Weekly Mercury and Hawke’s Bay Advertiser 37 – October 13 1877

WEEKLY MERCURY
AND
Hawke’s Bay Advertiser,

A Journal of Commerce, Agriculture, Sports, Politics, and Literature.

Vol. II. – No. 100.   NAPIER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1877.   PRICE SIXPENCE

THE SIRES OF THE SEASON.
“MUTE,” “JAV’LIN” “ARAB CHILD” and “SAMSON” will serve a limited number of broken in mares this Season at the Tuki Tuki Station.
MUTE by Fireworks dam Fenella own sister to Maribyrnong, Ferryman and half sister to King of the Ring.
Terms: For thoroughbred mares, classed A or B in Stud Book, 8 guineas each; for other mares 6 guineas each.
JAV’LIN by Yattendon dam Lilla, the dam of Alpaca, Commodore and Jessamine and grand dam of Llama, Ringwood, and Woodlands, the winner of the last Hawkesbury guineas and the Derby. (For performances see Turf Register.)
Terms: For thoroughbred mares, classed A or B in Stud Book, 8 guineas each; for other mares, 6 guineas each.
ARAB CHILD. – A pure Khylean, bred by the great Anazah [Anazzah or Anizah] tribe of Nedjd [Nejd] Arabia.
Terms: For thoroughbred Mares, classed A or B in Stud Book, eight guineas each; for other Mares, 5 guineas each.
SAMSON. – Pure bred Shetland pony. Imported by Alexander MacMaster, Esq., of Oamaru.
Terms: Three guineas each mare.
An allowance will be made for two or more mares the bona fide property of the same owner.
The owner of the above horses considers it is unnecessary to enlarge on their merits feeling perfectly assured that Breeders are quite competent to form their own judgment and send their mares to first-class horses only. An inspection of the above is invited at their owner’s stables any day in the week excepting Sunday. First-class paddocks provided free. Every care taken but no responsibility. All mares to be paid for and removed when stinted, due notice of which will be given. Any mares not proving in foal will be served at half price next season.
Mares left at Mr. Giblin’s Mangateretere West, on Fridays, and at Mr. Hugh Campbell’s, Poukawa, on Saturdays, will be forwarded free of charge.
For further particulars apply to Mr. John Ewart, Stud Groom, or to
ALLAN McLEAN,
Tuki Tuki Station.

DUGDALE.
This first-class pure-bred Clydesdale Sire will stand for the season at Hastings, where an excellent paddock, well-watered, belonging to J. N. Williams, Esq., has been secured.
Dugdale is a bright bay, standing over 16 ½ hands; thoroughly staunch in shaft and trace harness, and of a very tine temper. He was foaled in December 1871. Sire Black Prince, imported; dam Rose, by Cowder Lad, imported; granddam by Ben Lomond, imported; great-granddam, Bodie’s imported mare, the dam or Sir Benjamin.
PERFORMANCES –
When one year old he gained 2nd prize at Ballarat, 2nd at Smeaton, and 1st at Myrniong; when two years’ old, 2nd prize at the Grand National held in Melbourne, 1st at Ballarat, and 2nd at the Grand National held at Smeaton, 1st at Myrniong, 1st at Melton as the best entire of any age, and 1st for two-year-old colt. On account of the severe weather, and the horse’s long journey to the Show, he was placed 2nd at the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Show in 1875. In 1876, at the same Show, he took the 1st prize in his class, also the Champion Prize and £50 Gold Cup as the best draught entire horse in the yard.
His foals are very promising, and he was sire of the 1st prize foal at the Foal Show and Ploughing Match in 1876, competing against a large field.
Dugdale will travel to Clive, Meanee [ Meeanee ], and Taradale every Wednesday, remaining at Taradale through the night, and returning to Hastings on Thursday.
Terms – Single mares, £6 6s, groom’s fee included; two or more mares subject to arrangement. Paddocks free.
Every care taken of mares, but no responsibility incurred.
Fees payable on the 1st February, 1878, to the order of John Davis Canning.
For further particulars, apply to
JOHN EVANS,
Goodwin’s Hotel,
Hastings.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT MARAEKAKAHU [ MARAEKAKAHO ] STATION.
THE pure Clydesdale Entire “DUKE,”
Got by the imported Clydesdale horse Matchless, dam by the imported Clydesdale horse Iron Duke, grand dam by the imported Clydesdale horse Cumberland, &c, &c.
Duke took the first prize at the H.B. P. and A. Show, in 1873, and is so thoroughly well known as a sure foal-getter, that further commend is unnecessary.
Only a limited number of mares can be taken besides his owner’s.
Terms: – £4 each mare. Two or more, the property of the same owner, £3 10s each.
Every care taken of mares, but no responsibility.
For further particulars, apply to
ARCHIBALD McLEAN, JUN.,
Maraekakaho.

WANTED KNOWN – That in all Orders for GENERAL PRINTING executed at the DAILY TELEGRAPH Office, FULL NUMBERS are guaranteed.

TO STAND THIS SEASON
AT
THE EMPIRE STABLES, WAIPAWA.
THE superior thoroughbred Entire “HERCULES,”
Bred by Mr Murphy, of Spring Creek, and raced by Mr Redwood.
Got by Ravensworth, dam Plover, by Sir Hercules, Ravensworth by Touchstone, Fair Jean by Verulum, Fair Helen by Pantaloon.
Hercules is a bay horse, 6 years old, and stands 15 ¾ hands high, combines the best of blood, with good bone and immense power, and was one of the best weight-carriers of his day. Hercules won the Hawke’s Bay Stakes in 1876.
Plover, the dam of Hercules, is also dam of Malvina, who ran so successfully during the seasons of 1872 and 1873.
Hercules made a splendid season last year in the Marlborough district, with great satisfaction to the public, and is a sure foal getter.
Terms – Six guineas each mare, and five shillings for groom. Two or more by arrangement.
Good paddocks, but no responsibility. Mares to be paid for on delivery.
For further particulars, apply to
THOMAS BRINSON,
Groom-in-Charge.
Or, to
LEWIS EVANS.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT HAVELOCK.
THE THOROUGHBRED STALLION “TERENGA”
“TERENGA” is a rich chesnut rising, seven years old, was bred by Mr Redwood, is by Ravensworth dam Phoebe by Sir Hercules. Woodstock by Theorcam, Ravensworth by Touchstone dam Fair Jean by Verulam.
Terenga has proved himself a good horse, both on the turf and at the stud, he is a sure foal getter and his stock speak for themselves. A foal out of Hatred by Terenga won the first prize at the H.B.A. and P. Society’s Ploughing Match in 1876, and the same foal when a yearling took the first prize at the last H.B.A. and P. Society’s Show. A special prize of Five Pounds will be given at the forthcoming Show for the best yearling and five pounds for the best two-year old.
G.G. having procured good paddocks, owners of mares may rely on having their mares returned in good condition. Every care taken but no responsibility.
Terms: 5 guineas single mares, two or more belonging to same owner as agreement.
Fees to be paid and mares taken away when stinted, due notice of which will be given.
Terenga will travel to Clive on Wednesdays and to Hastings on Fridays.
For further particulars apply to
GEORGE GRANT,
Havelock.
Or to,
ROBERT GOSEMAN,
Man-in-Charge.

HIAWATHA
This thorough-bred Horse, will stand this season at Rissington.
Hiawatha is a bay horse, five years old, got by Sledmere, dam Emmeline.
Terms – Single mares, five guineas each, for two or more mares the property of the same owner a reduction will be made.
For further particulars, apply to
G. T. SEALE.
Rissington, Sept. 17, 1877.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT WAIPAWA.
THE Pure Clydesdale Horse
“CAMPSIE 3RD.”
Terms Three Guineas
First-class Paddocks provided free. Every care taken, but no responsibility.
All mares to be paid for and removed when stinted due notice of which will be given.
J. HAMMOND,
Groom in Charge.
Waipawa, Sept. 26, 1877.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT GREEN HILL FARM, PUKETAPU.
THE pure-bred Clydesdale Draught Stallion
“YOUNG LORD GLASGOW.”
Terms: – Three Guineas; allowance will be made for two or more mares, the property of one owner.
First-class Paddocks provided for one month, after which 2s 6d per week will be charged.
Pedigree will be published in future advertisement.
For further particulars, apply to
JOHN BICKNELL.
Peketapu [ Puketapu ].

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT TAMUMU.
THE Thorough-bred Horse,
“ORLANDO,”
Orlando is a roan horse-bred in Auckland in 186?, by Joseph Hargreaves, Esq., by the imported horse Pacific, out of Refraction, by Cap-a-pie, her dam, Princess, by Grates (imported), grand-dam by Stride, great-grand-dam by Hector. Pacific by Flatcatcher, dam Disagreeable, by Agreeable, her dam by Sam out of Morel, by Sorcerer.
Refraction won nine races out of eleven in New South Wales, and Orlando’s performances are very good.
Terms: Four guineas each mare. A reduction will be made in the case of two or more mares, the property of the same owner.
Paddocks free till mares stinted, of which due notice will be given.
All mares to be paid for before removal.
Every care taken, but no responsibility.
All mares left at Mr Baker’s Empire Hotel, Waipawa, Mr. John Petit, Te Aute, and Mr. Charles Stuart, Havelock, will be forwarded free of charge.
J. PRICE,
Tamumu.

Just Landed
MANGOLD SEED.
BOYLAN & CO.

THE
TOWN & COUNTRY ALMANAC
FOR
1878
IS IN COURSE OF PREPARATION.
As a medium of Advertising the Publication is unequalled.
ADVERTISEMENTS
Will be received up till the end of October.
COLLEDGE & CRAIG,
PUBLISHERS.

THE
MIRACULOUS PEN
WRITES WTHOUT INK,
BLACK, BLUE OR RED.
Sixpence each.
AT COLLEDGE & CRAIG’S

SQUEEZER CARDS
VARIOUS PATTERNS, AT
COLLEDGE & CRAIG’S

THE NEW
IRISH LINEN NOTE PAPER AND ENVELOPES
AT
COLLEDGE & CRAIG’S.

[Advertisement]
GRATEFUL – COMFORTING.
EPPS’S COCOA.
BREAKFAST.
“By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by a careful application of the fine properties of well-selected cocoa, Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast tables with a delicately flavoured beverage which may save us many heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious use of such articles of diet that a constitution may be gradually built up until strong enough to resist every tendency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are floating around us ready to attack wherever there is a weak point. We may escape many a fatal shaft by keeping ourselves well fortified with pure blood and a properly nourished frame.” – See in the Civil Service Gazette.
Made simply with boiling water or milk.
Sold only in pockets (tins for abroad), labelled: –
JAMES EPPS & Co.,
HOMEOPATHIC CHEMISTS,
48, THREADNEEDLE STREET, and 170, PICCADILLY,
WORKS, EUSTON ROAD AND CAMDEN TOWN
LONDON.

WAIPUKURAU.
SECOND HALF-YEARLY SALE OF STOCK.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1877.
At half-past 11 o’clock.
MR. J.J. TYE
HAS received instructions to sell by public auction on the above date, in the Railway Sale Yard, opposite the Waipukurau Railway Station, the undermentioned Stock –
50 HEAD of Messrs Nairn Brothers’ Well-bred SHORTHORN CATTLE
For particulars of pedigrees, etc., see printed catalogues.
STORE AND FAT CATTLE.
RAMS –
68 Lincoln Ram Hoggetts, bred by Hon. H.R. Russell, got by imported Kirkham Rams, out of pure-bred Lincoln Ewes.
22 Lincoln Rams, 4, 6, and 8-tooth, bred by Hon. H.R. Russell; pedigree as above.
12 Lincoln Ram Hoggetts, bred by Mr F.H. Drower, got by a Sutton Ram (which was sold last year for sixty guineas), out of ewes got by Mr Sutton’s Invercargill Champion Ram.
170 Merino Ram Hoggetts, bred by Hon. H.R. Russell, by Dowling rams out of Currie ewes.
40 Merino Rams, 4 tooth, bred by Hon. H. R. Russell by Dowling rams out of Currie ewes.
HORSES –
9 Draught Colts and Fillies, bred by Messrs Nairn Bros., got by Honest Tom. These horses have been carefull [carefully] broken in, and are guaranteed quiet and staunch.
6 Draught Colts and Fillies (unbroken) bred by Hon. H. R. Russell, got by Little John.
1 Draught Mare imported from Tasmania.
2 Colts, by Southern Hero, broken to saddle and harness.
2 Fillies, 2 and 3 years old by Pacific, bred by Mr F. H. Drower, out of well-bred mares.
1 Well-bred Mare, out of imported Mare.
4 First-class Weight Carriers.
IMPLEMENTS, &c.
2 Double-furrow Ploughs
3 Single-furrow Ploughs
3 sets Harrows
1 Horsepower
1 Dray
2 Dobbin-carts
In addition to the above list, there [are] other lots; particulars of which have yet to come to hand.
J.J. TYE,
Auctioneer.

KONINI HOTEL.
THE Undersigned begs to inform his friends and the public that he will open the above Hotel on MONDAY, the 17th instant, which is situated on the direct road to Patea, and hopes by attention to the comfort of his visitors to merit their support. The Hotel has recently been built for the specific accommodation of the travelling public, and no effort or expense will be spared to make the Hotel one of the most comfortable and attractive in the County.
None but the very best brands of Beers, Wines, and Spirits, will be kept in stock.
Splendid Stables, Grass Paddocks, and every accommodation for persons travelling.
The Proprietor is erecting a new Store, where goods of the very best quality will always be on sale.
J.W. O’BRIEN.
Konini, Sept. 5th, 1877.

2   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

[…]

PORT CHALMERS.
October 5.
Sailed – Wanaka, for the North. Passengers for Napier – Mr and Mrs Rich, Messrs J.M. Miller, D. Drummond, A.C. Strode, and Stuart.

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   3

[…]

[October 5.]

A petition was presented signed by 100 inhabitants of Napier district against a renewal of the lease of the Te Aute School Estate to Rev. S. Williams.

[…]

October 6.

[…]

2.20 pm.
Mr Rolleston presented a Petition from Napier residents referring to the Te Aute trust estate.
Neither of the Hawke’s Bay members were asked to present it.
There is considerable commotion. A Ministerial crisis is imminent. The Opposition claim the majority. Both sides appear sanguine.
The Petitions Committee on the petition of John Buchanan and Joseph Rhodes relative to the severance of J.N. William’s Mangakuri run have reported that the run should be restored to the Oero Highway District, and that all the rates which the highway district may have lost in consequence be recouped.

[…]

4   THE WEEKLY MERCURY

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS

A case of sudden death occurred on Friday to a person of the name of Henry Elliott. It appears that on Thursday morning deceased came into town from Petane, where he had been residing, and called in at the Clarendon Hotel with a friend. Deceased had some lemonade, and then asked to be allowed to lie down in one of the bedrooms. He expressed his intention to leave town that afternoon. About three o’clock, on being attended to by the waiter, he complained of violent pains in the stomach, and Dr. Spencer was sent for, but that gentleman could not attend till after four o’clock. Medicine was then prescribed, and was taken by deceased, who refusing to take any food, relieved his thirst with milk and water. Every attention was paid him during the night, and the doctor was again sent for on Friday, but the sufferer expired at half – past eleven o’clock, on Friday. A post mortem examination was made, and the body removed to the Forester’s Arms Hotel. Deceased was about fifty years of age, and in good circumstances.

In reference to the letter in another column, signed, “A Member of the Press Cricket Club,” we may state that the request of the Napier Cricket Club to use a portion of Clive Square, which was made to the Corporation in September, last year, was granted for the purpose of “Cricket,” but that no tenure of occupancy was given. It appears to us that the Napier Cricket Club has no claim to the ground, and we must express our astonishment at that Club assuming a power to exclude others from a piece of land to the occupancy of which it has no right of whatever.

At the annual meeting of the Fire Brigade held on Thursday, at the station there was a large attendance of members, and great interest was manifested in the result of the election of officers. A ballot was taken with the following result: – Sub-superintendent, G. Kempsley, re – elected; foreman, C. Palmer and J. Christie, re-elected; secretary, S. Spence, re-elected; treasurer, F. W. Garner, re-elected; committeemen, J. Gilberd and R. Vinsen. From the above it will be seen that the Brigade has shewn its confidence in all those officers who since the Brigade was established have worked so well and cordially together to establish it on a sound footing, and we may say, experience has shown that this confidence is fully merited. At the conclusion of the meeting the Brigade formed fours, and paraded the town by torchlight. The meeting altogether was a most enthusiastic one.

Mr J. Robertson of Hastings-street, has lately opened up a remarkably beautiful assortment of jewellery, of latest fashion and unique designs. The designs of ladies dress sets are extremely chaste, and, indeed, the whole of the shipment is well worthy inspection.

The Napier Cricket Club held its annual general meeting on Thursday, at the Criterion Hotel, at W. Routledge, Esq., presided. The secretary’s report showed a balance of £26 7s. 9d., and a club list of 70 members. The report was adopted. The office bearers were then elected as follows: – President, the Mayor; Vice-President, Mr. Routledge; Secretary, Mr. A. Leslie Campbell; Committee of Management, Messrs. Sainsbury, Mayo, J. Dinwiddie, Gillman, and Gilberd; Match Committee, Messrs. Sladden, Mayo, J. Dinwiddie, Gilman, and Gilberd; Auditors, Messrs Margoliouth, and Jacobs. Certain alterations in the rules were proposed and carried, and it was agreed that the club colors should be, dark blue cap and belt, white trousers and shirt. Proposals from the Star and Press Clubs for the use of Clive Square as a practice ground were declined. A challenge was accepted from the Star club to play a match at Taradale on the 10th inst. A vote of thanks to the Chairman terminated the meeting.

The formation of a Cricket Club at Waipawa has eventuated, and between fifty and sixty settlers have placed their names on the members’ roll. Mr. Rathbone has been elected President of the Club, and Mr. Baker the Vice-President. Mr. Collins with his well-known liberality, has offered the Club the free use of a splendid paddock for seven years, and the offer has been accepted thankfully. A match between the Waipawa and [and] some of the other country clubs is already talked of.

We call attention to a Government notification, announcing a sale of lands which are situated in various parts of the Hawke’s Bay, District. The auction is to take place at the Waste Lands’ Office, Napier, on Monday, the tenth day of December at noon.

The Board of Education met on Friday. Present: – Messrs Rhodes (Chairman), Lee, Newton, and Chambers. An application of Mr. Stevens, of Pohui, to exchange certain land, his property, for some portion of the education reserve adjoining, was declined on the ground that the Board had no power to do so. A letter was received from the Inspector notifying the resignation of Mr. Cobbe of the mastership of the Te Aute School. Mr. Cobbe’s resignation was accepted by the Board. The Board resolved that it be an instruction to the Inspector, that, for the future, all teachers must give a quarter’s notice of resignation. Vouchers of accounts were passed, and the quarterly capitation monies payable to teachers were ordered to be paid, and the Board adjourned.

[…]

The Poverty Bay Standard, of Thursday’s date, contains the following information: – “We regret very much to learn that the Native Land Department will, at the close of the present month, be swept from Gisborne. We only know so much as we have been told; but this comes from an authority which is not to be doubted. Where the Lands Court will be held in future no one tells us. Some say in Napier; others in Auckland. Great injustice will be inflicted on Poverty Bay. We shall feel the blow; but are powerless to help it. Judge Rogan we are informed will retire on his pension; but will no longer be Judge. Mr Woon will cease to hold his appointment at the end of the present month.”

At Mr E. Lyndon’s sale of union shares, on Friday, the shares averaged from 8s. to 9s. premium.

[…]

A Coroner’s inquest was held on Saturday at the Forester’s Arms, before Dr. Hitchings and a jury of twelve, of which Mr. Blyth was foreman, on view of the body of Mr. Henry Elliott, who died suddenly at the Clarendon Hotel on Friday. The evidence of Mr. Villers, Mr. Hugo, and Drs. Spencer and De Lisle was taken, as was also that of Mr. William Elliott, the brother of the deceased. The evidence of the latter was taken for identification. Mr. Sainsbury was in attendance on behalf of the relations. The jury returned a verdict of “died of natural causes.”

The celebrated tragedian Mr Morton Tavares, has engaged the Odd Fellow’s Hall, and will open in Napier on the 10th instant. Mr Tavares will be accompanied by the accomplished Miss Surtees, and the full company of the Wellington Theatre Royal. Mr Tavares has now been for some time in New Zealand, having visited in company with Miss Surtees the principal towns, in all of which they succeeded in drawing crowded houses.

Mr Charles Clark will deliver his first lecture in the Hall on the 22nd instant.

The Committee of the late Fancy Dress Ball held a final meeting at the Engine Station on Friday. The total cost of the ball amounted to £98 10s 9d, the receipts showed a deficit of £7 3s 3d, which was met by the Committee. A cordial vote of thanks was passed to the Hon. Secretary, Mr. R. Brooking, for the satisfactory manner in which he had performed his duties.

In the Resident Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, Mrs Searle, an old offender, was sentenced to one month’s imprisonment for drunkenness. Mr Chas. Palmer was fined 5s and costs 6s 6d for leaving carriages in Emerson-street, and a Maori had to pay £1 11s 6d in all for refusing to register a dog owned by him.

A gentleman named Mr Elliott, who has been for some time residing in Napier, negotiating for the purchase of a run, after reading the account in the DAILY TELEGRAPH on Friday of the very sudden death of a Mr Elliott at the Clarendon Hotel, expressed a wish to see the body of the deceased gentleman. He at once recognised the deceased as a brother, whom he had not seen for the last twenty years. There was of course an alteration in the features, but he well remembered a mark which the deceased had on his forehead, the result of an accident which occurred during his boyhood. Documents found in the possession of the late Mr H. Elliott, fully confirmed Mr William Elliott’s statement as to his being his brother.

[…]

The Bay of Plenty Times in its last Saturday’s issue, furnishes the following: – “Mr Troutbeck of Petane, near Napier, arrived in Tauranga yesterday, with a mob of fine cattle for the Thames, which he had driven from his run near Galatea. A start for the Thames will probably be made by Mr Troutbeck this morning. From what we hear, occasionally, the Tauranga end of the Tauranga and Napier road appears to have a bad name given it elsewhere, and we are therefore glad to learn from Mr Troutbeck in disapproval of this statement, that he was agreeably disappointed in the road from Ohinemutu, and found it in a much better condition than he expected. A scarcity of feed was found to be a drawback, but the cattle notwithstanding arrived in Tauranga in very good condition.

[…]

It is rumored that the Rev. Mr Parkin, who has been Pastor of the United Methodist Free Church in Emerson-street, for the past two years, has intimated to the Trustees of the Church his intention of resigning his charge at the end of January next. The United Methodist Annual Conference will be held in Napier shortly, when arrangements will be made as to the future.

[…]

Owners of depasturing licenses ever live in dread of unemployed capital, and the sight of a sold-out run-holder dodging around, as if spying out the country, is pretty certain to be followed by a sale of Crown Land. The other day, a gentleman who recently sold his run in the Wairoa County, paid a visit to a friend, not a hundred miles from the Tunanui station, and during his stay there, rode about by way of amusement, not having the slightest intention of buying land or of investing his capital in Hawke’s Bay. The overseer of the adjoining station, however, took alarm – a capitalist on the boarders, and Crown Lands galore to be snapped up – he galloped into town, reported to the owner, and a purchase of some 10,000 acres was the result. We would suggest that the Waste Lands Board engage the services of a capitalist, or a person who looks like one, to ride about country for which a purchaser is wanted.

We learn that the negotiations between the Union Club Committee and Messrs. Watt Brothers, for the occupation, as clubrooms, of a portion of the Criterion Hotel, have fallen through, Messrs. Watt declining the terms as amended by the committee from the original offer made to the Club.

[…]

Mr. Sutton has given notice to move, “That the Ordinance, No. 3, passed 12th August, 1847, referring to the supply of liquors to the native race, be re-printed,with a view of distributing the same for public information, and that all holders of publicans’ and wholesale licenses through-out the colony shall be supplied with copies.”

A Maori hailing from Waimarama was brought before the Court on Monday charged with stealing the £30 cheque stolen from Mr. G. Mullinder at Patangata, to which we previously referred. He has been recognised by Mr. Beck, of Clive, as the man who cashed the cheque at his shop a fortnight ago, and proof will, we believe, be adduced that he was in the hotel the day the cheque was lost.

[…]

It is notified in the General Government Gazette that the Native Land Court will sit at Napier on the 9th instant, and a list of cases – which appear very important – are set down for hearing. Owing to the inability of the Judge to be present on Monday, the Court has been adjourned until Monday next.

A lad in the employ of Mr J. T. Johnson was on Saturday exercising on a horse, when he fell on his head, and lay for some little time completely stunned. On Monday he was all right, but feels rather sore at the top of his cranium.

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   5

A New Zealand Gazette dated the 4th inst., notifies the following traffic returns on the New Zealand Railways for the month ending 25th August – Kaipara section receipts. $321 10s 6d; Auckland, do, £1899 10s 5d; Napier £1397 14s 9d; Wellington, £832 11s 6d; Foxton £690 5s 7d; Wanganui, £121 5s; New Plymouth, £149 0s 9d; Greymouth, £511 4s 9d; Westport, £74 3s 1d; Nelson £327 0s 9d; Picton, £403 3s 3d; Christchurch, £15,583 18s 7d; Dunedin, [£] 5955 3s 5d; Invercargill, £2643 14s.

On Saturday evening the boating season opened on the Tutaekuri river. The Union, Telegraph, and Napier Clubs were all represented, and a large number of people watched the proceedings from the banks of the river. A more beautifully fine day could not have been chosen, and all passed off pleasantly. After the procession, there was some capital racing.

We were shown on Monday several articles manufactured on the premises of Mr H. Williams, of Hastings-street, which were exhibited at Hastings on Thursday, well worthy of notice. First, there is a double-barrelled breach loading rifle, all made, from stock to muzzle, by Mr Borzutzky, Mr Williams’ gunmaker. It is a handsome piece of workmanship, and beautifully finished. Next, a garden arch made by wire cannot but attract horticulturists and gardeners. It is about 10½ feet high, and artistically got up, as also are the flower-pot moulds, &c. Being all by local manufacturers, and as showing what can be done in Napier, the whole of Williams exhibits should command particular attention.

According to the Colonies of the 11th August, Messrs Mappin and Webb had on view on this date, at their city warehouse London, ten large sterling silver challenge cups, manufactured to the order of the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society. The cups were described as richly chased from designs by Mr Harrison Weir.

The last meeting of the season of the Hawke’s Bay Philosophical Society took place on Monday. Mr. Holder occupied the chair. A paper on the “Native Dog” was read by Mr. W. Colenso, and Mr. J. A. Smith read a paper on Manganese, showing its commercial value as an article of export, and also on algo-marina, or sea-grass. In the course of the evening, Mr. Colenso stated that he had received specimens of a beetle from Mohaka, that had been recognised as the Colorado, but which, on examination, he had found to be nothing more dangerous than the common bug.

From our correspondent we learn by telegram that the Wairoa bar is now good, and the weather fine.

[…]

We are glad to hear that because the Union Club failed to come to terms with the proprietors of the Criterion Hotel for accommodation, that there is no probability of the Club falling through. We hear that the Committee is in treaty for the lease of Dr Gibbs residence in Tennyson-street, a house in every way most suitable for Club purposes, as it contains spacious apartments together with ample bed-room accommodation.

On Saturday afternoon last the boating season was opened in the usual manner by procession of boats, and a few scratch races, in which the Napier, Telegraph, and Union Clubs took part. All the morning, members of the Clubs might have been seen flashing about in flannels, while towards the middle of [middle of] the day great difficulty was experienced in hiring a cab, which fact spoke well for a strong muster of spectators at the Tutaekuri. The weather was all that could be desired, while the crowd assembled gave a gay and animated appearance to the scene. The sheds were gaily decorated with flags, and, we think, the Clubs should take it as a great compliment that so many people came to the opening of the season. After some little manoeuvring the boats were got into order on the harbor side of the bridge, and on a signal being given, they were pulled slowly in single file up the river, the former being fairly criticised by the spectators. The coxswains of the various crews kept their boats in much better line than in former years, and certainly greatly credit is due to the captain of the Napier Club, who had the sole management of everything connected with the days sport The scratch races excited great interest. The first heat between Messrs Liddle and Gilberd’s crews was easily won by the latter; indeed Gilberd’s crew pulled throughout the day in very good form. The second heat between Bogle’s and Tabuteau’s crews was won by Tabuteau, by about three-quarters of a length. We may mention that in both these crews substitutes had to be found to pull the bow oar. Mr F. Duncan, who stroked the winning junior race, in a very pretty manner was Tabuteau’s bow and a very good one he made. The Union Club had what promised to be a very close race between their own members; one boat was stroked by Williams, in which No 2 unfortunately caught a crab, which took away all their chance of winning; the other stroked by Gifford came in winners by a length. The final heat between Gilberd’s and TabuTeau’s crews brought the afternoon’s amusement to a close. Gilberd’s crew won with a length and a half to spare, and came in loudly cheered. Everyone went away perfectly satisfied with their holiday. We were glad to see an enterprising townsman provided refreshments for the thirsty souls, and we hope the luxury of a marquee may be indulged in for the benefit of the ladies next year.

There has be [been] on view, in Mr J. Robertson’s shop window, Hastings-street, a handsome silver cup, that will be presented by Mr A. McLean to the owner of the best yearling by “Arab Child,” who may be adjudged the winner at the ensuing Agricultural and Pastoral Society’s Show. The Cup is of solid silver, and was manufactured and bought at Messrs Edward’s and Kaut’s, silversmiths, Collins-street, Melbourne. Mr A. Mclean has done more for the improvement of the breed of horses in Hawke’s Bay than any other settler, and the prize cup which he now offers for the best produce of his imported Arab is quite in keeping with the enterprise and liberality, he has shown for so long a period.

[…]

A word of praise is due to Mr P. Bear for his design and execution of the testimonial presented the other day to Mr H. Baker of Waipawa. The address is beautifully written in German text, with open Tudoresque, and Gothic ornamental capitals. At the sides of the writing are medallions containing admirably drawn figures, typical of the various courses at a dinner, from soup to fruit, inclusive. The base of the address contains an assortment of sporting scenes, and at each corner female figures, emblamatic [emblematic] of indoor games. The top is set of with heathen deities, the whole forming a very beautiful piece of etching.

[…]

We learn the uniforms for the Napier Artillery Band have been shipped on board the s.s. Durham, which vessel is due at Melbourne. The uniforms may therefore be soon expected.

Mr. Binny, of Port Ahuriri, has been appointed to the Stewardship of the Working Men’s Club.

[…]

In the Resident Magistrate’s Court on Wednesday, there were no police cases. A civil case, A. Peters v. Andrew Young, claim £75 odd, was called on, but there was no appearance of the parties. The Court was then adjourned until Friday next.

A new suit of clothes, valued at 46s, was offered by Messrs Combs and Co., of Hastings-street, to the best shearer at the Agricultural Society’s show.

The Wellington Post of Tuesday states; – “Some sensation was caused in town this morning by the body of a man being conveyed in an express to the morgue covered with a sail, whence it was inferred that some dreadful accident had occurred on board a vessel at the wharf. The facts, however, are as follows: – The name of the deceased is Malcolm Fraser; he was manager of Mr. Smith’s station at Matikuna, East Coast, and has been ailing for a long time passed. He resolved to try a trip to Wellington, for change of air, leaving yesterday by the Kiwi. His medical attendant endeavored to dissuade him from going, warning him that he would not live through the rough passage, but he persisted in going and the steamer met with rough weather on the way down. Mr. Fraser expired at about 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon, the steamer arriving early this morning. The body was removed to the Morgue, but it is probable that the inquest will not be held, as it is believed that the medical attendant of deceased at Napier, who has been telegraphed to, will be able to certify to the cause of death. The chief officer of the Kiwi informs us that Mr. Fraser was seen in his cabin at 3 p.m., apparently all right, but, on looking in an hour later, he was found to have passed away as if in his sleep.”

[…]

In noticing Mr Williams local exhibits, we omitted to mention one special worthy of attention, viz., a large Colonial oven, built after a new pattern. We notice these articles for the purpose of showing what can be done in Napier, and as supporters of Colonial made productions.

At a meeting of the shareholders of the Napier Co-operative Baking Company held on Tuesday, it was resolved to request members to pay their first call on or before Monday, the 23rd instant. Those who neglect to do so, will forfeit all right to membership. An advertisement notifying the same appears in the DAILY TELEGRAPH.

The residents of Port Ahuriri are getting very tired at having to go to the Post Office for their letters. There are a good many people now living at the Spit, and the work entailed on the Postmaster by having to answer repeated calls at the window for letters must seriously increase his duties. A delivery post-man would be a great boon to the public, while the cost would be extremely trifling.

The Christy Minstrel performance at Waipawa on Monday evening was well attended. The entertainment was similar to one given at Waipukurau by the same company a few weeks ago, and of which we then gave a lengthened notice. The Waipawa Minstrels will not make their appearance again this season, but during the recess will be engaged in rehearsing new pieces for a new season.

Visitors to town are often at a loss as to where they should make their purchases. The exorbitant prices usually charged for all kinds of Millinery Goods have induced us to devote special attention to this department. Having procured a competent staff, we are prepared to execute all orders submitted to our care of every description at fully 50 per cent. below the usual prices charged, – Combs & Co., Hastings-street. [ADVT.]

[…]

6   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

[…]

WELLINGTON.

[…]

October 10.

[…]

IMMIGRANTS FOR NEW ZEALAND
The Agent-General reports that the Rangitikei left Plymouth for Lyttleton on August 12, with 277 emigrants; and the Mataura from Plymouth the same day for Napier with 184; and the Marlborough from Glasgow for the Bluff on August 16, with 185 emigrants.

[…]

JUST RECEIVED
60 CASES PRIME APPLES,
4½ d per lb Cash by the Case.
A. MANOY & CO.

[…]

LENNONS’
CELEBRATED
AUSTRALIAN PLOUGHS,
Double and Single Furrows.
F. TUXFORD.

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   7

BENNETT & JOHNSON’S LIST
OF
PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
FREEHOLD.
HOUSES FOR SALE.
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, 66 x 132, Shakespeare-road.
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, upwards of half-an-acre, Coote-road, house well finished.
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, ½ acre, Milton-road. Grounds planted with fruit and other trees.
5 Roomed Cottage and Section, ½ acre, over looking Milton-road. Grounds laid out. House nearly new.
5 Roomed Cottage and Section, opposite Garry’s foundry and facing the sea.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, White-road, opposite Garry’s foundry.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, ¼ acre, Lighthouse-road.
4 Four roomed Cottages, near the Gas-works, £110 each.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, White-road, near the Maori Club. Price £160.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, one-eighth of an acre, Milton-road.
3 Roomed cottage and Section, 23 x 80, Beach Road.
3 Roomed Cottage and Section, one-eighth, of an acre, Shakespeare-road.
2 Two-Roomed Cottages and Sections, White-road, near the Maori Club. Price £90 each.
2 Roomed Cottage and Section, 21 x 66, Port Ahuriri.
2 Roomed Cottage with 1 acre land laid out as an orchard, at Puketapu.
LAND FOR SALE.
186 acres, Waikato District, Province o [of] Auckland.
80 acres, County Mongonui, Province of Auckland.
40 acres, Danevirk, Hawke’s Bay.
40 acres Woodville, Hawke’s Bay.
40 acres Wairoa, Hawke’s Bay.
37 acres Te Whaku, Hawke’s Bay.
Town Section 296 in White-road.
Town Section 308 in White-road.
Town Section 312 in White-road.
Town Section 311 in White-road.
Town Section 302 in White-road.
Town Section 41 in Hyderabad-road
Town Section 353 in Dickens-street
Town Section 377 in Munroe-street, near railway.
Town Section 382 in Munroe-street
Town Section 223 in Thackeray-street.
Sections in Woodville, Hampden, and Waipawa.
Numerous other Town and Country Properties for Sale or Lease.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

TO LET,
6 ROOMED HOUSE in Owen-street, suitable for a Boarding-house. To a good tenant, inducement will be offered.
Apply to
JOHN ORR,
Port Ahuriri.
Or to
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

MONEY TO LEND.
£1,000 (TRUST FUNDS), in one or two sums.
Good Freehold Security required.
Also,
£750 in two sums of £450 and £300 respectively.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

BENNETT & JOHNSON.
BEG to inform property owners and others that they make a special business of collecting rents and attending to the execution of repairs, &c., when required.
Proceeds remitted and accounts furnished promptly.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

Debtor and Creditors Act, 1876.
BENNETT & JOHNSON
CERTIFICATED ACCOUNTANTS,
HASTINGS-STREET, NAPIER.

Land Transfer Act.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.
LICENSED GOVERNMENT BROKERS.
NAPIER.
All transactions under the above Act promptly and cheaply carried out.

HOUSES TO LET.
WHITE ROAD. – 4, 6 and 2-Roomed Cottages.
Milton Road. – 4-Roomed Cottage.
Lighthouse Road. – 4-Roomed Cottage.
Shakespeare Road. – 4-Roomed cottage.
Thackery [ Thackeray ] Street. – 6-Roomed Cottage.
SHOPS TO LET.
Shakespeare Road. – Large Shop with Dwelling-house attached.
Dickens Street. – Two Shops adjoining Messrs. Gilberd and Co’s factory.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

RYMER’S
NAPIER AND TARADALE ROYAL MAIL COACHES.
TIME TABLE.
FROM TARADALE –
1st   ½ past 8 o’clock, New Road.
2nd   ¼ to 9 o’clock, via Meanee.
3rd   11 o’clock, New Road.
4th   ¼ to 2 o’clock, via Meanee.
FROM NAPIER –
1st   10 o’clock, Newton’s Corner, New Road.
2nd   11 o’clock, via Meanee.
3rd   ½ past, 2 o’clock, New Road.
4th   4 o’clock, via Meanee.
The Puketapu Coach leaves Napier every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday mornings at 11 o’clock, departing from Puketapu the same days, at 1 o’clock.
Special Coaches, Buggies, and Saddle Horses, can be had at Taradale, at any time.
G. RYMER.

COBB & CO.’S
TELEGRAPH LINE OF COACHES.
LEAVE Takapau every Monday and Thursday morning’s for Palmerston and the Wairarapa, for the arrival of the 6.45 train from Napier, returning every Tuesday and Friday.
HASTWELL, MACARA AND CO.,
Proprietors.
H.P. COHEN.
Agent.

GRANT’S MAIL COACHES
LEAVE Havelock for Hastings Railway Station in connection with the Train as follows: –
Depart   Arrive   Retrn
Havelock   9 a.m.   Hastings   9.30   9.35
Havelock   11.45   Hastings   12.15   12.25
Havelock   4.30 p.m.   Hastings   5 p.m.   5.5
An open Express Waggon leaves Havelock daily for goods as required.
Coach can be hired to meet any train that is not met in the ordinary time table for 3s for one or three passengers, above three, the ordinary fare of 1s each.
Fares 1s each way.
General goods, 8s per ton.
Timber, 1s per hundred feet.
Shingles, 1s per thousand.
Ladies and Gent’s Saddle Horses, 7s 6d per day.
Single seated Buggies, 15s per day.
Double seated Buggies, 20s per day.
Horses broken to single and double harness.
Horses bought or sold on commission.
Saddle horses, Buggies, or Coaches can be had to meet any train at Hastings by telegraphing to G. Grant, Hastings.
GEO. GRANT.

ON and after, TUESDAY, 5th December, Four-Horse Coaches will leave Napier weekly, for Taupo, Rotorua, and Tauranga, leaving Napier every TUESDAY MORNING, arriving at Tauranga on FRIDAY; leaving Tauranga every TUESDAY, arriving at Napier on FRIDAYS.
Fares:
Taupo   £2 10s
Tauranga   £5 0s
A. PETERS.
Booking Office at Clarendon Hotel.

ROYAL MAIL COACHES, between PETANE and the WESTERN SPIT will run Daily on and after this date –
Leaving Petane at 8 o’clock a.m. and  1 p.m.
Leaving Ferry Hotel, Spit, at 11 o’clock a.m. and 4 p.m.
Fares, 2s 6d each way.
Booking Office, Clarendon Hotel.
W. VILLERS,
Proprietor.
August 30, 1877.

D. COTTON,
LIVERY AND BAIT STABLES,
PORT AHURIRI.
ALL KINDS OF VEHICLES
ON HIRE.
Passengers called fori n [for in] time for outgoing steamers.
D.C. has continually Busses running between Port Ahuriri and Napier.
D. COTTON.

RAILWAY HOTEL,
PORT AHURIRI.
THE undersigned begs to inform his friends and the public that he has just opened the above splendid, new and commodious Hotel, at Port Ahuriri, near the Railway Station. This Hotel is replete with every accommodation and convenience, and every effort will be made to meet the requirements of customers.
Splendid Ales, Beers, Wines, and Spirits always on hand.
A Table D’Hote daily.
Splendid Accommodation for Travellers and Families.
JOHN YOUNG,
Proprietor.

VICTORIA HOTEL.
WHITE ROAD.
THE Undersigned begs to inform his friends and the public that he has now entered into possession of the above well-known Hotel. Having had considerable experience in hotel business, he trusts, by civility and attention to merit a fair share of patronage.
Only the best brands of Ales, Wines, and Spirits kept.
All the conveniences of a first-class Hotel can be obtained at this establishment.
J. PARKER,
Proprietor.

WEST CLIVE HOTEL,
W.J. CAULTON,
PROPRIETOR.
The above Hotel is beautifully situated on the banks of the Ngaruroro River, facing the main line of Road, and has lately been Greatly Enlarged and thoroughly Renovated. It is now a
FIRST CLASS HOTEL,
and affords every comfort for Travellers and Visitors.
Attached is a Two-Roomed Cottage fitted up with every comfort, which can be engaged by Parties or Families travelling along the road.
LARGE & COMMODIOUS STABLING
Good Paddocks for Horses
BOATS ON HIRE.
ARTESIAN WELL ON PREMISES.
Nothing but the Best Quality of WINES & SPIRITS kept.

GREENMEADOWS’ HOTEL,
TARADALE
Arthur McCartney…Proprietor.
A. McC has much pleasure in informing his numerous friends in town and county, that he has taken the well-known Hotel. The House is replete with every comfort and convenience, and is equal to any in the Country. The Proprietor will earnestly endeavour to give every satisfaction to those who may kindly favour him with their patronage, and they may depend upon being supplied with every article of consumption of the very best quality.
Splendid paddock for the convenience of visitors from the country.
Good Stabling.
Charges strictly Moderate.

CROWN HOTEL
PORT AHURIRI.
J. GOLDEN… Proprietor
The above Hotel which has now for many years been under the superintendence of Mr Greer has been purchased by the undersigned. Having a thorough knowledge of the requirements of the locality, the advertiser promises to use every effort to make this Commodious Hotel one of the best in this part of the province.
Table d’Hote every day between 12 and 1 o’clock.
Commodious stables and excellent Paddocks.
The use of one of Alcock’s splendid Billiard Tables always to be obtained.
The comfort, Accommodation, and Convenience of Travellers will continue to be the FIRST study of the Advertiser,
J. GOLDEN.

WANTED KNOWN – That in all Orders for GENERAL PRINTING executed at the DAILY TELEGRAPH Office, FULL NUMBERS are guaranteed.

IMPORTANT SALE OF WINES
SPIRITS, TEA &c.
TO CLOSE CONSIGNMENTS.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1877.
At 2 o’clock.
BANnER & LIDDLE
Are instructed to sell by auction, on the above date, the following valuable assortment of Wines, Spirits, and Tea, being balance of direct consignments ex “Chandiere,” “Schiehallion,” and Broomhall.”
In bond –
I   258 – 1 QUARTER CASK BRANDY (Planats)
M   179 – 5 quarter cask (Biscuit de Bouche)
M   783 – 3 quarter casks Sherry (Iglesias)
I 93 – 77 cases Jamaica Rum
M   180 – 6 half-chests Tea (Brisbane)
M   181 – 5 half-chests Tea (Pardo & Co.)
M   182 – 25 boxes Tea (Pasha)
Duty paid –
15 doz Gonzalez Sherry (very old)
20 doz Dark Sherry
20 doz Pale Dinner Sherry
20 doz Old Port
30 doz Champagne (quarts)   A. Jaillot & Co.
20 doz Champagne (pints and qurts [quarts] )  Louis Renouf
28 doz St. Julien Claret (very superior).
The attention of private families, hotel-keepers, and storekers [store keepers], is particularly called to the above sale, as the quality is all of the very best, and is only to be sold by auction in order that the returns can be forwarded by the next mail.
Terms: – Under £20, cash; over £20, approved bill, bearing bank interest.
BANNER AND LIDDLE,
Auctioneers.

UNION FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND.
CAPITAL – £2,000,000.
HEAD OFFICE – CHRISTCHURCH.
THIS Company are now prepared to insure at Current Rates against Loss by Fire, on Houses, Stores, Furniture, Stock-in Trade, and all descriptions of property.
We would call particular attention to the amount of capital, which is double that of any other Colonial office, and is not exceeded by any Fire or Marine Insurance Office in the world.
Insurances effected with open or valued polices [policies] on Wool from sheep’s back, woolsheds, or shipping port to London.
Risks accepted on Vessels and Cargoes to or from any port to the United Kingdom, America, or the Colonies.
Forms of proposal and any information can be obtained from the
SUB AGENTS –
H. MONTEITH, Waipukurau
W. RATHBONE, Waipawa
S. STONE, Havelock
J. BARRY, Taradale
H. WILLIAMS, Wairoa
Or from
BANNER & LIDDLE.
Agents for Hawke’s Bay.

UNION FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY.
ALL requisitions for transfer of Shares in the above Company must be handed to the undersigned for transmission to Christchurch.
Transfer forms can be obtained on application.
BANNER & LIDDLE,
Agents.
Napier, 28th Sept., 1877.

BANNER AND LIDDLE
GRAIN, WINE,
AND GENERAL COMMISSION
MERCHANTS.
AUCTIONEERS, ACCOUNTANTS,
SHAREBROKERS,
CUSTOM-HOUSE AGENTS, &c.,
TENNYSON-STREET, NAPIER.
And Waghorne-street, Port Ahuriri.
Auctions held in town and country. Customs Entries passed. Free and Bonded Goods stored.
AGENTS FOR.
Union Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of New Zealand.
Australian Mutual Provident Life Assurance Society.
New Zealand Trade Protection Society
Reuter’s Telegram Agency
Oriental Telegram Agency
Rubber Stamps
Curator in Intestate Estates.

HAVELOCK RACES.
THE above Races will be held on WEDNESDAY, December 26, 1877.
Programme to be published early November.

8   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

Shipping Intelligence.

PORT AHURIRI
ARRIVALS.
October.
5 – Sir Donald, s,s., from Poverty Bay. Passengers – Mr Clayton.
7 – Rangatira, s.s., from Welington. Passengers – Mr & Mrs Matherson, Miss Nugent, Messrs Griffiths, McDonald, Mabin, Webb, Douglas, Johnston, Lovelock, Griffiths, Nealy, and 3 for Poverty Bay.
8 – Helen Denny, barque, from London via Dunedin. Passengers – Mrs Ruth.
8 – Hawea, s.s., from Auckland via Tauranga and Gisborne.
8 – Kiwi, s.s., from Wellington via the coast.
8 – J.G. Coleson, brigantine, from Lyttleton.
9 – Rangatira, s.s., from Poverty Bay. Passengers – Misses Scrimgeour (2), Father Reignier, Messrs Griffiths, Cooper, Wiseman, Kelly, Caulton, and one prisoner.
10 – Wananka, s.s., from Wellington and Southern Ports. Passengers – Hon. Colonel Whitmore, M.L.C., Messrs Sutton, M.H.R., Fitzroy, M.H.R., Irvine, Marcroft, Newman, 3 A.C., and a number of others.

DEPARTURES.
October.
4 – Albatross, schooner, for Whangapoua.
4 – Reward, schooner, for Whangapoua.
5 – Isabella Pratt, schooner, for Oamaru.
5 – Minnie Hare, schooner, for Auckland.
6 – Orpheus, schooner, for Mercury Bay.
7 – Fairy, s.s., for Mohaka and Mahia. Passengers – Mr. Mackenzie and three others.
7 – Rangatira, s.s., for Poverty Bay. Passengers – Messrs McVay, Miller, and three original.
8 – Hawea, s.s, for Wellington and Southern Ports. Passengers – Messrs G. Coates, J. McLean, Rundle, Cotterill, Murphy, and Weaver.
9 – Kiwi, s.s., for Wellington via Blackhead. Passengers – Messrs Galbraith, Richmond, Graham, and Boyd.
9 – Result, s.s., for Wairoa. Passengers – Four natives.
9 – Manaia, p.s., for Wairoa.

The schooners Albatross and Reward were towed out by the Bella on Thursday.
The barquentine Falcon, Captain Hair, has been charted to load at Newcastle this trip for Lyttleton.
The s.s., Sir Donald towed out the schooner Isabella Pratt a little before noon on Friday.
The entrance to the harbor is improving. On Thursday there were nine feet in the channel, and on Friday about ten feet at high water, but the channel is very narrow and tortuous.
The P.M.S.S. Zealandia arrived with the ‘Frisco mails at Auckland at 6 o’clock on Saturday. The Napier portion was transhipped to the Hawea, which steamer had been detained, and she left about 10 on Saturday. The punctuality with which the P.M. Company deliver the mails in Auckland, is very creditable, the present steamer, according to the Postal Guide, actually not being due till Sunday.
The schooner Minnie Hare and schooner Orpheus left for their respective ports, the former on Friday, and the latter on Saturday. Both being favored with a fair wind were enabled to set their canvass at their moorings, and sail out.
We understand that for the future all passengers going by the Rangatira when she anchors in the Bay will be taken off by the launch Bell free, provided they book their passage at the agent’s office before starting.
The s.s. Rangatira arrived at the anchorage at 2 p.m. on Sunday, and left for Poverty Bay a little after five, having been tendered twice by the launch Bella. She has about 90 tons of general cargo.
The s.s. Fairy left on Saturday night for Mohaka and Mahia, with a full general cargo of station stores.
The barque, Helen Denny, Capt., Ruth, anchored in the Bay about 11 o’clock on Monday, having been eight day on the passage from Dunedin, caused by a succession of light northerly winds; in fact, anything like a fair wind was not experienced till 4 o’clock on Monday, which Capt Ruth took advantage of. The Pilot boarded her off the Bluff, and took her to the usual moorings, were she made fast. Capt. Ruth reports having passed, shortly after leaving Dunedin, the main mast of a large vessel, which he supposes is one of the masts belonging to the ill -fated Ocean Mail recently wrecked at the Chatham Islands. Captain Ruth also exchanged signals with two schooners bound south, viz., the Atlantic and Emerald. Captain Ruth informs us that he landed his last homeward cargo last voyage in excellent condition. She has for this port about 500 tons of general cargo, and having already on board all her ballast, she will soon be ready to take in her homeward cargo. She will be the first ship on the berth for London.
With regard to the detention of the Zealandia, we (New Zealand Times) gather from the agents, Messrs Levin and Co., that the vessel arrived at Rio about 1st August, and that they received from Messrs Shaw, Saville and Co., a letter dated 3rd August in which it was stated that the vessel would only be detained at Rio a fortnight, and that the cargo had suffered no damage. As the run from Rio to this port. under favourable circumstances, would take about sixty days, it is expected that the vessel will arrive before the 20th instant; but it will be possible to estimate more accurately when it is known on what day the Zealandia left Rio, and a telegram giving this information the agents expect to receive at any minute.
The s.s. Hawea, Captain Wheeler, had a large number of passengers, and about 25 tons of cargo. The former were landed in the steam launch Bella, and the cargo was put in the Three Brothers. The Hawea left at 4 o’clock on Monday, having discharge our ‘Frisco mail, and taking on with her the Southern portion of the inward mails, which Captain Wheeler was anxious to deliver as soon as possible.
The s.s. Kiwi, Captain Campbell, arrived in the Bay early on Monday, having left Blackhead at 5 o’clock in the morning, being unable to discharge cargo through a strong southerly gale springing up. She had landed cargo and passengers on Sunday at Castle Point.
The brigantine J.G. Coleson, arrived on Monday afternoon from Lyttleton, with a full cargo of Colonial produce, consisting of flour, bran, oats, potatoes, &c., which she is discharging at the Breastwork. The s.s. Result towed her inside on Monday evening.
The s.s. Rangatira, hence on Sunday evening, did not get rid of her passengers till Tuesday at Poverty Bay doubtless caused by Monday’s southerly wind.
The s.s. Rangatira left Poverty Bay at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, and arrived here after a good run of 9½ hours. She was brought inside and made fast to the breastwork early on Wednesday. She left for Wellington the same evening at 6 o’clock.
The s.s. Wanaka arrived in the Bay early on Wednesday, and was immediately tendered by the Bella, and all her passengers landed, of which there was a large number, including a number of visitors to the coming Show. We have been unable to ascertain the names of the whole of the passengers, as they were not reported on the ship’s manifest.
Favorable reports having been received on Tuesday from Wairoa as to the state of the bar, induced the captain of the Result and Manaia to leave at 8 o’clock that night. Both had full cargoes of general merchandise.
The s.s. Rotorua, Captain Kennedy, arrived at Auckland from Sydney at 6 o’clock on Wednesday.

Commercial.
MESSRS. MURRAY, COMMON & CO’S WOOL REPORT.
THE third series of colonial wool sales has just been brought to close, and the result, as regards prices, cannot be otherwise than eminently satisfactory to all concerned. During the whole of the series, prices have continued most unexpectedly firm, and this has been partly due to the selection of wools for sale, and also in part to the fact, that English users have been obliged to operate more extensively, owing to their having bought on a very small scale during the second series. Prices may be quoted as ruling on a par with the best rates of last auctions. Superior scoureds have sold well, at a slight advance, but inferior and faulty parcels have suffered to some extent. Greasy descriptions have remained firm, merinos being more sought after than cross-breds, which, owing in great measure to changes of fashions, have not sold so well.
The result generally of this series is such as perhaps might lead to too great confidence in the course of market for the next few months, which is, however, scarcely warranted by the present, state of the trade on the whole. There is room to believe that the attitude of foreign buyers’ during the series, holding back as they have done, has been founded upon their firm conviction, that in the event of the war being carried through the winter, prices must necessarily again somewhat decline, and that the closing series of the year might very probably see such a depreciation as would justify them in operating. However much importance may attach to this theory, the fact must not be ignored that although the last series of the year might (as in all probability it will) pass over without very much change, it is almost certain that the first series of the new year must open with a depreciation in values. There is a great deal to support this, in the event of a continuation of the Continental struggle. With the new clip before them, buyers will take their time, and act warily, owing to the uncertainty of political affairs. Confidence will still be wanting, and without this the amount of competition from French and German users will necessarily be very small, and they will only buy from hand to mouth.
It is most sincerely to be hoped that those rather gloomy predictions as to the fate of the forthcoming clip may not be verified, but it is as well to look head and be prepared for what may happen. As things stand at present in Europe, the ground for these suppositions is more than sound enough to Warrant them. On the other hand, cessation of the war would no doubt enhance the value of the article, but such a happy circumstance seems yet rather remote.
NEW YORK.
THE active business last reported has continued till lately, when prices slightly declined, and the market is now quiet.
ANTWERP.
There was a good gathering of buyers at last auctions, and some sorts obtained a slight advance. Competition became, however, less animated towards the close of the sales, and the upward tendency was lost.
MARSEILLES.
Very little is doing at present, transactions being small. The demand is very moderate. The quietness of the market is caused by disinclination of users to stock themselves, hoping for a fall in value.
HAVRE.
Since last advices business has remained quiet; prices are without change, but little disposition is own to operate.

Church of England Service will be held on Sunday next at Waipukurau at 11 a.m., and Norsewood at 6 p.m.

[…]

POST OFFICE NOTICE.
MAILS CLOSE
For the United Kingdom, Continent of Europe &c., via Suez, and Brindisi, by every opportunity to Wellington, where the mails close on the 21st. instant.
For Fiji, Sandwich Islands, America, West Indies, the United Kingdom, Continent of Europe, &c., via San Francisco, per Rotorua, on Saturday, the 20th instant, at 9 p.m.
Money Orders, and Registered Letters will close at 5 p.m. Book Packets and Newspapers will close at at 8 p.m., on the 20th instant.
J. GRUBB.
Chief Postmaster.

BIRTHS.
MOORE. – At Milton-road, Napier, on October 6, the wife of Mr. George Moore, of a son.
SCOTT. – At the Kaikora Hotel, Kaikora, on the 7th October, the wife of Mr. James Scott, of a daughter.

DEATHS.
LYSNAR. – At the residence of her sister, Camden Road, London, England, on August 12, 1877, Emma, youngest sister of William D. Lysnar.
GRAINGER. – At Napier, on October 5, Emma Grainger, aged 18 years.
O’REGAN. – At Napier, on the 7th October, after a long and painful illness, Michael O’Regan, printer, formerly of Limerick, Ireland, and late of Auckland, aged 64 years. – Auckland and Limerick papers please copy.
DUNN. – At her late residence, White-road, Napier, on the 9th October, Sophia, beloved wife of W. Dunn, aged 28 years.

JOHN McVAY,
SADDLER & HARNESSMAKER
Hastings-street.
The Cheapest House in the Trade.

ARTIFICIAL TEETH.
MR. R.C. WILSON,
SURGEON AND MECHANICAL DENTIST.

I.O.O.F., M.U.
LOYAL ABBOTTSFORD LODGE,
No. 6025,
WAIPAWA.
THE ANNIVERSARY of the above Lodge will be celebrated by a Dinner and Ball, on WEDNESDAY, the 17th inst.
Brothers will meet in the Oddfellows’ Hall at 1 p.m.
Visiting Brothers invited to attend.
WM. BROWN.
Secretary,
N.B. – Places of Business will close on that day at noon.

The Weekly Mercury
AND
HAWKE’S BAY ADVERTISER.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1877.

POVERTY BAY has not gained much by the success of the agitation that was got up for the purchase and destruction of the scabby sheep owned by the natives on the East Coast. It was believed that the presence of these diseased sheep on Maori land effectually prevented settlement, and if the Government could be prevailed upon to buy up the native flocks and boil them down, the coast would soon be taken up by settlers. The scheme, for a long time did not commend itself to the Government, and a new idea was suggested. This was to make it appear that, from the East Coast, scab might easily get introduced into Hawke’s Bay. Our morning contemporary, we recollect, got dreadfully alarmed, and strongly advocated the purchase of the Maori sheep. We pooh-poohed the idea, as, firstly, emanating from land speculators, who wanted to mop up the country for sheep runs, which was admirably adapted for agricultural settlement, and secondly, because a clean sweep of the diseased flocks would never me [be] made by the native owners, or by the contractors who might undertake to boil-down the sheep. However, sufficient pressure was brought bear, and after several unsuccessful attempts on the part of the various commissioners, Captain Porter at length negotiated the purchase of the Maori flocks on the East Coast. Tenders for boiling these down were called for, and now, we learn, the work is nearly completed, but with the result that we all along anticipated. The East Coast lands have not nearly been cleared of scabby sheep, an immense number of “stragglers” being left to multiply, and hand down their disease. The natives have learned that it is profitable to take no pains with their flocks, and, as they are held to be above all laws relating to sheep, it will abundantly pay them to go on breeding from the scabby stragglers. A Poverty Bay contemporary, however, is of opinion that these stragglers will be hunted down and shot in the course of a few months. We do not think that this is at all likely to occur in broken country covered for the most part in fern and scrub, and backed by bush hills. The expense having been incurred in an attempt to clear the country of scab, it is of course much to be regretted that it has proved of such little avail. But what is much more serious is the announcement made in the Gisborne Herald, that scab has broken out in some of the flocks belonging to European settlers in the Poverty Bay district itself. Our contemporary says: – It would be worse than useless to attempt to slur over or to ignore the fact, unpalatable though it might be. There is only one way out of the difficulty – namely, the adoption of the most vigorous and stringent measure permitted by the laws now in force for the banishment of these plagues. The scab and lice are both reported as having shown themselves in only one or two flocks in the district.

The state of drainage in Napier cannot but cause forebodings of what will soon follow in the state of disease and mortality, if not better attended to. Cr. Rochefort has given notice of motion to be discussed next meeting of the Council, when the question of the drainage of the borough will be fully gone into, and it is to be hoped will lead to something else being done than an elegant plan being drawn and deposited in pigeon-holes in the clerks room, and now and again opened to be admired. On the subject of fever and its prevention, the West Coast Times says – “In addition to scarlet fever, a true case of typhoid fever proved fatal to a little girl of eight years of age a few days ago. This came within or own knowledge, but there may be more about. With the mild weather that has lately set in, miasmatic illness, under which head fevers are classed has shockingly and painfully increased. Within four days one family lost two children and within a little more than a week a widowed mother has lost the same number. These cases are rapidly spreading, and, it is hardly necessary to add parents are in terror for the fate of their little ones. There are scores of instances in the town, and the epidemic threatens to assume, very shortly, still graver proportions. Several grown up people have lately been attacked, though as yet we have not heard of any fatal results attending the more mature sufferers.”

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY.   9

[…]

THE Ministry were defeated on Monday, by a majority of four, on the no-confidence motion that was proposed on Monday afternoon by Mr. Larnach. The debate was short, sharp, and decisive. Both sides of the House were confident of their success, and neither wished to waste time over a trial of strength that could only be decided by the Tellers. Mr. Larnach briefly spoke to his motion, referring to the inability of the Government to carry their Bills; their financial expedients, their land policy, and general exhibition of weakness. The Hon. Mr. McLean defended the Ministry to the best of his power, and taunted the Opposition with having been actuated from motives of jealousy in bringing forward a no-confidence motion. After the dinner adjournment, the debate was resumed, and before eleven o’clock it was known throughout the colony the Ministry were defeated. From the tone of Mr. McLean’s speech it is evident such a result was unexpected by the Government side, and so confident of an easy victory were many of their supporters, that up to a late hour that evening, telegrams were received in Napier stating the Opposition were bound to be beaten by at least a majority of five.
The Ministry, whose resignations were placed in His Excellency’s hands on Monday, may be said to have been a continuous administration since October, 1872, when Sir Julius Vogel, (prior to knighthood) moved and carried a no-confidence motion against the Stafford Government. The Hon Mr Waterhouse then took office as Premier, and though there have since been many reconstructions of the Cabinet, the same party has been in power – the party to whose efforts have been due the carrying out of the Public Works policy, and the abolition of the provincial system. We have said above that the Ministry will probably resign to-day, but we trust the other alternative will be permitted by His Excellency, and the application, if made, for a dissolution, granted. At the last general elections there was a distinct issue at stake, viz., the continuance or the abolition of provincialism. At the present time also there could be placed a distinct issue before the country, viz., the question lately raised by Mr Woolcock relative to the incidence of taxation. The Ministry have pledged themselves to include in their financial proposals for next year a change in the incidence of taxation, and the party that will go to the hustings prepared to support the removal of the heavy burdens now borne by the working men and the commercial classes, and place them on property will have little difficulty in securing the confidence of the country.

THE question which very seriously concerns many County Councils is that relating to the construction and maintenance of main roads – arterial roads, as some call them, by which are known those highways that connect the capitals of provincial districts with each other. These roads, for the most part, have been constructed by the late Provincial Governments, and their maintenance has never devolved on the Highway Districts through which they pass. Many of these roads are of colonial importance, and their maintenance, which is altogether beyond the power of the Counties, should certainly be undertaken by the General Government. This question has recently been brought before the House; the debate was, however, adjourned, but we are sure its importance will be sufficiently recognised as to bring about a resolution affirming the desirability of declaring certain roads to be colonial highways. This must, in fact, be the natural result of the abolition of the provinces, which, stripped of their powers, and resources, can no longer perform their especial function of opening up the country. This work must therefore devolve on the General Government, and unless it is speedily commenced and vigorously carried on, its neglect will be most disastrous to very many districts. It was only the other day the Chairman of the Waipawa Council stated that it was quite beyond the power of that County to keep in repair the road running through the Seventy-Mile Bush, and, in consequence, tenders for metalling some three miles of it were declined. It was felt to be no part of the duty of the County to maintain a road the opening of which benefited alike every district through which it passes lying between Napier, Wellington, and Wanganui. Its maintenance, indeed, would exhaust the whole revenue of the Waipawa County; and if it were possible to even undertake it, a manifest injustice would be committed to those other districts not directly interested, whose share of the County rates would be expended in keeping it in repair. It is satisfactory to know, that, to some extent, the Government have recognised the principle that they should take charge of arterial roads in that they have undertaken to maintain the Hokitika and Christchurch road. Mr Gisborne, during the debate on this subject, stated the case very fairly. He said the abolition of the provincial system had left a great gap to be filled up, and it was now found necessary that there should be some proper authority to construct and maintain main arterial roads, and to bridge dangerous rivers. A county might not only be divided by a mountain range, or, he might have added a mighty forest, but it might be divided by a dangerous river. One County might not be interested in bridging that river, while the interests of the other County would be all in that direction. It was obvious that one County should not have to bear the whole cost of the bridge. This pretty well describes the relations subsisting between the Waipawa and Hawke’s Bay Counties with respect to the Seventy-Mile Bush road and the Ngaruroro bridge. The one wants the road kept in repair, the other wants to rebuild the bridge, and both works are beyond the united powers of the two Counties to undertake. Mr Burns, the member for Roslyn, cited a case in point, almost parallel with that of the Ngaruroro bridge. Across the Taieri river there is a bridge that cost in its erection between £20,000 and £30,000; it is now on its last legs, and the question to be settled now is, who it to replace it? Mr Woolcock was of opinion that the debate on this question went to show that the County system was a failure. And in this most of our readers will agree. He thought that unless the Counties were prepared, or unless they could be so situated as to undertake the construction and maintenance of main arterial roads in their districts, there was no alternative but to abolish the Counties. The Government would then have to add the arterial roads to the list of railways, and by improving the standing of the Road Boards reduce Government expenditure in that direction, Mr Woolcock pointed out that already there were on the Estimates a sum on nearly £79,000 to be expended on public roads in both Islands, and he wanted to know by whose authority this money was to be spent. If it is to be handed over to the various County Councils there would very soon arise a suspicion that certain Counties were more avored [favoured] than others. The whole question is one that cannot be so easily dealt with as a first glance at it might lead one to think.

A WELLINGTON correspondent writes under date of Saturday: – “The defeat of the Government next week is looked on as a positive certainty. The New Zealand Times is very quiet over the matter, and this is looked on as a bad omen for Ministers. The conversion of Curtis fell like a bomb-shell in the Ministerial camp, and Stafford is said to be very much annoyed. There is a rumor afloat, but I do not attach credence to it, that in the event of Ministers going out, Sir William Fitzherbert will be asked to become Premier. It is known that Sir William and Bunny, his old Provincial Secretary, have been in close confab during this week, and Bunny is known to know old Fitz’s mind pretty well. Larnach is only put forward as a cat’s paw, and it is not intended that he will be even a member of the new Government. The debate will not occupy many days. Both sides are tired of talk, and members are very anxious to return to their homes. If the division does not take place on Monday night, Stafford will pair with one of the opposition, and leave for Napier in the Wanaka for the purpose of attending the Show. Afterwards, it is expected that he will lead an Opposition against the new Government, provided the present Opposition are strong enough to carry the no-confidence motion. Efforts are being made by the Government to induce Wood of Southland, Seaton, and a few others of Macandrew’s tail to join them, but up to the present their efforts have been unsuccessful. The Ministry are now, however, too weak to carry on the government of the colony with efficiency, or with success. Their intentions may be honest, but they have improved themselves sad blunderers in political tactics. Had they gone out of office when the [they] found they were unable to carry their Native Lands Bill, they would have returned as a strong Government. The Opposition at that time was so disorganised than no Government could have been formed from their side of the House, and they would have failed. As it is, in the event of the Ministry being defeated, a Government can be formed which, I believe, will stand out this session at least.

[…]

NAPIER CO-OPERATIVE BAKING COMPANY.
ALL Shareholders in the above Society are requested to pay their First call on or before the 22nd day of October, otherwise they forfeit Membership.
Calls to be paid to the Secretary,
W.N. GRINLINTON,
At Mr Powell’s, Hastings-street.

[…]

10   THE WEEKLY MERCURY

[…]

The Show.
(FROM OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.)
HASTINGS, October 10.
There is not a very large attendance at the Show, those present being for the most part personally interested in the exhibits. It is noticeable that there are a good many visitors from other provinces, including many members from the General Assembly. The show of sheep is very fair, especially of the longwool classes.
There is a cold drizzly rain, and it is an extremely unpleasant day.
2.15 p.m.
The Hon. H.R. Russell was awarded first and second prizes in Lincoln ram hoggets. Mr Nelson’s were highly commended, and Mr J. N. Williams’ commended. There was 28 entries in this class, and the largest in the Show, and the award is considered a triumph for Waipukurau. The merino breed is more largely represented than at any former period, and the sheep of better quality. The judging is not yet finished.
THURSDAY.
This being the second day of the Show, and it being a beautifully fine day, it was largely attended, there being upwards of 2,000 people on the ground. We cannot find room for a full report in this issue, but it will appear in our next. We can only say, it was the most successful Show in Hawke’s Bay. The proceedings included [concluded] with a dinner, which took place at the Criterion Hotel.

HAWKE’S BAY AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL SOCIETY’S SHOW.
The Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society, that took a fresh lease of life last year, has exhibited no less vigor this season, and the Show, that was held yesterday was one of which in every respect the Society might well be proud. The position the Society holds at the present time is second to no other association of its kind in New Zealand. It is fully carrying out the objects the members have kept steadily in view; its shows are attracting increased attention, which is shown by the large numbers of visitors who annually come here, and it is gratifying to know that those visitors take away with them the highest opinion of our stock, of the capabilities of the country, and the enterprise of our settlers.
The Show of 1877, that was held on Wednesday and Thursday last, was in no way inferior to that of last year, and, in some respects, was superior. For instance, the number and quality of the Merino sheep exceeded all previous exhibitions of the kind in Hawke’s Bay, the entries showing, in a marked degree, the result of the care and attention that have been paid to this breed during the past few years. The long- wools, however, formed the chief feature of the Show, as might have been expected from the vast areas of the country that have been brought to a condition which enables those breeds to be kept with the greatest advantage. The total number of sheep entered was 221, of which no less than 122 were Lincolns; 31 Cotswolds; 67 Merinos, and 1 Lester. Unfortunately the Cotswold classes were not represented as fully as it was hoped and expected they would be, owing to the absence of Mr. J. D. Canning’s sheep, which had been kept back, we regret to hear, through their owner having recently sustained a family affliction. It was Mr Canning who introduced the Cotswold breed into this province, and his original flock still stands at the head of its class. The value of the breed has long been recognized, and there are now many small flocks of Cotswolds that have been bred up from selections from the best breeders in England. With regard to the Lincolns that were exhibited, it was noteworthy that the first and second prizes were carried off by the Hon. H.R. Russell, to whom the credit is due of having been the first in this province to wrest the honors from the Ahuriri plain flocks, that have for so long a period carried all before them.
The show of horses was exceedingly good, but it would have been much better had not a singular fatality attached itself to many of the horses that were intended to be exhibited. Quite recently Mr Ormond has lost by death two magnificent draught colts; Mr Wellwood lost a fine foal out of his draught mare that took first prize last year; and Mr Sutton lost a Kingfisher foal, and also its mother; Mr Giblin’s light-weight carrying hack, “Midnight” that was a awarded a prize at the last Show, met with an accident early this week, by which his legs were so cut about by a wire fence as to preclude him from exhibition. In addition to these misfortunes, that lessened the number of exhibits, Mr. A. McLean’s thorough-bred imported horses, “Mute,” “Jav’lin,” and “Arab Child,” were withheld from the Show, for a reason which, we think, might have been overcome by some slight give-and-take arrangement with the Committee. To prevent disappointment, however, these magnificent animals were paraded outside the Show ground, and commanded a large amount of attention.
The show of cattle, if not large, was sufficient to exhibit the quality of many of our best herds. There were some grand animals in the yards, and the young stock spoke highly for the progeny of the valuable animals that have been imported into the province.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE COMING SHOW.
SIR, – In your issue of the 4th instant, I notice a letter signed “A Member of the Committee,” referring to a paragraph about the non-appearance of my stud horses at the forthcoming Show. The writer takes to you to task for casting a slur on the H.B.A. & P. Society. What you stated was simply the truth; and the truth cannot be gainsaid whether it refers to a private individual or a society. I became aware of the fact that the money had been forwarded to England for the cups; but not being a member either of the “Working” or “Financial Committee,“ had no say whatever in the matter. Had I been on the Committee I should certainly have objected to such an error of judgment in sending the money to England instead of to Melbourne, where cups of any design might have been procured and handed to the winners nine months ago. The ridiculous taunt that I am afraid to show my horses could only have emanated from a mean and malicious mind, and hardly deserves notice. I may, however, state (what “A Member of Committee” knew perfectly well when he penned his cowardly attack) that I have already had the pleasure of meeting and beating every horse of note that will appear at the Show with my well known horse King-fisher, which has only once been defeated in a show-yard and then by my own horse Mute. The latter with his stable companion, Jav’lin, I am neither afraid nor ashamed to show in any show-yard in Christendom, for perfect shape, substance, and quality. “A Member of the Committee” must be thoroughly ignorant of the risk owners take in sending valuable high-spirited horses to an unprotect show-yard like the one at Hastings. I should like him to hold my horse Mute in the Hastings yards from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; he would find it a trial of pluck far beyond his endurance. Nor can he be aware of the injury done to animals by some owners through the pampering and over-feeding they are subjected to before they become that bloated and unwholesome mass you sometimes see in a show-yard – so fat that they waddle rather than walk. I for one object to such a course. My experience has taught me that a sire in condition to perform hard work, will get more hardy and enduring stock than an over -fed pampered animal can do. At last Show my Champion Cup horse Mute, as well as King -fisher, and Arab Child, stood for seven hours exposed to wind and showers of rain, and when I asked the Committee to remove them at 3 p.m., nearly all the spectators having left, I met with a curt refusal. Before that, I had requested the Committee by letter to alter the hour for horses to be on the ground from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. to 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.; this was also refused, and the hours this year were the same as they were last. If the Managing Committee will not meet owners in small matters like these, it should not be surprising if they refuse to risk their horses on the Show ground. To avoid disappointment to the public, some of my horses will be on view at Hastings, at noon, on the Show day, under my control, when they will have the opportunity of seeing the celebrated Jav’lin, a horse that, among other brilliant performances, has done his mile and a half in 2 min. 44 sec., carrying 10st., (vide N.Z. Turf Register) a feat unaccomplished , on record, by any other horse; and after racing from 2 years old to 7, leaves the turf perfectly sound. – I am, &c.,
ALLAN McLEAN.
Tuki Tuki, October 9, 1877.

IMPOUNDING HORSES.
SIR, – I am glad to see that the police are taking steps at last to put a stop to the nuisance of horses roaming in the streets. People who have to pay for their own wanton negligence, are sure to cry out, but that should not deter officials from doing their duty. By the way, I see Mr. Higgens writes a cock-and-bull story about his case to the Herald. He mentions, however, one fact, that proves to my mind that he is trying to impose on the credulity of the public. He writes, or some one else does for him, “It is not to my interests that my horses should be wandering about the streets of the town; I want them at home, ready at hand to carry out meat ordered by my customers.” Now, Mr Higgens was fined for allowing his horse to wander on Sunday, (the day above all in which horses are sent out to grass by their owners). Surely he did not want his horses to carry meat about on Sunday! It is a poor case that requires resorting to such yarns as that. It won’t do, Mr. Higgens, it won’t do! – I am &c.,
A STRAYING HORSE.
October, 10, 1877.

NAPIER ARTILLERY VOLUNTEERS.
BATTERY ORDERS, OCTOBER, 1877.
THE following will be the order of drills and officers on duty: –
Friday, October 12, – Gun and Detachment Drill: Lieutenant Garner, Corporal Sellars, and Bombardier Campbell.
Friday, October 19 – Commanding Officer’s Parade and Government Monthly Inspection. Band to attend.
Friday, October 26 – Gun and Detachment Drill; Sergeant-Major Gray, Sergeant Gilberd, and Bombardier Christie.
Members will parade in undress uniform for Gun drill at the Gun -shed, at 7.30 o’clock, p.m.
The Government Inspection will be held at the usual place, at 7 o’clock. Full Dress Uniform.
NAPIER ARTILLERY VOLUNTEER CADETS.
The Monthly Inspection will be held at the usual place, on THURSDAY, October 18th, at 7 o’clock, p.m.
The Cadets will parade at the Gun-shed for Gun drill every WEDNESDAY, at 7 o’clock, until, further notice.
W. ROUTLEDGE.
Capt. Commanding N.A.V. and Cadets.

RELIABLE INDEMNITY
Against Fire and Marine Loses secured to Policyholders in the
NEW ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANY,
Representing One Million Sterling of Capital, with unlimited liability of Shareholders.
Liberal Terms and Prompt Settlement of Losses characteristic features of the Company.
Forms of Proposal and all information may be obtained from
MONTEITH & FOUNTAINE, Woodville.
SMITH & CO., Waipukurau;
W. L. COWARD, Waipawa;
W.G. CRAWFORD, Kaikora;
GEORGE BEE, Havelock;
KNIGHT BROTHERS, Hastings;
A. ALLANACH, Taradale;
ROBJOHNS, IRVINE & CO., Spit;
J. SUTHERLAND, Mohaka.
W.F. SHAW, Wairoa;
or from
A. LESLIE CAMPBELL,
Agent for Hawke’s Bay.
Office – Beach end of Emerson street.

SPRING DRAPERY, MILLINERY
&c.,   &c.,   &c.
NEWTON, IRVINE, & CO., are now shewing a large assortment of Spring Goods in all the latest styles, and invite Inspection.

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY.   11

[…]

12   THE WEEKLY MERCURY

[…]

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE’S COURT.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER, 9,
(Before E. Lyndon, and J.A. Smith Esqs., J.P’s.)

WHERE IS THE COURT INTERPRETER?
Hami Poheroa, an aboriginal, was brought before the Court charged with drunkenness. The native being unable to understand the English language, the Court was unable to get a reply from him in answer to the charge, and he was therefore dismissed.

A DRUNKEN RAILWAY TRAVELLER.
Thomas Thorp was charged with being drunk and annoying the passengers by the railway. He was fined 5s, or in default 24 hours imprisonment. Being short of funds, he was taken to the goal.

AN INCORRIGIBLE YOUTH.
George Shellim, a lad aged eleven years, was brought up having stolen the sum of 13s from Mr Simons, store-keeper, at Port Ahuriri.
The youthful delinquent pleaded guilty.
Mr Simons informed the Court that he was sitting writing at three o’clock, when he heard a noise in his shop, and a rattling in his till. He then saw the prisoner who jumped off the counter, and ran away. He saw him run up the road and shouted to a Constable to stop him, who did so, and he then gave him in charge.
The father of the lad informed the Court that he could not get the lad to go to school. He had tied him up for a week at a time and beat him, but as soon as he was let loose he was a bad as ever.
Serjeant White informed the Bench that the prisoner had been convicted on three other separate occasions, and had been whipped at the goal. The Inspector of Police was absent, and he would ask for a remand until Saturday, with a view to geting [getting] him sent to an Industrial School.
The request was acceded to

ALLOWING HORSES TO STRAY IN THE PUBLIC STREETS.
Alexander Snellen was charged with allowing two horses to stray in the public streets on Sunday. He admitted the offence, but pleaded that he had left a lad in charge of the horses, who had neglected his duty. He was fined 10s for each horse and 6s 6d costs.
John Higgins was charged with allowing a horse to wander at large in Browning-street on Sunday. The defendant stated the horse had been let out of his yard. Fined 10s and costs 9s.
George Bowman appeared in answer to a similar charge. He pleaded guilty and was fined 10s and costs 6s 6d.

BAIL.
Mr Knight applied for bail to be granted for the Maori charged with stealing a cheque of £30 from Mr. Mullinder, of Patangata.
Their Worships agreed to take as bail, Mr Henry Williams and Mr David Lindsay in the sum of £100 each.

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   13

[…]

MR. ORMOND AND HIS ENEMIES.
I warned you by telegraph, some days ago, that Mr. Ormond’s implacable enemies were determined not to let the unfortunate Russell-Locke letter affair rest, and the debate on Tuesday afternoon bore out my prophecy. There will, I fancy, be a big row in the House when the letters are debated, though if Rees goes the length he threatens, and moves the expulsion of Mr. Ormond from the House, he will only injure his own party. Look at the affair as we will, that letter business is an awkward one.
No one supposes that Mr. Ormond made the charges against Sir George Grey knowing them to be false. Until the letters are made public, the real facts of the case will be known; but it is probable that Mr Ormond was misled by information which he then thought to he reliable. When he clearly saw that, whatever “ fishy“ transactions Sir George Grey had been engaged in, this Taupo affair rather to his credit than otherwise, he apologized like a gentleman. It is true that his apology was not such a servile and crying production as Grey, Rees, and Co., might have liked; but when we remember the men to whom he had to apologise, we cannot wonder at the meagre nature of his retraction. Neither Rees nor Grey know what generous feeling is, and they will never cease dinning his unfortunate speech and the consequent apology into Mr Ormonds ears. He made a huge mistake – that cannot be denied – but he also made full reparation, and generous opponents would have cheered him, and straightway have consigned his hasty speech to the limbs of forgotten things, I should like to kick some men in the House, when I remember their miserable cant about intemperate speeches, recollecting, as I do, their own masterly productions in that line.

[…]

HAWKE’S BAY COUNTY COUNCIL.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 8.
The Council met in the old Council Chamber at 11.30 a.m., today.
Present: – Messrs Tiffen (Chairman), Williams, Bennett, and Brathwaite.
The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed.
A letter was read from the Secretary to the Post Office Department declining to carry out a suggestion of the Council to supply country Post Offices with stamps.
The Road Overseer’s report was read.
The Engineer’s report was read.
The Inspector of Police notified by letter that he had collected in all £132 for dog tax.
Mr Bennett called the attention of the Council to the non-collection of the dog tax from the Maoris, and suggested that the Inspector be instructed to collect the tax from the natives, and in the event of difficulty to take legal proceedings.
On the motion of Mr Williams the Council adjourned till Monday next at 11 o’clock.
Mr Bennett gave notice of motion that the Engineer be requested to prepare a plan for a new truss bridge over the Ngaruroro, also the cost of the same, and also to furnish an estimate of the value of the timber of the old bridge when taken out after completion of new bridge, and that the foregoing be furnished for consideration of the Council.
Mr Bennett gave notice that the plan and dimensions of the proposed drain at Taradale as furnished by the Meanee Road Board be approved of by the Council.
Mr Tiffen gave notice of motion That a rate be struck forthwith of 6d in the £, on the rateable value of rateable property in the County.

WAIPAWA.
(FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.)
THE complimentary dinner given to Mr Henry Baker by the inhabitants of Waipawa and the surrounding districts, on Friday night, proved a great success, and his numerous friends who attended from the out-districts fully proved the estimation in which he is held as a caterer for the wants of the public. The table offered a display which might be equalled, but certainly not beaten, by any hotel in Hawke’s Bay, and reflected the highest credit on the “maitre de cuisine” of the Empire Hotel. About thirty-two gentlemen sat down to dinner at 7.30. Amongst the visitors were Messrs Swan, H. Caulton, Neil Campbell, T. Price, Hickey, and W.Y. Miller, contractor. Mr. Stewart, the respected schoolmaster from Tamumu, although a novice at the work, made a very good chairman; and to those who know the “White Swan” (and who doesn’t?) it is unnecessary to say how he filled the office of vice. After the toast, “The Queen and Royal Family,” was drunk, the vice -chairman, in a happy and humorous speech, proposed “The Guest of the evening, Mr Baker.” He had the pleasure of Mr Baker’s acquaintance ever since he had arrived in the colony, and had always found him to be an upright man and a gentleman, and wished there were more like him. Mr Swan then presented the testimonial, which was handsomely engrossed by Mr Percival Bear, and which expressed the sympathy of his friends with his late misfortunes, and the hope that the future would make up for the past. Mr Baker, in a feeling speech replied, thanking those who attended that evening to do him honor. That, with regard to the testimonial, he considered it far better than money as a mark of esteem. He trusted that now that his hotel was re -opened he would be able to preserve the good-will of those who had hitherto supported him. (Cheers.) A song by Mr Scott, alias “Sandy McScott,” gave evidence of a fine and well-trained voice. The toast of “The Visitors” was next proposed in a neat speech by Mr Spillers, and was responded to pleasantly by Mr J.M. Fraser, of the Mutual Improvement Company, who eulogised Mr Baker in glowing terms, saying that ninety-nine out of a hundred hotels have not the same accommodation or were as well conducted as the Empire. The Swan then warbled sweetly “Ale and Tobacco,” and was not “nigroque similima signo.” “Tommy make room for your Uncle,” was then given by our local comic gentleman, and as usual was great with immense applause. Mr Adair’s song, “The Wedding of Ballyporeen” was received with shouts of laughter, the Hibernian brogue giving true zest to the song. Messrs Corrigan, Spiller, Miller, and Garnham all contributed their quota to the melody. The toast which came next was one which appeared to be duly appreciated by a certainly non local-option gathering was given by Mr Swan, “The Heath of the Publicans,” coupled with the name of Mr H. Fletcher. Mr Swan said that, although looked down upon by some Pharisees, they were, no doubt, as a body, a most respectable class of men; and he could say from experience that whatever gain they made, they earned it hardly, as no one unconnected with the trade knew the trials and hardships a publican had to endure. Mr Fletcher, as the second oldest publican in Hawke’s Bay, made a telling speech in reply, and fully endorsed Mr Swan’s remarks, and upheld the character of the publicans as a body, admitting, however, that there were black sheep in every flock. No one sympathised more with Mr Baker than his brother tradesmen, and to show their existing friendship they would see an evidence on Monday evening, at the Oddfellows’ Hall, in Waipawa. Mr Fletcher’s remarks were received with loud cheers. “The Commercial Interests of Waipawa,” coupled with the name of Mr Tye, was proposed by the Chairman, and was responded to by Mr Tye in his usual felicitous manner. Mr Adair then proposed “The Ladies,” and did ample justice to the toast, which was replied to rather diffidently by Mr Bowden. “The Press” was proposed by Mr Stewart, and was responded to by “your own.”  So ended one of the most pleasant evenings I have spent during my sojourn in these diggings.

[…]

14   THE WEEKLY MERCURY

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY.   15

[…]

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

CLIVE SQUARE.
SIR, – Very much to my surprise, and I think to that of the public generally, the Napier Cricket Club has refused the Star and Press Cricket clubs the right to practice on the enclosed portion of Clive Square. Would you inform me of the virtue of what powers vested in the Napier Cricket Club has this assumption of authority been exercised? I am aware that the Mayor permitted the Cricket Club to fence in, level, and lay-down in grass, a portion of Clive Square, but I have yet to learn that either the Mayor or any one else can give away a piece of public property to a cricket or any other club. So long as the Napier Cricket club behaved itself there would be no fear of anybody disturbing it in the possession of a piece of Clive Square as a practice ground, which by the expenditure of club money had been rendered fit for use. But, Sir, the very instant the Club, by virtue of having effected certain improvements, presume to claim a vested right to public ground, the sooner the public destroy those improvements the better. The Napier Cricket Club having impudently refused its sister clubs the right to enter public land it is to be hoped the members of the Star and Press Clubs will ignore the Napier Cricket Club’s insolent assumption of ownership, and use the ground when and how they like. – I am &c.,
A MEMBER OF THE PRESS CLUB.
Napier, October 5, 1877.

[…]

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE’S COURT
FRIDAY, OCTOBER, 5.
[Before J.A. Smith, Esq., and E. Lyndon, Esq., J.P.’s.]

LARCENY OF BABY COTHES.
Rose Mullins was again brought up on remand, charged with having stolen baby clothes to the value of £2 10s, from Mr. B. Johnson, Port Ahuriri.
Charlotte Ellen Johnson, was called, and deposed she was the daughter of Mr. B. Johnson, timber merchant. She lived at Port Ahuriri. The prisoner lived as a servant at her father’s house. The prisoner left on Friday, the 21st September. She missed a robe and baby’s petticoat after the prisoner left. The day before the prisoner left, the witness, with her sister, were getting some children’s clothes out of a lot which was in the prisoner’s room. The prisoner was present. Her sister took all the things out of the box. The prisoner said she admired the robe and the petticoat which were lying on the box. In reply to a question, the witness told the prisoner it was her mother’s work. The witness recognised the robe (produced). She knew it to be the christening robe. She saw the robe put back in the box by her sister. It was put at the bottom of the box. Other clothes were put in the box. She missed the robe the Monday after the prisoner left the house. The box was not locked. They searched everywhere for the articles, but could not find them. She did not see the robe again until to-day.
Cross-examined by Mr Lee: She did not take the things out of the box. Her sister took the summer clothes got from the box out of the room. This happened between two and three o’clock in the afternoon. The prisoner was simply looking on. The room was upstairs. Her sister was in the room before her. The prisoner was in the room when she reached there, but did not know what part of the room she was in. The clothes were put on the floor and unrolled. The top things may have been put in roughly. On the Monday, they went to get more of the summer clothes out, and then they missed the robe. There was half a lid to the box. She could not say the clothes were not littered about in that room.
Thomas Scully deposed that he was an Inspector of Police. On the 25th or 26th September, from what he heard, he went to Mr. B. Johnson’s house at the Spit. From information received he procured a search warrant, and went to a house in Coote road where the prisoner was living. He saw the prisoner, and searched a box in the downstairs room, after which he asked her where her box was. The prisoner said upstairs. We went upstairs, and he called on her to show the things in her box one by one. She took out several articles, and afterwards took out this robe, and in putting it down on the floor she lifted two or three articles and placed them on the robe. He asked her what that was, and told her to lift it out again, and hold it up, which she did. He said “That is the article wanted. It was stolen from Mr. Johnson’s.”
Inspector Scully asked the Court to commit the prisoner, as several cases of a like nature were complained of in Napier, and he would like to make an example of some.
The prisoner made no defence, and was fully committed to take her trial at the next criminal sittings of the Supreme Court at Napier.
Mr. Lee applied for bail, but their Worships refused, as the girl had no relations in the country to watch over her.
His Worship the Mayor then took his seat on the Bench.

EMBEZZLEMENT.
James Bartlett, a young man in the employ of Mark Rolls, baker, of Port Ahuriri, was charged with that he did, on the 8th September, obtain for his master the sum of £3 8s 6d, and at divers times, other monies to the amount of £8 4s 9d, which he did feloniously and fraudulently embezzle.
The prisoner pleaded guilty.
Mr Mark Rolls stated to the Court that the prisoner had been in his employ for three years, or ever since he arrived in the colony in the Schiehallion. The prisoner had before kept monies paid to his (Rolls’) account, but he had forgiven him.
His Worship sentenced the prisoner to twelve months, imprisonment with hard labor [labour].

VAGRANCY.
Stephen Trainer was charged by Constable Black with vagrancy, and having no visible means of support.
Inspector Scully informed the Bench he was taken up for his own protection, but if he would promise to go to work that was all that was required.
He was discharged with a caution.

A DEVOTEE OF BACCHUS.
David Power pleaded guilty to having imbibed too much alcohol yesterday, and was fined 5s, or in default 24 hours imprisonment.

CIVIL CASES.
Renouf v. Cashmore. – Claim of £27 17s 6d. This summons had not been returned from Auckland, and the hearing consequently could not be continued with.
Rochfort v. Madden. – Claim £6 14s 4d for board and lodging. Defendant did not appear. Judgment by default for plaintiff for amount claimed, and 13s costs.
Toop v. Oulton. – Claim £4 0s 1d. No appearance of either party, and case struck out.
Pocock v. Eddy. – Claim &5 12s [£5 12s] for rent. Judgment for plaintiff for amount as claimed and costs 13s, and order made that defendant pay
the same by instalments at the rate of 10s per week.
The other civil cases had been settled out of Court.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 8.
(Before R. Stuart, Esq., R.M.)

BREACHES OF MUNICIPAL LAWS.
Mr H. O. Caulton appeared in answer to an information that he had allowed his chimney to take fire one day last week. The defendant stated that he had only been in the cottage a fortnight, and was not aware the chimney was previously in a sooty state.
His Worship cautioned the defendant and fined him 5s and costs 6s 6d.
G. Benjamin appeared in answer to an information charging him with having allowed a horse to wander in the public streets on Sunday the 29th ultimo.
The defendant stated that his horse broke away from his yard, where it was tied, and during the short time he was looking for it the police had taken possession of it.
His Worship said that as the horse had evidently wandered through an accident, he would dismiss the case.
R. Staples was charged with leaving a horse and trap in the public streets unattended on the 29th ultimo. The case was full proved, although the defendant denied the charge.
He was fined 10s, and costs 9s.

THE STOLEN CHEQUE.
Pene Matoha, an aboriginal native, was charged, on the information of Mr. G. Mullinder, of the Patangata Hotel, with having stolen from his premises, on the 3rd September, a cheque drawn by Mr Saxby, to the amount of £30.
The prisoner pleaded he knew nothing about the cheque.
Mr Lee, who appeared for the prosecution, applied for a remand in order to enable him to produce the stolen cheque.
The case was adjourned until Monday next, the 15th instant.
This concluded the business.

[…]

16   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

[…]

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS.
NAPIER – TAKAPAU.
TIME TABLE.
DOWN.
WEEK DAYS.   SUNDAYS.
A.M.*   A.M. +   A.M.   P.M.   P.M.
Spit, depart   7.40   11.0   3.40
Napier arrive   7.50   11.10   3.50
Napier depart   6.45   7.55   11.30   4.10   2.30
Farndon depart   7.10   8.20   11.55   4.35   2.55
p.m.
Hastings, depart   7.35   8.45   12.20   5.0   3.20
Paki Paki arrive   9.5   5.18
Paki Paki depart   7.53   9.13   5.20
Te Aute arrive   8.32
Te Aute depart   8.35   9.55   6.5
Kaikora depart   9.15   10.35   6.45
Waipawa, depart   9.35   11.15   7.25
Waipukurau arrive   9.55   11.15
Waipukurau depart   10.0   11.30
p.m.
Takapau, arrive   10.50   12.20
* On Monday and Thursday only.
+ On Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday.
UP.
WEEK DAYS.   SUNDAYS.
A.M.   A.M.   P.M.   P.M.   P.M.
Takapau, depart   2.20
Waipukurau, dep.   7.10   3.15
Waipawa, depart   7.30   3.35
Kaikora, depart   7.50   3.55
Te Aute arrive   8.13
Te Aute depart   8.33   4.35
Paki Paki, arrive   9.10   5.15
Paki Paki, depart   9.12   5.22
Hastings, depart   9.32   1.0   5.42   5.20
Farndon, depart   9.57   1.25   6.7   5.45
Napier arrive   10.22   1.50   6.32   6.10
Napier depart   7.20   10.25   3.0
Spit, arrive   7.30   10.35   3.10
*Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday only.
Passengers are requested not to enter or leave the carriages while in motion.
Season tickets issued to and from all Station. Apply to the Manager.
To ensure despatch, Parcels should be booked fifteen minutes before the starting of the Train.
W.J. MILLER,
General Manager,
Napier, March 8, 1877.

M.R. MILLER,
STOCK AND STATION AGENT
HAS FOR SALE,
SHEEP STATIONS
of various extent, and
FREEHOLD PROPERTIES,
Stocked and Unstocked, in the Provinces of Auckland, Hawke’s Bay, Wellington. Canterbury, and Otago.
For particulars, apply at the office, Browning-street, Napier.
RAMS FOR SALE.
LINCOLN
Lincoln-Leicester
Leicester
Cotswold
Merinoes,
All First-class Flocks.
STORE SHEEP. – Various Lots of Store Merinos Ewes and Wedders for Sale.

PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
5,500 acres Freehold
2,500 acres Leasehold
8,000 Merino Sheep, and all necessary Plant, within 30 miles by coast.
4,677 acres Freehold, Agricultural and Pastoral land, Wairoa with
3,000 Sheep, and necessary working improvements
25,000 acres, Leasehold, Poverty Bay and
112 acres Freehold, close to town, with
20,000 Sheep, and improvements
4,200 acres, Freehold, Agricultural and Pastoral Land, Poverty Bay
11,000 acres Leasehold, Pastoral, Poverty Bay, with
3000 Sheep and few Cattle
1,600 acres, Leasehold, half interest, Poverty Bay
28,750 acres, Poverty Bay, situate about 20 miles from Tologa [ Tolaga ] Bay, title under Maori Lands Court
1657 acres, rich Pastoral land, good title, Poverty Bay
1385 acres, rich Pastoral land, good title, Poverty Bay
8,800 acres, Leasehold, excellent country, Tolaga Bay, with
3,000 Sheep and good improvements
3,000 acres, Freehold, Southern Seaboard, improved
1220 acres, Freehold, Southern Seaboard, improved
400 acres, Freehold, Southern Seaboard, improved
1,200 acres, Freehold, Rich Pastoral Land, improved, Opotiki
M.R. MILLER,
Stock and Station Agent.

RURAL SECTIONS, WOODVILLE.
On Deferred Payments.
For particulars, apply to
M.R. MILLER.

PRELIMINARY NOTICE.
WAIPUKURAU.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1877.
MR J. J. TYE’S
SECOND HALF-YEARLY SALE
OF
CATTLE AND HORSES, including a draft of Messrs. Nairn Bros., well-bred Cattle and Draught Stock, will take place at the Railway Sale Yards on
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1877,
Also,
At the request of a number of the leading settlers in the Southern portion of the Province, he is making arrangements for holding a
RAM FAIR
On the same date, when a large assortment of Longwools and Merinos from the best breeders will be offered for sale UNSHORN, thus giving purchasers better facilities for judging the Stock. Suitable paddocking and other necessary conveniences will be provided.
Stockowners desirous of sending Stock to the above sale are respectfully invited to communicate with the undersigned as early as possible.
J. J. TYE,
Stock and Station Agent.
Waipawa.
Or to
H. MONTEITH,
Commission Agent,
Waipukurau.
August 25, 1877.

CITY OF DUNEDIN.
TO FIRE BRIGADES, MUNICIPAL COUNCILS, FARMERS, AND OTHERS.
The City Council has FOR SALE one of Shand, Mason & Co.’s Patent Curricle FIRE ENGINES, together with the following Gear, appertaining thereto:
80ft copper-rivetted Leather Hose
100ft Voucher’s patent wove Canvas Hose
1 Branch and 2 Nozzles
20ft India-rubber Suction Hose, with copper Strainer.
The whole in good order and condition.
Also,
2 sets of strong Ladders, each set splicing to 30ft.
The above can be inspected at the Central Fire Brigade Station, High-street, Dunedin.
The Council invites tenders for the whole (in one lot), to be lodged at the office of the undersigned on or before the 9th October, 1877.
The highest tender not necessarily accepted.
J.M. MASSEY,
Town Clerk.
City Council Chambers,
Dunedin, September 7, 1877.

WANTED KNOWN – The price of “Wanted” Advertisements in the DAILY TELEGRAPH is at the rate of ONE SHILLING per insertion for 20 words.

BOYLAN & CO.,
IRONMONGERS,
HAVE JUST LANDED
EX “COLUMBUS,”
Agricultural Implements, Gas Pipe, Cutlery,
AND
General Ironmongery.
PARAGON and new model Buckeye, and Buckeye combined Mowers and Reapers, Robinson’s combined Mowers & Reapers, American Champion & Patent Balance Horse Rakes, and Hand Drag Rakes, Corn Crushers, Bentall’s Root Pulpers, and Turnip Cutters; Chaff Cutters, Double Furrow Ploughs, American Gang Ploughs, Bentall’s Horse Powers, Winnowing Machines, Murray’s Tiny Thrashers, Stable Fittings, Fowl Troughs, Cradle Scythes, American Post Hole Augers, American Horse Hoes, American Wind Mills, Flexible Chain Harrows, Hay Tedders, Hay Spades and Knives, Sheep Shears No. 81, 38, and 79, Lawn Mowers, Automaton and Eclipse.
To Arrive per “Galatea.”
3 TONS Horse Shoes, specially made for this market; Garton and King’s Ranges, Register Grates, 100 kegs Nails F, R and R A 1 and 3 Wheel Ploughs.
American Garden Seeds.
Mangold Seed, (Yellow and Long Red) Garden and Vegetable See4dsd.
Builders’ Ironmongery.
BRASS FOUNDRY.
B B H Bar and Rod Iron, Boiler Plate, Sheet Iron, Anvils, Vyces; Spring, Sheer, Cast, and Blister Steel, Horse Shoes and Nails, Files, Rasps, Portable Forges, Dray and Buggy Axles.
Hydraulic Wool Press.
Galvanised Corrugated Iron, Guttering and Down Pipe, Ridging, Sheet Zinc, &c.
Sheet Lead, White Lead; Boiled, Raw, Linseed, Colza, Castor, and Kerosene Oils.
Paint Brushes, Sash Tools, Varnish, Soft Soap, Raddle, Charcoal, Putty, &c.
AMERICAN NOVELTIES
FURNISHING REQUISITES
In great variety.
CUTLERY: – Rodger’s Lockwood’s and Johnson’s.
DAIRY UTENSILS.
Double and Single Barrelled GUNS, RIFLES, Sporting Material, Blasting Powder, Fuse, Dynamite, &c.
Clearing Sale of Crockery, 25 per cent. under Cost.
50 doz. Cups & Saucers, from 4s per doz
100 doz. Plates from 2s 6d per doz
100 doz. Childrens Mugs from 2s per doz
Preserve Pots in nests, Earthenware Milk Pans, Tea Pots, from 1s each; Tumblers, from 6s per dozen.
American Wagon.
PIANOS – By Broadwood, Brinsmead, Aucher Freres, Challon & Hodgson, and Board.
HARMONIUMS – By Trayser & Co., Metzler & Co., and Alexandre.
CABINET ORGANS – By Mason, and Hamlin,
N.B. – THE ABOVE INSTRUMENTS MAY BE PURCHASED FOR CASH, OR ON THE TIME-PAYMENT SYSTEM.
BOYLAN & CO.

[Advertisement]
CURE FOR   ALL NEVER DESPAIR
THE GREATEST WONDER OF MODERN TIMES!
HOLLOWAY’S PILLS
Persons suffering from weak or debilitated constitutions will discover that by the use of this wonderful medicine there is “Health for all.” The blood is the fountain of life, and its purity can be maintained by the use of these pills.
SIR SAMUEL BAKER,
in his work entitled “The Nile Tributaries in Abbyssinia,” says, “I ordered the dragoman Mahomet to inform the Fakey that I was a Doctor, and that I had the best medicines at the service of the sick, with advice gratis. In a short time I had many applicants, to whom I served out a quantity of Holloway’s Pills. These are most useful to an explorer, as possessing unmistakable purgative properties they create an undeniable effect upon the patient, which satisfies him of their value.”
SIMPLE, SAFE, AND CERTAIN!
HOLLOWAY’S OINTMENT
Is a certain remedy for bad legs, bad breasts, and ulcerations of all kinds. It acts miraculously in healing ulcerations, curing skin diseases, and in arresting and subduing all inflammations.
MR. J.T. COOPER,
in his account of his extraordinary travels in in China, published in 1871, says – “l had with me a quantity of Holloway’s Ointment.  I gave some to the people, and nothing could exceed their gratitude; and, in consequence, milk, fowls, butter, and horse feed poured in upon us until at last a teaspoonful of Ointment was worth a fowl and any quantity of peas, and the demand became so great that I was obliged to lock up the small remaining stock.”
Sold by all Chemists and Medicine Vendors throughout the World.
On the Label in the address, 533, Oxford-street, London, where alone they are manufactured.
BEWARE OF ALL COMPOUNDS STYLED
HOLLOWAY’S PILLS AND OINTMENT
With a “New York” Label.

[Advertisement]
SAMSON FENCE WIRE. – This is an entirely new article, and is fast superseding the old style. Five Wires weigh Ten cwt. per mile, and costs in Melbourne £12 10s, versus Seventeen cwt. ordinary wire costing £14 10s (the relative cost will be the same at the principal ports of Australasia) with the advantage of having Seven cwt. less to pay carriage for. Over 1,000 TONS sold by one firm last year, giving unbounded satisfaction. Send for full descriptive circular with innumerable testimonials from leading colonists, and judge for yourselves. McLEAN BROS., and RIGG, Importers, and General Ironmongers, Melbourne.

THE
WEEKLY MERCURY
AND
Hawke’s Bay Advertiser

Notice to discontinue advertisements (unless where number of insertions is mentioned on original order) must be forwarded, in writing, addressed to the Manager.
Standing Advertisements for Three, Six or Twelve Months can be arranged for at a Liberal Discount.
TERMS OF ADVERTISING AS PER SCALE.

LIST OF AGENTS
NAPIER   COLLEDGE & CRAIG, Hastings-st
W. DENHOLM, Port Ahuriri
MEANEE – J.C. SPEEDY.
TARADALE – J. BARRY.
CLIVE – J. BECK.
HASTINGS – R. SOMERVILLE
HAVELOCK – S. STONE
KAIKORA – J. NICHOLSON
WAIPAWA   E. BIBBY
DUNCAN & CO.
WAIPUKURAU – MESSRS. SMITH & CO
WOODVILLE – MONTEITH AND FOUNTAIN [ FOUNTAINE ].
NORSEWOOD – A. LEVY.
WAIROA – T. PARKER

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION
£ s d.
Per Quarter, if paid in advance   0 6 6
Per Quarter, if booked   0 7
Per Annum, if paid in advance   1 6
Per Annum, if booked   1 10

Printed and published by EDWARD HENDERSON GRIGG, for the Proprietors, at the Mercury Office, Tennyson-street, Napier, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1877.

(SUPPLEMENT)   THE WEEKLY MERCURY   1

HAWKE’S BAY AGRICULTURAL AND PASTORAL SOCIETY’S SHOW.
The Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society, that took a fresh lease of life last year, has exhibited no less vigor this season, and the Show, that was held on Thursday was one of which in every respect the Society might well be proud. The position the Society holds at the present time is second to no other association of its kind in New Zealand. It is fully carrying out the objects the members have kept steadily in view; its shows are attracting increased attention, which is shown by the large number of visitors who annually come here, and it is gratifying to know that these visitors take away with them the highest opinion of our stock, of the capabilities of the country, and the enterprise of our settlers.
The Show of 1877, that was held on Wednesday and Thursday last, was in no way inferior to that of last year, and, in some respects, was superior. For instance, the number and quality of Merino sheep exceeded all previous exhibitions of the kind in Hawke’s Bay, the entries showing, in a marked degree, the result of the care and attention that have been paid to this breed during the past few years. The long-wools, however, formed the chief feature of the Show, as might have been expected from the vast areas of country that have been brought to a condition which enables those breeds to be kept with the greatest advantage. The total number of sheep entered was 221, of which no less than 122 were Lincolns; 31 Cotswolds; 67 Merinos, and 1 Leicester. Unfortunately, the Cotswold classes were not represented as fully as it was hoped and expected they would be, owing to the absence of Mr J. D. Canning’s sheep, which had been kept back, we regret to hear, through their owner having recently sustained a family affliction. It was Mr Canning who introduced the Cotswold breed into this province, and his original flock still stands at the head of its class. The value of the breed has long been recognized, and there are now many small flocks of Cotswolds that have been bred up from selections from the best breeders in England. With regard to the Lincolns that were exhibited, it was noteworthy that the first and second prizes were carried off by the Hon H.R. Russell, to whom the credit is due of having been the first in this province to wrest the honors [honours] from the Ahuriri plain flocks, that have for so long a period carried all before them. The ewes, in all classes of Lincolns, were remarkably good, and showed an improvement on those of last year; the rams, however, taken as a whole, did not quite come up to those of the previous Show. Messrs Coleman and McHardy again won the Champion Cup for the best longwoolled ewe.
The show of horses was exceedingly good, but it would have been much better had not a singular fatality attached itself to many of the horses that were intended to be exhibited. Quite recently Mr Ormond has lost by death two magnificent draught colts; Mr Wellwood lost a fine foal out of his draught mare that took first prize last year; and Mr Sutton lost a Kingfisher foal, and also its mother; Mr Giblin’s light-weight carrying hack, “Midnight” that was awarded a prize at the last Show, met with an accident early this week, by which his legs were so cut about by a wire fence as to preclude him from exhibition. In addition to these misfortunes, the lessened the number of the exhibits, Mr. A. McLean’s thorough-bred imported horses “Mute,” “Jav’lin,” and “Arab Child,” were withheld from the Show, for a reason which, we think, might have been overcome by some slight give-and-take arrangement with the Committee. To prevent disappointment, however, these magnificent animals were paraded outside the Show ground, and commanded a large amount of attention. Messrs Watt and Farmer were the principal winners in the thoroughbred stock, those gentlemen having sent to the ground a collection of splendid animals. The draught horses were numerously represented, and were extremely good, but the show of hacks was superior to anything of the kind seen in Hawke’s Bay.
The show of cattle, if not large, was sufficient to exhibit the quality of many of our best herds. There were some grand animals in the yards, and the young stock spoke highly for the progeny of the valuable animals that have been imported into the province.
Pigs and poultry were not largely represented, Messrs Ormond, Baldwin, and Merritt being the only exhibitors of the former. The fowls, though there were not many of them, were very hand-some, and valuable birds.
The exhibition of agricultural implements was much better than in former years, and afforded evidence of the growth of an industry that for too long a period has been neglected. Messrs Boylan and Co., of Napier, were the largest exhibitors, having placed on the ground £400 worth of imported implements of the best makers. This firm carried off the Champion Cup, besides several first prizes. The show of Napier made carriages formed a pleasing feature in this part of the Society’s ground. Two years ago this industry was in its infancy, but Mr G. Faulkner and Mr Vinsen have within this short period abundantly proved that there is no occasion to go out of the province for any description of carriage, from a farm dray, to a ladies brougham.
Miscellaneous provincial produce chiefly showed itself in a collection of some fine examples of butter, the judges of which must have had no little difficulty in deciding which should be awarded the prize. Mr McVay exhibited a really excellent assortment of his own-made saddles and harness, and Mr Sterry’s entries in these lines where of very considerable merit. In this same booth, a large slab of clear solid ice attracted attention; it was the product of Messrs Gilberd & Co’s ice machine lately imported by Mr H.S. Tiffen. The same firm also showed a “trophy” of cordials, the contents of many of the bottles being frozen. Messrs Mitchell and Beatson, and Mr R.P. Williams, exhibited a few bales of scoured wool, and our local brewers were not without representation.
Amongst the Extra Exhibits we should not forget to mention Mr H. Williams’ Colonial ovens; these were admirable specimens of workmanship, and evinced, perhaps, more than anything that was shown of local manufacture the strides that have been made in the supply of the wants of a growing community. Mr Williams also showed wire strainers and other specimens of wire work that, on a previous occasion we have referred to. Mr J. Hannay’s box of assorted soap, mottled and yellow, and Messrs Highley and Sons samples of tanned leather were pleasing evidence of industries, which merely require to be encouraged to save a large amount of money from being sent out of the district for articles that can well be supplied at home. Mr McGlashan had, at the corner of the booth, a stack of well made bricks, and Messrs Parker & Co., showed an assortment of horse shoes, the workmanship of which could not have been excelled. Messrs Boyce and Fail well deserved the first prize that was awarded them for their cheese vats and tubs.
With the above remarks we are reluctantly compelled to close our notices of the exhibits, but we feel that we have by no means exhausted the subject, or done justice to it. Our space, however, is too limited to extend our remarks, which we will bring to a close by noticing the appearance of the ground, and with a short reference to the dinner which took place at night at the Criterion Hotel.
The popularity of the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society was abundantly proved by the large assemblage of persons that visited the Show ground at Hastings. The weather was splendid, and the day being observed as a public holiday, the town of Napier put its shutters up, and the inhabitants went into the country. From an early hour the road to Hastings was lined with carriages and horsemen, while the trains, which ran every hour, were crowded. By three o’clock in the afternoon, there were estimated, from the tickets sold at the gate, to be over 2,000 people on the ground, a very considerable proportion of whom consisted of the fair sex. When the total population of the district is taken into consideration this number represents a very large crowd indeed, and was certainly larger than at any former Show that has been held by the Society. The ground was laid off as last year, and the arrangements of the Committee, and the performance of the arduous work devolving on its members, were deserving of all praise. Nothing was omitted, and the smallest details, attention to which goes so far to make a Show a success, were carried out with the greatest care. In the way of refreshment the public had no reason to complain. Mr Johnson, of Hastings-street, had two large booths on the ground, in which an excellent repast could be obtained, and the table spread for the Judges, and for a few of the distinguished guests who were present, was the most elegant display we have seen under canvas. The band of the Napier Artillery Volunteers performed during the day, and enlivened the proceedings by playing inspiriting airs. A fancy bazar [bazaar] was held in a large markee [marquee] for the benefit of the Havelock church, and from the number of persons who patronised it, we should think a good business was done. The leaping match, that offered the final attraction of the Show, brought out five steeplechasers whose performances created the greatest interest, and on their termination sent everyone home well pleased with the one day’s holiday.
At 7 o’clock in the evening, a dinner was given at the Criterion Hotel, at which over sixty members of the Society and others sat down. The dinner was laid on three tables in the large banqueting room of the Hotel, and did infinite credit to those who, under Mr G. Becker’s supervision, arranged the tables. The attendance was perfect, and the dinner, in every respect, was certainly the best that has ever yet been given in Napier. The Hon. Col. Whitmore occupied the chair, and Mr. F. Sutton. M.H.R., and J. Mackersey Esq., the vice chairs. The usual loyal, and other toasts were given, and responded to most heartily, one of the best speeches of the evening being given by the Hon. E.W. Stafford. The party broke up at about eleven o’clock with a cordial vote of thanks to the chairman and vice chairmen.

The following is a list of the prize takers: –

CHAMPION CUP WINNERS.
Class A. Thoroughbred Sire – Watt and Farmers Papapa.
Class B. Thoroughbred Mare – A. Buckland’s Una.
Class C. Draught Sire – J. Evan’s Dugdale.
Class D. Draught Mare – J. Bennett’s Champion.
Class E. Best Bull – Hon. H. R. Russell’s King Henry III.
Class F. Best Cow – Coleman and McHardy’s Duchess Chamburgh.
Class G. Best Merino Ram – Hon. H.R. Russell.
Class H. Best Merino Ewe – T.P. Russell.
Class J. Best Longwool Ram -P. Dolbell.
Class K. Best Longwoolled Ewe – Coleman and McHardy.
Champion Cup for Implements – Boylan and Co.

HORSES.

THOROUGHBRED HORSES.
Judges – Hon. E.W. Stafford and J. T. Ford, Esq. Stewards in attendance – Messrs Birch and Shrimpton.
1st Prize – Watt and Farmer, ch Edward James, 1yr by Papapa, dam Hatred.
2nd Prize – R. Brathwaite, iron grey colt, 12 months, by Arab Child, dam Lucy.
Commended – W. Douglas, dark brown colt, 11 months, by Kingfisher, dam a Figaro mare.
TWO – YEAR OLD COLT, FOALED SINCE 1ST. AUGUST, 1875.
1st Prize – Watt and Farmer, brown colt Dundee, 2 yrs, by Traducer, dam Renga.
2nd Prize – Watt and Farmer, black, Macilleathaini, 2 yrs by English Tim Whiffler, dam Flying Scud.
ENTIRE, 4 – YEAR OLD, AND UPWARDS.
1st Prize – Watt and Farmer, chest nut, Papapa, 6 yrs, Ravensworth, dam Waimea, (also Champion).
YEARLING FILLY, FOALED SINCE 1ST AUGUST, 1876.
1st Prize – W. Burnett, iron grey filly, 12 months , Arab Child, dam Titania.
2nd Prize – Watt and Farmer, chestnut, Daisy, 1 yr., by Panapa, dam Marchioness.
MARE FOUR – YEAR – OLD AND UPWARDS.
1st Prize – Watt and Farmer, bay, Hatred, 9 yrs, by Traducer, dam Emmeline.
MARE ANY AGE, IN MARE OR FOAL AT FOOT.
1st Prize – A. Buckland, bay, Una,15 yrs, by St. Aubyn, dam Miss Rowe (also champion).
2nd prize – Watt and Farmer, brown, Mina Mina, 6 yrs, Ravensworth, dam Queen of the South.
Commended – J. Heslop. bay, Young Althea, 6 years, Ake Ake, dam Althea.

DRAUGHT HORSES.
Judges – Messrs Thomas Sutton and R. Wilkin. Stewards in attendance – Messrs Haultain and W. Couper, jun.
2 – YEAR OLD COLT, FOALED SINCE 1ST AUGUST, 1875.
1st prize – J. D. Ormond, bay, Sir Charles, 22 months, by Prince Charlie, dam Lady.
2nd Prize – R.P. Williams, colt, 23½ months, by Dugdale, dam Blossom.
3 -YEAR OLD COLT, FOALED SINCE 1ST AUGUST, 1874.
1st Prize, G. S. Whitmore, bay, 3 yrs, by Little John.
ENTIRE HORSE, FOUR – YEAR OLD AND UPWARDS.
1st Prize, – John Evans, Dugdale, 6 yrs, Black Prince, dam Rose (also champion).
2nd Prize – A. Taylor, Young Lofty, 6 yrs, by Lofty, out of Jess.
Highly Commended – J. Bicknell, Young Lord Glasgow, 7 yrs.
TWO – YEAR OLD FILLY, FOALED SINCE 1ST AUGUST, 1875.
1st Prize, – J.D. Ormond, bay, Pink, 2 yrs, by Dugdale, dam Rose.
2nd Prize – F. and W. Nelson, filly, 22 months, by Dugdale.
THREE – YEAR OLD FILLY, FOALED SINCE 1ST AUGUST 1874.
1st Prize – J. Bennett, bay, 3 yrs, by Little John (also champion).
2nd Prize – J. Bennett, grey, 3 yrs, by Little John.
MARE, FOUR – YEAR OLD AND UPWARDS.
1st Prize – R. Wellwood, bay mare, aged, imported from Australia.
2nd Prize – J. Heslop, brown, 5 yrs.
MARE, ANY AGE, IN FOAL OR FOAL AT FOOT.
1st prize, N. Todd, mare, 5 yrs, by Young Hero.
2nd Prize – J.D. Ormond, bay, Rose, aged, imported.

MISCELLANEOUS.
ENTIRE BEST CALCULATED TO IMPROVE THE BREED OF SADDLE HORSES.
1st prize – G. R. Grant, Terenga, 7 yrs, Ravensworth, dam Phoebe.
ENTIRE BEST CALCULATED TO IMPROVE THE BEST OF CARRIAGE HORSES.
1st prize – W. Burnett, bay, 4 yrs, by Sledmere, dam Azucena.
WEIGHT-CARRYING HACK, ANY AGE, UP TO 16 STONE.
1st Prize – J. S. Giblin, black gelding, Black Douglas.
2nd Prize – G.E.G. Richardson, chestnut gelding, Rob Roy, aged.
Highly commended – F. Hall, black gelding, aged.
LIGHT – WEIGHT HACK.
1st Prize, H. Sladen, 10 yrs. hack.
2nd Prize – H. Gaisford, bay gelding, Dumboy, 18 yrs.
Highly commended – R. Brathwate, grey gelding, Pai Mariri, aged.
PONY, ANY AGE, UNDER 13 HANDS.
1st Prize – D. S. Fleming, black entire, Shetland breed.
HARNESS HORSE, SUBJECT TO TRIAL.
1st prize – J.D. Ormond, grey mare, Violet, 9 yrs.

SHORTHORN CATTLE.
Judges – Messrs James Hay, Henry Pannett, and C. J. Story. Stewards in attendance – Messrs T. Bishop, and A. H. Wallis.
BULL UNDER 18 MONTHS.
1st prize, – Coleman and McHardy, bull, Imperial Windsor, calved Feb. 27, 1877, by Iron Duke, dam Duchess of Chamburgh.
2nd prize, H.R. Russell, King Henry VI., calved August 12, 1877, by Crown Prince, dam Lady Rose.
Very highly commended – W. Marcroft, bull calved October 31, 1876.
Highly commended – A. M. Williams, bull, calved Feb 25, 1877, by Derby, dam Buttercup.
Commended – A. M. Williams, bull, calved Feb 10, 1877, by Derby, dam Duchess of New Zealand.
BULL 18 MONTHS AND UNDER 2½ YEARS.
1st prize, – H.R. Russell, King Henry III., calved September 15, 1875, by Crown Prince, dam Lady Rose, bred by H.R. Russell (also champion).
2nd prize, – R. Wellwood, roan, King of Hearts, calved April 1st, 1871, by Royal Gywnne.
BULL, 3½ YEARS AND UPWARDS.
1st prize – Coleman and McHardy, roan, Prince Leonard, calved September 27, 1873, by Royal Prince, dam Catherine, bred by H. Aylmer (also champion).
2nd prize – H.R. Russell, Crown Prince, calved June 21, 1870, by Prince Fredrick, dam Flower, bred by G. Bell.
Highly commended – G. Tanner, roan, Earl of Oxford, 8 years 9 months, by Abbot of Rissington, dam Sweet Sauce, bred by Col. Whitmore.
Commended – H. R. Russell, King Henry I, calved October 21, 1873, by Crown Prince, dam Lady Rose.
HEIFER, UNDER 18 MONTHS.
1st prize – Coleman and McHardy, roan, Duchess III, calved April 17, 1876, by Earl Derby, dam White Duchess II.
2nd prize – T. Tanner, Roan Heifer, 18 months, by Earl of Oxford, dam Carlyon cow
HEIFER, 18 MONTHS AND UNDER 2½ YEARS.
1st prize – H. R. Russell, Queen Bess II, calved Jan. 3, 1876, by Crown Prince, dam Lady Betty.
2nd prize – T. Tanner, roan, 20 months, by Earl of Oxford, dam Carlyon, cow.
Highly commended – A. M. Williams, roan, 22 months, by Derby, dam Marchioness cow.
Commended – A.M. Williams, red and white, 24 months, by Marquis, dam Comet cow.
HEIFER, 2½ YEARS, AND UNDER 3½ YEARS.
1st prize – Coleman and McHardy, Duchess of Chamburgh, roan, calved June, 1874, by Royal Windsor, dam White Socks; breeder Outhwaite
(also champion).
2nd prize – T. Tanner, roan, 3 years, by Earl of Oxford, dam Carlyon cow.
Highly commended – Coleman and McHardy, roan, Gazelle II., calved Dec. 17, 1874, by Earl Derby, dam Gazelle.
COW, 3½ YEARS AND UPWARDS.
1st prize, H. R. Russell, Lady Rose, calved August 13, 1870, by Belvoir Duke,

2   THE WEEKLY MERCURY

dam Lady Blanche, Breeder J.P. Russell.
2nd prize – A.M. Williams, roan, 7 yrs, by Sir James, dam Comet cow, bred by Rev. S. Williams.
Highly commended – Coleman and McHardy, roan, Lady Beatrice II., calved March 16, 1872, by Sir James II., dam Lady Beatrice.

HEREEORD [HEREFORD] CATTLE.
BULL, UNDER 18 MONTHS.
1st prize – G. S. Whitmore, bull, 12 months by Regulator, imported.
COW, 3½ YEARS AND UPWARD.
1st prize – G. S. Whitmore, cow, imported.
2nd prize – G. S. Whitmore, cow, imported.

CATTLE OF ANY BREED.
BULL.
1st prize – H. W. P. Smith, Polled Angus 4 years, imported.
COW.
1st prize – H.R. Russell, cow, Lady Mary.
2nd prize – H.W. P. Smith, cow, 2 yrs.
DAIRY COW.
1st prize – J. N. Williams, dairy cow; owner, J. Wall.
H.W.P. Smith, Polled Angus, 7 years, imported.
G. Merritt, roan, Rose.
TWO FAT BULLOCKS, 2½ YEARS AND UNDER.
1st prize – T. Tanner, 2 roan Bullocks. Breeder T. Tanner.
2nd prize – J. N. Williams, 2 bullocks.
Highly commended – T. Tanner, 2 road bullocks. Breeder T. Tanner.
TWO FAT BULLOCKS, OVER 3½YEARS.
1st prize – Coleman and McHardy, 2 fat bullocks, bred by Hunter Bros.
2nd prize – J. N. Williams, 2 fat bullocks.
Highly commended – G. S. Whitmore, 2 fat bullocks.

SHEEP.
MERINO BREED.
Judges, Hon. Ernest Gray, R. Wilkin Esq.
Stewards in attendance – Messrs A. W. Williams, and G. T. Seale.
Champion Cup for best Merino ram, 12 months and upwards – Hon. H. R. Russell, 4 – tooth, bred by Dowling.
Champion Cup for best merino ewe – 12 months and upwards – Purvis Russell, bred by J. Gibson.
Cup given by Mr. Robertson for best provincial bred merino ram 12 months’ old and upwards – A. Lyons, 16 months, bred by D. Gollan.
RAM HOGGETT, 18 MONTHS OR UNDER.
1st prize – Arch. McLean, 14 months, bred by Gibson.
2nd prize – A. Lyons, 16 months, bred by D. Gollan (also winner of Mr. Robertson’s cup).
Highly commended – A. Lyons, 16 months, bred by D. Gollan.
Highly commended – W. Shrimpton, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
There were eight other competitors.
TWO-TOOTH RAM.
1st prize – A. Lyons, 16 months, bred by D. Gollan.
2nd prize – W. Shrimpton, 2 – tooth, bred by exhibitor.
FOUR-TOOTH RAM.
1st prize – H.R. Russell, 4 – tooth, bred by Dowling. (Also champion merino ram.)
2nd prize – Arch. McLean, 4 – tooth, bred by D. McLean.
Highly commended – H. R. Russell, 4 – tooth, bred by Dowling.
Commended – W. Shrimpton, 4 – tooth, bred by exhibitor.
SIX-TOOTH RAM AND UPWARDS.
1st prize – P. Russell, 6 – tooth, bred by J. Gibson.
2nd prize – P. Russell, 6 – tooth, bred by J. Gibson.
Seven others entered for this prize.
EWE HOGGETT, 18 MONTHS OR UNDER.
1st prize – H.R. Russell, 12 ½ months, bred by exhibitor.
2nd prize – H. R. Russell, 12 ½ months, bred by exhibitor.
Highly commended – Hugh Campbell, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
Commended – H. R. Russell, 12½ months, bred by exhibitor.
There were ten entries.
TWO-TOOTH EWES.
1st prize – Arch. Mclean, 2 – tooth, bred by D. McLean.
2nd prize – A. Lyons, 16 months, bred by D. Gollan.
Highly commended – W. Shrimpton, 2 – tooth, bred by exhibitor.
FOUR-TOOTH EWE, WITH OR WITHOUT LAMB.
1st prize – A. Lyons, 2 years, bred by D. Gollan.
2nd prize – A. Lyons, 2 years, bred by D. Gollan.
Highly commended – W. Shrimpton, 4 – tooth ewe, bred by Sise.
Commended – W. Shrimpton, 4 – tooth ewe, bred by exhibitor.
SIX-TOOTH EWE, WITH OR WITHOUT LAMB.
1st prize, Purvis Russell, bred by J. Gibson (also champion Merino ewe).
2nd prize – Purvis Russell, bred by J. Gibson.
Highly commended – W. Shrimpton, bred by R. Campbell.
Commended – W. Shrimpton, bred by F. D. Rich.
EWE WITH LAMB AT FOOT.
1st prize – Arch McLean, 6 years, bred by Learmouth.
2nd prize – W. Shrimpton, over six – tooth, bred by R. Campbell.
Highly commended – W. Shrimpton, over six – tooth, bred by F. D. Rich.
W. Shrimpton, over six -tooth, bred by R. Campbell.

LINCOLN BREED.
Judges – Messrs. J. T. Ford, R. Parker, and W. Marcroft. Stewards in attendance – Messrs G. Peacock, Arch. McLean, and J. Chambers, jun.
RAM HOGGETT, 18 MONTHS OR UNDER.
1st prize – H. R. Russell, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
2nd prize – H. R. Russell, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
Very highly commended – H.R. Russell, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
Highly commended – F.W. Nelson, 13½ months, bred by exhibitor.
Commended – J. N. Williams, 14 months, bred by exhibitor.
There were twenty -three other exhibitors.
RAM 18 MONTHS AND UNDER 30 MONTHS.
1st prize – G.S. Whitmore, 26 months, bred by exhibitor.
2nd prize – Coleman and McHardy, 4 – tooth, bred by exhibitors from Marshall stock.
Very highly commended – H. R. Russell, 4 – tooth, bred by Col. Whitmore.
Highly commended – J. Heslop, 4 – tooth, bred by Sutton Bros.
There were 12 other entries.
RAM, 30 MONTHS AND UPWARDS.
1st prize – P. Dolbel, aged, bred by Dudding.
2nd prize – Coleman and McHardy, 5 yrs, bred by Marshall.
Very highly commended – T. Tanner, 6 yrs, bred by Dudding.
Highly commended – T. Tanner, 4 yrs, bred by Russell, Ritchie and Co.
Commended – J. N. Williams, bred by J. May.
Eight other competitors.
EWE HOGGETT UNDER 18 MONTHS.
1st prize – G. S. Whitmore, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
2nd prize – G. S. Whitmore, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
Very highly commended – T. Tanner, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
Highly commended – T. Tanner, 13 months, bred by exhibitor.
Commended – J. W. Wilson, 14 months, bred by Maney.
TWO -YEAR OLD EWE, 18 MONTHS AND UNDER 30 MONTHS, WITH OR WITHOUT LAMB.
Very highly commended – T. Tanner, 25 months, bred by exhibitor.
High commended – T. Tanner, 25 months, bred by exhibitor.
Commended – T. Tanner, 25 months, bred by exhibitor.
Seventeen other entries.
THREE – YEAR OLD EWES, 30 MONTHS AND UPWARDS.
1st prize – Coleman and McHardy, aged, bred by Marshall.
2nd prize – G. S. Whitmore, aged, bred by exhibitor, from imported stock.
Very highly commended – G. S. Whitmore, aged, bred by exhibitor, from imported stock.
Highly commended – G. S. Whitmore, aged, bred by exhibitor, from imported stock.
Commended – T. Tanner , over 30 months, bred by exhibitor.
Nine other entries.
EWE, WITH LAMB AT FOOT.
1st prize – Coleman and McHardy, aged, bred by Kirkham.
2nd prize – T. Tanner, 4 years, bred by exhibitor.
Very highly commended – J.N. Williams, bred by exhibitor.
Highly commended – T. Tanner, 6 years, bred by Vesey.
Commended – Coleman and McHardy, bred by Marshall.

COTSWOLD BREED.
RAM HOGGETT, 18 MONTHS OR UNDER.
1st prize – A. Buckland, 14 months, bred by exhibitor, from Garne ewes.
2nd prize – A. Buckland, 14 months, bred by Garne ewes.
Highly commended – G. D. Hamilton, bred by exhibitor, from Garne ewes.
RAMS,18 MONTHS AND UNDER 30 MONTHS.
1st prize – J. Mackersey, bred by executors late J. Calvert.
2nd prize – A.M. Williams, bred by A. Buckland.
Highly commended – J. Mackersey, bred by executors late J. Calvert.
Commended – A.M. Williams, bred by A. Buckland.
RAMS, 30 MONTHS AND UPWARDS.
1st prize – G. Mackersey
EWE HOGGETTS, UNDER 18 MONTHS.
1st prize – J.L. Herrick, 13 months bred by exhibitor.
2nd prize – A. M. Williams, 13 months, bred by Rev. S. Williams.
Very highly commended – G. Hamilton, 12 months, bred by exhibitor, from Garne ewe.
Highly commended – G.D. Hamilton, 12 months, bred by exhibitor, from Garne ewe.
THREE – YEAR OLD EWE, 30 MONTHS AND UPWARDS, WITH OR WITHOUT EWE.
1st prize – J. L. Herrick, 4 years, bred by S. Brown.

FAT SHEEP.
1st prize – T. Tanner, 5 fat wethers.
2nd prize – T. Tanner, 5 fat wethers.
Highly and very highly commended – H. J. Collins, 10 fat wethers.
Commended – F. W. Nelson.

PIGS.
LARGE BREED: – BOAR.
2nd prize – M. Baldwin.
SOW.
2nd prize – M. Baldwin.

POULTRY, FOWLS, &c.,
Judges – Messrs Taylor, White, and W. Miller.
Steward in attendance – Mr. Frederick Knight.
Turkey – Hugh Campbell – 1st prize.
Ducks – G. Merritt – 1st prize.
Dorking Fowls – Upsale Grey, 1st prize; H. Campbell, 2nd prize.
Spanish Fowls – G.E. Sainsbury, 1st prize; W. Miller, 2nd prize.
Game – G. S. Giblin, 1st prize; 2nd prize, W. MacGlashan; Highly commended, J. S. Giblin.
Brahma – W. H. Simpson, 1st prize.
Any other breed – William Cox, Silver Spangled Polish, 1st prize; W. Miller, Black Polish, 2nd prize.
In all these exhibits the first prize was £1, and the second 10s.

IMPLEMENTS.
Boylan and Co. took the Champion Cup, valued 25 guineas, for the best collection of Implements; also the first prizes for the Mowing Machine, Combined Reaper and Mower, Seed Sowing Machine, Horse, Rake and Double – furrow Plough.
Mr. Alex Jones got the first prize for Single – furrow Plough, which was manufactured by himself.

MISCELLANEOUS PROVINCIAL PRODUCE.
Mr. John Collins of Hastings, was awarded the first prize for fresh butter, and Mrs. O’Dwyer’s of Taradale exhibit, was highly commended.

SADDLERY.
Mr. John McVay obtained the first prize for Provincial made saddlery and harness.

SHEEP DOGS.
1st prize – R. Wellwood’s Snider; 2nd prize, H. McLean’s Traveller; Highly commended, J.H. Bennett’s Sharp.

EXTRA EXHIBITS.
J. Hanning, first prize for assorted Soap; J. Parker, first prize, Horse shoes; H. William’s Pin Fire Breech Loading Gun was highly commended; H. Highley and Co’s., samples of leather obtained a first prize, as did also a handsome double – seated brougham and waggonette exhibited by Mr. Falknor. An extra prize was given to a buggy built by Mr. Vinsen.
Leaping Match. – Prize, £5 for clearing the highest bar, not less than 4ft. from the ground. Three trials for each rise of the bar. Four entries.
Prize – McHardy’s Rowdy.
Prize, £5, for the best jumper over fences, hurdles and water. Three entries.
Prize Douglas’s horse.
Shearing – 1st prize, £2 10s; 2nd prize,£1 10s; 3rd prize, £1. Three sheep each.
Five entries.
1st prize (also J. Collins’ prize) – W. Cheer, 27 minutes.
2nd prize (also J. Collins’ prize) – W. Archie

PRIVATE PRIZES.
Hogskin riding saddle, value £10, for best hack up to 13 stone, presented by Mr. John McVay – Won by Mr Douglas’s Day and Martin.
£5 for the best yearling colt or filly by Terenga, presented by Mr. G.R. Grant – Won by Mr. W. Orr’s Zanoni.
Cyclopaedia of Agriculture, value four guineas, for the best pair of carriage horses, presented by Messrs Dinwiddie, Morrison and Co. – Won by Mr. Rymer.
Case of port wine for the best fresh butter, not less than 10 lbs, presented by Mr. Manoy – Won by Mr. John Collins, Hastings.
One box of tea as first prize, and one bag of sugar as second prize, for the best fresh butter, presented by Mr. G. Scarfe – Won by Mr. John Collins, Hastings.
Silver cup for the best yearling colt or filly by Arab Child, presented by Mr. Allen McLean – Won by Mr. R. Brathwaite.

[…]

Mr. Troutbeck of Petane, arrived at the Thames on Thursday, from Napier, with a herd of 50 head of bullocks, which were sold to Messrs. Fisher and Co. This is Mr. Troutbeck’s first experiment; and although ten days were occupied in bringing the cattle over, if some improvement were made to the road from Ohinemuri to Parawai, he states that he would continue to bring larger herds, sufficient to supply the wants of the district. – Thames Advertiset.

Mass will be celebrated by the Rev. E. Reignier in the school – house, Havelock, on Sunday next, at 11 a.m.

Printed and published by EDWARD HENDERSON GRIGG, for the Proprietors, at the Mercury Office, Tennyson-street, Napier, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1877.

Original digital file

HardingR741_Weeklymercuryoctober131877.pdf

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Date published

13 October 1877

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Newspaper

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Some sections of this newspaper not relating to Hawke’s Bay have not been transcribed – these are indicated by […]

Accession number

741/1365/42724

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