Weekly Mercury and Hawke’s Bay Advertiser 19 – May 26 1877

WEEKLY MERCURY
AND
Hawke’s Bay Advertiser,

A Journal of Commerce, Agriculture, Sports, Politics, and Literature.

VOL. II – No. 80.   NAPIER, SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1877.   PRICE SIXPENCE

PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
7000 ACRES freehold, Crown Grant, 24 miles from Napier.
23,000 acres Leasehold, 18 years to run, low rent, with
9,000 sheep, 40 head Cattle, Horses, Bullocks &c. Good home improvements, and 2000 acres fenced into paddocks; the whole will take grass seed readily, is well watered, and easy access from town.
11,000 acres Freehold, Crown Grant, with
2,000 acres Leasehold, excellent pastoral lands, 40 miles from Napier, well bounded, over 30 miles fencing, 25 paddocks, good houses, woolshed, and all necessary improvements with
10,000 Sheep, few Cattle and Horses
3,920 acres Freehold, rich pastoral land, Wairoa, with
800 sheep, and 100 head Cattle
900 acres Freehold Agricultural and Pastoral Land, Wairoa
4,677 acres Freehold Agricultural and Pastoral Land Wairoa, with
3,000 Sheep and other necessary working improvements
3,000 acres Freehold, Southern Seaboard, improved.
1,200 acres Freehold, Southern Seaboard, improved
400 acres Freehold, Southern Seaboard, improved
2,500 acres Freehold, Southern Seaboard, improved, with
2,000 Sheep and 250 head Cattle
4,200 acres Freehold Agricultural and Pastoral Land, Poverty Bay
11,000 acres Leasehold, Pastoral, Poverty Bay, with
3000 Sheep and few Cattle
1,600 acres Leasehold, half interest, Poverty Bay
14,000 acres Leasehold, excellent country, Tologa [Tolaga] Bay
8,800 acres Leasehold, excellent country, Tologa Bay, with
3,000 Sheep and good improvements
1,100 acres Freehold, rich land, Opotiki, with
1,000 Sheep and all necessary improvements
33,000 acres Leasehold, Pastoral, 26 miles from Napier
150,000 acres Leasehold, Pastoral, 30 miles from Napier with
10,000 Sheep, exclusive of Lambs
55,000 acres Leasehold, Pastoral, 70 miles from Napier, with
5,000 Sheep and 50 head Cattle.
9,000 acres Freehold, Agricultural and Pastoral, Seaboard, with
14,000 acres Leasehold, valuable improvements and
15,000 Sheep, few Cattle, Horses, &c.
1,639 acres Freehold, near Greytown, with
1,040 acres Leasehold, all fenced and subdivided, and
5,000 longwool Sheep, 120 Cattle, few horses, and every improvement necessary. The coach road passes through the property.
M.R. MILLER, Stock and Station Agent

COUNTRY RESIDENCE.
FOR LEASE.
MR GRANT, the purchaser of the Pakowhai Estate, has instructed the undersigned to Lease for a term the very substantial and commodious Dwelling-House, lately occupied by Mr McHardy, with the well-stocked Garden, Orchard, Shrubbery, and a small paddock adjoining; with part of the offices, a Coach-house, Stable &c. This is situated within easy drive of Town or the Farndon Railway station. To a good tenant the rent will be very moderate.
M.R. MILLER.

FOR SALE
Mr Evan’s Draught Stallion “LORD NELSON” by “Sir Colin Campbell” dam “Blossom” etc.
Liberal terms.
For further particulars apply to
M.R. MILLER

FREEHOLD ESTATE.
HOMEWOOD – KAIKORA.
The Undersigned is instructed by Mr Robert Evans, of Homewood, Kaikora, to offer for Sale, as a whole or in convenient lots,
1,000 ACRES RICH AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL LAND. This property has frontages to the Waipawa River, from the bridge downward, a ring fence round the remainder.
This property is divided into two large divisions, one of these portions containing three small paddocks, about 30 acres, under artificial grass, two whares, sheep-yards &c, with or without 1500 sheep now de-pasturing thereon.
Price moderate, and a considerable portion of the purchase money remaining on mortgage.
M.R. MILLER.

RURAL SECTIONS, WOODVILLE.
On Deferred Payments.
For particulars, apply to
M.R. MILLER

SHEEP FOR SALE.
2500 CROSS-BRED EWES, mixed ages,
200 cross-bred Ewes, 8-tooth
700 6 and 8-tooth cross-bred Wedders
60 Merino Rams, bred by Sir Donald McLean.
M.R. MILLER

TARADALE SALE YARDS.
FRIDAY, JUNE 1, 1877.
At 12 o’clock.
MARGOLIOUTH & BANNER,
Will sell by Public Auction on the above date,
60 FAT CROSS-BRED WETHERS
20 Fat Steers, Heifers, Bullocks
20 Horses
&c.,   &c.,   &c.
Entries will be received as before by Mr McDonald, at the Taradale Hotel, and by the undersigned,
MARGOLIOUTH & BANNER,
Auctioneers.

FOR SALE,
In lots to suit Purchasers.
Ten cases Prime Canterbury CHEESE, just received from Akaroa.
MARGOLIOUTH & BANNER.

FOR LEASE,
A DAIRY FARM AT TARADALE, about 2 miles from Town, consisting of 95 acres of well-grassed land and Artesian Well. With purchasing clause.
109 acres land known as “Park Island”, lease 14 years to run.
Also, 30 Milking Cows
Horses, Carts, and
Dairying Utensils.
The business is capable of giving a large return, and is at present yielding £1000 per annum.
Also,
7 good Draught Horses: price from £15 to £35, and several weight-carrying hacks.
The Auctioneers have made arrangements for the erection of suitable yards, in connection with Mr McCartney’s, Taradale Hotel.
First sale will take place about the end of the month.
For further particulars, apply to
TURLEY & BRATHWAITE,
Auctioneers.

Encourage Local Industry!
As the planting season has arrived again, we beg to drawn the attention of the public to our large stock of Nursery Produce. Our collection comprises all the well-known varieties of Conifers, Forest, Fruit and hardy Ornamental Trees and Shrubs, and consists of –
23,000 Conifers, as Pines, Cypress, &c.
11,000 Forest and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs
7,000 Fruit Trees of the choicest varieties
2,000 Roses in great and choice variety
100 Choice Standard Roses
270,000 White Thorn, 1, 2, and 3-year old
6,000 Sweet Briar for hedges
2,000 Arbor Vitae for hedges
4,000 Cherokee Roses, Privets, and Pittis-porums.
20,000 Osage Orange, &c.
We also have a large stock of Greenhouse and Stove Plants, Florist Flowers, Vegetables, and Flower Seeds of the best and choicest varieties. We can warrant all our trees, shrubs, and seeds healthy, sound, and true to name. We, therefore, beg to trust us trustfully with your esteemed orders, which shall have our best attention.
Orders addressed to us at the Nurseries, or left at our Seed Store, Emerson-street, Napier, will meet with prompt attention.
Our prices will be found as low and reasonable as those of any respectable house in the Colony. Where large quantities are ordered, a most liberal reduction in price will be made.
F.W.C. STURM & SON.
Hawke’s Bay Nurseries,
West Clive, near Napier.

THE REPOSITORY,
HASTINGS STREET, NAPIER.
The Undersigned desires to intimate that Saturday sales will be resumed at the above establishment on SATURDAY, the 2nd day of June, 1877, under the management of Mr J.A. Lennie, who has rented the premises, and taken over the goodwill of the business.
W.K. McLEAN, Auctioneer

In reference to the above, J.A. Lennie begs to inform Country Settler, Dealers, and the public of Hawke’s Bay generally, that he intends carrying on the business as heretofore, and to assure them that no effort shall be wanting on his part to make the establishment both attractive and profitable to all who may favour him with their support.
Auction sales of Stock, Vehicles, Produce, &c, will be held every Saturday, and on such other days as circumstances may require, of which due notice will be given.
All produce sent by rail will be conveyed to the Repository free of charge.
Hay, oats, maize, chaff, bran, potatoes and other produce kept in Sock for sale privately or by Public Auction.
Horses taken into Livery day and night. First class Hacks, Buggies, and quiet Trap Horses always on hire and for sale.
Mr W.K. McLean is engaged as Auctioneer.
J.A. LENNIE,
Commission Agent, &c.

HAWKE’S BAY AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL SOCIETY.
The Annual General Meeting will be held at the Criterion Hotel on WEDNESDAY, the 30th May, 1877, at 11 o’clock a.m. for the purpose of passing accounts, and the election of Officers for the current year, and other important business.
JOHN BENNETT, Hon. Sec.

Returning Officer’s office,
Mohaka, May 19, 1877.
At the nomination of Candidates for the vacancy in the Mohaka Riding of the Wairoa County held on this date, the undermentioned elector was the one duly nominated. I therefore declare
E.C. FANNIN
to be duly elected as Councillor for the Mohaka Riding of the Wairoa County.
Given under my hand at Mohaka, this 19th day of May, 1877.
JOHN SUTHERLAND,
Returning Officer.

NAPIER ELECTORAL DISTRICT.
NOTICE is hereby given that a Court will be held for Revising the List of Voters for the District of Napier, at the Resident Magistrate’s Court, Napier, on WEDNESDAY, June 6, at 11 o’clock a.m. at which place
The Claims of Persons objected to will be determined.
The Names of Ppoundsersons proved to be dead will be expunged.
The Names of Persons whose Christian Names or Places of Abode, or the nature of whose Qualifications shall be wholly omitted, where by law required to be specified in the List, or whose place of abode or the nature or description of whose qualifications are insufficiently described for the purpose of being identified, will be expunged;  unless the matter so omitted or insufficiently described be supplied to the satisfaction of the Revising Officer before he shall have completed the Revision of such List of Voters.
G.A. OLIVER,
Revising Officer,
Napier, May 18, 1877.

CLIVE ELECTORAL DISTRICT.
NOTICE is hereby given that a Court will be held for Revising the List of Voters for the District of Clive, at the Court-room, Waipawa, on TUESDAY, 19th June, at 11 o’clock a.m. at which place
The Claims of Persons objected to will be determined.
The Names of Persons proved to be dead will be expunged.
The Names of Persons whose Christian Names or Places of Abode, or the nature of whose Qualifications shall be wholly omitted, where by law required to be specified in the List, or whose place of abode or the nature or description of whose qualifications are insufficiently described for the purpose of being identified, will be expunged;  unless the matter so omitted or insufficiently described be supplied to the satisfaction of the Revising Officer before he shall have completed the Revision of such List of Voters.
G.A. OLIVER,
Revising Officer,
Napier, May 18, 1877.

TO THE SETTLERS OF WOODVILLE AND 70-MILE BUSH.
To meet the growing wants of the up-country settlers, I have decided to start a Four-horse Waggon once a week, leaving Takapau Railway station every MONDAY MORNING, after the arrival of the down train from Napier, and returning to Takapau on each following FRIDAY. To enable settlers to have their goods forwarded with despatch, it will be necessary that advice be sent to me as early as possible before the day appointed for the departure of the waggon.
H. BERTIE REED,
Railway Hotel,
Takapau.

2   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

[…]

INTERPROVINCIAL.
WAIROA.
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT).

THREATENED FAMINE POSTPONED.
May 18.
The Manaia and Result arrived safely. There is now a good entrance.
The natives are flocking into town to see Mr Hamlin.
There is great excitement to obtain supplies, which have arrived just in time.
The threatened famine is now postponed sine die.

RIVER AGAIN BLOCKED.
May 19.
The Result left at 10 a.m., and the Manaia left at 10.30. Passengers – Mrs McGuire, Messrs H.E. Webb, Davis and others.

LATER.
The steamers could not get out after all, there being too much sea on. They are to try again tomorrow.

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   3

[…]

WAIPUKURAU
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
RIDING NOMINATION.
May 18.
At the nomination to-day for a member for the Waipukurau Riding, Messrs. Johnston and Russell were both nominated.

WAIPAWA.
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
FIRE AT WAIPAWA.
May 21.
A fire broke out this morning, between 4 and 5 o’clock, in the Waipawa bush, in a house owned by James Bennett, and occupied by Anderson. The house and contents were consumed. The cause of the fire is unknown.

GISBORNE
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
LOCAL INSTITUTIONS.
May 21.
Gisborne has been declared a Borough. Ever so many candidates are in the field for Mayor, and any number more for Councillors. Things are looking up for the printers on election addresses, squibs, and declarations. We have a County Council, three Road Boards, and a Borough. The taxes to be raised thereout will be a caution for all.
EFFECTS OF DYNAMITE
The rocks in the channel are being blasted by dynamite. The Contractor was nearly dynamited himself last week. He was under the impression that scarcely anything but the electric spark would cause it to explode.
WANTING TO BE JOYFUL!
More money is looked for by the Maoris for their land. They have scarcely done suffering a recovery from their last grant spree from the £6000 paid to them. This time the sum is to be a little less, but the expenditure is absolutely necessary to keep us joyful.
THE GOAHEAD.
The Goahead is on the river bank undergoing repairs, she is considerably damaged but it is expected she can be floated to Auckland.

[…]

4   THE WEEKLY MERCURY

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS
It is notified that the rental for the toll-gates in the Hawke’s Bay County will be sold by auction at noon, on June 15, at the Council Chambers, Napier.

We are informed by Mr Upham that he has now registered the Theatre Company floated by him, and mentioned in our columns on Thursday. The prospectus appears in our advertising columns, and will doubtless receive that support from the public which the venture merits.

We learn that Mr Charles Stuart, the present proprietor of the Havelock Hotel has concluded negotiations for the occupation of a new house to be erected opposite the Hastings-road at Havelock. Mr Smith has obtained the contract for the building which is to cost £1,450. The situation on which the new Hotel is to be built is an excellent one, and under Mr. Stuart’s management cannot fail becoming a success.

We notice that the Inspector of Weights and Measures has brought the bakers of that town to book. We do not for one moment imagine that the bakers in Napier give short weight, but nevertheless we have noticed a great difference in the size of some of the loaves sent out from the different bakeries in Napier. No doubt the large loaves are overweight, but still the Inspector of Weights in Napier might find it to be advantage of the public were he now and again to inspect the weights.

The following is a list of wool from Napier lost in the ship Ocean Main, lately wrecked at Chatham Islands:
223 bales shipped by Watt Brothers, 213 and 374¼ bales shipped by Murray, Common and Co.; 12 bales shipped by Routledge, Kennedy and Co. We are happy to say the whole was insured.

[…]

The “At Home” of the Napier Rowing Club, held at the Oddfellows Hall on Friday, was a pronounced success. The entertainment is scarcely of a public nature, being confined to the members of the Club and their friends. The first part consisted of a concert in which only gentlemen took part, the whole being under the direction of Mr Flood, who, in the instrumental parts, was ably assisted by Messrs Chicken and Garry. Several good solos were given and also a chorus in which about twenty gentlemen took part. A recitation, given by a gentleman who is a recent arrival, elicited roars of laughter. The whole concluded with a dance, which was thoroughly enjoyed. We may safely predict a success for these “At Homes”, and we congratulate the Committee and those gentlemen who assisted, on being so well able to provide a novel and enjoyable evening’s amusement for the members of the Napier Rowing Club and their friends. The next “At Home” will take place on June 22.

[…]

The total number of acres under crop, including sown grasses, in New Zealand, according to the last statistical returns, was 2,682,757.

[…]

Dr Cowie the Bishop of Auckland, is now on a visit to this district, having come at the request of the Primate to fulfil certain clerical duties which have to lay in abeyance, since the resignation of the Bishop of Waiapau [Waiapu].

R. Beetham Esq., our respected Resident Magistrate has we learn, obtained six months leave of absence. We regret to learn that Mr Beetham has been for some time suffering from indisposition, the result of the heavy duties which have devolved on him since his appointment as Resident Magistrate here.

The Napier Artillery Volunteers were inspected by Major Withers on Friday. There was a very good attendance of the members present. After the inspection, the Battery, headed by their newly-formed band, proceeded for a march out as far as the railway crossing. On their return they were marched to the Post-office, at which place the corps were dismissed.

Information has been received at Gisborne that the petition of the inhabitants of that town, praying that the town may be constituted a Borough has been acceded to by the Government.

[…]

There were no cases, either civil or criminal, for hearing in the Resident Magistrate’s Court on Saturday.

[…]

The Right Rev. Dr Cowie administered the rite of confirmation at the Taradale Church on Sunday morning, and in the evening preached an excellent sermon in St. John’s Church to a large congregation.

[…]

A man named Michael Tanty, died suddenly on Sunday morning at his residence on the White-road [Napier]. He has been in the colony a couple of years, and since married a daughter of Mr Barry, by whom he had one child. Tanty has been for some time working in the country, where he has been sheepwashing and since his return to town has suffered from illness.

THE WEEKLY MERCURY.   5

The polling for the election of a representative for Waipukurau, in the Waipawa County Council took place on Tuesday. We believe the Hon. H.R. Russell is certain to be returned. The voting for the Waipukurau and Ruataniwha districts was taken on the new rolls that have just passed the Assessment Court, as per clause 30 of the Rating Act. No rate having yet been struck this year in either of those districts, one vote each was all that could be given by persons whose names appear on those rolls. The Makaretu was to be treated as an outlying district, and all persons on the House of Representatives electoral roll for that district were allowed one vote. The single voting was greatly in favour of Mr Russell. Mr Johnston’s motion, that he carried in the Council, to make all roads County roads, and thereby indirectly to abolish Road Boards, has given great offence to all the small farmers, and will cause him to lose many of the votes that, at the previous election, were recorded in his favor.

We are requested to state that the side entrance door into the Fire-engine station is always left unlocked. As the existence of this door is not known to every one, we should think it would be advisable to keep a lamp burning over it at night to direct attention to the entrance.

Fortunately for Napier fires are not frequent, but at the two or three we have had in as many years, there has been a disappearance of buckets and axes kindly lent from the ironmongers’ stores to aid the extinguishment of the conflagration. At the fire up the White Road, nearly twelve months ago, Mr H. Williams lost a lot of buckets that he lent to any one asking for them, and on Sunday night, Mr Tuxford opened his store and gave out axes, all but two of which have been stolen. If the Engine Station were supplied with regulation fire buckets, and branded axes, there would be less chance of their loss than there is of the ordinary articles, the whereabouts of which can never be traced.

[…]

The unfortunate man Frederick Harding who was so badly burnt at the late fire, was removed from Mr V. Riber’s on Monday evening and conveyed to the Hospital.

We understand that Mrs Neill proposes giving another of her pleasing concerts in the Oddfellow’s Hall, Napier, on Friday evening June 1. We are informed that a most excellent programme is in preparation, and that Mrs Neill will be assisted by an efficient orchestra.

It is notified that Mr R.C. Fannin has been elected County Councillor for the Mohaka Riding, without opposition, in the room of Mr McKinnon, resigned.

Mr. Youill, the station keeper at the engine station, rung the fire bell on Sunday night as soon as Messrs. Skelton and Campbell aroused him by the alarm of fire.

The Georgia Minstrels again delighted a crowded audience on Monday, keeping the house in roars of laughter throughout the whole entertainment. The concert portion of the programme was in its solos and choruses extremely admired, Messrs Hicks, Matlock, and Bowman, in their songs receiving encores. Messrs Crusoe and Mills, the “Bones” and those excruciatingly funny “Tambos” Messrs Wilson and Brown, repeatedly brought down the house by the genuine humor of their business. The farces, burlesques, and the dances, were as good as they could be, and no audience could possibly have been better pleased than was that of Monday.

We hear that the residents of Hastings are very indignant at the dilatoriness of the Chairman of the Road Board in commencing the carrying out of the drainage scheme. The levels have been taken and the surveys made, long ago, and the ratepayers are most anxious that the work of draining should be begun before the wet weather, that must be expected at this time of the year, sets in. If draining is delayed much longer, the chances are that it will have to be postponed till next summer.

Ten shares in the Napier Gas Company were sold by order of the trustees in Boylan’s estate, by Messrs Routledge, Kennedy and Co.  The shares are £10, with £8 paid up, the ten realised £7.

[…]

We understand that the Inspector of Police has made application to the authorities to increase the Police force in Napier by three men, owing to the heavy duty now devolving on the few men stationed here.

[…]

The consecration of the Anglican portion of the Taradale cemetery is postponed until further notice.

The police sheet was blank on Monday.

During Mr Beetham’s leave of absence, his Worship the Mayor will undertake the duties of Resident Magistrate.

The fire bell was run on Sunday morning at a quarter to twelve o’clock, alarming the congregations assembled in the various churches, and bringing a lot of people from all parts of the town to the engine station to find the whereabouts of the conflagration, and to render assistance if necessary. The Fire Brigade mustered up so rapidly as to call forth praise from all quarters. Mr Cotton, who had just brought up the Rangatira’s mails to the Post Office, threw the bags off the coach, and driving to the engine station unharnessed his horses ready to put them at the service of the brigade. The manual engine was got out, and drawn a little way down Emerson Street, when it was learned that the cause of alarm was only a chimney on fire at Mr Myhill’s store, which had been quickly extinguished.

[…]

A private telegram received in town states that, notwithstanding the official declaration of the poll has not been made, the Hon. H.R. Russell has been elected for the representation of Waipukurau in the Waipawa Council by a large majority.

There have been three gentlemen nominated for the office of auditors for the Borough of Napier, viz., Messrs. Hoadley, McLean and Banner. This will necessitate an election by the ratepayers. The office of auditor is an arduous one, and requires some experience to fulfil satisfactorily. The emoluments are but five guineas per annum.

[…]

An inquest on the fire, that occurred in Emerson Street on Sunday night, took place on Wednesday at the Star Hotel, before T. Hitchings Esq., Coroner, and the following jury: B. Smith (Foreman), H. Renouf, E.L. Smith, D Lindsay, G Faulknor, R. Holt, J. McVay, W. Britten, J. Burton, H. Donahan, H. Neal, A. Gould. The jury returned a verdict that there was no evidence to show how the fire originated.

[…]

A preliminary meeting of those interested in the formation of a Napier Theatre Company took place on Tuesday at the Criterion Hotel. Mr Upham, pro tem Secretary, laid the prospectus of the proposed company before the meeting, and explained that the site selected for the theatre was that at the back of the Foresters’ Arms Hotel. The hostelry would be incorporated with the theatre by which an immediate return of £200 a year would be secured by the shareholders, inasmuch as the present tenant was now paying that rental. The theatre itself it was reckoned would find a tenant at £300 a year. Thus 7½ per cent could be confidently anticipated upon an expended capital of £7,000. Mr A. Manoy was appointed pro tem Treasurer, and Mr Upham, Secretary, and the meeting then adjourned till Tuesday evening next.

We learn that a new school is about to be opened at Te Aute, by a Mr Cobbe, who has already been promised nineteen pupils. Mr Cobb [Cobbe] is an accomplished musician, and it is proposed to purchase a set of musical instruments, and for the Maoris in that district, to be taught to play. It is hoped by this means to form a native band.

The Georgia Minstrels made another successful appearance on Tuesday before a crowded house. A new programme was again introduced which gave general satisfaction. The first part included a number of pathetic plantation songs, intermixed with some droll ones from the four corner men, the latter sparkling with life and darkie fun. “My Old Cabin Home” which was composed by the singer H.B. Hicks was especially admired for its natural sentiment and poetry. The “Napier Polka” which concluded the first part arranged by Mr Thomas, and played by the band, went exceedingly well. The second part consisted chiefly of negro faces. Judge Crusoe’s harangue to the audience was exceedingly clever and elicited applause.

Mr Upham was busy on Wednesday canvassing for shares to be taken in the Napier Theatre Company, and has we learn been very successful, a good number of shares having been taken up already.

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   7

[…]

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE’S COURT.

FRIDAY MAY 18. (Before J.A. Smith Esq., J.P. and T.K. Newton, Esq., J.P.)|
DRUNKENNESS.
George Sinclair, for the above offence was fined 5s, or in default 24 hours imprisonment.
Thomas Mansfield, on a like charge, was fined 10s, or 48 hours.
Both these worthies preferred going on the hill to parting with the “siller”.
There were several civil cases set down for hearing, some were settled out of Court, and the remainder were of no public importance.

TUESDAY MAY 22.
DRUNKENNESS.
A man who gave his name as Henry Spencer, who was arrested by Constable Irvine for drunkenness, at the prisoner’s own request, was discharged with a caution.

AN HAVELOER [HAVELOCK] LOAFER,
John Williams, a well-known character, but described as a labourer, was charged with robbing the till at Mrs Taylor’s store at Havelock, and with assaulting Mrs Taylor.
Mounted Constable Alfred James Mitchel deposed that last evening, from information received, he went to Mr Taylor’s house, and learnt that a man answering the description of the prisoner at the bar had taken some money from Mrs Taylor’s till, and had also assaulted Mrs Taylor, when endeavouring to stop him. He affected escape for the time being, and was apprehended by the constable three hours afterwards. On being told this charge he replied “that he was drunk, and that it was his brother, not him who did it.” He was taken to the station. A short time afterwards, on searching the bar of Mr Reynold’s Hotel where he was known to have called for a beer, a thimble was found, which Mrs Taylor identified as her property. The swag also which was dropped by prisoner in his flight was owned by him this morning.
Mrs Taylor supposed last night, about five, she heard a noise in the shop and on looking out saw the prisoner leaning across the counter with his hand in the till. In endeavouring to pull him away, he turned round and struck her in the face, rendering her for the moment almost insensible. She could identify the prisoner as the man who committed the act.
Inspector Scully stated that he had known the prisoner for some time, and knew him to be a violent man, and had on one occasion severely injured one of his constables.
His Worship characterised the case as being a very bad one, and sentenced the prisoner to be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for six calendar months in the Napier Gaol.

CIVIL CASES
There were a few civil cases disposed of, and others settled out of court.

WEDNESDAY MAY 23.
(Before His Worship the Mayor).
OLD SINCLAIR AGAIN
This old inebriate was again brought before the court on a charge of drunkenness. He pleaded guilty to the soft implication, but excused himself on the grounds that he had come into town with the object of obtaining monies due to him from a solicitor. He spent his money, and in doing so obtained just two glasses too much.
His Worship said that he was a man who appeared to be an habitual drunkard, and in order to turn him from his evil ways, he would send him to the care of Mr Miller for three months, where he would be kept out of the way of all temptation.

LAST SUNDAY’S ALARM
John Myhill appeared in answer to an information laid by the Municipal Inspector of Nuisances with having permitted his chimney to be on fire on Sunday last.
Mr. Myhill in answer to the Court, pleaded guilty to the charge, but stated that his chimney was in such a position that it was not safe. On Sunday morning there was a small fire in the kitchen chimney, he opened the door of the room, a draught drew the fire up the chimney, and set the soot alight. He immediately threw some salt on the fire, which put it out.
His Worship said that Mr. Myhill had been aware of the state of the fire place according to his own account, for some time, and had taken no steps to remedy it. However, as this was his first offence, he would fine him 10s and costs.

INSULTING THE RAILWAY GUARD.
Rhoderick McCrea was charged with having used abusing and insulting language at Paki Paki to Rees Watkins, a railway officer, while in the execution of his duty.
McCrea expressed his contrition for the offence, to which he pleaded guilty.
His Workshop, after admonishing him as to his future conduct, fined him £2 and costs 7s.6d.

SERIOUS CHARGES AGAINST TARADALE SETTLERS.
Charles Patrick O’Dowd, James Neagle, James Daly, Richard Jeffares, and Samuel Golding, were placed in the dock all charged that on Saturday, the 19th day of May, they did feloniously steal and carry away a ledger and other books to the value of £6, and also did forcibly and with strong hand did enter into a certain house of which one Thomas McFarlane was then in legal possession.
Mr Rees, who appeared on behalf of the prosecution, stated to the Court that he would ask a remand of the cases until Friday next in order that the police might obtain further evidence. In doing so, however, he wished to ask, at the request of the police, the release of Mr Golding, as no evidence could be forthcoming against him.
Mr Lee on behalf of the prisoner, offering no objection, Mr Golding’s release was granted.
His Worship remarked that he had no desire of throwing obstacles in the way, and would accede to Mr Rees request. The prisoner would have, however, to find bail in £50 each, and two sureties in £2 each.
Messrs R. Neagle and T. Jeffares gave the required security, and the prisoners were then set free until Friday next, on which day they will again have to make their bow to the Court.
This was all the business.

[…]

8   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

Shipping Intelligence.

PORT AHURIRI.
ARRIVAL – May
19 – Kiwi, s.s., from Wellington, via Castle Point, Blackhead, and Pourerere. Passenger – Mrs Mitchell and 4 steerage.
19 – Wanaka, s.s., from Auckland via Tauranga and Poverty Bay. Passengers, Mesdames De Lias, Watt and servant, Macshane, Townsend, and Misses Browery, Bishop Cowie, Rev Mr Williams, Messrs Shrewsbury, Reid, Rees, Brady, Broadgate, Watt, Beuly, Lascelles, Cross, Mills, Davidson, Maun, De Lias, and Georgia Minstrels, 3 steerage, and 7 for South.
20 – Kenilworth, schooner, from Wangapoa [Whangapoua]
20 – Rangatira, s.s., from Wellington. Passengers, Mrs Brown, Misses Brow and Dunning, Messrs Frood, Griffiths, Trask, and five in the steerage.
20 – Minnie Hare, schooner, from Ngunururu [Ngunguru]
20 – Manaia, p.s., from Wairoa. Passengers Mrs McGuire and three children, Miss Donelly, Messrs Davidson, Webb, and four in the steerage.
20 – Sir Donald, s.s., from Mangakuri
21 – Opotiki, schooner, from Poverty Bay
21 – Fairy, s.s., from Nuhaka
22 – Jane Douglas, s.s., from Mangakuri

DEPARTURE.
May
17 – Result, s.s., for Wairoa. Four passengers
17 – Manaia, p.s., for Wairoa. Passengers Mrs Robinson, Mrs McMurray and child, Messrs Powdrell, Davidson, and 2 natives.
18 – Jane Douglas, s.s., for Mangakuri
18 – Sir Donald, s.s., for Mangakuri
18 – Isabella Pratt, schooner, for Timaru
19 – Wanaka, s.s., for Wellington. Passengers Mesdames Colville, McCulloch, Mitchell and child, Lloyd, Query and 5 children, Miss Scoble, Messrs Lloyd, Glenn, Watt, Davis, Burns, Jeffs, Kingden, Engel, Falconer, Dransfield, Scott, and 7 steerage.
19 – Fairy, s.s., for Nuhaka
20 – Kiwi, s.s., for Wellington via Pourerere
22 – Rangatira, s.s., for Wellington. Passengers Mesdames Kennedy, Chuck, Alexander, and Rede, Messrs Smart, Swanson, Williams, Creighton, Grant, Bull, Rede, Chuck, and Alexander.

The Star of the South arrived at Gisborne from Napier at 10 p.m. on Thursday, and the Pretty Jane at 1 a.m. on Friday. Both had store ewes on board.
The Silver Cloud is being lightered by the Bella, Three Brothers, and Why Not.
The s.s. Result left the Breastwork on Thursday at 5 p.m., and anchored in the Bay til midnight, and then steamed for Wairoa.
The p.s. Manaia left at 10 p.m., and steamed straightaway. Both vessels arrived there early on Friday, and crossed the bar in safety, arriving at the wharf about nine o’clock.
The s.s. Kiwi, Captain Campbell, left Wellington last Wednesday evening, arriving morning; discharged passengers and cargo, leaving there at 1.30 p.m.; arrived at Blackhead at 8 p.m. same day, and stood off and on till daylight; discharged cargo and left at 1.30 p.m., and arrived at Pourerere at 2.15, and left at 5.30 p.m.; arrived at the anchorage at 1 o’clock on Saturday. Had fine weather all the way, and favourable landing on the beach.
The s.s. Phoebe is again to be put in commission. The command of her has been offered to and accepted by Captain Kennedy, late of the Easby.
The s.s. Wanaka arrived in port on Saturday. The following is her report – left Auckland on the 16th May at 5 p.m.; arrived at Tauranga on the 17th, at 7 a.m.; left Tauranga on the 17th, at 9 a.m.; arrived at Poverty Bay on the 18th, at 8 a.m.; arrived at Napier on the 19th, at 8 a.m. Find weather and light southerly winds throughout. The Wanaka after discharging her cargo to the Bella and Three Brothers, left for Wellington about 1 p.m. Captain McGillvray is still in command, as Captain Malcolm has gone down the West Coast to join her at Wellington. We thank the purser for files and report.
The schooner Kenilworth arrived in the Bay early on Sunday from Whangapoa [Whangapoua] with a cargo of sawn timber to the order of Mr B Johnson.
The s.s. Rangatira, Captain Evans, arrived in the Bay on Sunday morning, at 9.45, having come most of the way from Wellington under easy steam. Passed the Wanaka, bound south, off Pourerere at 10 p.m. on Saturday. Amongst the cargo we noticed 20 cases of quail, larks, &c, to the order of the Acclimatisation Society.
The schooner Minnie Hare has her hold full of sawn timber, and on her deck a few piles for the harbour works.
The p.s. Manaia, in coming out of the Wairoa, grounded all the way over the bar, and had to be assisted out with poles on each side. The captain of the Result took the wrong passage, and grounded on a bank, but fortunately floated off at high water, and is now safe in the river. The bar at Wairoa was scarcely ever so bad as it is now.
The s.s. Sir Donald returned from Mangakuri on Sunday, having succeeded in landing the whole of her cargo. We regret to hear that whilst the Sir Donald was discharging there, and near to the Jane Douglas, a boat from the latter steamer was capsized on going ashore with a full cargo of stores. The Sir Donald’s boat immediately put off and picked up the men, but the boat’s load of stores was lost.
The schooner Opotiki, Captain Harris, had a quick run from Poverty Bay, she having left there on Sunday and arrived here early on Monday. She has a cargo of sawn timber for Mr Scarfe.
The s.s. Jane Douglas, Capt. Fraser, arrived on Tuesday at 11.30 from Mangakuri and the Coast.
The s.s. Rangatira left a little after noon, on Tuesday, for Wellington.
It will be observed by advertisement that the Jane Douglas will leave at 3 p.m. tomorrow afternoon, instead of to-night as previously advertised.
During the Jane Douglas’s stay at Mangakuri, an accident happened by which the ship’s boat was capsized, and the contents lost. Two of the men clung to the boat; the other man, being a good swimmer, struck out for the shore. All three were eventually picked up by the Sir Donald boat. Some of the cargo was washed ashore later on in the day.
The s.s. Sir Donald will proceed to Wellington shortly for a thorough overhaul. She will be newly coppered, her boiler and engine will be thoroughly examined, and she will be made3 as good as new.
The steamer Southern Cross, Captain Holmes, having completed her charter with sheep to Raglan on the West Coast is expected to leave Wellington for Napier today, and will then proceed to Auckland.
The s.s. Kiwi hence arrived at Wellington Saturday.

POST OFFICE NOTICE.

MAILS CLOSE
For the United Kingdom, Continent of Europe &c, via Suez and Brindisi, by every opportunity to Wellington, where the mails close on the 1st June. Correspondence for this route should leave Napier not later than the 28th instant by overland to Wellington.
For Fiji, Sandwich Islands, America, West Indies, United Kingdom, and Continent of Europe &c, via San Francisco, on Monday, 4th June, at 8 a.m.
Money orders and registered letters will close at 5 p.m. newspapers and book packets will close at 9 p.m. on Saturday, 2nd June
J. GRUBB,
Chief Postmaster.

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENT.
ADVISER – You have not forwarded with your letter your name and address. Your communication therefore cannot be published.

BIRTHS.
HARRIS – On the 10th of May, at Tonk’s Cottage, Webb-street, Wellington, the wife of J.J. Harris, of a daughter.
CARTER – At Wairoa, on May 15, the wife of Mr Edwin Carter, of a daughter.
SCRAGG – At Taradale, on May 19, the wife of Mr Scragg, of a daughter.

Government Notifications.

NOTIFICATION.
Crown Lands Office,
Napier, 19th May 1877.
I hereby give Notice that the right to depasture Stock for a period of 5 years over 1500 acres more or less land in the Arapawanui and Moeangiangi District, now at the disposal of the Government, and which was lately comprised in License No. 123, will be offered for competition by Public Auction at this office, at Noon, on SATURDAY, the 30th June next, subject to the terms of “The Hawke’s Bay Renewal of Licenses Act, 1870.”
Conditions may be obtained at this office.
J.T. TYLEE,
Commissioner of Crown Lands.

NOTICE.
Office of Waste Lands Board.
Napier, 8th December 1876.
TO HUGH MCCORMICK, formerly of the 65th Regiment or his representatives.
You are hereby required, within six months from this date, to prove to the satisfaction of the Waste Lands Board that you have complied with the conditions required to entitle you to 60 acres of land in the Wakarara District, selected under a Military Settlers Land Order, and if you fail to prove your claim within the specified time, your title to the land will be forfeited and the land be dealt with as the Board may direct.
J.T. TYLEE,
Chief Commissioner.

“HAWKE’S BAY SPECIAL SETTLEMENTS ACT, 1872”.
Crown Lands Office,
Napier, 19th May 1877.
Notice is hereby given that the following selections of land in the MAKARETU RESERVE having been forfeited, will under Section 13 of the above Act, be sold for Cash, by Public Auction at the Crown Lands Office, at Noon on MONDAY, the 30th July, 1877.

Application   Contents   Upset price.
A.R.P.   £ s. d.
13   100 acres   50 0 0
15   100 acres   50 0 0
17   200 acres   100 0 0
49   100 acres   50 0 0
50   60 acres   30 0 0
54   100 acres   50 0 0
86   40 acres   20 0 0
110   50 acres   25 0 0
111   50 acres   25 0 0
*The above areas are exclusive of 5 per cent allowance for Roads.
J.T. TYLEE,
Commissioner of Crown Lands

JOHN McVAY,
SADDLER & HARNESSMAKER
Hastings-street.
The Cheapest House in the Trade.

The Weekly Mercury
AND
HAWKE’S BAY ADVERTISER.
SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1877.

[…]

Some little time ago we republished from a southern contemporary a portion of an article that we entitled “sheep-grazing v sheep-farming”. The remarks contained in that article, with reference to the wastefulness of grazing, as against the profitableness of sheep-farming, have since been borne out by the reports of the sheep Inspectors of Hawke’s Bay, Canterbury, and Otago.

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   9

[…]

SOME months ago, a deputation of the Bar practising in Napier, waited on the Minister of Justice, during that gentleman’s visit here, to urge the advisability of appointing a District Judge for Hawke’s Bay. Without committing himself to any definite reply, the Hon. Mr Bowen promised that the subject, thus brought before him, should have his earliest consideration. Further, a distinct promise was given by the Government last session, that such an appointment should be made. Nothing more, however, has been heard of the matter. At the time when the deputation waited upon Mr Bowen, there was, perhaps, less occasion for the appointment of a District Judge than there is now; and taking into consideration the unpopularity to which District Courts had obtained in Napier, very little fault can be found in the fact that the Government virtually declined to accede to the request made by the barristers here. The case is now very different; the times have altered, having declined from good to indifferent, and these are apparently rapidly approaching to the bad. The frequent notices of bankruptcy, which from time to time, appear in the advertising columns of this journal point to this state of affairs. That there should be but two sittings of the Supreme Court in this town in the twelve months, at which cases of bankruptcy can alone be settled, is a circumstance, to say the least, most unsatisfactory both to creditors and debtors. The fact of there being no Court here, having criminal and civil jurisdiction superior to the Resident Magistrate’s Court but inferior to that of the Supreme Court, constantly necessitates civil cases of all descriptions being sent from here to Wellington, involving immense cost to clients. Putting on one side criminal cases, in which persons committed for trial on charges that may or may not be proved, have to linger in gaol for months, a very great deal might be said in favour of the establishment of a District Court that should hold its sittings, say, once in every three months, it was only lately that we drew attention to the practice of suitors before the Resident Magistrate’s Court to ask, in the absence of the Resident Magistrate, for the adjournment of their cases. There can be no question as to why this course is pursued. That it is done in order to obtain the judgment of one of more judicial experience than can be found amongst our local Justices, cannot be doubted. Now, without in any way calling in question the ability of his Worship the Mayor to fill the office of Resident Magistrate during the absence of Mr Beetham, it cannot be denied that Mr Stuart has had no more experience on the Bench than the majority of his brother Justices. We imagine that Mr Stuart would himself be the very last person in the world to claim any special qualification, in the way of legal knowledge, for the office of Resident Magistrate. And yet in the course of the next six months, it is more than probable that cases will be brought before him requiring an intimate knowledge of the law to decide to the satisfaction of the members of the legal profession. The fact of the matter is that Resident Magistrates who are not lawyers should not have the most extended jurisdiction the law allows. In a town such as this is, the Resident Magistrate might be very well the District Judge. We should be the last to urge the establishment of a Court here having all the formalities of the Supreme Court and involving all possible trouble and annoyance to jurymen, but a District Court presided over by a sensible judge is what we want here, and the want is becoming more felt every day.

MR REES, the well-known barrister, and M.H.R., is, apparently, making a seat on the Magisterial Bench very unpleasant. On Tuesday, after the hearing of the case Smith v Peter, claim £18 15s.5d., balance of account of £23 for butcher’s meat, in which judgment was given for the plaintiff, Mr Rees made application for an appeal. The Court expressed itself disinclined to grant it. Mr Rees pointed out that the Court incurred no responsibility in granting his application. Mr. E. Tuke, who was sitting on the Bench with His Worship the Mayor, replied that if it were granted the Supreme Court, in dismissing the appeal, might say that the Magistrates ought to have known their duty. Mr Rees, thereupon, said “the Supreme Court could say so, but such a remark could have no possible effect, it would be a good job if Magistrates did know their duty, for then so many comical decisions would not be given.”  This puts us in mind of a story told of a Magistrate, who, many years ago, dispensed justice in a rising township not a thousand miles from Napier. Two men, owing some money in that town, were about to leave for Wellington, and a creditor on an application to the Magistrate obtained their committal to the lock-up on the ground that they were about to leave the colony. The men were sent to prison on a Friday, and on Sunday night a lawyer, a friend of the Magistrate, told his Worship that he had somewhat exceeded his powers. The Magistrate, having slept the matter over, deemed it was advisable to order the gaoler, who was also constable bailiff, and general factotum, to let the said two prisoners go. It was pretty easy times in a New Zealand lock-up in those days, and the prisoners declined to accept their liberty. “I won’t have you here,” said the gaoler. “You can’t turn us out” answered the prisoners, whereupon the gaoler reported to the Magistrate, who eventually, had to pay the men one pound apiece to clear out!  But almost similar stories could be told ad infinitum of the New Zealand Justice’s justice.

WE understand that summonses are about to be taken out by the Immigration Officer of Hawke’s Bay against several persons, the cost of whose passage to this colony has not yet been repaid to the Government. Some of the defaulting immigrants have been settled here from three to four years, and are in good circumstances; others have acquired properties of considerable value, and no possible excuse, on the score of inability to pay, can be urged by many who have come out to New Zealand at the expense of the general public. Repeated applications have been made to these people to pay their just debts, but no notice whatever, in a majority of instances, has been taken of the demand. It must be allowed that the loss sustained by the Government through the non-payment of passage monies owing has been largely due to the leniency of the Immigration Officers at the several ports of the colony. While we should deprecate any attempt to wring hard earned savings from a poor and struggling family for the payment of their passage to this country, we have no sympathy whatever for those who can and won’t pay. It is a fact that many persons came out here with from £500 to £1000 in cash in their pockets, and yet owe for their passage to this colony.

[…]

CORONER’S INQUEST.
A Coroner’s inquest was held on Tuesday, at the Victoria Hotel, on the White Road, on view of the body of Michael Talty, who died early on Sunday morning after a short illness.
The following gentlemen comprised the jury: Messrs J. Gray (Foreman), M. Hayden, G. Scott, Becker, C. Tenly, T. Williams, D.T. Williams, P. Gillespie, Wall, Tuckwell, T. Taylor, and P. Grant.
The jury after viewing the body at the house of the deceased, returned to the hotel, and after the Coroner, Dr Hitchings had made a statement as to the evidence likely to be brought before them, called
Mrs Bridget Talty, who deposed: I am the wife of the deceased, and we were married about two years. We came out in the Inverness last November. My husband has always been a healthy man, but since he came out here he often complained of a pain in his heart. To my knowledge he never sought medical advice. Lately he has been working at Mr Graham’s, at Puketapu. When there, he was so ill from the same cause that he was obliged to keep his bed for about three days, five or six weeks ago; when at Graham’s. I was living with him at Puketapu part of the time. He then complained of pains in his heart and stomach. He thought it was brought on by hard work. His last work was dressing sheep – with some arsenical preparation. We came back to Napier last Wednesday and stayed at my father’s, Mr Barry. I did not hear him again complain until ten o’clock on Saturday night. My husband then said to me, “he was going to have another turn in his stomach”. We were then in bed half an hour. He then got up and went towards the kitchen door, when he threw off the contents of his stomach, into the yard. He then came in and went to bed again. In a short time he got up again, and was ill. He refused to go to bed again, saying to my father, “I can’t sleep to-night, and I feel so bad that I won’t live til morning. Tell my father to go for the priest”. My father sent him in some brandy, of which he partook of about two spoonfuls. He also took pain killer and chlorodyne, but it did not remain on his stomach. I think he took about 25 drops of chlorodyne. After vomiting he got easier and warmer. He was previously cold. He soon began again to complain of his heart. The priest arrived about midnight. The priest gave him some brandy and weak tea. He then seemed better for a time. The priest advised a doctor to be sent for. Dr. Spencer was sent for about four o’clock. Dr Spencer did not come himself, but sent some pills, which were procured at Mr Ellis’s shop. Deceased took one pill. Deceased continued to get worse, but was quite conscious up to the time of his death, which occurred about seven o’clock on Sunday morning.  Mustard plasters were applied to the chest of deceased, and his feet were put in mustard and water. He had for tea bread and butter, and honey, of which we all partook, and afterwards some cabbage and sheep’s tongue. We all had same. I am quite sure he could have taken nothing of a poisonous nature during the evening. I do not know what to attribute his death to. He was a man of sober habits.
Thomas Barry, being sworn, stated he was a warder at the Lunatic Asylum. On Sunday morning, at three o’clock, I was informed by Patrick Barry of the illness of the deceased. I went to the house and found deceased lying on his bed complaining of his heart and head. I put my hand on his body, and found it in a cold perspiration. He said he had been thirsty and drunk milk and tea; I gave him about half a glass of brandy and 25 drops of chlorodyne in it. He heaved it off, with a lot of yellow slimy stuff and the milk. I then put on a mustard poultice, and gave him a mustard foot-bath. He still continued very cold. After taking the pills sent by the doctor, he said he felt better. I left him about six o’clock thinking him better, and that he would recover.
John Murray Gibbes deposed that he was a qualified medical practitioner residing in Napier, and he made a port-mortem examination of the body of the deceased 82 hours after death. He was to all appearance a strong muscular and well-nourished man, and seemed to have died a natural death. (Dr Gibbes then gave a description of the state of the stomach of the deceased man). He was of opinion that deceased died from heart disease, accelerated by vomiting &c.
The jury, after a short consultation, returned a verdict that deceased died from natural causes.

Fatal Accident.
ON Wednesday we learned that a man named Henry Goddard, residing on the White-road, was driving a cart with a load of vegetables, when the cart by some means tilted, throwing Goddard under one of the wheels which passed over his chest. When picked up the unfortunate man was found with life quite extinct. Goddard leaves a widow and large family.

THE GEORGIA MINSTRELS
These Minstrels made their first appearance at Napier, in the Oddfellows Hall on Saturday night. The audience was the largest we have ever seen on a Saturday night, every part of the hall being packed. The performance commenced with a “Grand Drawing-room Concert”. Messrs Crusoe, Mills, Wilson, and Brown acted as corner men, and well indeed did they perform their parts, being the life and soul of the Company; their antics were something surprising, more especially Billy Wilson’s, whose facial and labial contortions created roars of laughter. “Brudder Jones’ Baby” was a most humorous piece. Mr Easton gave a very clever banjo solo, which was encored. He responded to the call, and gave a capital imitation of a fog-horn. There was some very good dancing by the “Big Black Four” and other members of the troupe, and some laughable negro farces followed. Taken altogether, the performance was the best negro concert we have witnessed, and the frequent applause and encores given, showed that it was highly appreciated by the large audience. We must not omit to mention the orchestra, which acquitted itself well.

[…]

10   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE THEATRE AND THEATRICAL COMPANIES.
SIR, – As I am about to criticise your criticisms on dramatic representations, you may please yourself as to whether you read another line of this letter before consigning it to the waste-paper basket, or publish it for the benefit of your play-going readers, and the information of itinerant professors of the histrionic art.
Sir, in despite of your indiscriminate praise, awarded lavishly to all comers of the theatrical profession, I think you will agree with me in the observation that Napier is visited by more mediocre actors and actresses than any other of the principal towns in the colony.   The real “stars” do not come here as a rule; they pass us by, and go further a-field. The question then offers itself for solution “why this thusness?”
Have we far to seek for an answer? I think not. In the first place, the town is small, and it may not be generally known how liberally real art, and genuine talent, are patronised. This has been abundantly proved on the visits of such companies as the Steele and Howard, the Hoskins, the Alice May, the Simonsen, the Lingards, and the De Murska.  When these companies were here the Oddfellows’ Hall was nightly crowded, and the building was altogether inadequate to meet the wants of the audiences.
But the companies I have mentioned visited us at rare intervals, and, perhaps within the last six years no theatrical troupes but those and one or two others have come here whose abilities and talents could be compared with our local amateurs in the days when poor Tom Kemp had command of our stage.
Such being the case, and the good, bad, and indifferent companies being all praised alike, it is reasonable to suppose that true artistes would be apt to believe that mediocrity being as much appreciated as talent, it was little use for it to come here. When a true comedian comes here supported (Heaven save the mark) by a crowd of persons whose actual presence on the stage must ever remain an enigma, my astonishment may be pardoned at the visit of Ilma de Murska.
You can throw this letter into the waste paper basket if you like. I trust you will not study my feelings in the matter. Should you decide to publish it, I may be permitted to close my remarks by observing that if you criticised honestly you would confer a benefit on the town by effectually damning such dramatic troupes, whose glaring posters and advertisements might be classed as a means to obtain money under false pretences. If you even reported a performance fairly, and endeavoured to reflect the opinion of sensible people among the audience, instead of feeding the inordinate vanity of those on the stage, you would do good by discouraging the visits of so-called artistes, whose more legitimate sphere would be found in the ranks of domestic servants, behind the counter or at the plough-tail.
A little and good is surely better than much and bad. – I am, &c.,
A PLAYGOER.
Hastings, May 17, 1877.

CORPORATION MANAGEMENT.
SIR, – Can you inform me the reason the bell in the Fire Brigade station has never been fitted with a ringing appliance, as I believe the Council at its last meeting agreed to see to the matter? There seems to be a general wish that the Corporation should take charge of the fire plant, &c. I think this would be a mistake, seing the bungle they have made of the share they have had in the matter of supplying us with a bell, that is at the present time almost useless for want of a ringing apparatus. The bell itself is also a differ; and if it is a sample of what we may expect of Corporation management of the Fire Brigade, I should think it will be better that they should have no further finger in the pie. I feel rather sore on the matter of the bell, as from not hearing it last night I was one of the few boys who were absent at roll call. As one who has been present at nearly all the practices, I think that better means of raising the alarm could be devised than a man being compelled to climb forty feet to ring a fire bell to warn the Brigade. – I am, &c.,
HELMET.
Napier, May 21, 1877.

DISGRACEFUL STATE OF THE TARADALE ROADS.
SIR, – Although attention has been drawn to the disgraceful state of the road between Taradale church, the schoolroom, and the township before through your columns, nothing whatever has been done, and it is getting worse and worse. Today the water is flowing over the road in three or four places, and is about thirty or forty feet into Mr Gebbie’s paddock. Now if we have a few day’s rain, it will be impassable for foot passengers, and there are thirty or forty scholars pass to and fro  to the school, not to speak of other traffic, which is considerable. Beside the drain, which must thoroughly cleared out, the road requires to be raised 18in. or 2ft, which can be done without a great expense, for material can be obtained within twenty chains of the spot.
All through the late dry weather men have been working at a lot of dry drains, and cleaning off grass weed &c from their banks, and yet the drains by the side of this road, which are as much the work of the County Council as the others, are full of watercress and raupo.  Now, Mr Editor, land was sold at a late sale here for between £50 and £60 per acre with a frontage to this road, and the owners are paying their full share of rates, and very reasonably ask, why can we not get this state of things mended?
I am afraid when Bishop Cowie comes to consecrate the English portion of the cemetery, he will have to cross this spot in a boat, if we have much rain before that time comes; and there is an old saying, “A road is always mended when a bishop has been killed or drowned on it”. It is hoped it will not take that before our trouble is attended to. – I am, &c.,
STILTS.
Taradale, May 22, 1877.

THE WAIPUKURAU ELECTION
SIR, – I notice in your paper this evening, a local informing us that the Hon. H.R. Russell is certain to be returned on the present occasion, because the voting in Waipukurau and Ruataniwha will be single votes under the new roll, as provided you inform us by the Rating Act, clause 30.
The Rating Act contains no such provision, and in fact does not refer to the matter. The Counties Act, clause 49, provides that the new roll shall come into force on July 1st.
Supposing the new roll were in force and no rate had been struck under it there would not then be single voting; the plural vote is calculated upon the valuation, not upon the rates paid or levied, section 41, Counties Act.
I do not pretend to know whether the hon. gentleman has any chance or not, but I think you will see on reference that the state of the case is not as represented in your local.
I do not think the Returning Officer is likely to receive single votes from the ratepayers of Waipukurau and Ruataniwha; if he does, we shall probably have another successful appeal. – I am, &c.,
COUNTY ELECTOR.
May 22, 1877.
(If our correspondent will read the paragraph to which he refers in last night’s issue, he will perceive that he has entirely mistaken its meaning. – ED. W.M.)

A COMPLAINT.
Hear it Napier, for it is a knell,
Which summons thee to Heaven, or to Hell!
SIR, – I am an extremely ill-used individual, and although born and “raised” in this town, of excellent parentage – my progenitor being a church bell of long standing, so that I may truly say that I am the oldest son of the Church (bell), I have, since my birth, only six months ago, been treated in a most scandalous manner. From place to place I have been dragged, with a crowd at my heels, and at each place I have been well hammered!
But, Sir, although I have no tongue to express my wounded feelings, my persecutors having deprived me of that appendage so necessary to the female sex, and so indispensable to me, I have, however, a heart of true bell metal, and I am determined at length to make myself heard. I will no longer be satisfied with one tongue only – I will be bi-lingual, I will have two; and when I get them, I will raise my voice from the elevated position which I at present occupy, and which commands a fine view of the Court House and the sea, and no longer, like “Patience on a monument,” not “smiling at grief” but “waiting for her tongue”, I will make myself heard from “the centre all round to the sea,” and a good deal further, yea even to the outermost bounds of this blessed borough.
I am not a brazen “duffer”, Sir, as my detractors call me, and when I “ope my mouth”, or rather, wag my double tongue, I will raise such an infernal clatter at the midnight hour, that they will wish they had left me “speechless and voiceless in my silent woe”.
If I do not do this, you may call me a rank duffer; but all I ask is to strike me first, and hear me afterwards.
I am, Sir, “more in sorrow than in anger”.
FIRE BELL.
Napier, May 23, 1877.

WHO CARES FOR TARADALE?
SIR, – Every person who now perceives the state of the Taradale4 Road must ask the question, who represents this district in the Hawke’s Bay Council? Echo answers, the Chairman. Sir, this gentleman was elected for this constituency in the belief that his interests were bound up with that of the settlers; but the eating of the pudding is the fruit thereof. No man we could have elected could have done less for us; and no representative could have shown a greater contempt for the interests of his constituents. He has not only shown that he cares not for us by his action, but, if I am rightly informed he stated after the last election for the General Assembly, that he would serve the Taradale settlers out for not giving him a block vote. Be that as it may, we are now placed in an almost helpless position. Our roads are in a worse state than in any other portion of the county. Money is freely to be expended on roads which lead to private property, and it would thus appear that there is some truth in the remarks reported to have been made by our member. Howbeit, we have always respected Mr Tiffen, and I, for one, regret that he should continue his present course of action, which can do nothing but alienate the confidence we had hitherto reposed in him as a settler and representative. – I am, &c.,
TARADALE SETTLER.
Taradale, May 23, 1877.

THE FIRE ALARM.
SIR, – A Mr. S Freeman, one of the “young men” who amused themselves on Sunday night ringing the St John’s Church bell, fancying that by doing so they were helping to put out the fire, writing to the Herald, is pleased to call my report of the conflagration “fallacious”. Mr Freeman finds fault with me for not recognising the immense service he and Mr O’Regan performed in ringing the bell. In “justice” to himself and his friend, he therefore writes as follows: –
“Now, being one of the young men referred to, allow me to state that, far from continuing the alarm after the bell at the engine-shed had ceased, as commenced to ring the church bell as soon as the one at the engine-shed started, and continued after the other bell had ceased to peel forth the alarm”.  Mr Freeman appears to point out a distinction without a difference. The fire-bell completely drowned the tinkling of the church bell, and the latter was only heard after the other had ceased ringing.  Mr Freeman concludes his admirably composed effusion by hoping that the TELEGRAPH will be a “little more indiscriminate in future”. When his aspirations are fulfilled in this respect, probably there will be some chance of Mr Freeman’s abilities being appreciated. – I am, &c.,
YOUR REPORTER.
Napier, May 23, 1877.

THE PLOUGHING MATCH.
In spite of the efforts that have been put forth to make ploughing matches, in this province, a success, it must be admitted that they have failed to attract either competition, worthy of the name, or the interest of the general public. Last year, the match at Hastings, being the inaugural meeting, there certainly was a tolerably fair attendance of spectators, and an interest, more apparent, however, than real, was exhibited by those of the settlers who, it might be thought, were more directly concerned in the encouragement of good ploughing. At the match held in Mr R. Wellwood’s paddock yesterday, there was a very thin attendance, and the total number of entries was but seven. These consisted of six single ploughs and one double furrow plough, the latter being entered by the Hon. J.D. Ormond. The entries were as follows:
OWNER   PLOUGHMAN
Mr Wellwood   Grey
Mr Schilwerk   White
Mr Karaitiana   Native
Mr Ormond   Pulford
Mr J Heslop   Lincoln
Mr Miller (swing plough)   Owner
Mr Ormond (double plough)   Coster
The ploughing of each of the competitors was remarkably good, and showed a marked improvement upon that of last year. Mr Ormond’s ploughman, Pulford, who won the champion prize last year, was again adjudged the winner.
The show of foals was not only small but the exhibits do not call for any special mention. The draught entries were: –
Mr D Howell’s filly by young Lord Glasgow
Mr T Chrystal’s filly by Lord Lorne
Mr T. Tanner’s filly by Lord Lorne
Mr T.D. Ormond’s filly by Prince Charlie
Mr J.D. Ormond’s colt by Prince Charlie4
Mr J.D. Ormond’s colt by Prince Charlie
Mr Ormond took the first prize with one of his colts and the second with his filly. Mr Chrystal won the first special prize of £6, awarded by Mr Evans, and that gentleman’s second prize of £4 was taken by Mr Tanner’s filly. The best young animals on the ground were Mr Ormond’s three, and Mr Chrystal’s exhibit came next. There were only two thorough-bred foals entered; these were Messrs W and G Heslop’s colt by Papapa, which was awarded the first prize, and Mr Tanner’s colt by Arab Child, to which the second prize was given.
At the termination of the match, the competing ploughmen were entertained at a dinner by Mr R. Wellwood, by whom the greatest hospitality was shown throughout the day.

Fire At Waipukurau.
We regret to report the total destruction of the Tavistock Hotel stables and coach house, the property of Messrs Gow and Scrimegour on Wednesday night by fire. The loss was seriously increased by eleven horses, in the stable at the time, having been burnt to death. The building, which was situated some little distance from the hotel, was first discovered to be on fire by Mr Gow at about ten o’clock, when he was closing the hotel for the night. An alarm was at once raised, and several persons immediately hurried to the burning building. The doors of both the stable and coach house were locked, and these had to be broken open to save loss of time. As soon as an entrance was effected a terrible sight presented itself. The interior of the building was in one blaze, some of the horses whose halters had been burnt, were staggering about the stable in a state of stupefaction, and fearfully burnt. It was impossible from the hold the flames had of the building to attempt to rescue the horses, eleven of whom perished miserably in the fire.
The total loss is estimated at £1,500 which is not nearly covered by insurance. The building was insured for £200, and the stock for £100, in the New Zealand office. Messrs Gow and Scrimegour have lost four horses, one each, and buggy; Mr Tyne, coach proprietor, has lost three horses; Mr D. Hunter two horses; Messrs Stuart and Co., two horses, and a buggy (hired from Mr Rymer of Taradale) In addition to this, Messrs Stuart have lost some cases of samples that were locked up in the coach-house, and which were valued at £370.

KAIKORA STEEPLECHASE.
THESE races came off on Thursday last, and were an immense success. In this present issue, we do not pretend to give but the results of the various events, but promise a fuller and more detailed account in our next issue. In the meantime we cannot but remark that the thanks of the public are due for the admirable arrangements made for their accommodation, and for the manner in which the mee4ting throughout was conducted.  The following was the result: –
Maiden Plate of 20 sovs; 1¼ miles, weight for age.
Mr H. Harkie’s Commissioner, 8st 7lb (Brimner)   1
Mr Watene’s Pakowhai, 11st 1lb (Erai)   2
Mr Pritchard’s Phantom (Gooseman)   3
Time 3 min 10 sec.

KAIKORA HANDICAP STEEPLECHASE of 30 sovs. Distance 2 miles.
Mr Ropiha’s Prospect, aged, 10st 8lb (Edwards)   1
Mr Douglas’ Galway, aged, 10st 4lb (Munn)   2

WAIPAWA HANDICAP FLAT RACE, of 30 sovs., distance 1½ miles.
Mr Hill’s Worm, 5 yrs, 9st 7lb (Brimner)   1
Mr Dene’s Champagne Charley, aged, 10st (Benny)   2

HACK FLAT RACE of 11 sovs.
Kaikora Kate   1
Lallah Rookh   2

BIRTHDAY HANDICAP STEEPLECHASE of 20 sovs., distance 1½ miles
Mr Ropeha’s [Ropiha’s] Prospect, aged, 11st 2lb (Edwards)   1
The other three horses were nowhere.

The Hack Steeplechase was won by a horse named Black Patea.

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   13

FIRE.
THE ALARM.
AT twenty minutes past eleven o’clock on Sunday, the town, for the second time that day, was alarmed by the clanging of the fire bell. A person whose name we have not discovered, passing up Emerson-street, a few minutes before the hour named, having seen the rear of the premises occupied by Mrs Wilson brilliantly illuminated, sung out “fire” as he passed the Criterion Hotel. Three gentlemen who were sitting in the parlor immediately ran out; one, Mr Hugh Campbell, making for the engine station, the other two, one being Mr J. Sheehan M.H.R. hurried to the scene of the conflagration. In a very few seconds some dozen people had come to the burning house and, entrance having been effected, the work of saving the property was begun without any delay.
By this time, Mr H. Campbell, who had been joined by Mr Skelton, succeeded, after getting into the engine station, in ringing the bell. This was no easy task; the entrance doors were locked, and the assistant engineer, who sleeps on the premises, had to be woken up. The interior was in darkness, and a break-neck tower had to be ascended before the bell rope could be reached. In spite of these drawbacks, it was not long before the bell was ringing out the alarm, and in an incredibly short time there was a sufficient muster of the members of the Fire Brigade and of others, to get out the manual engine, and run it down to Mrs Wilson’s house. about this period, one or two young men, having clambered up to the bell at the back of St John’s Church, began to ring it, and by doing so continued the alarm which had ceased to be given from the engine station.

THE FIRE BRIGADE.
Arrived at the fire, an attachment was instantly made to the water-main and the engine being worked by willing hands, a stream of water was directed at the burning building, and the neighbouring houses, which were threatened by the flames. So fierce was the heat, the manual engine could only be made to partially protect the adjoining house, occupied by Mr Penn, and several times a puff of wind directing the flames at the walls the whole would be in flames. The utility of the manual engine, however, was fully proved on this occasion, for had it been absent, Mr Penn’s house, and probably also that of Mr White’s, on the other side of Mrs Wilson’s, would have been past saving by the time the steam engine could have been got to work. As it was the fire, which had got considerable hold of Mr Penn’s, was prevented from getting the mastery, and in saving of this house from destruction the very highest praise is due to the Fire Brigade. While the work of getting all movable property out of the houses in danger was going on, and crowds of people were relieving each other at the pump of the manual engine, steam in seven minutes was got up in the large engine, which was taken down Tennyson-street, and the suction hose communicated with the salt-water well at the rear of Messrs Newton, Irvine & Co’s stores. It was then that the efficiency of the Brigade was particularly noticeable; the long hose was carried out, and laid along the cross street leading from Tennyson to Emerson-street, and down the latter to the scene of the fire, and a powerful stream of water was soon deluging the burning houses. In a very short time Mr Penn’s premises were saved from further damage, and it was then seen that the fire could be confined to the one house in which the conflagration had first broken out. When this was accomplished, the work of a few minutes only, the stream of water was directed at the burning house, and so effectually was this done, that every spark of the fire was extinguished in a remarkably short space of time. It was then that three hearty cheers were given by the people for the Fire Brigade, and one more for their Captain, Mr W. Miller. This British compliment was well merited; the men had worked admirably and had fearlessly exposed themselves to much danger, to say nothing of the suffocating smoke, heat, and drenching by water to which they had been subjected.

MASTERING THE FIRE
For the first time in Napier a fire had been mastered, and the people had not been compelled to look helplessly at the conflagration. And for this we have to thank those citizens whose public spirit urged them to form themselves into a Fire-brigade, and to procure engines. Without the steam fire engine, it would have been almost impossible to have save the block of houses, and at last night’s fire, the advantage of possessing such an efficient engine was abundantly proved. Another lesson was also learned, namely, the desirability of sinking salt water wells. These wells are practically inexhaustible, and without that which is sunk at the back of Messrs Newton and Irvine’s, the steam engine could not have been adequately supplied.

ASSISTANCE RENDERED.
Where all worked so well, it would be invidious to particularise those whose early arrival at the fire enabled them to be of great service. But we do think, having already awarded praise to the Fiore Brigade, that very great credit is due to many members of the Napier Artillery for the active assistance they gave, not only in saving property, but also in protecting it. Conspicuous also for the hearty manner in which they labored at the manual engine, were the members of the Georgia Troupe of Minstrels.

THE ORIGIN OF THE FIRE
Is not known. The only inmates of the house at the time were Mrs Wilson (the proprietress) Frederick Harding, and another man who was boarding there. Mr Harding’s story is as follows: Tea was served by Mrs Wilson at about half past five, and afterwards my fellow lodger and myself took a walk. We returned a little after eight o’clock. Mrs Wilson was sitting in the parlor, and the fire was very low. We all went to bed at 25 minutes to nine o’clock, but my watch is about a quarter of an hour fast, so it must have been somewhere about a quarter past eight when we retired to rest. Mrs Wilson slept in the front room, upstairs. My fellow lodger, whose name I don’t know, and myself slept in the same room at the back of the house, also upstairs. When we went to bed, the fire was apparently quite out, and everything appeared safe. I have been boarding at Mrs Wilson’s when she kept the Q.C.E. in Hastings-street, she was always very careful about fire. After we had been to sleep some hours we were woke by screams of “murder”, “fire”, and other cries of alarm. I jumped out of bed at once, fearing somebody might have broken into the house, and was attacking Mrs Wilson. I opened the door leading to the head of the staircase, and was almost suffocated with the flames. I was horribly burned. The sensation was like putting one’s head into a gas retort. I shut the door, and staggered back to the window where my fellow lodger was standing. He said “it is useless to try and get down by the stairs, we must jump out of the window”. He opened the sash, and lowered himself down, holding on to the sill, and then dropped to the ground. He did not get hurt. I followed in the same way, but I was so scared, and in such pain by the burns, that I don’t think I dropped right. I reached the ground, and got into Mrs White’s house, and sat down for a minute, and then went out. I fell down, and was picked up by a gentleman, (Mr Mann, of Auckland) and carried across the road to Mr Riber’s. Mr Riber took me in and made a bed for me on the sofa, and Dr De Lisle soon afterwards came and set my leg, which was broken, and dressed the burns”.
Frederick Harding, from whom the above particulars were obtained, is dreadfully burnt about the face, hands and arms. His fellow lodger we have not been able to discover. Mrs Wilson made her escape by the verandah. Finding the staircase in flames, she got onto the verandah from the window, and then jumped, the fall being broken by two or three persons who held out their arms to receive her.

INSURANCES.
The house occupied by Mrs Wilson was insured in the National Office for £400. There had been no insurance effected on the furniture. The house occupied by Mr Penn was insured for £400 by the New Zealand office. This building, though saved from absolute destruction, is very badly damaged. Mr White’s dwelling is only slightly injured and is insured in the National office, we believe for £250.

KAIKORA RACES.
The following are the entries for the Maiden Plate: –
Mr W. Douglas Baron, aged
Mr Watene’s Pakowhai, aged
Mr Pritchard’s Phantom, 5 years
Mr G Heslop’s Queen of the Meadows, 4 years
Mr H. Hartree’s Commission, 3 years
Mr G Hunter’s Trial, 3 years.

[…]

14   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

BENNETT & JOHNSON’S LIST
OF
PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
FREEHOLD.
SUBURBAN SECTION 75 in part, two sub-divisions, near Catholic Chapel.
Suburban Section 89 in part, sub-division 5, Marine Parade.
Suburban Section 82 in part, one or two sub-divisions.
Suburban Section 87 in part, one sub-division, Shakespeare-road.
Suburban Section 45 in part, one sub division, near the residence of G Scarfe, Esq.
Suburban section 23 in part, four subdivisions, near the residence of G.T. Fannin Esq.
Suburban Section 65 in part, ¼ acre, adjoining the property of Mr Wm Northe.
Sections in Hastings, Woodville, Hampden, and Waipawa.

8 Roomed Cottage and Section, ¼ acre Good garden, Marine Parade.
7 Roomed Cottage and Section, 33 x 166, Dickens-street. Well suited for a boarding house.
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, upwards of half-an-acre, Coote-road, house well finished
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, [1/3?] acre, Milton-road. Grounds planted with fruit and other trees.
5 Roomed Cottage and Section, ¼ acre, over looking Milton-road. Grounds laid out. House nearly new.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, adjoining Maori Club, facing the sea.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, 24 x 80, Chaucer-road. Price £95.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, White-road, near the Maori Club. Price £160.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, one-eighth of an acre, Milton-road.
2 Four-roomed Cottages and Sections, Milton-road, near Oddfellows’ Hall.
2 Four-roomed Cottages and Sections, Dickens-street, corner of Dalton and Dickens-streets.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section on the Beach, near the Napier Hotel.
3 Roomed Cottage and Section, 115 x 27, Port Ahuriri.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

FOR SALE,
DWELLING HOUSE AND LAND.
A NEWLY erected and well-finished Four-roomed House, situated within ten minutes walk of the Post Office. The Section has two frontages, and command a good view of the Bay.
This property is to be sold on very easy terms: nine months will be given to pay half the purchase money, and the balance can remain on mortgage for four and-a-half years.
Apply to
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

“POVERTY BAY STANDARD”
GENTS CANVASSERS AND COLLECTORS,
BENNETT & JOHNSON,
Hastings-street.

DAVID LEVI,
TOBACCONIST,
AND
DIRECT IMPORTER
OF
CIGARS AND TOBACCOS,
HASTINGS-STREET, NAPIER.
Having purchased the Stock and Goodwill of the business carried on so many years by Mr A.W. Abrahams, begs to inform the public, and Mr Abraham’s Customers generally, that he intends keeping
ALL THE VERY BEST BRANDS OF
TOBACCO AND CIGARS
MEERSCHAUM PIPES
(Plain and Carved)
G.B.D., and other BRIAR PIPES,
And every article connected with the business.
Having been a Smoker over Forty years, can with confidence recommend his
CUT TOBACCO MIXTURE
as equal, if not better than any in the whole of the Australian Colonies.
Wholesale Customers treated liberally.
JUST LANDED
COPES’ RIFLE CAKE TOBACCO
AND
GOLDEN CLOUD TOBACCO.
Closed every Saturday till dusk.

JUST ARRIVED,
Ex “Chaudiere” and “Fernglen” from London,
7,000 PIECES OF PAPER HANGINGS
5 tons of Genuine White Lead
1 ton of White Zinc Paint
1 ton of Putty
Boiled and Raw Oils
Coachbuilders’ and Painters’ Varnishes
Blue, Red, Light and Dark Green, Umber, Purple, Brown, Patent Dryers, and Black Paints
Brushware, Diamonds, Dry Colors.
Lamp Black, Brunswick Black, Plaster Paris, and Ceiling Roses
72 boxes Window Glass, from 10 x 8 to 60 x 40.
AT WILLIAMS’
OIL AND COLOR SHOP,
HASTINGS STREET, NAPIER.

TO ARRIVE,
EX SCHIEHALLION FROM LONDON NOW DUE
10 TONS GALVANISED CORRUGATED IRON, from 6 to 10 feet.
36 doz Real Patent Rim Locks, 6 to 10 inch.
7000 feet Galvanised and Black Iron Water Pipes, from ½ to 2 inch.
6 casks Water Fittings – Bends, Tees, Cocks, Flanges, &c.
2 cases Brass Taps, comprising Ranger Bib, Bottling, Racking, and Stop Cocks, Steam Cocks and Fittings.
25 cases Sporting Powder “ [?] Grane,” “Canister” “FFF” Curtis and Harvey’s and Pigou and Wilks “Alliance” Gunpowder.
25 cwt Patent Shot, assorted, B to 6.
5 cwt Patent Swan Shot
100,000 Eley’s best sporting and Double Waterproof Caps, and for CF Cartridge Cases.
1 case Pin Fire and Centre Fire Cartridge Cases, gastight and blue.
1 case Wads in grey cotton, waterproof card, and best white felt, assorted gauges.
3 cases R. Sorby’s manufacture, comprising Bill Hooks, Hand, Panel, Ripping, Compass, and Tenon Saws, and Web’s CS X-Cut and Pit Saws, Circular
Saws, 20 to 42 inch, &c &c.
1 case Ward and Payne celebrated Chisels, Firmer and Socket and Gouges, Draw Knives, Cut Plane Irons &c.
A large assortment of all kinds Steel
1000 Sash Weights, assorted sizes
40 Grindstones, assorted sizes.
H. WILLIAMS,
Cheap Hardware House, Hastings-street.

TO ARRIVE,
Ex “Chandiere,” “Rakaia”, “Leicester”, “Fernglen”, and “Thurland Castle”.
A VERY LARGE and General Stock of Furnishing and Builders Ironmongery.
Also,
A large assortment of breech and muzzle loading Guns, breech loading Carbines and Revolvers, Terry’s breech loading Cartridges, Centre and Pin Fire breech loading Cartridges, Gun Fittings of all descriptions.
N.B. – The undersigned having engaged a first-class Gunsmith, and made considerable alterations in premises, is now prepared to execute every kind of repairing or alterations to Guns, Revolvers, &c, and will guarantee moderate charges.
Sewing and other Machines, repaired in workmanlike manner.
H. WILLIAMS,
Licensed Dealer in Guns, Ammunition, &c.

ON HAND
A large stock of Garton and King’s celebrated Cooking Stoves
Also,
Leamington and other Ranges, Registered Grates, Colonial Ovens, Camp Ovens, &c, and a well assorted stock of Ironmongery Carpenters’ Tools, &c.
Patent Mail, Cart, and Buggy Axles and Springs.
H. WILLIAMS,
Cheap Hardware House,
Hastings-street.

LEDIARD’S KNICKERBOCKER SCHNAPPS
Is an absolutely original preparation.
ITS owner claims for it no relative or comparative merits, but that it is ne plus ultra, and the large and increasing demand for it in this colony is a proof that the people understand its virtues, and will continue to use it.
KNICKERBOCKER’S AROMATIC SCHNAPPS.
The most Reliable and Safe Drink during hot weather.
The best stimulant for the coming season.
The very purest beverage distilled.
A Manoy and Co., agents for Napier; N.J. Isaacs, sole wholesale agent for New Zealand.

WANTED KNOWN – The price of “Wanted” Advertisements in the Daily Telegraph is at the rate of ONE SHILLING per insertion for 20 words.

COBB & CO.’S
TELEGRAPH LINE OF COACHES,
Hastwell, Macara & Co., Proprietors.
NOTICE.
A Great Reduction of Fares by the above Line.
In future a Four-horse Coach will leave the Railway Station, Takapau, for Wellington and Palmerston every MONDAY and THURSDAY MORNING, returning on TUESDAY and FRIDAY EVENING.

LIST OF COACH CHARGES FROM TAKAPAU TO PALMERSTON.
£ s. d.
Takapau to Tahoraite [Tahoraiti]   0 15 0
Takapau to Woodville   1 2 6
Takapau to Gorge   1 5 0
Takapau to Lower Ferry   1 7 6
Takapau to Palmerston   1 12 6

TAKAPAU TO WELLINGTON BY WAY OF MASTERTON.
£ s. d.
Takapau to Woodville   1 2 6
Takapau to Masterton   2 7 6
Takapau to Upper Hutt   3 6 0

HUTT TO WELLINGTON.
£ s. d.
Train 1st Class   0 4 6
Train 2nd Class   0 2 9

PALMERSTON TO WELLINGTON via WEST COAST
Train and Coach Fare   £1 19s 3d

Passengers allowed 14lbs luggage free.
H.P. COHEN,
Agent, Hastings-street.

ON and after TUESDAY, 5TH December, Four-horse Coaches will leave Napier weekly for Taupo, Rotorua, and Tauranga, leaving Napier every TUESDAY MORNING, arriving at Tauranga on FRIDAY; leaving Tauranga every TUESDAY, arriving at Napier on FRIDAYS.
Fares:
Taupo   £2 10s
Tauranga   £5 0s.
A. PETERS.
Booking Office at Mr Cohen’s Fancy Repository, Hastings-street.

RYMER’S NAPIER AND TARADALE COACHES
TIME TABLE.
Leave Taradale   Leave Napier
¼ to 9 o’clock   ½ past 9 o’clock
11 o’clock   11 o’clock
¼ to 2 o’clock   ½ past 2 o’clock
4 o’clock   4 o’clock.
Fares One Shilling each way.
The Puketapu Coach leaves Napier on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturday morning’s, and leaves Puketapu the same day at one o’clock.
Special Coaches and other conveyance can be had at any time.
Horses for sale or hire.
G. RYMER.

PARCEL DELIVERY OFFICES, FOR THE HASTINGS, HAVELOCK, PUKAHU, POURERERE, MARAEKAKAHU [MARAEKAKAHO] AND KERERU DISTRICTS.
All parcels left at Mr Cohen’s Fancy Repository, Hastings-street, before three o’clock;  or Mr Topping’s General Store, Spit, before two o’clock, for any of the abovenamed districts will be forwarded by the evening train to Hastings.
Parcels for Maraekakahu [Maraekakaho] or Kereru will be left at Mr Somerville’s Store, Hastings.
Goods up to 5 cwt. received.
Business people having goods to send through this Agency too heavy to carry to the Office, by leaving instructions, they will be called for free of charge.
The advantage to the public by sending goods through this Agency is an insurance of a careful delivery, and a considerable saving in freight, more especially on parcels under 1cwt.
All parcels and goods must be addressed “G. Grant, Hastings, for Mr -, Hastings, Maraekakaho &c.”
N.B. All parcels for Maraekakahu [Maraekakaho] and Kereru to be prepaid.

D. COTTON, LIVERY AND BAIT STABLES, PORT AHURIRI.
ALL KINDS OF VEHICLES ON HIRE.
Passengers called for in time for outgoing steamers.
D.C. has continually Busses running between Port Ahuriri and Napier.
D. COTTON

GRANT’S MAIL COACHES
LEAVE Havelock for Hastings Railway Station in connection with the Train as follows:
Depart   Arrive   Return
Havelock 9 a.m.   Hastings 9.30   9.35
Havelock 11.45 a.m.   Hastings 12.15,   12.25
Havelock 4.30 p.m.   Hastings 5 p.m.   5.5.
An open Express Waggon leaves Havelock daily for goods as required.
Coach can be hired to meet any train that is not met in the ordinary time table for 3s. for one or three passengers, above three, the ordinary fare of 1s. each.
Fares 1s each way
General goods, 8s per ton
Timber, 1s per hundred feet
Shingles, 1s per thousand
Ladies’ and Gents’ saddle horses, 7s.6d per day
Single seated Buggies, 15s per day.
Double seated Buggies, 20s per day.
Horses broken to single and double harness.
Horses bought or sold on commission.
Saddle horses, Buggies, or Coaches can be had to meet any train at Hastings by telegraphing G. Grant, Hastings.
GEO. GRANT.

GRASS SEEDS.
50,000 LBS COCKSFOOT from Pigeon Bay.
1,500 bushels Rye Grass provincial and Canterbury.
ENGLISH SEEDS,
Guaranteed imported of 1876.
White Clover
Cow Grass
Heyke Clover
Meadow Fescue
Meadow Foxtail
Sheep Fescue
Timothy
Crested Dogtail
Poa Nemoralis
Florin Grass (agrostis stolonifera)
&c.,   &c.,   &c.
FENCING WIRE
To arrive per “Plieone”,
1400 Coils No. 6, No. 8, &c.
Flour
Oats
Bran, &c., of the best quality.
MURRAY, COMMON & CO.
Napier and Port Ahuriri.

BOOKS!
BOOKS!!
BOOKS!!!
SUBLIME, RIDICULOUS, GRAVE OR GAY,
AT
COLLEDGE and CRAIG’S.

BENEFIT CONCERT.
THE WEST CLIVE MINSTRELS.
WILL give a Musical and Vocal Entertainment at the Schoolhouse, West Clive, on SATURDAY, May 26, in aid of the Widow and Children of the late Joseph Snowsell.
Prices of Admission – Front Seats 3s; Back Seats 2s. Children, Half-price.
ROBERT L HATCH,
Secretary.

THE WEEKLY MERCURY.   15

NEW BOOKS
AND
NEW SUPPLIES OF STANDARD WORKS
AT
COLLEDGE AND CRAIG’S
HASTINGS-STREET.
Cheap Edition of Irish Orators, – O’Connell, Sheil, Grattan, Curran, Burke, Plunket, 3s.6d. each
Cusack’s, the Book of the Blessed Ones, 8s.
Dictionary of Daily Wants, 9s.
Cobbett’s Advice to Young Men, 3s.
Templeton’s Operative Mechanic’s Workshop Companion, 6s.6d.
Tredgold’s Carpentry, by Hurst, 24s.
The Peep of Day, large type, coloured illustrations, 8s.
Phillip’s Select Atlas, 24 maps, 7s.6d.
The World of Wit and Humour, 9s.6d.
Swiss Family Robinson, numerous illustrations, 6s.6d.
Historical Works of Prescott, 4 Vols., 24s.
Talmage’s Sermons, 4 Vols., 10s
Spooner on Sheep, 7s.6d.
British Workman 1876, 2s.
New Serial Volumes for 1876.
The Childrens’ Album, with coloured illustrations, 3s.
Farrar’s Life of Christ, 8s.6d.
Darwin’s Geological Observations, 17s.6d.
Daniel Deronda, 4 Vols., 30s.
Captain Burnaby, a Ride to Khiva, 24s
Hunting Grounds of the Great Wess, 30s.
Baring Gould’s Vicar of Morwenstow, 13s.
Spry’s Cruise of the Challenger, 22s.6d.
Stevens’ Book of the Farm, 2 Vols., 67s.
Spon’s Dictionary of Engineering, 8 Vols., £7 7s.
The Arctic World, profusely illustrated, 13s.6d.
Cusack’s Life of the Liberator, handsomely bound, 25s.
Mark Twain’s Tom Sawyer, 8s.6d.
Randall’s Practical Shepherd, 12s.
Annual Summary, Chronicle for 1876.
The Imperial Speaker, 7s.6d.
Lowe’s British Grasses, 28s.
Sowerby’s Grasses of Great Britain, 35s.
Wonderland of the Antipodes, 12s.
Cattle and Cattle Breeding, 3s.6d.
Steam Engine, by Northcote, 20s.
Australasia and the Oceanic Region, 12s.
Tyndal on Sound, 15s.

VERY GREAT REDUCTIONS
IN THE PRICE OF
SADDLERY
Are now being made at
HOLDER’S
There is an
ENORMOUS STOCK OF SADDLES, BRIDLES, HARNESS,
And almost every conceivable article in the trade, which must be
REDUCED
Every description of Harness made to order
AT THE
LOWEST POSSIBLE RATES.
H.R. HOLDER,
Opposite the Post-office, Napier.

RELIABLE INDEMNITY
Against Fire and Marine Losses secured to Policyholders in the
NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY,
Representing One Million Sterling of Capital, with unlimited liability of Shareholders.
Liberal Terms and Prompt Settlement of Losses characteristic feature of the Company.
Forms of Proposal and all information may be obtained from
SMITH & Co., Waipukurau;
W. RATHBONE, Waipawa;
W.G. CRAWFORD, Kaikor;a
GEORGE BEE, Havelock;
KNIGHT BROTHERS, Hastings;
ELDRED BECK, West Clive;
JOHN BARRY, Taradale;
ROBJOHNS, IRVINE & CO, Spit;
W.F. SHAW, Wairoa;
or from
A.LESLIE CAMPBELL,
Agent for Hawkes Bay
Office – Beach end of Emerson street.

WANTED KNOWN – That in all Orders for GENERAL PRINTING executed at the DAILY TELEGRAPH office, FULL NUMBERS are guaranteed.

MASONIC HOTEL
PROPRIETOR: H.O. CAULTON.
THE above splendidly furnished Family and Commercial Hotel is situated in the business centre of the Town of Napier, and is replete with every convenience.
Handsomely furnished private suits of apartments. Large and comfortable Commercial Room.
Spacious Billiard Room, with one of Robertson’s Pattern Tables by Alcock.
Hot and Cold Baths.
Table D’hôte
Sample Rooms
Best brands, Wines, Sprits, and Champagnes.
The Masonic Hotel is within two minutes walk of the Post and Telegraph Offices.
Colonial papers filed.
CHARGES MODERATE
H.O. CAULTON,
Proprietor.

FARNDON HOTEL
G.E. TOOP
Begs to inform the public that he has now entered into possession of the above Hotel, and can assure those who patronise him that no effort will be spared on his part in making the Hotel one of the most comfortable in Hawke’s Bay.
Wines, Spirits, and Malt Liquors of the best brands.
A LIBERAL TABLE PROVIDED.
Every accommodation for Visitors and Travellers
First-class Billiard Room and Table.

CROWN HOTEL
PORT AHURIRI.
J. GOLDEN… Proprietor
The above Hotel which has now for many years been under the superintendence of Mr Greer has been purchased by the undersigned. Having a thorough knowledge of the requirements of the locality, the advertiser promises to use every effort to make this Commodious Hotel one of the best in this part of the province.
Table d’Hote every day between 12 and 1 o’clock.
Commodious stables and excellent Paddocks.
The use of one of Alcock’s splendid Billiard Tables always to be obtained.
The comfort, Accommodation, and Convenience of Travellers will continue to be the FIRST study of the Advertiser,
J. GOLDEN.

CITY TERMINUS HOTEL
NAPIER
GEO. JAMES…PROPRIETOR.
(Late of Picton and Blenheim).
This splendid new Hotel adjoins the Railway Station, and is most conveniently situated for Country Visitors. It has been fitted with every care and attention to comfort and convenience. It contains commodious and well-ventilated Bed Rooms and Dining Rooms; suits of Rooms for Private Families; Commercial and Sample Rooms, for commercial travellers.
Breakfast will be provided for Travellers in time for the First Trains from Napier.

KAIKORA
RAILWAY HOTEL.
DUNCAN MUNDELL,
Proprietor.
The above Hotel is newly opened, and situated close to the Railway Station; it is replete with every COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE.
No expense has been spared by the Proprietor to make this Hotel Comfortable and deserving of Public Support.
Excursionists by the Trains will find every Convenience.
PRIVATE ROOMS FOR FAMILIES.
Good Paddocks and Stabling for Travelling Stock.
WINES, SPIRITS AND MALT LIQUORS of the Best Brands kept.

WANTED KNOWN – That the Cheapest and Neatest BILL-HEADS may be had at the TELEGRAPH Office.

COMMERCIAL HOTEL
PORT AHURIRI.
Extensive Improvements an Additions having recently been made this Hotel now offers every
COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE
At Moderate Charges.
TO
Travellers, Visitors, and Boarders.
WINES, SPIRITS, & MALT LIQUORS
Always of the Best Quality.
DINNERS AT 12 AND 1 O’CLOCK.
HENRY WILLIS,
PROPRIETOR.

PROVINCIAL HOTEL,
CLIVE SQUARE.
E. ASHTON
Begs to inform his friends and the Public generally that he has opened the above-named and Well-known Hotel, and hopes, by strict attention to the wants of his customers, to merit a fair share of public patronage.
ALES, WINES, AND SPIRITS
OF THE BEST BRANDS.
Travellers and Visitors to this Province will find this Well-known Hotel centrally situated, being opposite the Oddfellow’s Hall and Railway Station.
Private rooms for Ladies and Families
FIRST-CLASS BILLIARD ROOM AND TABLE.
E. ASHTON,
PROPRIETOR.

FORESTERS’ ARMS HOTEL,
SHAKESPEARE ROAD
M. HAYDEN…PROPRIETOR
Every accommodation for Visitors and Travellers.
WINES, SPIRITS, AND MALT LIQUORS
Always of the Best Quality.
Dinner at 12 and 1 o’clock.
M. HAYDEN.

PATANGATA HOTEL
TRAVELLERS and others are informed that Mr. Mullender has now obtained a license for the above Hotel. Mr Mullender has for many years had considerable experience as a Publican, and is therefore prepared to meet all requirements.
Ales, Wines, and Spirits of the very best brands, are always obtainable.
Good Paddocks, and Stabling.
G. MULLENDER,
Proprietor.

RAILWAY HOTEL,
PORT AHURIRI.
THE undersigned begs to inform his friends and the public that he has just opened the above splendid, new and commodious Hotel, at Port Ahuriri, near the Railway Station. This Hotel is replete with every accommodation and convenience, and every effort will be made to meet the requirements of customers.
Splendid Ales, Beers, Wines, and Spirits always on hand.
A Table D’Hote daily.
Splendid Accommodation for Travellers and Families.
JOHN YOUNG,
Proprietor.

LONDON HOTEL,
PORT AHURIRI.
The Undersigned having now entered into possession of the above Hotel, would desire to call the attention of travellers and visitors to the excellent accommodation he is enabled to afford.
Wines, Ales, and Spirits of the very best brands always on hand.
Splendid accommodation for Travellers and others.
JOHN ASHTON,
Proprietor.

WAIPAWA HOTEL.
The American Bowling Saloon is now open.
W.G. GARNHAM,
Proprietor.

VICTORIA HOTEL.
WHITE ROAD.
THE Undersigned begs to inform his friends and the public that he has now entered into possession of the above well-known Hotel. Having had considerable experience in hotel business, he trusts, by civility and attention to merit a fair share of patronage.
Only the best brands of Ales, Wines, and Spirits kept.
All the conveniences of a first-class Hotel can be obtained at this establishment.
J. PARKER,
Proprietor.

GREENMEADOWS’ HOTEL,
TARADALE
Arthur McCartney…Proprietor.
A. McC has much pleasure in informing his numerous friends in town and county, that he has taken the well-known Hotel. The House is replete with every comfort and convenience, and is equal to any in the Country. The Proprietor will earnestly endeavour to give every satisfaction to those who may kindly favour him with their patronage, and they may depend upon being supplied with every article of consumption of the very best quality.
Splendid paddock for the convenience of visitors from the country.
Good Stabling.
Charges strictly Moderate.

WEST CLIVE HOTEL,
W.J. CAULTON,
PROPRIETOR.
The above Hotel is beautifully situated on the banks of the Ngaruroro River, facing the main line of Road, and has lately been Greatly Enlarged and thoroughly Renovated. It is now a
FIRST CLASS HOTEL,
and affords every comfort for Travellers and Visitors.
Attached is a Two-Roomed Cottage fitted up with every comfort, which can be engaged by Parties or Families travelling along the road.
LARGE & COMMODIOUS STABLING
Good Paddocks for Horses
BOATS ON HIRE.
ARTESIAN WELL ON PREMISES.
Nothing but the Best Quality of WINES & SPIRITS kept.

SHAMROCK HOTEL
CORNER OF CHILDERS AND LOWE STREET, GISBORNE – POVERTY BAY
Three minutes walk from the Wharf.
ALFRED WALKER,
Proprietor.

Public Works Office,
(Colonial Architect’s Branch),
Wellington, May 21, 1877.
TENDERS are invited for ADDITION to the Post and Telegraph Office, at Port Ahuriri.
General conditions, specifications, and drawings may be seen at the Offices of the Colonial Architect, Wellington, and at the Offices of Mr E.H. Bold, District-Engineer, Napier.
Tenders addressed to the Hon. the Minister for Public Works, and marked outside “Tenders for Addition to Port Ahuriri Post and Telegraph Office,” will be received at the office of the undersigned up to Noon on MONDAY the 4th day of June, 1877.
Telegraphic tenders will be received provided the original tender and deposit are lodged with the nearest District Engineer at the time above specified.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
W.H. CLAYTON,
Colonial Architect.

Re JAMES NEAGLE,
STOREKEEPER, TARADALE
Notice is hereby given to all persons indebted to the above James Neagle not to pay any money or him, or to any person whomsoever other than the undersigned, as all the bookdebts of the said James Neagle are the property under deeds of Assignment of Messrs McArthur & Co., of Auckland.
THO. MACFARLANE,
Attorney for Messrs McArthur & Co., of Auckland.

16   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

NEW ZEALAND ROADS.
WAIPAOA BRIDGE CONTRACT (SITE No.2), POVERTY BAY, COOK COUNTY.
Public Works Office,
Wellington, 29th April, 1877.
Written Tenders will be received at this office up to NOON on WEDNESDAY, the 6th June, 1877, for the Erection of a CART BRIDGE over the River WAIPAOA. They must be addressed to the Hon. the Minister for Public Works and marked outside “Tender Waipaoa Bridge (site No. 2)”. Plans and specifications may be seen at this office, and at the Public Works Office, Napier; also at the Survey Office, Gisborne. No telegraphic tenders will be received. The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted; and all tenders must be sent in on a proper printed form which a Schedule, which may be had on application at the offices above mentioned.
JOHN CARRUTHERS,
Engineer-in-Chief.

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS.
Public Works Office.
(Constructed Railways Branch)
Wellington 23rd April, 1877.
TENDERS are invited for supplying the Railways at Auckland, Napier, Foxton, Wellington, New Plymouth, Wanganui, Picton, Westport, and Greymouth with COAL from the 1st July to the 31st December 1877.
Specifications and form of tender can be seen at offices of Railway Managers. Tenders, addressed to the Hon. the Minister for Public Works, and marked outside “Tenders for Coal”, will be received at the offices of the undersigned up to Noon of FRIDAY 25th May. The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
FRANK B. PASSMORE,
Superintending Engineer.

TENDERS will be received by the Harbor Board until noon, TUESDAY, 29th instant, for the erection of about 54 chains of Wire-fencing, at the Lighthouse, Bluff, Napier. Material and Labour.
Specifications at the offices of the under-signed.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily to be accepted.
CHARLES WEBER,
Engineer Harbor Board.

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS
Public Works Department,
Napier, May 21, 1877.
TENDERS receivable up to NOON on SATURDAY May 26, for CARTING about 1500 YARDS OF RUBBLE STONE from quarries to railway trucks at Spit Station. Particulars can be obtained upon application at the office of the undersigned to whom tender must be addressed. The lowest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted.
By command,
E.H. BOLD,
District Engineer.

ARMED CONSTABULARY.
TENDERS for the supply of FORAGE to the Armed Constabulary at (I) Napier, (II) Taradale, (III) Havelock, (IV) Waipawa, (V) Danevirk [Dannevirke], (VI) Wairoa, will be received at this office up to 12 o’clock noon, on TUESDAY the 14th day of June 1877.
Form of tender and all requisite information can be obtained at this office.
Tenders to be addressed to the Offer commanding in the Hawke’s Bay District, Napier, and marked “Tender for Forage”.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
THOMAS SCULLY,
Inspector A.C.F.
Commanding H.B. District.
District Office,
May 18, 1877.

THOMAS STUART
HAVING taken the shop adjoining the photographic establishment of Mr Corbett, opposite the Horse Repository, Hastings-street, intends carrying on the business of
WATCH AND CLOCK MAKING
In all its branches.
All Repairs entrusted to him will be faithfully carried out in a workmanlike manner, and with the utmost despatch.

NEWTON IRVINE & CO.,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
GENERAL MERCHANTS
AND
COMMISSION AGENTS.
HASTINGS-STREET, NAPIER.
AGENCIES
In London, Wolverhampton, and Glasgow.
AGENTS FOR THE WHEELER AND WILSON SEWING MACHINE COMPANY.
Indents executed on favourable terms.
IMPORTERS
OF
General Drapery, Hosiery, Household Furnishings, Blankets, Fancy Colored Rugs, Carpets, Hearth Rugs, Oil Cloths, Men’s, Youths’ and Boy’s Clothing, Boots, Shoes and Slippers,
GENERAL GROCERY GOODS
OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS.
Wines and Spirits, Ales and Stout, Patent Medicines, Builders’ and General Ironmongery, Holloware, Tinware, Electro Plated ware, Lamps, Lampware and Kerosine Oils, Brushware, Combs, &c.
Stationery and Account Books, Cutlery, Earthenware and Glassware, Saddles and Saddlery.
TAILORING, MILLINERY
AND
MANTELMAKING
ON THE PREMISES.
MONTHLY SHIPMENTS
OF
GENERAL DRAPERY, CLOTHING, &c.,
From the leading Manufacturers, and Warehousemen.
N.I. & Co having full stocks in each department are prepared to execute all orders that may be entrusted to them with the utmost promptitude.
NEWTON, IRVINE, & CO
HASTINGS-STREET.
Depot Stores Carlyle-street.

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS.

NAPIER – TAKAPAU.
TIME TABLE
DOWN.
WEEK DAYS.   SUNDAYS.
A.M.*   A.M. +   A.M.   P.M.   P.M.
Spit, depart   7.40   11.0   3.40
Napier arrive   7.50   11.10   3.50
Napier depart   6.45   7.55   11.30   4.10   2.30
Farndon depart   7.10   8.20   11.55   4.35   2.55
p.m.
Hastings, depart   7.35   8.45   12.20   5.0   3.20
Paki Paki arrive   9.5   5.18
Paki Paki depart   7.53   9.13   5.20
Te Aute arrive   8.32
Te Aute depart   8.35   9.55   6.5
Kaikora depart   9.15   10.35   6.45
Waipawa, depart   9.35   11.15   7.25
Waipukurau arrive   9.55   11.15
Waipukurau depart   10.0   11.30
p.m.
Takapau, arrive   10.50   12.20
* On Monday and Thursday only.
+ On Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday.

UP.
WEEK DAYS.   SUNDAYS.
A.M.   A.M.   P.M.   P.M.   P.M.
Takapau, depart   2.20
Waipukurau, dep.   7.10   3.15
Waipawa, depart   7.30   3.35
Kaikora, depart   7.50   3.55
Te Aute arrive   8.13
Te Aute depart   8.33   4.35
Paki Paki, arrive   9.10   5.15
Paki Paki, depart   9.12   5.22
Hastings, depart   9.32   1.0   5.42   5.20
Farndon, depart   9.57   1.25   6.7   5.45
Napier arrive   10.22   1.50   6.32   6.10
Napier depart   7.20   10.25   3.0
Spit, arrive   7.30   10.35   3.10
*Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday only.

Passengers are requested not to enter or leave the carriages while in motion.
Season tickets issued to and from all Station. Apply to the Manager.
To ensure despatch, Parcels should be booked fifteen minutes before the starting of the Train.
W.J. MILLER,
General Manager,
Napier, March 8, 1877.

Watches! Watches! Watches!
JOHN ROBERTSON,
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELLER, Napier
DRAWS special attention to his Magnificent Stock of WATCHES just received direct from English and American Manufacturers, and made Specially to Order, which, for Excellence and Cheapness, are unequalled in the colony.
All Watches sold at this establishment are thoroughly regulated and put in working condition before leaving the premises, and Guaranteed.

[…]

[Advertisement]
BEWARE OF VILE AMERICAN COUNTERFEITS.
OF
HOLLOWAY‘S PILLS AND OINTMENT. I most respectfully take leave to call the attention of the inhabitants of Australasia to the fact that Messrs. Henry Curran and Co., Wholesale Druggists, of New York, have agencies in various parts, and that their Travellers are going all over the country vending spurious Imitations of my Pills and Ointment, which they make in New York, and which bear in some instances their trade mark thus
Whilst on other labels of this trash it is omitted , the better to deceive you, but the words ‘New York’ are retained. Much of this fictitious stuff is sold in the Auction Rooms of Sydney and elsewhere, and readily finds its way into the back settlements. These are vile frauds, as I do not allow my medicines even to be sold in any part of the United States; they are only made by me at 533, Oxford Street, London.
The same people are circulating a report that my business is about to be formed into a Company which is UTTERLY FALSE.
I most earnestly appeal to that sense of British justice which I feel sure I may venture upon asking my kind countrymen and countrywomen in their distant homes, to assist me, as far as may lay in their power, in denouncing this shameful American Fraud, by cautioning their friends lest they he duped into buying villainous compounds styled “Holloways Pills and Ointment” with any New York label thereon.
Each Pot and Box of the Genuine Medicines bears the British Government Stamp, with the words “HOLLOWAY’S PILLS AND OINTMENT, LONDON.” engraved thereon. On the labels is the address, 533 Oxford street, London, where alone they are manufactured.
Signed,
THOMAS HOLLOWAY,
LONDON, Feb. 15, 1796

[Advertisement]
GRATEFUL – COMFORTING.
EPPS’S COCOA.
BREAKFAST.
“By a through knowledge of the natural laws which govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by a careful application of the fine properties of well-selected cocoa, Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast tables with a delicately flavoured beverage which may save us many heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious use of such articles of diet that a constitution may be gradually built up until strong enough to resist every tendency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are floating around us ready to attack wherever there is a weak point. We may escape many a fatal shaft by keeping ourselves well fortified with pure blood and a properly nourished frame.” – See in the Civil Service Gazette.
Made simply with boiling water or milk.
Sold only in pockets (tins for abroad), labelled: –
JAMES EPPS & Co.,
HOMEOPATHIC CHEMISTS,
48, THREADNEEDLE STREET, and 170, PICCADILLY,
WORKS, EUSTON ROAD AND CAMDEN TOWN
LONDON.

[Advertisement]
GORDON AND GOTCH
I21 HOLDBORN HILL, LONDON;
and at
SYDNEY AND MELBOURNE.
ADVERTISEMENTS inserted in English, Continental, and American Newspapers, Newspapers, Periodicals, Magazines, Books, and Stationery supplied with accuracy and punctuality, and at the lowest prices.
Proprietors of Newspapers furnished with Paper, Ink, and every requisite connected with the printing business.
Indents through the Sydney and Melbourne houses, and Commissions executed quickly and economically generally.

WAIPAWA COUNTY COUNCIL
Notice is hereby given that the temporary office of the Waipawa County Council is at the Court House, Waipawa; and that the days on which it will be open for transaction of business will be on MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, and FRIDAYS.
It is further notified for public information that the office hours are from 10 a.m. till 4 p.m., on the days above specified.
A.W. RAMSAY DAVIDSON
Clerk Waipawa County Council,
Waipawa, May 14, 1877.

[Advertisement]
CURE FOR   ALL NEVER DESPAIR
THE GREATEST WONDER OF MODERN TIMES!
HOLLOWAY’S PILLS
Persons suffering from weak or debilitated constitutions will discover that by the use of this wonderful medicine there is “Health for all.” The blood is the fountain of life, and its purity can be maintained by the use of these pills.
SIR SAMUEL BAKER,
in his work entitled “The Nile Tributaries in Abbyssinia,” says, “I ordered the dragoman Mahomet to inform the Fakey that I was a Doctor, and that I had the best medicines at the service of the sick, with advice gratis. In a short time I had many applicants, to whom I served out a quantity of Holloway’s Pills. These are most useful to an explorer, as possessing unmistakable purgative properties they create an undeniable effect upon the patient, which satisfies him of their value.”
SIMPLE, SAFE, AND CERTAIN!
HOLLOWAY’S OINTMENT
Is a certain remedy for bad legs, bad breasts, and ulcerations of all kinds. It acts miraculously in healing ulcerations, curing skin diseases, and in arresting and subduing all inflammations.
MR. J.T. COOPER,
in his account of his extraordinary travels in in China, published in 1871, says – “l had with me a quantity of Holloway’s Ointment.  I gave some to the people, and nothing could exceed their gratitude; and, in consequence, milk, fowls, butter, and horse feed poured in upon us until at last a teaspoonful of Ointment was worth a fowl and any quantity of peas, and the demand became so great that I was obliged to lock up the small remaining stock.”
Sold by all Chemists and Medicine Vendors throughout the World.
On the Label in the address, 533, Oxford-street, London, where alone they are manufactured.
BEWARE OF ALL COMPOUNDS STYLED
HOLLOWAY’S PILLS AND OINTMENT
With a “New York” Label.

[…]

THE
WEEKLY MERCURY
AND
Hawke’s Bay Advertiser,

TERMS OF ADVERTISING AS PER SCALE.
Standing Advertisements for Three, Six or Twelve Months can be arranged for at a Liberal Discount.
Notice to discontinue advertisements (unless where number of insertions is mentioned on original order) must be forwarded, in writing, addressed to the Manager.

LIST OF AGENTS
NAPIER   COLLEDGE & CRAIG, Hastings-st
T. MEEHAN, Port Ahuriri
MEANEE – J.C. SPEEDY.
TARADALE – J. BARRY.
CLIVE – J. BECK.
HAVELOCK – S. STONE
WAIPAWA – E. BIBBY.
WAIPUKURAU – MESSRS. SMITH & CO

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION
£   s  d.
Per Quarter, if paid in advance   0 6 6
Per Quarter, if booked   0 7 6
Per Annum, if paid in advance.   1 6 0
Per Annum, if booked   1 10 0

Printed and published by EDWARD HENDERSON GRIGG, for the Proprietors, at the Mercury Office, Tennyson-street, Napier, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.
SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1877.

Original digital file

HardingR741_Weeklymercurymay261877.pdf

Tags

Date published

26 May 1877

Format of the original

Newspaper

Additional information

Some sections of this newspaper not relating to Hawke’s Bay have not been transcribed – these are indicated by […]

Accession number

741/1365/42736

Do you know something about this record?

Please note we cannot verify the accuracy of any information posted by the community.

Supporters and sponsors

We sincerely thank the following businesses and organisations for their support.