Mayfair School Silver Jubilee 1950-1975

MAYFAIR SCHOOL SILVER JUBILEE

KIND THOUGHTS – GOOD DEEDS

1950 – 1975

MAYFAIR SCHOOL SILVER JUBILEE

1950 – 1975

APRIL 12th and 13th 1975   

AERIAL PHOTO OF MAYFAIR SCHOOL – 1954

Page 3

Mayfair School Silver Jubilee

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Chairman: Mr B. DAVEY   Secretary: Mrs B. MacLEAN
Treasurer and Hospitality: Miss L. JENKINS
Principal: Mr O. A. BENSON

BOOKLET COMMITTEE
Editor: Mr L. W. SCOTT
Treasurer: Mr A. HUGHES
Advertising: Mr A. ROSS,  Mr R. KIRK

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE
Chairman: Mrs J. RULE
Committee: Mr L. SUTTON , Mrs C. FRANKLIN, Mrs O. REAN

ENROLMENT COMMITTEE
Chairman: Mrs N. HUGHES
Committee: Mrs J. FINNIMORE, Mr A. KITE, Miss G. DAVEY, Mr J. JENKINS

MEMBERS
Mr R. McMURRAY, Mr E. BOESE, Mr H. WALKER, Mrs S. WILSON, Mrs R. KIRK, Mrs E. JENKINS, Mrs EVERITT

A GROUP OF JUBILEE MEMBERS

Page 4

MAYFAIR SCHOOL, 1975

FOREWORD

The Minister of Education: Hon. PHILLIP A. AMOS

I am very pleased to be given the opportunity to associate myself with the Silver Jubilee of Mayfair School.

Being the product of a country school, and later teaching at several schools in provincial centres which were not so very different from Mayfair, I am only too well aware of the special problems and challenges which confront you.

But with those challenges – and that is the way I like to regard them – comes the pleasure and the satisfaction of seeing solutions . . . local solutions which meet the local need. This is one of the Government’s major policy considerations, and is right in line with our general policy of regional development, and regional decision-making.

Jubilee celebrations mean the coming together of old friends and schoolmates. A review of the past perhaps, but more importantly a rekindling of enthusiasm for the future. It is a time to thank people for past performances, and to plan for bigger and better things in the years to come.

My best wishes to all those former and present pupils, and good luck for the future.

P. A. AMOS
Minister of Education

Page 5

GOODWILL MESSAGES

The M.P. for Hastings: Mr R. MAYSON

As both parent of children at the school and Member of Parliament I’m delighted to be associated with this Silver Jubilee Booklet for Mayfair.

A twenty-fifth anniversary is an important milestone and reminds us that several of the school’s first pupils are now parents who have their own children as pupils at Mayfair. A sure sign that the school has come of age.

It is almost a truism to say that the earlier years of a person’s education have a greater effect than most subsequent influences. In this regard Mayfair has left its stamp firmly on many Hastings citizens and people who now live elsewhere. Furthermore, the lively interest of parents in the school and the high standard of education its teachers have provided over these twenty-five years is a tribute to the worth and fine character of the school.

My warmest congratulations go to the school and all involved in its activity on the very special occasion of Mayfair’s Silver Jubilee.

RICHARD MAYSON, M.P.

Message from His Worship the Mayor of Hastings: Mr J. J. O’CONNOR

I am very pleased to be given this opportunity of writing a message of congratulations to Mayfair School on the occasion of their Silver Jubilee.

It does not seem long since February 1950 when Mayfair School was first opened, and I remember Mr L. Burke, the first Head master.

Mayfair School has grown with the area which originally, like so many areas surrounding the old boundaries of Hastings, were farms and orchards.

I have been advised that there are many ex-pupils and teachers attending your Silver Jubilee, quite a few of whom are now living in other towns and areas, and I am sure all these people will be delighted with the growth of both Hastings and Mayfair School.

I trust that your Silver Jubilee festivities over the weekend of April 12th/13th, 1975, are successful and look forward to meeting as many of you as I can. My congratulations and best wishes to the organising committee and to all our visitors, a very warm welcome and a safe journey home.

J. J. O’CONNOR
Mayor

Page 6

Chairman of Hawke’s Bay Education Board: Mr J. A. N. HALFORD

It is a pleasure for me to accept the invitation of your committee to write a short foreword for your Jubilee Magazine, and I trust that the magazine will serve as a valuable factual, and interesting record to commemorate the school’s 25 years of service to Education.

In congratulating the school on this memorable occasion I wish to express the Board’s appreciation of the valuable contributions made by pupils, teachers and parents not only to the material growth of the school over the years but also to the influence and standing it now enjoys in the community.

To the Jubilee Committee responsible for the celebrations I extend congratulations, and trust that their efforts will be a means of stimulating pride and continued interest in the school.

On behalf of my Board, I wish the School, its pupils, staff and supporters very best wishes for a successful Jubilee Reunion.

J. A. N. HALFORD
Chairman

Chairman of Silver Jubilee Committee: Mr B. DAVEY

“Time is a relative thing.”

As a four-year-old helping (!) to build Mayfair School, a point 25 years in the future, was a lifetime away. However, now that those years have passed, the time of that four-year-old seems almost like yesterday.

At the moment, in the mind of some child, perhaps at school – maybe yet to start – 25 years will seem to him as it did to me a quarter of a century ago. But whoever has the honour of being chairman at the time of the 50th Jubilee, will look back upon his time at school and wonder at the short space of time in which so much has happened in his life.

Looking through old school photographs, the memories of school friends come flooding back. What are they doing now? Where do they live? How have they fared in life? What is a jubilee for, if not to try to answer these questions and to enjoy the company of old friends once again?

To the members of the committees who have spent many hours in organising these celebrations must go the honour of knowing that without their undying efforts, this jubilee would never have got off the launching pad. Without the interest shown by these ex-pupils, teachers and members of the various committees connected with the school, this, the 25th year since Mayfair School was opened, would have passed as any other. However, thanks to the interest shown and the effort of these people, an idea has become a reality.

To those who have travelled to Hastings for these celebrations – welcome back; and to those who live locally – welcome.

The benefit and enjoyment to be had is now up to you. We have done what we can to make this a memorable weekend, so renew old acquaintances, relive memories and, most of all, enjoy yourselves.

BRIAN DAVEY
Chairman Jubilee Committee

Page 7

The Principal of Mayfair School: Mr O. A. BENSON

On behalf of the present pupils and staff of Mayfair School I wish to extend a warm welcome to all who attend our Silver Jubilee Reunion. Your loyalty and regard for your old school, and the desire to meet old friends have been responsible for your return.

As you arrive to celebrate Mayfair’s Jubilee, you will recall experiences made richer by time. You will look for and find many, though not all, of those teachers and pupils who figure in your school memories.

It would be fitting here to pay tribute to past teachers, school committees, and school Association parents and friends. Their co-operation and assistance has made Mayfair School what it is, and this Jubilee such a memorable event.

Special thanks are due to Brian Davey and his committee who have all worked so hard organising this Jubilee.

The staff and pupils of our school welcome you, and hope that there is joy in the meeting of contemporaries, and hours of pleasure in your reminiscences.

O. A. BENSON
Principal

OUR OAK TREE

Page 8

EDITORIAL

A school jubilee is a time when old friends meet once again to recall those happy, far-off days when they used to work and play together.

Working together has always been a feature of Mayfair School, where the children learn to help each other as they work in their groups, their teams or their syndicates. Our motto, “Kind Thoughts – Good Deeds”, is indeed an appropriate one.

The oak tree, which was planted in the school grounds long before Mayfair School was built, has been chosen as a symbol for our Silver Jubilee. It is also a symbol of strength, endurance and dignity.

Mayfair, too, has its strength in the children who have attended the school, in the teachers who have taught there, and in the parents who have helped to make Mayfair the school it is today.

“Great oaks from little acorns grow” is a fitting expression to describe all those who attend our Silver Jubilee. We hope that you will enjoy the celebrations. To all those, who for one reason or another, are unable to be present at this time, remember that our thoughts will be with you.

May we take this opportunity to thank all those wonderful people who have helped to make the production of this booklet possible. Perhaps the mention of a name, or an event within these pages will help you to recall those days when you too worked together as pupils, teachers or committee members of Mayfair School

L. W. SCOTT
Editor

Page 9

IN THE BEGINNING

BUILDING THE SCHOOL

Orchards, farms and shingle roads are an early memory of the Mayfair area.

An old wooden homestead had been built on a site which is now a part of the Mayfair School playground. An oak tree had been planted at one side of the house, with two walnut trees on the other. A concrete path which had led up to this house was still there when Mr L. Sutton bought the property. A barberry hedge surrounded the area and it was close to the walnut trees, near where Room 16 now stands, that Mr Sutton built his milking shed.

As he was milking his cows one morning he noticed a number of ducks flying from Karamu Creek to the Windsor Park stream. Whenever the sky was overcast and the ducks were flying low Mr Sutton used to keep his shotgun in the shed.

Immediately a duck appeared he would drop his milking bucket and reach for his gun. In this way he was often able to shoot two or three of the ducks during the early part of the day.

One morning, Mr Sutton looked at the oak tree which was growing in the middle of his paddock. As the branches looked thin and straggly, he decided to take his axe in order to chop down the tree.

However, after a little persuasion, he changed his mind. Instead, he pruned back the branches to half their length. As a result we have today a beautifully shaped oak tree growing in the school grounds.

Page  10

Early Days

On February 1st, 1950, Mayfair School began to enrol pupils from Central, Mahora and Parkvale Schools. As these schools had become very crowded, the Hawke’s Bay Education Board had decided to build a new type of school in the Mayfair area.

When Mr L. Burke, the first Headmaster, made his first entry in the school log book he wrote: “This is a new school of six classrooms and library built to relieve the congestion at the above schools. It will cater for pupils from P1 to S4.”

The children arrived at Mayfair on February 6th. On this day 264 pupils were in attendance and additional children were still expected from contributing schools.”

There were more than enough children to fill the six classrooms, so Mr Burke reluctantly decided to convert the library into a classroom.

A RECENT PHOTOGRAPH SHOWING THE SCHOOL AS IT WAS IN 1950

Page 11

PRIMERS 1 AND 2, 1950
Teacher: Miss Y. G. Hay.

MAYFAIR SCHOOL STAFF, 1950
Back row; Mr I. Talbot (1st Assist.), Mr L. G. Tocher, Mr R. A. Sivewright
Front row: Miss M. M. Esler, Miss Y. G. Hay (I.M.), Mr L. J. Burlee (H.M.) Miss J. A. Chappell (S.A.), Nurse C. Eberhard

Page 12

STANDARD 4, 1950
Teacher: Mr L. J. Burke

The rooms which formed the school at this stage were the present Rooms 2 and 3 in the Junior Block, together with Rooms 5, 6, 7 and 8 in the Administration Wing.

As soon as the children were assembled they were welcomed to the school and motion pictures were taken.

The first staff appointed to Mayfair School was Mr L. Burke as Headmaster and teacher of Std. 4, Miss Y. G. Hay as Infant Mistress, with a class of P.1-2 pupils, Miss A. Chappell as A.3 Assistant with Std. 1, Mr T. Dymond as relieving A.3 First Assistant with Std. 3, Mr L. G. Tocher, Miss M. M. Esler with P.3-4, and Mr R. A. Sivewright with Std. 2.

After an interview with Mr Burke, the “Herald-Tribune” reported, “Floors are still bare, but there is nothing austere about the Hastings ‘super school’ which opened at Willowpark on February 6th. From its outer coat of turquoise paint to the rubber-shod classroom chairs and tables Mayfair sets an education precedent. . . . Things were topsy-turvey, fun for the children, hard work for the teachers. New faces in new places made it so. Tradesmen still worked, paint had to be applied, flooring laid, lights fitted and a thousand and one small jobs completed. The workmen are still there, but the children have peeked and poked into all the places in which it is possible to peek and poke, and are now ready to settle down to work.

A tour of the school starts with “The Blue Room”. This is the dental clinic, a glossy pastel-tinted room in which surroundings, the headmaster says, the children should not object to having their teeth attended to. . . .

Out in the big, far-stretching ground there is much layout work to be done. Here too, Mayfair will be different. For, as the headmaster explains, [“] the lawns will grow walk-on grass, not the keep-off variety.”

Page 13

On the 7th of February, Messrs S. Rouse, H. B. Tobin and A. H. Croucher were appointed as commissioners to act as a school committee until the elections in April. It was on this day too, that a caretaker who was to remain at Mayfair for over twenty years, first commenced his duties. That man was Mr H. J. Dove, and before he retired in 1970, Harry had become Mayfair School itself.

A few days later it rained so heavily that the grounds were practically a quagmire. With permission from the Education Board, the children were dismissed at noon. The school re-opened again until mid-day, next day, but there was so much mud about that another day and a-half went by before school could resume.

On the 1st of March, nearly one hundred parents attended a special meeting. Mr Rouse welcomed the parents and introduced the head- master, who told of the parent co-operation required to make the school an efficient institution. Proposals for raising the considerable amount of money mentioned by the head- master came freely. It was decided to hold a Gala Day in the near future. The gala committee elected to organise the function was: Messrs Ramsay, McCracken, R. Smith, Boldt, Hingston, Walker, Jackson; Mesdames Smith, Boldt, Robin, Martin, Lepien, McCracken and Thompson.

Mr A. H. Sivewright, Chairman of the Education Board, congratulated the parents on their enthusiasm. The school colours were vigorously debated. So many suggestions were made that it was decided to allow time for consideration and to make a decision at the next meeting.

Page 14

The Opening Ceremony

Mr A. H. SIVEWRIGHT, CHAIRMAN OF THE HAWKE’S BAY EDUCATION BOARD

Mayfair, the most modern school in Hawke’s Bay, was officially opened on March 16th by the Mayor, Mr R. D. Brown, in the presence of a large gathering of parents and friends as well as a full assembly of children, who next day enjoyed a holiday granted by the Minister of Education in celebration of the occasion.

Visitors to the function were welcomed by Mr Rouse, and other speakers included Mr Burke, Mr L. R. Lewis, senior inspector, Mr C. G. E. Harker, M.P. for Hawke’s Bay who spoke on behalf of the Minister of Education, the Hon. R. M. Algie, and Mr A. H. Sivewright.

In opening the school, the Mayor quoted remarks made by Mr Algie, in which he acknowledged that the aim of the Government was the true welfare of the child. Mr Brown opened the building with the wish that all who laboured within its walls would realise a sense of achievement in their work, and a hope for the happiness of the teachers and children who attended.

On May 1st, over sixty householders were present at a meeting for the election of a school committee. The following members were elected as Mayfair’s first committee: Messrs S. Rouse as chairman, C. A. Boult as secretary, R. McCracken as treasurer, A. H. Croucher, F. W. Liley, A. Ramsay, A. Shewan, R. G. B. Smith and Mrs D. E. Walford.

Page 15

During the year an unjustified complaint was received by the Education Board. It was thought that children living in the vicinity of Parkvale were attending schools at Mayfair or Havelock North. The Board chairman, Mr Sivewright, recalled that prior to the opening of Mayfair School nobody wanted to go there. “Now everyone wants to go to Mayfair,” he said. However, Mr Burke assured the Board that no children living outside the school’s boundaries had been admitted.

The Gala Day Committee met weekly, and as a result of this effort, the school benefitted to the extent of £414 ($828) The function was an outstanding success, especially when we remember that the school had only been open for two months!

Mr Ian Talbot, who later returned to Mayfair School in 1965 as Head Teacher, first commenced at Mayfair as First Assistant in 1950.

The children probably had mixed feelings when the Dental Clinic was opened on April 24th, with Nurse C. Eberhard in charge. When the call went out, Ngaire Kirk had the “honour” of being the first patient.

THE FIRST SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1950-51
Back row: A. Shewan, A. H. Croucher, C. A. Boult, R. M. McCracken, J. A. Ramsay
Front row: F. W. Liley, Mrs W. G. Walford, S. J. Rouse, R. G. B. Smith

Page 16

In those days the Primary School Athletic Sports were held at the Hastings Racecourse. Three girls gained certificates in 1950. Judith Leppien was first in the 7-8 year old race, and broke the existing record. In the 9 year old race, Dianne Leech came second, while Rae Estcourt came third in the same race.

Help from the school committee soon provided two new pianos, a typewriter, a duplicator, as well as a large supply of tools, a film- strip projector and a speaker system. Parents of children at Mayfair School have always been very willing to provide the school with the latest educational aids, or material necessary to give their children the very best possible education.

At a well attended meeting of parents on the 31st of May, the first Home and School Association was formed.

Mr Burke explained the necessity for Road Patrols who would ensure the safety of children crossing Karamu Road.

During June a decision was made regarding the school’s colours. These were to be sky blue and navy, colours which have never been altered.

In order to provide the area with a park-like appearance, one hundred trees and twenty-six rose bushes, all of which had been donated, were planted by parents and children on a Saturday in July.

Before long, arrangements for a bottle drive and a shop day to raise money for a swimming pool were being finalized.

On the first Parents’ Day in December, a programme of items was given by the children. The M.P. for Hastings, Mr S. I. Jones, the Board Chairman, Mr A. Sivewright, the Ward Member, Mr D. Ormond, the School Committee Chairman, Mr S. Rouse, and the Headmaster all gave brief speeches.

The rooms and the pupils’ work were then opened for inspection, while supper was served for the official party.

The Years of Growth

As the roll had risen to 309, Mayfair commenced 1951 as a Grade VC School, with a change in some of the senior positions. Mr Chadwick was now the First Assistant. A new prefabricated room had been built during the holidays, and this was soon occupied by the Form 1 class.

The Napier Frivolity Minstrels, the Frivs., were always a popular group of entertainers. “Cinderella” was the theme of their programme for this year, and the School Baths Fund benefitted from their show by £63 ($126).

This year the Form 1 pupils commenced their Manual Training lessons – either Woodwork or Cookery -for the first time in the history of the school.

Do you remember the 1951 School Picnic? Over five hundred children and adults travelled to Westshore for a very successful outing. The seating accomodation [accommodation] on the special train was fully occupied. The weather was perfect for the outing, and an enjoyable day was spent in sports and swimming.

Children were provided with toys, sweets, ice-cream, soft drinks and fruit.

The 1951 Gala Day opened with a Trolley Derby which started at Weed’s Store on the corner of Jervois Street and Willowpark Road. This was followed by a Grand Parade of trolleys, children in fancy dress, decorated bicycles, tricycles and prams, headed by the Hastings District Scots Highland Band. Mr S. I. Jones, M.P. for Hastings, performed the opening ceremony.

Page 17

During the afternoon the Pipe Band, Shaw’s Kilties and Shaw’s Midgets marching teams provided entertainment. A baby show in four classes attracted no fewer than fifty babies – some dark, some fair, some sleepy, some cheeky – but most managed to gurgle at the judge, Sister Simpson.

Judging was indeed a difficult task, and it was not completed until 5 p.m.

In April, the school was presented with an Environment Certificate by Mr Sivewright, Board Chairman, Mr Page, Secretary-Manager and Mr Lewis, who was the District Senior Inspector. This was a much sought-after award given only to schools with well-kept grounds and gardens. The school environment had to be inspected by the Nature Study Specialist, Mr Hurdsfield whom many of our readers will no doubt remember. As schools found it difficult to achieve the honour of obtaining this certificate, it speaks well of all concerned that this high standard was reached in so short a time. Unfortunately this scheme seemed to fade out after Mr Hurdsfield retired. Mr L. R. Lewis remarked that the school was a model of neatness, and congratulated all those who had worked so hard in just one year since the school had been opened.

The children, of course, were thrilled, because Mr Sivewright granted a half-holiday to mark the occasion.

In June, word was received that three new rooms were to be added to the school, as the roll number was now 329. These were the rooms now known as Rooms 1, 2 and 3.

When the school receives a film projector, both pupils and teachers appreciate its arrival. There must have been some smiles at the first film showing in July.

Shortly afterwards, Dr Beeby, Director of Education, accompanied by Messrs Sivewright, Mercer and Lewis came to inspect this new, modern type of school.

Mayfair was, and still is a “model” type of school.

No doubt some people will remember the evening when Traffic Inspector Heaven met the Traffic Patrols. After the showing of films, followed by a discussion, short Safety First plays, written by the children themselves, were presented to the meeting.

By November the school roll had risen to 355, so the school had been reclassified as Grade VIA. Shortly afterwards the Education Board notified the school that it was to be staffed as a Contributing School. This meant that the 1951 Form 1 pupils would have to return to their former schools for their Form 2 year.

Early in 1952 the second prefabricated room was occupied by a Std. 2 class, and the name “Mayfair School” as well as the motto “Kind Thoughts, Good Deeds” were painted on the front of the school building.

 “Long Live the Queen”

On the 7th of February the school was closed and the flag flown at half-mast for the death of King George VI. A few days later Mr Burke assembled the children and read out  Proclamation of Accession of Queen Elizabeth II.

Page 18

THE SWIMMING POOL, 1951

The children were thrilled when the new Learners’ Swimming Pool was opened for the first time in February. The official opening did not take place until November, when the ceremony was performed by Mr Carl Atkinson, a past president of the H.B. Centre of the Swimming Association, who spoke to a large gathering of parents, teachers and school children. “I regret,” he said, “that we in New Zealand have one of the highest death rates through drowning, per head of population, in the world. These baths will enable you to learn to. swim.”

After the official speeches, Mr Rouse broke the “ice” by swimming a length of the pool, after which the infant children splashed around, while the standard children later competed in races.

A very successful function concluded with afternoon tea.

In 1953 the school opened with the three new classrooms which had now been completed, while both the prefabricated rooms had been removed.

On March 25th the flag was flown at half-mast for the death of Queen Mary, wife of the late King George V, and the grandmother of our Queen.

When Lord and Lady Norrie visited Hastings in April, the children from Stds. 3-4- attended the welcome at Cornwall Park. The Governor-General gave the schools a holiday for the rest of the day.

Page 19

In May, a Coronation Service was held. After Mr Burke had addressed the pupils, Meryl Hunt and Bruce Latton planted an Irish Yew to commemorate the occasion. Souvenir booklets were issued at the conclusion of the ceremony. Shortly afterwards all the standard classes went to see a film called “A Queen is Crowned”.

As Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh were to visit Hawke’s Bay during the Christmas holidays, Royal Tour medals with blue ribbons were issued to the children. Hundreds of the children assembled in Fitzroy Avenue, near Cornwall Park, to welcome the royal party.

A new wing of three rooms, 11. 12 and 13, were added to the school during the year.

To give good service for the next ten years was an electric duplicating machine which was purchased for the school that year.

As the Hastings Intermediate School was opened in 1954, the Form 1 pupils were transferred to the new school. As a result, the Library was not required as a classroom for the time being.

When Mr Burke was asked to be an Acting-Inspector in May, Mr Chadwick became Acting-Headmaster until August.

Some ex-pupils and teachers will probably remember a ceremony that was observed on October 20th. This was honouring the flag in memory of Trafalgar Day – a ceremony which was once of very great importance.

Due to lack of space in 1953, a Standard 1 and a Standard 2 class had to be sent to Mahora each day.

Equipment received during the year was a new Bell and Howell Film Projector. This had been purchased to replace the earlier model.

At the end of the year Mr Burke left Mayfair as he had been appointed to Nelson Park School in Napier. When the school re-opened in 1956, Mr Chadwick was Acting-Headmaster.

MAYFAIR SCHOOL STAFF, 1956
Back row: Nurse B. Graham, Mr R. T. Foley, Mrs D. F. Hingston, Mr P. N. Lorck, Mrs A. Healey (Sec.), Mr W. J. Weterings, Mrs S. Unwin, Mr D. S. Johnson, Miss M. A. Flanagan, Miss D. M. Williams
Front row: Miss N. Erceg, Mr J. Te K. Chadwick (1st Assist.), Miss Y. G. Hay (I.M.), Mr R. McMurray (H.M.), Miss J. A. Chappell (S.A.M.), Mr W. W. C. Coutts, Mrs D. A. McMillan

Page 20

During March, Mr R. McMurray commenced his duties as the new Headmaster.

Perhaps some people will remember the day when two members of the 1956 Springbok Rugby Team visited the school. They were P. S. du Toit, a forward, and P. G. Johnston, a three-quarters. This was indeed quite an occasion as some of the boys were able to see the Springboks training at Nelson Park during the morning.

During July the Standard 2 and 3 classes were able to occupy their new classrooms, now called Rooms 9 and 10. This was indeed a relief as the two classes had been travelling to Mahora each day by bus. On one occasion at least, the bus did not arrive at 3 p.m. to bring the children back to Mayfair.

Just the same, within a few days another class, Upper Primers, were being transported to Mahora where a spare room was again available.

When Hastings reached city status in September, a Children’s Day was planned as part of the celebrations. This was held at Windsor Park and consisted of a morning’s programme devoted to tabloid games, followed by less formal games and competitions in the afternoon.

Polio vaccinations commenced soon afterwards, to be followed by a booster at a later date. It was noted that some pupils appeared rather pale at the thought of the “ordeal to come”.

It was during this stage and the next year that the school started installing Multiplex fixed equipment for both junior and senior departments – such equipment as Taranaki Climbers, Climbing Bars and Maypoles.

During 1957 it was found necessary to transport a Standard 2 class to Frimley, while a P.4/Std.1 class were later sent to Central.

In August, a meeting attended by a Traffic Inspector, the Headmaster and members of the School Committee discussed the need for a pedestrian crossing in Karamu Road.

New equipment purchased during the year was a filmstrip projector, a tape recorder and a spirit duplicator.

In 1958 the covered way to the new rooms was commenced.

When Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, visited Hastings on February 5th, the standard classes were taken to the city where they lined the street to watch the royal party as they drove along Heretaunga Street.

The Governor-General Viscount Cobham visited Hastings in October. The children paraded at Windsor Park for the reception. The Governor-General was very popular when the afternoon was declared a holiday, and a further day’s holiday was granted, to be taken at the end of the year.

When a new gramophone arrived, teachers were provided with a useful teaching aid for musical appreciation.

Two members of the British Lions Rugby Team, Mr Risman and Mr Mulcahy, visited the school during 1959.

Later, a group of Standard 4 children, accompanied by a group of teachers, visited Christchurch.

In 1960 a new iron fence was erected across the western boundary, while the centre piece of the main driveway, which had been a flower bed, was sealed over.

At mid-year, parental interviews with teachers, in place of written reports, began for the first time, and was of value to both parents and teachers.

During 1961, Miss M. Atkinson the Adult Education Officer, commenced evening classes in “A Workshop of Singing”.

Twelve Hawke’s Bay Education Board Activity Day records were broken or equalled when the sports were first held at Mayfair School. Twenty-four teams of twelve children each took part in tabloid sports, relay races and athletic events. Nearly fifty parents helped the teachers to make the day a success. Green House won the sports with 854 points, followed by Red with 843, Gold with 823 and Blue with 781.

Page 21

Mrs E. L. WILLS WITH A PRIMER CLASS

To try out the new Infant Number Book, Mayfair became a pilot school. Cuisenaire sets and pattern boards were soon in use.

An Art Week was held in June. The Art specialists were working mainly with the standards, although the primers benefitted as well. Two hundred parents visited the school to see the displays of Art in each room. This was an excellent opportunity to thank Mr and Mrs W. J. Lennon for a beautiful picture of fishing boats, entitled “Near Sorrent-Sorrente” which had been placed in the staffroom.

After five and a-half years Mr McMurray left the school. In the school log book he wrote, “It is a school with a spirit and an atmosphere of its own, and too has the full confidence of the parents and of the children.”

The Changing Years

Mr F. H. Bacon commenced his duties as Head Teacher in September, with a school roll of 489.

At this time it was decided by the Post Office to make a change in banking procedure, as deposit slips were to be used at the school for the first time.

A spare cloak room in the Infant Block was set up as a film room and was used as such until an Assembly Hall was built.

Office equipment was renewed in 1961 with the purchase of a new typewriter and a spirit duplicator.

Page 22

During the year a party of thirty-five children with a teacher and a parent arrived on a “Farm Visit”. The children, who had travelled from Featherston, were soon billeted with families in the Mayfair area.

At the beginning of 1962, the Education Board stated that no children from outside the school boundaries were to be enrolled.

An International Exhibition by the Junior Red Cross provided a pleasant outing for Standards 2, 3, and 4 early in the year. “Peter and the Wolf”, performed by the New Zealand Ballet “Company, provided another for the senior pupils.

Tape recordings and slides taken during a class Social Studies Unit, about the Middle Ages, were presented at an in-service course in Napier, Waipawa, Wairoa and later at a meeting of teachers in Hastings.

During July, the school received a picture which had been won at the Hawkes Bay and East Coast Art Society’s Annual Exhibition. The picture, which is entitled “Exercise, Misty Morning”, is an original oil painting by Lynn Gurney and depicts a jockey riding his mount.

At the beginning of 1963 flags were issued to children so that they could welcome Her Majesty the Queen and Prince Philip, who visited Hastings on Sunday, February 10th. Shortly afterwards each child received a copy of “Her Majesty’s Farewell Message to the School Children of New Zealand”. The booklet concluded with these words, “From what I have seen of the young people of New Zealand, in the schools and at the gatherings – and I wish I could have seen many more of you – I am quite confident that the future of New Zealand is in excellent hands. God bless you all.”

Plans were soon under way for the raising of funds to build a Little Theatre. This was to have been a small hall built with voluntary labour. Meanwhile the school was being re-painted and the corridors in Blocks 1 and 3 were re-roofed.

Mr M. PALUSEN [PAULSEN] AND STANDARD 4, 1963

Page 23

THE NEW ASSEMBLY HALL

A new amplifying set, with two-way communication was provided by the School Committee during the year.

A Gala Day held in March brought in £450 ($900). Included in the fund-raising plan was a Queen Carnival. A special function was held in St. Martin’s Hall when the carnival was concluded. The winning queen was Maxine Boag, while the princesses were Penny Beaven and Shirley Paul. At this event a cheque for £1252 ($2504) was handed over to the School Committee.

It was decided at this time that a filtration plant should be installed at the swimming pool. However, a new decision had to be made as information had been received from the Education Board that a £2 to £1 ratio was now available for the erection of assembly halls costing approximately £6000 ($12000).

After the School Committee had discussed the matter a meeting of parents was called. As a result it was decided to use the funds available for a hall, and to install [install] a filtration plant at a later date.

In December, the Standard 2 to 4 children attended a function at Nelson Park to meet the Governor-General and Lady Fergusson. As a result, the children were given a day’s holiday, to be taken at the end of the year.

In 1964 the school boundaries were revised, with the western boundary through the centre of Caroline Road, and the eastern boundary changed to a line through Sylvan Road to the corner of Plassey Street and Collinge Road. However, numbers still increased so a class had to be sent by bus each day to Riverslea School, where a spare room was available.

Late one afternoon scores of wild ducks invaded the playground to feed on the acorns which had fallen from the oak tree. “There were at least forty-five ducks there at about 4.30 p.m.” said Mr Bacon. “Where they came from can only be conjectured, but we presume that they come mostly from Windsor Park, though that is quite a distance away. Anyway, they cleaned up the acorns, and that will save us having any trouble with children throwing the acorns about as they are prone to do.”

Road Rules were given a practical test with the arrival of the Shell Road Safety Trainer. Miniature streets, corners and road signs were laid out on the front netball court. Children rode along the streets on small bicycles or in pedal cars. In fact, some children were so intrigued with the pedal cars that they almost forgot the road rules.

During September, work on the Assembly Hall commenced. Everyone wanted to see what the new building would look like when it was finished.

Page 24

“New Mathematics!” Mayfair had been selected as a pilot school to try out the new system. The Junior Department and Standard 1 had already commenced, while other classes were getting prepared as material became available. Teachers from other schools kept visiting from time to time, to observe the programme in action.

The electric duplicating machine was sold later in the year and a new hand-manipulated model was purchased.

In May 1965, Mr Bacon left Mayfair to commence his duties as Head Teacher at Havelock North Primary School.

The Years of Expansion

The next Head Teacher was Mr Ian Talbot who arrived from Twyford School. This was the second time that he had been on the staff of Mayfair School, so he was soon at home in his new environment.

As an Industrial Exhibition was being held in one of the wool stores at Ahuriri, Napier, children from Standards 1 to 4 spent an enjoyable morning looking at the displays.

When a new film-strip prjector [projector] arrived teachers were very pleased to have the additional machine readily available.

In July the Assembly Hall was officially opened by Mr W. Smith, Chairman of the Hawke’s Bay Education Board. Mr Smith said that parents and all those connected with raising money for the hall had provided something of which the school children could be proud.

In our district parents have raised about £2800 ($5600) towards the cost of the hall. We also received a Government grant of £400 ($800).

Other speakers were Mr W. E. Ormond, Ward Member, who acted as Master of Ceremonies, Mr Osborne, Chairman of the School Committee, Mr C. Waddell Chairman of the Home and School Association, and Mr R. V. Giorgi, Mayor of Hastings. After the builder Mr C. Trask, had presented the keys to Mr Smith, the hall was officially opened. Parents, local residents and friends of the school then filed into the hall to be entertained by children of the school.

In 1966 the Assembly Hall was used for Teachers In-Service Training Courses for the first time.

Visits included a Standard 4’s trip to Christchurch, and the presentation of the ballet “Aurora’s Wedding” at the Municipal Theatre for the standard classes.

Two dancers and two other men from Fiji entertained the children with Indian as well as Hula dances, and with drum playing in 1967. Later a sandpit was installed close to the swimming baths for the use of the junior classes, although older children are quite attracted by it if they do not happen to be having a swim on that day.

When the Governor-General visited Hastings in 1968, the children from Standards 3 and 4 paraded at Nelson Park, while the rest of the school greeted Their Excellencies as they drove along Karamu Road.

Later in the year the Orphans’ Club held a concert in our hall in aid of school funds.

A new four-track tape recorder soon became a valuable asset when it was purchased for the school.

In 1969 the practice Emergency Evacuation and Fire Drill was made very realistic when the fire brigade brought two engines to the school to demonstrate fire-fighting and ladder rescue work.

Page 25

A pleasant surprise this year was the gift of a lectern, by the Education Board, for use in the assembly hall.

In 1970, Mr Talbot was appointed to Havelock North School, as relieving Head Teacher, for a year. At Mayfair, Mr L. W. Scott was appointed as relieving Head Teacher and Mr E. Daymond as relieving First Assistant.

Fluorescent lights were fitted in the classrooms, while infra-red wall heaters were installed in the staffroom.

During Education Week in July, an Open Day gave parents the opportunity to visit the school. Special displays of Language, Social Studies and Art work were arranged in progressive stages around the walls of the assembly hall. Class items were given for the benefit of the visitors, and many speakers came to the school. One class held an “India Day”, with costumes, food and activities.

A STANDARD 3 GROUP – INDIA THEME FOR SOCIAL STUDIES

An electric adding machine, as well as a new portable gramophone were purchased during the year. As one of the gramophones was very worn, the new machine was welcomed.

Dr Applegate, Dean of Minnesota University, U.S.A., visited the school in August.

Despite the wet weather, a large number of people attended the School Gala in September. As this had been the first one for some time everyone enjoyed the experience.

This year the School Road Patrols were invited to morning tea at the Hastings City Assembly Hall, by the Mayor Mr R. V. Giorgi. The children all enjoyed the cakes and soft drinks which had been provided by the Council.

In 1971, Mr Talbot returned to Mayfair after his year at the Havelock North School.

During March the children from the school visited the Municipal Theatre to see a ballet called “Pineapple Doll”.

A “Walkabout” was organized by the Home and School Association in November. As a result the school funds benefitted by $400.

Page 26

As the school roll had now risen to 510 Mayfair was graded as VII B. Word was received that an extra room was to be added to the third wing of the school.

Until the room was completed, in February 1972, a Standard 2 class had to be placed in the school assembly hall.

Nearly four hundred children visited the city to see a film, “Tales of Beatrix Potter”, at the end of July, and when the ballet “Coppelia” was performed at the Municipal Theatre in December, many children were able to attend.

A change had recently been made in the titles of some of the senior positions. The Head Teacher was now known as the Principal, the First Assistant as Deputy-Principal, while the Supervisor of Junior Classes (once called the Infant Mistress) was now called the Senior Teacher of Junior Classes. The Education Department also created a new Senior position this year.

New teaching aids provided for the school were an isolating transformer to allow the use of electrical equipment out of doors, a cassette tape recorder and a self-threading film projector.

In 1973 another new room was added to the third wing. This meant that after more than twenty years, Room 4 could once again be used as the school library. Metal shelves were installed and library books moved from the small second storey in the assembly hall. Carpets were laid in the library and also in the staff room.

A new visual aid which arrived during the year was an overhead projector, and this has proved to be of great value.

A new picture, “The Jester” by Leyster, was purchased by the school and is now hanging in the assembly hall.

In September, the Governor-General Sir Dennis Blundell, arrived in Hastings. Children from the standard classes were present at Nelson Park, where they were thrilled to be given a day’s holiday.

The day after school commenced in 1974 the children were granted a holiday which is to be known as New Zealand Day in commemoration of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

It had been expected that another new room, to be known as Room 16, would be built at the school during the Christmas holidays. However, this was not commenced until later in the first term. This room, which is situated behind the third wing is the only building not actually connected to the main complex by a covered way.

Shortly after school opened, Mr Talbot, the Principal, was absent for two months due to illness. During this time Mr Scott was Acting Principal.

In June the school was closed owing to flooding of the grounds, the possibility of sewers becoming overloaded, and of children using water which could be in short supply. The staff, however, were required to be present.

Unfortunately it was a very wet winter. This meant that the children had very few opportunities for the playing of netball, soccer or rugby. Also the grounds were often too muddy to be used by the children.

As the school would be 25 years old in 1975, a meeting was held in August to discuss whether Silver Jubilee celebrations should be held. Thirty-two people attended the meeting and of these twenty-two were elected to the organising committee.

Another overhead projector, and a cassette tape recorder which were added to the school’s equipment list helped to provide the classes with greater use of these teaching aids.

As this was his last year at Mayfair School, Mr Talbot presented the school with two pictures, “Sheep” by Franz Marc, and “Boats at St. Marie” by Vincent van Gogh. These two lovely pictures now hang in the school assembly hall

On September 28th, a School Gala was held. After weeks of preparations and a week of warm weather everything was ready – and then it rained! Despite this, the stalls were packed and the stallholders were kept busy all afternoon. At the end of the day over $1800 had been raised, and of this $1600 was clear profit.

In October a Standard 3 class visited Wairakei and Rotorua as part of their Social Studies Unit about a Thermal Area. Everyone had a very enjoyable time.

Page 27

After ten years as Principal of Mayfair School, Mr Ian Talbot decided to retire. The School Committee and Home and School Association held a social evening in December to give everyone a chance to say farewell.

In 1975, our Silver Jubilee Year, we will have a new Principal, Mr O. Benson, who had previously been the Principal of Parkvale School. He will be the first Principal to lead Mayfair into the first year of its Golden Jubilee era.

We would like, to conclude our story with a few words from a speech given at the Parents’ Evening in 1952 by Mr S. J. Rouse.

“May you always remember Mayfair and the things that you have learnt there. Wherever you go, put your best foot forward all the  time.“

L. W. SCOTT

MAYFAIR SCHOOL STAFF, 1974
Back row: Mrs W. Derksen, Mrs R. Adams, Mrs E. Porter (Secretary), Mrs M. Elliott (T. Aide) Miss A. Sulzberger.
Middle row: Mr J. Brittain (Assist Ctk), Mrs G. Prebble, Mrs G. Cotching, Mrs F. Bongard, Mr G. Everitt (Ctk), Mrs M. Duxfield, Miss A. Thompson, Miss D. Field, Mr G. Reece.
Front row: Mrs J. Ellis, Mrs C. Everitt (Assist Ctk), Mr P. Johnstone (S. Teacher), Mr L. Scott
[3 names missing], Nurse L. Gordon.
Absent: Mrs P. Perrott (S.T.J.C.)

Page 28

SPORTS SECTION

Sports have always been a very important part of the Mayfair School programme.

Parents, teachers and children have shown great interest over the years, and this has been helped by the school committees which have always. provided the teams with the necessary sports material and equipment. The first mention in the school records was about Athletics.

ATHLETICS

In 1950, the Hastings Primary Schools Sports Association used to hold its athletic sports at the Hastings Racecourse. Not only were there track and field events, but team games such as medley ball, sack races, potato races, relay races and corner spry were also part of the programme. Schools closed down for the day to enable all the children to attend the sports. From the packed grandstand, competitors were marshalled to take part in the heats which were held in the morning, and the finals in the afternoon. The games concluded with an impressive grand parade of competitors, who marched behind the banners of their schools.

Mayfair gained two places in 1950 –

Girls’ 50 yds, 7 and 8 years: J. Leppien, 1st. Time 7 3/5ths seconds, equalling the record.

Girls’ 50 yds, 9 years: Dianne Leech, 2nd, and R. Estcourt, 3rd.

Later the Athletic Sports were held at the Tomoana Showgrounds. Today, owing to the number of schools involved, only competitors attend the sports which are held at Nelson Park. In 1974 Regional games were held in order to give more children a chance to take part.

In 1961 Mayfair School held its first Activity Day, which was organised by the Education Board Physical Education Section. This included tabloid sports, relay races and athletics. All children who are capable of taking part compete in many activities. On this first occasion Mayfair School broke twelve H.B. Education Board Activity Day records, and equalled another.

“The outstanding results are due to the work that the teachers have put in,” Mr R. McMurray, Headteacher, remarked. “It is the first time we have had the sports and we must have more than our share of the records.”

CRICKET

The first photograph of a cricket team was taken in 1951.

In 1952, the best performances noted in Hastings Primary School Cricket were:

J. Makris, v Mahora C, the hat trick, and v Central B, 7 for 11
H. Kaukau, v Central B, 7 for 0
T. Martin, v Mahora B, 5 for 12

Today, the boys play not only on Wednesday afternoons but also on Saturday mornings.

SOFTBALL

When Mayfair first opened there were two team games played during the summer months. The boys played cricket, while softball was the official summer game for girls. The first photograph in the school records shows a girls’ softball team taken in 1951. Although the boys had been playing the game at school also, the first record we have of a boys’ softball team was in 1965.

RUGBY FOOTBALL

Two teams were entered in the Wednesday games as early as 1950. If we go by the first photographs it would appear that during the first season the boys played without football jerseys, but they were keen to play and it was not long before the school was able to provide them with their sky-blue jerseys.

Since then the boys have always shown a keen interest in the game. Many play on Saturdays as well as in the Wednesday afternoon games.

Page 29

SOCCER

The 1963 Soccer team were very keen players indeed. This was a new game for Mayfair School and immediately a great deal of interest was shown by the boys.

Like rugby, two teams now play in the Wednesday, as well as the Saturday morning games.

In 1972 Mayfair defeated Nelson Park School, Napier, to win for the first time the Ward Cup, which is presented to the best primary schools soccer team in Hawke’s Bay.

In the same year, we won the Hastings Shield, as well as the Challenge Shield, which we still hold.

SWIMMING

Our first swimming sports were held in the new learners’ pool on a glorious day in February 1953. A good attendance of parents witnessed swimming events, a hoop race, a duck walk, and an egg-and-spoon race. The house points gained were: Green (53 points), Blue (52 points), Gold (41 points) and Red House (32 points).

A local paper reported that the value of the pool to the children was reflected in the good standard of swimming achieved.

Since then we have entered a swimming team each year in the Hastings Inter-Primary Schools Swimming Sports.

GYMNASTICS

The children started to show interest in gymnastics during 1964, when a Gymnastics Group was formed. During club time thirty children were able to take part in the group’s activities. Since then our teams have been taking part in the annual Gymnastics Festival in Napier.

L. W. S.

SOCCER TEAM, 1963

Page 30

GIRLS’ SOFTBALL TEAM, 1951
Miss M. Esler   Mr J. Te K. Chadwick

BOYS’ SOFTBALL TEAM, 1965
Mr D. Caves

Page 31

CRICKET TEAM, 1951
Mr L. J. Burke Mr J. Te K. Chadwick

JUNIOR “A“ ‘CRICKET TEAM, 1965

Page 32

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL TEAM, 1950
Miss J. Chappell

RUGBY TEAM, 1950

Page 33

THE SCHOOL STAFF – 1950-1975

Principals

1950-55   Mr L. J. Burke
1956-61   Mr R. McMurray
1961-65   Mr F. H. Bacon
1965-69   Mr I. Talbot
1970   Mr L. W. Scott (Relieving)
1970-74   Mr I. Talbot
1975-   Mr O. Benson

Assistant Teachers
1950-56   Miss Y. G. Hay (I.M.)
1950-53)
1955-57 )   Miss J. A. Chappell
1950   Mr T. J. Dymond
(1st Assistant)
1950-51   Mr L. G. Tocher
1950-53 )
1954-56 )   Miss M. M. Esler (Mrs Bartlett)
1950   Mr R. A. Sivewright 
1950   Mr I. Talbot (1st Assist.)
1951-59   Mr J. Chadwick (1st Asst.)
1951   Mr W. J. Sullipan [Sullivan?]
1951   Miss J. S. Hingston
1951   Mr Doak
1951-53   Miss D. P. Dowling
1951   Mrs D. Bennett
1951   Mrs McArthur
1952-54   Miss M. B. Thompson
1952 )
1958-59 )   Mrs E. L. Wills
1961-70 )   
1952   Mr B. E. Potts
1952   Miss Collins
1952-57   Mr W. C. Coutts
1952   Mr L. Marsden
1953-55   Mr L. A. Bowen
1953-55   Mr T. Kenyon
1953   Miss H. K. Rattray
1953   Miss Harris
1954-56   Miss A. H. Rathie
1954-55   Miss D. M. Williams
1954   Miss I. Boyd
1954   Miss I. A. Izatt
1954   Miss M. A. Dysart
1954-57   Mr P. N. Lorck
1954-60   Miss N. Erceg
1955   Mr G. Kamau
1955   Miss L. L. Boshier
1955   Miss V. I. Yates
1955-57   Miss D. Johnson
1956   Miss M. A. Flanagan
1956   Mr W. J. Weterings
1956   Mr E. E. Coumbe
1956   Miss S. McKay (Mrs S. Unwin)
1956   Miss M. A. Flanagan
1956-58 )
1961-62 )   Miss D. McMillan
1956-61   Mr R. T. C. Foley
1957-61   Mrs J. I. Curnow (I.M.)
1957-61   Mrs D. Hingston
1957   Miss G. M. Bailey
1957   Miss C. M. Kelly
1957-59   Miss R. E. Hutchins
1958   Miss J. Bruce
1958   Mr A. Brown
1957   Miss M. Craven
1958   Miss M. M. Morley
1958   Miss K. Ellingham
1958   Miss I. K. Crombie
1958-64   Mr B. Flack
1958-63   Mr B. A. Curran
1959-63   Mr R. Lamb
1959   Mr D. G. Kilpatrick
1959   Miss I. Kale
1960   M V. G. Britten
1960-61   Miss J. Johnston
1960-61   Mr R. Walker
1960   Miss N. Rogers
1960-61   Mr G. Robertson
1961   Mr A. Liley
1961   Miss D. Blackford
1961-63   Mr M. Paulsen (1st Asst.)
1961-64   Miss J. Houlahan (Mrs J. Jackson)
1962-73   Mrs M. Bark (S.T.].C.)
1962-63   Miss Samuels
1962-64   Mr D. Olsen
1962-68   Mr F. Wismeyer
1962   Miss Hutchinson
1962   Miss Stott
1962-64   Mrs Short
1963   Miss L. J. Dawson
1963   Miss M. B. Stevenson
1963-69   Miss M. Pulford (Mrs M. Kramer)
1963-67   Mr D. Caves
1963   Miss M. Crampin
1964  Mr L. W. Scott (Dep. Prin.)
1964   Miss C. L. McKenzie
1964   Miss E. C. Isdale
1964-65   Mr A. Bryan
1964   Mrs Stephen
1964-65   Miss B. Oliver
1964   Mrs V. Bacon
1965-71   Mr E. Daymond
1965   Miss J. Manley
1965   Miss G. Hazelwood
1965   Miss Clark
1965   Miss F. Hilton
1965   Mrs Ivey
1966   Miss B. Elliott
1966-67 Miss B. Hodgson
1966-69   Mr J. McDonald
1966   Miss I. Hope
1966-67   Miss K. Boyle
1966-68   Miss Wellwood
1967   Mrs F. Bongard
1967   Miss J, Mitchell
1967-69   Miss S. Ridgway (Mrs S. McDonald)
1967   Mrs B. Crawford
1967   Mrs O’Rourke
1968   Miss S. Godfrey
1968   Miss E. Hope
1968-72   Miss A. Barber (Mrs A. Marshall)
1968-69   Miss K. Spooner
1968  Mr Hucker

Page 34

Assistant Teachers
1968   Mr Telford
1969   Mrs A. Shepherd
1969   Miss J. Reading
1969-71   Mr A. Connor
1969-71   Mrs J. Laird
1969   Mrs D. Glover
1970   Miss ]. Millyn
1970-71   Mrs V. Wimms
1970   Miss K. Meyer
1970   Mrs K. Horwood
1970   Mr M. Taaffe
1970   Miss C. Easton
1970-72  Mr G. Marshall
1970   Mrs T. Patterson
1970   Mrs M. P. Lamb
1970   Mrs G. M Prebble
1971   Miss J. Seamark
1971   Miss B. Davidson
1971-72   Miss B. Cato
1971   Miss Whooley
1971-72   Miss L. Laurent
1971-72   Mrs Gledhill
1971   Mrs I. P. Marshall
1971   Miss A. I. Mead
1972   Mr P. W. Johnstone
1972   Mrs M. Derksen
1972   Mrs G. B. Cotching
1972   Mrs I. E. Ellis
1972-74   Mr B. J. Herbert
1972   Mrs C. ]. Richecoeur
1972   Miss J. M. McLennan
1972   Mr G. T. Grace
1972   Mrs H. Chipper
1972-74   Miss A. Thompson
1973   Miss L. Dallas
1973   Miss T. Gray  
1973   Mr R. Mettrick
1973   Mrs A Adams
1973   Miss R. Hakawai
1974   Mrs N. A. Perrott
1974   Miss A. Sulzberger
1974   Miss D. Field
1974   Mrs E. M. Duxfield
1974   Miss V. Hopkinson
1974   Mr I. Saathof
1974   Mr G. Reece
1975   Mr B. Milne
1975   Mrs C. Treacher
1975   Mrs L. Balfour
1975   Miss R. Middleton
1975   Miss G Squire
1975   Mrs A. M. Watson 

Clerical Assistants
1952   Mrs Jones
1952-54   Mrs Middleton
1954-71   Mrs A. J. Healey
1966   Mrs A. Roberts (Relieving)
1970   Mrs M. Elliott (Relieving)   
1971   Mrs E. Porter  

Teachers’ Aide
1971   Mrs M. Elliott

Dental Nurses
Miss C. Eberhard
Miss McNamara
1952    Mrs P. Delaney
1952 Miss J. McCorkindale
Miss E. Graham
Miss E. Macaulay
Miss L. Gordon 

Caretakers
1950-70   Mr H. J. Dove
1970-   Mr W. Lee, Mrs Lee
Mr G. Everitt, Mrs Everitt

Assistants
1974   Mr S. Birch
1974   Mr J. Brittain

Page 35

PROMINENT EX-PUPILS

Dr WILLIAM HENRY FODDY, Ph.D

Bill Foddy was one of the foundation pupils at Mayfair School. From there he went to the Boys’ High School before attending Canterbury University where he gained his B.A., and then his M.A. with Honours, specialising in sociology.

In 1968 he gained his Ph.D. at Vancouver University, in Canada. Bill lectured at Vancouver and also at the University in Edmonton. Once a week he used to fly up to Lesser Slave Lake and to Yellowknife, where he gave lectures to oil men and chief trappers.

At the present time he is a lecturer at Melbourne University.

As Les Tocher, a teacher at Mayfair, once said, “Bill is the only pupil who has ever made me spend half my spare time in the library looking up information in order to provide answers to his questions.”

Dr W H Foddy

A FAMILY OF TEACHERS

E. S. (Fred) Jackson attended Mayfair School from 1950 to 1952. He graduated B.A. at Massey University, played representative rugby for Wellington 1959-60, for East Coast 1962-64, Manawatu 1966-67 and is now Head of the Geography Department at Niue High School, Niue Island.

Jacqueline Jackson, 1950 to 1953, graduated B.Sc. at Victoria University and was a N.Z. Universities hockey rep. in 1963.

Moana Jackson, 1950 to 1956, graduated Bachelor of Laws at Victoria University and was awarded the Ngarimu V.C. University Scholarship for the top Maori student. She practised law, but is now teaching at Wainuiomata College.

P. O. (Philip) Jackson, 1956 to 1961, Dip.Ed. Waikato University. Now teaching at Manutuke Primary School.

DANCING:

KAREN and SHONA THOMPSON

Shona commenced at Mayfair School, in 1954, while Karen started in 1955. After attending Karamu High School, Karen joined the New Zealand National School of Ballet, after which she returned to Hastings where she opened her own dancing studio.

Meanwhile, Shona had been to Massey University where she obtained her B.A.

While travelling overseas Karen enrolled for four years at a ballet school in Germany, and Shona taught ballet at a finishing school in Switzerland.

Later, both girls joined a dancing group called the Bluebells, which performs in Paris, Las Vegas and Barcelona, where they are at present living. The Bluebells are renowned for their spectacular costumes and for spectacular dancing which is very similar to ballet.

Page 36

MUSIC: WAYNE MYHILL

Wayne, who commenced at Mayfair, has always shown interest in band music as has his father and younger brother Grant. All are members of the Hastings Citizens Band in which Grant plays a drum, while Mr Myhill and Wayne play trombones.

In 1974 Wayne was selected to play in the Junior National Youth Band of New Zealand. At the provincial contests at Fieilding, Wayne gained second place in the trombone solo section.

THE HOME AND SCHOOL ASSOCIATION

The Mayfair Home and School Association was formed in 1950 with the following aims:

1. To ensure a contact between parents and school.

2. To promote activities for fund raising as the need arises.

The officers of the association are elected at the Annual General Meeting and hold office until the following Annual General Meeting.

Since the first Gala, which was held shortly after the association was formed, consecutive committees have, with the help of the school committees, continued through galas, walkabouts, shop days and queen carnivals, to help with finance for the school’s needs.

Not only do parents and teachers meet together at meetings and social occasions but the school itself is always provided with first class equipment, sports material and library books.

In addition, a swimming pool was ready for use within two years, while an assembly hall – one of the first to be built in Hastings – is a memorial to all those who have worked for the welfare of the children and for Mayfair School.

This year, 1975, as a fitting conclusion to 25 years of co-operation and effort, a filtration plant is to be installed at the swimming pool. Another dream has come true.

Jan Simmonds, Secretary

OUR SYMBOL – THE OAK

The oak is the most characteristic tree of the temperate part of the Northern Hemisphere and, like the people of that region, sturdy, strong, enduring, living for use not for show.

The writer of this description, George Hill, has put this feeling happily into verse.

A glorious tree is the old grey oak;
He has stood for a thousand years –
Has stood and frowned
On the trees around,
Like a king among his peers;
He has stood like a tower
Through sun and shower
And dared the winds to battle:
He has the hail
As from plates of mail
From his own limbs shaken, rattle;
He has tossed them about, and shorn the tops
(When the storm has roused his might)
Or the forest trees, as a strong man doth
The heads of his foes in fight.

(from Mrs Hingston)

Page 37

THREE PRINCIPALS
Mr F. Bacon   Mr L. J. Burke   Mr I. Talbot

HEAD START

SOME REMINISCENCES BY THE FIRST HEAD MASTER

It is long enough ago to have forgotten many of the early incidents, but we feel sure that few of the original pupils will have forgotten that first day – strange children, strange adults (they turned out to be the teachers), strange surroundings and a lone man who kept dashing here and there posing this and posing that, determined that our opening should be made available for future generations. That was Mr McNair, the chemist, with his movie camera, and the resultant film is among the school archives.

Then the first week – and did it rain! Send them home,” said the Education Board. As a matter of fact, they wouldn’t allow a single footprint near the virgin whiteness of the floors. So there stood our pride and joy, marooned in a sea of mud and water along with a contractor’s truck, sunk to the axles in the main entrance.

DO YOU KNOW?

The school committees and P.T.A., with the willing co-operation of the parents and teachers raised about £3000 ($6000) in the first couple of years, so that in no time the school was equipped with teaching apparatus, two brand new pianos, and first class library.

Sid Rouse, Chairman of the School Committee, was first into the school baths. Someone said, “I declare the baths open!” There was a cash and a splash, and in a moment Sid’s smiling face broke the surface of the water. He had been hiding, suitably attired, for the big moment. And well he deserved it, too, as indicated by the applause.

Page 38

Parts of the grounds, especially the Fenwick Street entrance, were a real metal pit and most Saturday mornings were spent collecting the metal and performing the many tasks that needed doing. Perhaps you were one of those whose penalty for being late for school was to collect a bucketful of metal before going home. Yours was a noble contribution, despite its savouring of the slave gang.

The H.M. kept a suit of old clothes at the school and with Harry Dove and a number of the senior boys was responsible for the sowing of most of the lawn surrounding the school buildings. The lads loved it, and there was keen competition for a place in the work force. It might, however, be considered dereliction of duty on the part of the Headmaster.

WERE YOU ONE?

Were you one of the half-dozen found in Mr Sutton’s glasshouse, enjoying the luscious grapes. Let’s hope you have forgotten the consequences and remember only the delicious feast!

Were you one of the walnut gang who were dismissed ten minutes early to gather the fallen nuts before classes were dismissed – no need to tell you “WHY?” What a great source of revenue were those nuts, even if one wholesaler did accuse us of putting the small nuts in the bottom of the sack.

Do you remember the hilarious play put on by the staff for a P.T.A. meeting. Vivid memories are the terrific duel between Jack Chadwick and Les Tocker, with Dick Smith almost in hysterics in the front row of the audience.

There was the occasion when Noeline Leonard, Dianne Leech and two other girls locked themselves in a classroom store cupboard. An agitated group of girls appeared in the office, expecting a classic Houdini trick – the release of four girls from a locked cupboard with the key inside refusing to co-operate and no room to push it under the door. When it seemed the girls were there for keeps someone thought of the window high up near the ceiling and opening on to the outside bay. So that was how they came out – head first of course. Our girls were extremely decorous 25 years ago.

Finally, an appreciation to the Suttons for granting us a phone extension to the school. No-one else seemed to think we needed one, especially the Post Office, and we hate to think how we should have coped without this co-operation.

– L. J. Burke

PRIMER DAYS with Miss Y. G. Hays

To the New Entrants in the Infant Department, one day was admitted a very shy little girl – a newcomer from England – so, in order to try to make this big break from her former school easy for her, it was explained to the other children that X – had no friends in our country as she had left them all behind in England where she came from. We must all try to be extra kind to her and then one day when she was feeling not so strange she would tell us about the lovely country that she came from, and about her journey here in a big ship.

It was the expression “came from” that apparently appealed to the ears of the small fry rather than the story of the lonely little girl, for at once started up a chorus, “I came from Hastings”, “I came from Hood Street”, etc., etc., and then, just as the session was about to be brought to a sharp close one hitherto very quiet little girl stood up and announced in a most impressive tone, “And I come from Sister Cooper’s”, that being, as folks will remember, the maternity home in Hastings before the Maternity Annexe at Memorial Hospital.

Page 39

The Scene: Willowpark Road North, between Jervois Street and Grove Road.

The Time: A Friday lunch-time, almost 1 p.m.

Properties on “Stage”: The garbage tins of the local residents standing on the grass verge awaiting collection that afternoon.

Two chief actors on stage – two boys on bicycles competing with each other as to how many bins they could kick over as they rode by.

Enter behind them a third person – the Infant Mistress – who, noticing what was happening drove her car slowly behind the two boys until almost the last bin met its fate. Then she accelerated and was waiting at the school gate to escort the miscreants to the headmaster, who promptly sent them back, under supervision of a school prefect, to pick up the bins and the scattered rubbish.

Epilogue: Sorry, boys, I’ve forgotten your names but not the incident, for although for the name of the school and to soothe naturally irate residents, I had to report this, I confess I thought then and still do, what an excellent outlet for pent-up feelings.

The Third Person

Kipling is remembered for his famous poem “Boots, boots, booming over Africa”, but all that teachers of infant classes ask at the last round up is a simple depiction on their memorial stones of saw pairs of gumboots (lying couchant) and the inscription “She did what she could with them.” 

Oh, those gumboots – named, pegged together, set out in rows and still they managed to stray, and the last tearful unfortunate left with one boot or ever worse – two left-foot ones

Mrs Y. C. Bott (Y. G. Hays)

THE FIVE FULL YEARS

Contributed by R. McMURRAY (Dip. Teaching), HEAD MASTER, 1956-60

We, my wife and I, were introduced to Mayfair School one Saturday afternoon in January 1956, by the Chairman of School Committee, Mr S. Rouse. We came away with many impressions. Firstly, the very fine appearance of the buildings set in their park-like playgrounds, and secondly – from Mr Rouse’s conversation – that all concerned in this school district, not only wanted but also were to work for everything that would give a full education to their children – “What a terrific initiation”.

My first real experience of the calibre and the enthusiasm of the parents occurred when the “Annual Gala” netted £900 ($1800) – a colossal sum in those days. This set the pattern for all of the many activities that circulated around the school.

Mr R McMURRAY

Page 40

However, the 1956 winter was long and very wet. For most of the time a sheet of water stretched from the office to the Fenwick Street entrance. The Education Board’s sealed paths and paving was much too limited for over 500 children – and there was mud everywhere. So, “Operation Concrete” was born. For nine consecutive Saturdays working bees were held. The parents, headed by Andy Ross, (the late) Jim Osborne and (the late) Jim King, actually laid nearly 1000 square yards of concrete at a cost of less than ten shillings ($1.00) per square yard.

Two other terrific efforts that occurred later were the paving with asphalt of the play area in front of the primer block and the erection of the five-foot corrugated iron fence on the western boundary.

PARENTS AND THE SCHOOL

There was already a strong “Home and School Association” – regular meetings were held and teachers knew the parents of most of the children whom they taught. An invitation to the parents to visit the classes, while the children were at work, though undertaken with quite some trepidation by most teachers, proved so successful that it became a regular feature of school procedure. This aspect of teacher and parent co-operation was later extended in two ways. Firstly, the Education Board granted me the special permission to stop sending out the official mid-year report on each child’s achievements. Instead, individual appointments were made for the parent or parents of each child to meet the teacher privately, in the class- room. Parents then, not only saw how the child’s work compared with that of other members of the class, but also there was time for the teacher and parent to exchange those personal items (about the child) which so often were particularly valuable for his or her further development. This scheme proved such a success that I did not wait till mid-year for the first interview. The first interview was held late in February, as soon as the teacher had a chance to know the pupils – while the mid-year “report” interview was continued.

There were just so many new things, each worthy of comment, that were done towards this wider development of all the children, that space permits just a reference to call them to the minds of those involved.

The school and class libraries were extended to give – as well as the usual facilities – series of work books to provide the material for group work. Mayfair was one of the first to use the tape recorder in classes, and as well quantities of special equipment, for reading, for number, for communications and music were provided to lighten the load on the teachers.

The playground was equipped with every possible item of permanent equipment – including a climbing pole. There was a generous classroom supply of large balls and ample seasonal games equipment. In fact, there was so much of interest to – and challenge to the children that playground supervision and discipline usually took care of themselves.

Another facet to this children’s play was the ample supply of indoor games in each class- room for wet days.

Honours certificates covering all school activities – class-work, games, leadership, etc. – were instituted. As well, the weekly “honours list” gave even the less endowed pupils the opportunity to be acclaimed by their fellows.

Do you remember the splendid school ball in the assembly hall, the remarkable “Grand March” with its counter marching, the non- stop programme and ballroom dances for senior pupils.

Can you forget the popular annual “Break- up” – every child taking part and more than 1000 parents and friends able to see and hear the whole programme.

BANKING

“The wise use of money involves both spending and saving.” The first item is easier, but the second has to be taught, learned and encouraged. Thus, saving received so much attention that Mayfair became not only the top banking school in Hawke’s Bay but also – one year – 3rd for New Zealand in regard to deposits.

Page 41

Yes, money flowed into Mayfair, and to obviate the necessity for the enormous galas – the family voluntary donations to school committee funds. This was another terrific success – so much so that a safe had to be purchased. Nevertheless, for particular projects the children themselves held “mini-galas” – almost on the previous scale with pupils from Standard 4, under the supervision of a teacher, pricing, selling, giving change and counting the final takings – real home grown education.

During most of this time nearly all of the classrooms were used each Sunday for the Sunday schools conducted by the Church of England and Presbyterian Churches.

There was always something going on – the Arithmetic week, the Art and Craft, the class trips to “Christchurch” for the day, the cricket coaching school undertaken by the men on the Committee, and those exciting games when the children played their parents at cricket, basketball, etc.

 Mayfair’s good name continued to grow. We had pupils coming from all parts of the town. The roll grew so large – over 600 – that the Education Board made very strict boundaries for admission. In that year four of the classes had to go by bus to use classrooms in other schools.

My remarks would not be complete without reference to that man “of stature” Mr Andy Ross, Chairman of the Committee and friend to me and all the teachers, parents and children. I believe he knew by name every child. They loved him and he would always make the time to be present on the so many occasions when there was “something on” at the school. His was a wonderful contribution.

Mr Harry Dove – that excellent caretaker and example to all others, and who did so much in so many ways that the teachers made him a member of the staff. Thank you, Harry, for generous and really friendly service.

Please note – I have not mentioned the teachers; we were a team. All of us and together did so much for the education and development of Mayfair children, that our pupils always had much more than their share of achievement and leadership at the Intermediate School.

“What a privilege to be involved in those ‘Five Full Years’!”

EARLY DAYS AT MAYFAIR

Mayfair, the first of the post-war schools to be built in Hastings, was indeed an elite building project. All tenders for the buildings were considered to be too high, and the Hawke’s Bay Education Board decided that it would build the school using its own personnel.

Production of timber in New Zealand had fallen behind during the war because so many of our timber workers had been recruited into the forces. To fill the vacuum in much-needed materials to meet the building boom after the war, the Government had decided to import timber from America. The price of the timber was so high that the Government decided that the timber was to be used only on Government buildings. Thus the construction of Mayfair School was basically in American Oregon Pine for framing and cedar for weatherboarding.

The building followed traditional lines, with a corridor and 624 square foot classrooms, but modern differences appeared in the form of outside bays for lessons in the fresh air and sun- shine, cloakrooms and toilets attached and accessible from the corridors (a mixed blessing), a walk-in cupboard in each classroom, a built-in dental clinic, a doctor’s room, a sick bay, electric bar heating with thermostats to maintain an even temperature, separate cloakrooms for teachers, an art and craft walk-in cup- board, and a library (to be used as a classroom until the school attained a roll of 350).

The standard of building and the costs were high. The Education Board would not consider building additional rooms in 1972, 1973 and 1974 to conform to the original architectural plan owing to the huge additional cost

Page 42

above that of the demountable rooms added at present.

Changes in policy have brought about changes in the original concept as may be imagined, but the style of building and its general arrangement would be hard to beat.

Modifications have had to be made to meet the aforementioned policy changes so that when clerical assistants were first appointed the only office space available was the walk-in cupboard which was built to contain stationery and school materials. When the Infant Mistress found herself without a class early in the year, she had to have a place to work and set up her books, and so the doctor’s room had to serve also as an office for the infant mistress as well as a library for the junior class books. A teachers’ aide, when appointed had to have a place to work for an occasional half-hour and so a desk was placed for her in the sick bay.

Sadly, it took twenty years to implement the Department’s policy in regard to the library and so it was used as a Probationary Assistant’s classroom until 1973.

The school was fortunate in having Paddy Burke as its founding headmaster. He had a sense of history which resulted in the present series of photographs, newspaper cuttings and a film, all of which tell the story of the early days of the school; as well, he had a strong bias towards encouraging academic attainment and athletic prowess in his pupils and a keenness to develop the beautiful park-like environment of the school.

The staff, too, was dedicated towards the advancement of the pupils and a concern for their welfare. Miss Gwen Hay was the first infant mistress, Miss Joy Chappell was the first senior lady assistant, and Mr Ron Sivewright was the first probationary assistant. Miss Mabel Esler and Mr Les Tocher were other assistants and the school opened with a relieving first assistant, Mr T. Dymond, until 1st April when I was appointed to that position.

Nurse Eberhard was the first dental nurse.

Mr Harry Dove was the first caretaker, and he remained so for 20 years, thought of by teachers, pupils and parents as a wonderful asset to the school, able and willing to do his job, make equipment and look after the grounds and buildings with much greater than ordinary concern and ability.

The school was fortunate to have such a wonderful group of concerned parents who were chosen to administer the affairs of the school, on the School Committee. The first chairman, Mr Syd Rouse, was appointed originally as a commissioner with Mr H. Tobins and Mr A. Croucher to act in lieu of a committee until the time arrived for the bi-ennial elections.

Other committee members elected in April 1950 were Mr Smith and Mrs Jim Ramsay.

A very active Home and School Association chaired by Mr Hector Walker, got under way early in the school’s history. I remember many card evenings, raffles and other fund-raising and social activities as well as talks and discussions on matters of concern to parents and children and teachers.

No wonder Mayfair is such a good school today. It could hardly do other than succeed when it had such a fine beginning.

I. Talbot, Principal, 1965-74

Page 43

DO YOU REMEMBER?

I wonder if you have ever been lined up at the school assembly on April Fools’ Day, just dying to get into school, when instead of the usual march record being played over the loud- speaker system came the swingy notes of the latest rock-and-roll record.

Were you ever sent on the same day to fetch a sky-hook or the “long weight” from another teacher? When you arrived do you remember being told to “wait” by the door – quite a “long wait”?

As the School Secretary was walking along the corridor one day, she noticed a young lass, who had been on tea duty in the staffroom, peeping through the keyhole into her classroom.

“Why are you doing that?” enquired the Secretary.

“To see if the teacher is in a good mood, before I go back into my room,” replied the clever young miss.

Then there was the young lady who panicked one day. No wonder – While swimming, she had lost her swimming togs in the school baths.

The class was talking about “Tall Tales” when the expression “a white lie” began to be discussed. One bright Maori boy decided that a “white lie” was a lie told by pakehas!

One young lass remembers the time when there were no Rooms 14, 15 or 16. Instead, there was more playground and less TEACHERS!

Gala Day was fast approaching. A pram, which had been brought along for the auction by one of the parents, was being wheeled along the corridor by a male teacher. A Standard 4 girl, with a smile and a huge grin, just couldn’t resist remarking, “We’re ever so pleased for you!” I wonder if she meant the auction?

While marking his attendance register one morning, the teacher remarked, “Does anyone know why Cindy is away from school?” Peter, who was sitting nearby, asked “Who’s Cindy, Sir?” This was too much for John, who just couldn’t resist chortling, “Sir, Peter hasn’t been doing his ‘bird-watching’ lately”! (Names have been changed to avoid any embarrassment.)

Ghost Story! It is remarkable how rumours spread like wildfire amongst children. At the front of the Assembly Hall there is a small second storey which at the time of our story was being used as a library. At one end a small padlocked door blocked off an area which was being used as a storage space.

Children seeing the locked door became very curious and the story was soon being told that there was a ghost locked up in the library. Some children said that they had seen heads and arms floating around, while others said they had seen ghostly footprints on the stairs.

Mr Talbot soon dispelled that theory when he caught some boys desperately trying to wrench the door open, while a group of girls, with white faces, were running screaming down the narrow stairs.

Page 44

Syd Rouse states very definitely that he was not pushed into the school baths on the day when the pool was opened.

The true facts are these: “I dived into the water, which was icy cold, as Paddy Burke had just filled the pool that morning. Unfortunately, I dived into the shallow end and took the skin off my nose.”

No doubt you have had a laugh at the athletic sports. The marshall has lined up the five-year-old entrants in heats, ready for the starter. “Step up! Take your marks! Go!” he calls.

And every row of five-year-olds starts off down the track at the same time.

There was an occasion during the week when the Headmaster had been to a Standard 2 class to collect a group of children for a school council meeting. Being in a hurry, he took rather large steps. One dear little soul cried out in desperation, “Sir, Headmasters don’t run!” Naturally we all moved at a slightly slower pace immediately.

From Mr Talbot:
The loudspeaker system had just been installed at the school. Upstairs, in the staff room, the teachers were holding a meeting.

Suddenly, one of the men noticed that down below in the playground, a group of boys were starting to fight. Swiftly he dashed down the stairs, switched on the microphone and demanded, “Those boys fighting out there! Stop at once!”

Everyone stood still in petrified silence. Was this the voice of Doom? As you may be sure, the guilty parties stopped fighting and disappeared from sight as quickly as possible.

A wary eye was kept on the staffroom from then on.

From Mrs Hingston:
Following a lesson on various occupations whereby people earned their living, and their value to the community, a Standard 3 class was asked to write a story setting out what each child wished to be when he became a man.

One bright lad wrote that he would be a carpenter because, he very heartlessly added, Dad would be dead by then and he would have his tools. The Dad at this time was a very active and lively thirty-one year old and probably wouldn’t have been very happy about his young son’s plan.

Thanks!

When we commenced writing this Jubilee Booklet it was with the knowledge that the material would not be difficult to obtain. Mr L. J. Burke kept full records from the very beginning, while Mr McMurray, Mr Bacon and Mr Talbot have added to the collection over the years.

To all those very co-operative people who helped us, we extend our sincerest thanks for their support.

To:
Mr Maurice Smith of Taupo for his photographs, which he so kindly took for this booklet.
Mr Barry Webber of Photolithox Printing and Mr Neville Smith of Cliff Press for their advice about printing.
Process Signs for the cover design.
Batchelor’s for photo-copying.

[Advertisement]
NEWBIGINS CAN TEACH YOU A THING OR TWO
Newbigins are experts when it comes to Wines, Ales, Spirits, Liqueurs . . . You’ll never see a finer selection anywhere in New Zealand and all at Wholesale Prices.
But that’s not the half of it . . . We’ve got party ice, glass hire, punch bowl hire, peanuts, chippies . . . Everything you’ll need and what a service . . . fantastic! By George, Newbigins have got it!
OPEN SATURDAYS 8a.m. to 6-30p.m.
newbigins
DRIVE IN LIQUOR STORE
Corner of St. Aubyn & Miller
HASTINGS

[Advertisement]
FOWLER, DRUMMOND & WADDELL LTD
THIS SYMBOL IS YOUR ASSURANCE OF
ELEGANT DESIGN
EXPERT CRAFTSMANSHIP
SELECT MATERIALS
Our sincere Best Wishes to MAYFAIR SCHOOL for ca Successful JUBILEE and to a Renewal of Old Friendships

[Advertisement]
Congratulations
Mayfair School on your 25th Jubilee
Harvey’s Chinaware Store in Russell Street has a wide variety of Gifts for all occasions. In our modern easy-to-shop store you will find everything from beautiful China and Glassware to Kitchenware and Garden Tools. In the hardware department, Harvey’s have a good selection of Picnic Sets and Chillibins, unbreakable Plastic-ware and Barbecue Equipment.
Harvey’s have been serving the people of Hastings since 1912. Call in today and select your Christmas Gifts now while the selection is at its best.
Harvey’s
RUSSELL STREET   HASTINGS

[Advertisement]
REEVES TRANSPORT LTD
HASTINGS
We Specialise in Livestock Cartage Anywhere in the North Island
REEVES HORSE TRANSPORT
LTD HASTINGS
We Specialise in the Cartage of BLOODSTOCK Throughout New Zealand

[Advertisement]
A. H. & I. E. HUNT LTD.
JEWELLERS – MANUFACTURERS – WHOLESALERS
Inspect our large range of Trophy Cups now.
We have our own Engraver on the premises and can offer a quick service for inscriptions.
Traders in Old Jewellery
418 Heretaunga Street   Hastings

[Advertisement]
FOR TV SERVICING
RING 67-779
TECHNICAL PROJECTS
HASTINGS

[Advertisement]
The Symbol of
STYLE
QUALITY
AND SERVICE
We offer practical advice on all aspects of furnishing and interior decoration – Free of charge, of course
A. CHRISTIE & SONS LTD. 
RUSSELL STREET, HASTINGS
P.O. Box 263   Phone 87-033

[Advertisement]
WATSON and LANG LTD
Corner Alexandra and Hastings Streets, Hastings
BUTCHERS
WHOLESALE BACON MANUFACTURERS
SMALL GOODS MANUFACTURERS
P.O. Box 507   Phone 85-664

[Advertisement]
TYERS PHARMACY
PRESCRIPTIONS
SUN GLASSES
CYCLAX
MAX FACTOR
REVLON
FIRST AID EQUIPMENT
COUGH REMEDIES
CAMERAS
FILMS
GIFTS
Karamu Road, Hastings

[Advertisement]
Charles of Mayfair
FASHION HAIR STYLIST
Mayfair Shopping Centre
Karamu Road North
Hastings
Telephone Salon 87-650

[Advertisement]
PRICE and MORRIS LTD
PLUMBERS AND DRAINAGE CONTRACTORS
We wish all interested in the School Jubilee a very happy and Memorable Weekend
P.O. Box 397   906 E. Heretaunga Street, Hastings   Phone 88-959 

[Advertisement]
Always ask for – and be sure you get
BLUE MOON ICE CREAM
Available in Cones and Take Home Packs
LICKETY STIK ICE BLOCKS
are delicious and come in lots of great flavours
TRY ONE TODAY!
KARANEMA DRIVE   HAVELOCK NORTH

[Advertisement]
Walkers Mayfair Nurseries
Summer
Autumn
Winter
Spring
You can Plant Most Anything
We’re Just Along in Karamu Road So Come Along and Get Your Load

[Advertisement]
Karamu Beauty Salon
Vera and Paula are both fully qualified in all aspects of Hairdressing
901 KARAMU ROAD   HASTINGS   PHONE 87-209

[Advertisement]
YOUR FIRST PUPILS EXPERIENCED H.B.F. SERVICE
Congratulations MAYFAIR SCHOOL on being an important part of our past
We will both be part of HASTINGS’ FUTURE
Hawke’s Bay Farmers’

[Advertisement]
LIKE A CHANGE FROM THE “MATCH”
SWITCH TO “RONSON”
THE “MATCHLESS” LIGHT
The Ronson Electronic from $38.45
Electronic 7
A gentle touch, a muted sound, an instantaneous flame. A beautiful new kind of lighter from $46.30
The Ronson Premier from $14.50
The Ronson Comet from $8.35
H. J. Grieve Ltd
JEWELLERS WATCHMAKERS ENGRAVERS
HASTINGS

[Advertisement]
Ray Hutchinson LIMITED
Heretaunga Street
Hastings
Telephone 82-144 (3 Lines)
Carpet, Furniture and Drapery Specialists
Just one of the many SUITES from our Showroom which will enhance your home with timeless beauty and a lifetime of comfort.

[Advertisement]
CYCLONE TRAILERS
LIGHTWEIGHT – PRACTICAL – DEPENDABLE
The Cyclone “Pup” model 700lb carrying capacity is the ideal home-holiday trailer; strong, ultra lightweight, reliably suspended on DELTA rustproof diecast wheel sets with high tensile studs and ball bearings. ALL NEW MATERIALS. 16.00 x 8 4-ply tyres are standard. Deck size 5′ x 4′. Unladen weight 2 cwt.

[Advertisement]
GO TOGETHER – ARRIVE TOGETHER
May we have the pleasure of quoting you for your next trip away.
We have 33 – 35 – 38 – 40 – 43 – 47 Seat Coaches available
NIMON & SON LTD.
Phone 78-133   Hastings

[Advertisement]
For enjoyable family units, stay at
Fantasyland motels Ltd.
Hosts: B. & C. ZELCER
Phone 68-159   Phone 68-159

[Advertisement]
Beautiful Winter Fabrics are arriving
Call and See our Range
VIYELLAS – PURE WOOL DONEGALS – PRINTED VELVETS
JERSEYS
all available at
C. Sanderson’s Ltd
DRESS FABRIC SPECIALISTS
Heretaunga Street, HASTINGS   Emerson Street, NAPIER

[Advertisement]
ONWARD CYCLES AND TOYS
Have the best selection in Town!
CYCLES – NURSERY – TOYS – TRIANG
HANDICRAFT SUPPLIES – MODELS
King Street   HASTINGS   Phone 88-993

[Advertisement]
Hannahs Surfboards
for all SURFING ACCESSORIES
Phone 88-831   Hastings

[Advertisement]
LANTERN LIGHT DAIRY
Maureen & Gary Worthington
OPEN 7 DAYS
For all requirements
call at the LANTERN LIGHT DAIRY
509 GROVE ROAD   HASTINGS

[Advertisement]
THOMSON’S SUITS LIMITED
Specialists in clothes for Men and Boys
355 Heretaunga Street
Hastings
Telephone 89-740   Telephone 89-740

[Advertisement]
Congratulations MAYFAIR SCHOOL from
DOUGHANS DRAPERY LTD
(Opposite Mayfair Post Office)
LADIES’ & MAIDS’ WEAR
MEN’S & BOYS’ WEAR
KNITTING WOOLS
MANCHESTER GOODS
HABERDASHERY
LINGERIE
HOSIERY
1818 Karamu Road  Hastings   Phone 88-918

[Advertisement]
TOURIST-KELT MOTORS LTD.
Agents for
Valiant
Dodge
HILLMAN
Mitsubishi
HASTINGS   WAIPUKURAU

[Advertisement]
Anvil Caterers
For
WEDDING RECEPTIONS
BIRTHDAY PARTIES
and all
FESTIVE OCCASIONS
906 Jervois Street
Hastings
Phone 86-154

[Advertisement]
The  Bank with your interest at heart!
Enjoy safe secure investment, with the
Bank of New Zealand
We’d like to put a smile into your banking

[Advertisement]
FERNHILL RIVER SHINGLE CO. LTD
Have Pleasure Congratulating the MAYFAIR SCHOOL on Serving the District for 25 Years
We too are able to Serve the District with Supplies of
HIGH GRADE LAB-TESTED SAND AND GRAVEL
CRUSHED METAL
SCREENED METAL
WASHED METAL
Manager: TED BOESE
P.O. BOX 2004   PHONE 83-941

[Advertisement]
HISTORY ISN’T BORING
TAKE THE STORY OF BON MARCHE, FOR INSTANCE
Back in the l890’s, Matthew Johnson was appointed branch manager of Blythe’s new Hastings store. Two years later, he took it over, trading under his own name, “Johnson’s”.
The name was changed to Bon Marche in the 1920’s, and when Matthew Johnson died in 1929, his son-in-law, James F. Jones, took over the management. Under his dynamic leadership, the store weathered the depression years and grew into what was regarded as one of the most successful stores of its size in the country.
Since his death in 1960, his four sons, Ross, Stuart, Bryce and Richard have worked together as a management team, and the store has continued to grow and prosper.
In 1961 the boys opened their Napier store, now a very important part of their business operation.
History isn’t boring, is it!

[Advertisement]
Cedar Lodge Motel
11 Modern Units – Twin or Double Beds
Electric Blankets – Telephone
Colour Television Available
Swimming Pool – Laundry Facilities
Handy to Hotel – Licensed Restaurant
Reasonable Tariff
Hosts: Doreen & Peter Kerins
1122 N. Karamu Road   HASTINGS   Phone 68-062

[Advertisement]
SKODA SALES AND SERVICE
TWIN CITY MOTORS LIMITED L.M.V.D.
RING ROAD CORNER – NELSON AND EASTBOURNE STREETS
Phone 66-134   HASTINGS   P.O. Box 179
MODERN WORKSHOP FACILITIES PROVIDING A FULL AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR SERVICE
WE GUARANTEE TO PROVIDE FULL SATISFACTION WITH PERSONAL SERVICE
PRIVATE PHONES:
PETER YOUNG 85-498   GRAEME ROBSON 77-054   BRUCE HENDERSON 77-908

[Advertisement]
For Quality Continental Cars
NEW & USED
CROSBIE MOTORS (H.B.) LTD
HASTINGS
911 Heretaunga Street
Phone 85-007
NAPIER
55 Tennyson Street
Phone 58-879
SALES & SERVICE
Try our “Tom Thumb” One Minute Car Wash in Hastings
HAWKE’S BAY AGENTS
MERCEDES-BENZ
DAIHATSU
PEUGEOT
RENAULT
AUDI

[Advertisement]
IAN HICKMAN LTD
The Firm which specialises in GOOD BOOKS
See our wide range of
NOVELS – TRAVEL BOOKS – ART BOOKS
CRAFT BOOKS – TECHNICAL BOOKS
We are proud of our CHILDREN’S BOOKS and always have a large range in stock
206 E. Heretaunga Street   Hastings   Phone 87-763

[Advertisement]
stir up a little envy…
Go FORD for 75′
AFTER HOURS
MARK JONES  68-487
MARK JOHNSON  68-741
IVAN HOPPING  HMN 871
ESCORT
CORTINA
PHONE A FORD
87-I49
WE CAN BRING ONE TO YOUR DOOR
Ford Hastings Motors FORD
L.M.V.D.
FOREMOST FOR FORD

[Advertisement]
NOW TAKE THIS DOWN
HOLTS have everything for the homemaker
Timber
Hardware
Paint
Wallpaper
Home Appliances
Real Estate
HOLTS
RUSSELL STREET   HASTINGS
PHONE 86-109   

[Advertisement]
ALAN SCARFE LTD 
BUILDER 
808 Maitland Crescent, Hastings 
HOUSES
ADDITIONS
ALTERATIONS
PLANS 
SPECIFICATIONS  
PERMITS ALL ARRANGED

[Advertisement]
If you are looking for
A GOOD USED CAR
A NEW MORRIS MINI
A NEW MARINA
A NEW LEYLAND P.76
see
STEWART GREER MOTORS LTD
LMVD
Ask for a Demonstration
Phone 67-009   Phone 67-009   

[Advertisement]
KELLY’S NEW WORLD SUPERMARKET 
ONE-STOP DISCOUNT SHOPPING
for
GROCERIES
FRESH MEAT
FRESH FRUIT
FRESH VEGETABLES
DELICATESSEN
Cakes made fresh on premises Daily
Free Parking for over 90 cars
KELLY’S NEW WORLD SUPERMARKET
“Constantly striving to serve you better”
MAYFAIR SHOPPING CENTRE wish the MAYFAIR SCHOOL
Another Successful 25 Years   

[Advertisement]
IT’S A FACT
Blue, Green and Red make White on your Colour T.V.
Let us show you at WOOLLARD’S
906 Karamu Road North   Phone 83-435 
At your service 7 days a week for Colour or Black and White T.V. and all Electrical Appliances
WOOLLARD & SONS LTD    

[Advertisement]
TOYOTA
So Drivable
So Stylish
So Durable
THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR JAPANESE CAR
SALES – SERVICE – SPARES
at 505 N Karamu Road, Hastings   Phone 85-049
L.M.V.D.
Wrightcars

[Advertisement]
Congratulations to
MAYFAIR SCHOOL on its Silver Jubilee
JACK CHARTERS LTD
Stocks all your Sporting Requirements
King Street
Hastings
Telephone 88-641

[Advertisement]
Hastings Glass Co. Ltd
416 Heretaunga Street West, Hastings   Phone 89-142
Paints – Curtains
Wallpaper – Lighting
Glass – Auto Glass
Mirrors – Glazing
Aluminium Windows
The best ONE STOP SOURCE for all Home Decorating Supplies   

[Advertisement]
Furnware
The National Trademark of
Furnware Products
LIMITED
MANUFACTURERS OF
SCHOOL FURNITURE
FURNWARE CARAVANS
KITCHEN JOINERY
HOSPITAL & INSTITUTE EQUIPMENT
“POLYSTAK” CHAIRS, Etc.
Registered Office and Factory
416 QUEEN STREET WEST, HASTINGS
Telegrams: “Furnware”
P.O. Box 1   Telephone 68-039     

[Advertisement]
curly top Cordials (1969) Ltd 
The Soft Drink for all FUNCTIONS
Phone 68-134, 68-900

[Advertisement]
PRESTIGE RECOVERY SERVICE
24 HOUR SERVICE  
900 Karamu Road, Hastings
TOWING – UNDER COVER STORAGE
Panel Beating by PRESTIGE PANEL BEATERS
Telephone 87-104   After Hours 87-974     

[Advertisement]
INTRODUCING VONNELLA ’75
The Miracle Blend of Pure Vonnel and Fine Cotton that is truly washable, with the soft warmth of Wool, the durability of Cotton, Screen-printed in designs for Tots and Teens, Mods and Matrons.
Vonella is the only printed Winter Fabric with the coveted [coveted] 
LUX WASHABILITY CERTIFICATE  
See the Vibrant Screen-printed Designs on display now
36”/ 90 cms Wide   $3.35 metre
Bradshaw’s
FABRIC SHOP
HASTINGS   

[Advertisement]
MAYFAIR HOTEL
wishes all MAYFAIR SCHOOL Staff, Ex-Pupils and Pupils a very successful Jubilee

[Advertisement]
EMMA’S BOUTIQUE
EVENING DRESSES
DAY DRESSES
SKIRTS
SLACKS
KNITWEAR
LAY-BY AVAILABLE
Mayfair Shopping Centre, Hastings
Telephone 89-200   

[Advertisement]
This is our GOLDEN JUBILEE
We’ve enjoyed fifty years of supplying the people of Hawke’s Bay with
EVERYTHING FOR THE GARDEN
REDGRAVE GARDEN CENTRE

[Advertisement]
VENETIAN BLIND SERVICE
809 Karamu Road
HASTINGS
SALES – VENETIANS
RYLOCK
Fly-Screens – Doors – Windows
SERVICE – VENETIAN – LAUNDRY
Repairs – Re-Cords – Re-Tapes
D. R. Munro   Phone 86-639   

[Advertisement]
ALLAN BALDWIN LTD.
PICTURE FRAMERS
ARTISTS’ REQUISITES
QUALITY WALLPAPERS
HOUSEHOLD PAINTS
329 Heretaunga Street   HASTINGS   Phone 84-191

Our Complete UTiCOLOR Vinyl Repair, Recolor, Renewal Service
We have the equipment, personnel and expertise to restore all of your vinyl products to like-new condition and keep them in that condition.
REPAIRING – Check your home and business furniture, your automobile seats and interiors, even your luggage. We’ll make cuts, tears and burns disappear. We’ll save your Vinyl and save you money.
RENEWING AND RECOLORING – We’ll restore your Vinyl products to their original color and lustre or we can recolor them to any color you select. Either way, they’lI be restored to like-new condition.
RENARDS VINYL REPAIR
P.O. Box 2089
Stortford Lodge, HASTINGS    Phone 66-971     

[Advertisement]
FOR YOUR SERVICE IN YOUR AREA
HERETAUNGA STREET EAST
HASTINGS
PHONE 87-119
KENNEDY ROAD
MAREWA
PHONE 39-045
DALTON STREET
NAPIER PHONE
57-296
HAWKES BAY ELECTRIC POWER BOARD
HOME APPLIANCE CENTRE
Fisher & Paykel Refrigerators, Freezers, Ranges
Washing Machines and Clothes Dryers
TERMS 10% DEPOSIT, 30 MONTHS TO PAY
LOW INTEREST TERMS
TRADE-IN ON YOUR OLD APPLIANCE
CASH OR CHARGE ACCOUNT
Savaday Automatic Washers and Dryers, also Atlas, Shacklock Frigidaire, Champion, Moffat Electric Ranges
Fisher & Paykel Dishwashers
Comprehensive range of Electrical small appliances
If not in stock we can order for you
Experienced Service Personnel in Refrigeration, Electric Ranges and Appliances
ADVISORY SERVICE
LET US ADVISE YOU ON ALL ASPECTS OF ELECTRICITY IN HEATING, LIGHTING, COOKING AND HORTICULTURE
Use YOUR Power Board Home Appliance Centre   

[Advertisement]
USE GAS for
Water Heating 
Cooking
Space Heating
THE HASTINGS GAS CO. LTD
105 KING STREET NORTH   PHONE 89-252

[Advertisement]
LlNNELL- BUILDERS
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
JOINERY
DESIGNS
813 CAROLINE ROAD, HASTINGS
Telephone 86-699   Telephone 86 699   

[Advertisement]
MAYFAIR STATIONERY
Nola & Alan Bassett
MAGAZINES
TOYS
GIFTS
GREETING CARDS
KIWI JACKPOT AGENCY
1020 Karamu Road   HASTINGS   Phone 82-037 

[Advertisement]
KAYS of MAYFAIR (at KELLY’S SUPERMALRKET)
See our extensive range of
KNITTING WOOLS, SCHOOL COLOURS IN 4-PLY AND DOUBLE KNIT, ALSO BIG BALL FOR MACHINE KNITTING
GOOD STOCKS BABY WEAR AND HABERDASHERY
Phone 89-216   Phone 89-216

[Advertisement]
Planning to Build?
with confidence consult
C. J. TRASK LTD
DESIGN & PLANNING SERVICE
ARCHITECTURAL
CONVENTIONAL
LOCKWOOD CONSTRUCTION
308 Albert Street   Hastings   Phone 86-431   

[Advertisement]
C. D. O’SHEA TRANSPORT LTD. 
ST AUBYN STREET
HASTINGS
P.O.Box 1038    Phone 83-019

[Advertisement]
Play the Game — Be Tops in all Sports, see
ROBBIE at
CARLTON SPORTS CENTRE LTD
(The Centre Point Shopping Block)
FAMILY SPORTS CENTRE
Comprehensive Range at all Seasonal Sporting Equipment
TENNIS RACQUETS – SOFTBALL – CRICKET
SURFING – SHOOTING – GOLFING – FISHING
AIR-BEDS – LIFEJACKETS
Next time in Town call in and inspect
CARLTON SPORTS CENTRE LTD
Heretaunga Street East   Hastings   Phone 69-710   

[Advertisement]
FOR THAT GIFT OR NOVELTY TO TAKE HOME WITH YOU
TRY THE
Mandarin Gift Shop
312 Heretaunga Street West   HASTINGS

[Advertisement]
FlRTH
for everything made of concrete

[Advertisement]
The Complete Furnishers
J. W. SHAW LTD
117 Queen St.
Hastings
Phone 84-464   

[Advertisement]
Congratulations MAYFAlR SCHOOL
and may we wish all old pupils a most enjoyable Jubilee
BOYCE PLASTICS
119 DUCHESS CRESCENT   PHONE 86- 774

[Advertisement]
M. W. BOYLE LTD
your G.H.B. GROCER
Karamu Road   Hastings

[Advertisement]
STELLATA FLORISTE  
“Flowers say it so much better”
905 Karamu Road North, Hastings
Phone 68 414   After Hours 85 414   

[Advertisement]
Printed by
CLIFF PRESS PRINTERS
and
PHOTOLITHOX PRINTING
HASTINGS

Original digital file

MorganL691_MayfairSchoolJubilee1975.pdf

Business / Organisation

Mayfair School

Date published

1975

Format of the original

Book

Accession number

691/1437/38114

Do you know something about this record?

Please note we cannot verify the accuracy of any information posted by the community.

Supporters and sponsors

We sincerely thank the following businesses and organisations for their support.