Newspaper Article 1971 – Bushy delights at Elsthorpe

Tall timber in C.H.B.

Bushy delights at Elsthorpe

The fifth in the Daily Telegraph’s feature series dealing with scenic areas in Hawke’s Bay.

One of the sightseeing showplaces of Central Hawke’s Bay, the Elsthorpe Scenic Reserve is preserved in two parts about a mile apart, with a stream running between the two areas.

Noted mainly for its bush, the reserve contains kahikatea, white pine, matai, tawa and titoki in liberal portions.

However, some of the recognised species of native trees are not plentiful. These include totara, mahoe and lemonwood.

There is rapid seedling regeneration of tawa and titoki, but kahikatea and lemonwood are not so noticeable.

The land originally was set aside as a scenic reserve in 1896 when the Elsthorpe Estate was opened up for settlement.

The area consists of about 91 acres and is situated in a low rainfall area.

The reserve is controlled by the Lands and Survey Department.

Blackberry infestation is becoming noticeable. Periodically willows have been removed from the Makara Stream to stop flooding. Grants are made available for this and blackberry control.

The reserve, which is situated 13 miles east of Waipawa, is an interesting place to visit, with its attractive stand of native bush and pleasant surroundings.

However it is more suited to nature walks than picnics. Access, also, to the reserve is difficult.

Pretty reserve

The Makirikiri Scenic Reserve totals in area 38 acres, of which 19 acres is light bush containing several good stands of rimu, matai, white pine and totara. The balance of the area is leased.

The reserve, situated 2½ miles south of Dannevirke originally was established in 1923 and vested in the Dannevirke Borough Council.

In the past few years a number of mixed native trees have been planted by the Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society.

Wekas were liberated in the reserve and in the Woodville Domain about 10 years ago.

The reserve which is under the control of the Dannevirke Borough Council, provides little scope for recreation, but is of interest to naturalists.

Beautiful spot

Originally part of a block of Maori land purchased in 1917, the Ngapaeruru Scenic Reserve of 19 acres is covered with beautiful bush, containing large rimu, matai, totara, white pine, miro, kahikatea and ribbonwood.

There is also kowhai, lacebark, fern trees and a variety of undergrowth containing veronicas and many varieties of ferns.

The reserve is situated on Tuturewa Road, nine miles south of Dannevirke, and is controlled by the Dannevirke Borough Council.

Running through the reserve is a stream which is ideal for swimming and as a picnic spot.

Fencing was carried out around the reserve so as to make it stockproof and a good pedestrian path has been formed from the entrance of the reserve to the Mangatoro Stream.

A slab table for the use of visitors has been erected on the bank of the stream and a wicket gate erected at the road to enable pedestrians to enter and leave the reserve.

This is an ideal family picnic spot.

Photo caption – TALL STANDS OF TIMBER make the Elsthorpe Scenic Reserve one of the notable attractions in Central Hawke’s Bay. Above: The bush-clad reserve scene. Right: Native trees reach for the sky, affording both shade and a magnificent view for visitors.

Original digital file

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Location

Elsthorpe

Date published

6 January 1971

Format of the original

Newspaper article

Publisher

The Daily Telegraph

Acknowledgements

Published with permission of Hawke's Bay Today

Accession number

374348

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