlop, Balmoral Pharmacy, Mr H. Wong, Prop. of Foodlands, Mrs Church with Clifford and Michelle, Clifford being winner of the 2nd prize.

Telephone 88-093
321 Featherston Street
Palmerston North
MAITLAND PRIVATE HOTEL
PROPRIETRESS JEAN MORAN
Recommended by A.A. and Gov’t. Tourist Bureau
Special Rates for Children
Hot and Cold Water in Rooms – Centrally Heated
Tea Making Facilities – T.V. Lounge – Car Park
D/B/B  B/B  Lunch Optional

Page 61

CHRISTMAS TIME’S MOST SOUGHT-AFTER MAN GOES VISITING

FIRST STOP – WESTSHORE LIFE SAVING CLUB’S CHRISTMAS PARTY

Darryl Wilson is a little bashful about receiving his gift from Father Christmas

This little cutie is Sue Gorley of Napier.

“Give over'” Implores Mark Dennehy of Father Xmas.

Napier’s Mayoress, Mrs Tait, receives a bouquet from chairman, Mr B. Pratt, in appreciation for attending the party.

SECOND VISIT – ONEKAWA KINDERGARTEN

On the 8th December, parents, as well as 40 children attended the afternoon Christmas party at the Onekawa Kindergarten. The teachers at the Kindy had their work cut out with a party in the morning and one in the afternoon.

Right:This wee sweety seems pleased with the whole show. She is Deborah Boyd.

Page 62

Left: Looks as though Dougald Chalmers received a gift of sweets from Father X.

Above: Andrew Widdowson has a chat to “that man”.

Below Left: Boy! Some have all the luck! Miss Helen Paris, Director, and Jill Dickson with Santa

YET ANOTHER VISIT – ST. PHILLIP’S CRIPPLED CHILDREN’S PARTY

The St. Phillip’s Crippled Children’s party was held at St. Phillip’s Church Hall, Napier.

Below left: About to begin on the goodies

Below: At another part of the table a balloon blowing session was underway – one little girl is waiting for the explosion.

Page 63

A group of the children with their helpers. The helpers are, from left back, Messrs. Knowles, Beddows, Perfect, Thomas, Thurston (in charge) and Johannsen.

Below left: At Marewa Kindergartem. [Kindergarten,] the Pre-school Minding Centre also held their Xmas party. They were, from left: Rebecca Sinclair, Kevin Beechan, Steven Dodds, Robin Ansell, Vaughan Doods, Martin Jeory and their helpers Messrs Mochan, Twigg and Davidson.

SO TO THE XMAS PARTY AT MARY RICHMOND KINDY

Though the Good Man was not photographed, he had been, but these littl’uns wanted to get into the goodies. Though some enjoyed the photo being taken, there were a few looks of consternation.

If it looks like a NEWS PHOTO don’t delay – ring PHOTO NEWS right away

Page 64

MOST ACCOMPLISHED WREN FOR I966

Chosen as the most accomplished of this year’s entry into the Women’s Royal New Zealand Naval Service, Wren Margaret Godsmark of Auckland proudly displays the trophy she has won for her achievement.

She was presented with the Trophy by Mrs J. N. Lord who presented the trophy to the Service in 1963 when she retired as Director of WRNZNS.

Pictured admiring the trophy are, from left: Wrens V. D. Kingston of Dunedin, P. Hayward, of Fielding, M. Suther1and of Te Kuiti, A. Shirley of Hawke’s Bay, Leading Wren E. Oldham of Auckland, Wren J. Hynd, of Te Awamutu, J. Strong of Wellington, Third Officer S. Willard, of Wellington and Wren Godsmark of Auckland.

Page 65

Social Scene

Mike, son of Mr & Mrs I. L. Bilas of Waipukurau, is seen with his parents whilst celebrating his 21st birthday party at the Rugby Union Hall.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU.

Ian, son of Mr & Mrs D. L. Glennie of Hastings, is being helped to cut his 21st Birthday cake, by his parents, in the United Hall, Waipukurau.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU.

Happy smiles from Mr & Mrs Kyle, who were recently married at St. Mary’s Church, Waipukurau. The bride is Patricia, daughter of Mr & Mrs H. N. Williams, of Waipukurau and the groom, John Rutledge, son of Mr & Mrs R. A. Ky1e of Waipukurau.
WENDY STUDIOS. WAIPUKURAU.

Page 66

MUMS TAKE TO THE STAGE

And may we add “like veterans.” The Bledisloe School (Taradale) Infant Mothers’ Circle gave two splendid performances of a variety concert for the junior and senior classes of Bledisloe School, on 6th December in the Taradale Town Hall. Items included songs from the “Sound of Music”, a “Christmas Eve” play, and Christmas carols.

Above: The full cast on stage during the Christmas play. From back left: Mesdames Barnett, Weir, Strachan, McKinnie, Christison, Lum, Grant, de Manser, Hayes, Luck, Merson, Bower and

Centre: Clews, Holmes, Frazer, Isles, Nelson, Taylor, Bauckham (Father Xmas) Carr, Meechan, Bates, McKinlay, Jones, Goodier, Clark and

front: Boston, Baikie, Austin, Jeffares (Jack in a Box), Bates, Thomas and Atkins.

Above left: Big Boo! From “Jack in a Box”, Mrs Jeffares.

Above: In appropriate costumes, these ladies sang the ever popular songs from “Sound of Music”. They were, from back left: Mesdames Atkins, Weir, Clews, Luck, McKinlay, Lum and Centre from left: Strachan, Jeffares, Hayes, Holmes, and in front: Mrs Merson.

Left: Good ole faithful, Father Xmas, (Mrs Bauckham).

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Back cover

Next Issue
Feb.25

[Back cover photo – Is the newly formed “Marine Guards” Marching Team, who look most attractive in their ming uniforms.]

Original digital file

PN099Jan1967.pdf

Description

Published November 1958 – June 1967

Date published

January 1967

Format of the original

Magazine

Publisher

The Hawke's Bay Publishing Company Ltd

Accession number

967/968/35550

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