Weekly Mercury and Hawke’s Bay Advertiser 45 – December 29 1877

WEEKLY MERCURY
AND
Hawke’s Bay Advertiser,

A Journal of Commerce, Agriculture, Sports, Politics, and Literature.

Vol. III. – No. 111.   NAPIER, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1877.   PRICE SIXPENCE

COLLEDGE AND CRAIG’S.
TOWN AND COUNTRY
ALMANAC,
DIRECTORY, AND DIARY
FOR
1878
NOW READY.
PRICE ONE SHILLING.
The information contained in the publication will be of important benefit to Business Men, Country Settlers, Visitors, and the public generally.
COLLEDGE & CRAIG,
PUBLISHERS.

PRIVATE SALE
OF
COTSWOLD SHEEP.
THE undersigned has for Sale from 200 to 300 RAMS, selected from 7/8th to 15-16th bred; also, full-mouthed pure pedigreed RAMS, with 2,000 EWES, from ¾ bred to 7/8th, mostly 2 tooth, and Hogs in lots to suit purchasers.
None but private sales will be effected, and purchasers may rely on getting fair value for their money.
Apply by letter to the undersigned, stating number required.
JOHN DAVIS CANNING,
Oakbourne, Wallingford.
16th October, 1877.

[Advertisement]
GRATEFUL – COMFORTING.
EPPS’S COCOA.
BREAKFAST.
“By a thorough knowledge of the natural laws which govern the operations of digestion and nutrition, and by a careful application of the fine properties of well-selected cocoa, Mr. Epps has provided our breakfast tables with a delicately flavoured beverage which may save us many heavy doctors’ bills. It is by the judicious use of such articles of diet that a constitution may be gradually built up until strong enough to resist every tendency to disease. Hundreds of subtle maladies are floating around us ready to attack wherever there is a weak point. We may escape many a fatal shaft by keeping ourselves well fortified with pure blood and a properly nourished frame.” – See in the Civil Service Gazette.
Made simply with boiling water or milk.
Sold only in pockets (tins for abroad), labelled: –
JAMES EPPS & Co.,
HOMEOPATHIC CHEMISTS,
48, THREADNEEDLE STREET, and 170, PICCADILLY,
WORKS, EUSTON ROAD AND CAMDEN TOWN
LONDON.

WAIPAWA COUNTY COUNCIL
NOTICE is hereby given that the temporary office of the Waipawa County Council is at the Court House, Waipawa; and that the days on which it will be open for transaction of business will be on MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, and FRIDAYS.
It is further notified for public information that the office hours are from 10 a.m. till 4 p.m., on the days above specified.
A.W. RAMSAY DAVIDSON,
Clerk Waipawa County Council.
Waipawa, May 14, 1877.

WEST CLIVE AND FARNDON SPORTS
JANUARY 1st, 1878.
WILL be held at Farndon in the paddock kindly lent by R.P. Giffard, Esq.
PROGRAMME.
1.   Maiden Race, 100 yards; first prize, £2; 2nd prize, 10s; entrance, 2s 6d.
2.   Dancing Highland Fling, 1st prize, £1; entrance fee, 2s 6d.
OPEN HANDICAP, 3 events, 100, 200, and 300 yards, 1st prize, £6; 2nd prize, £2; 3rd prize, £1. Entrance 10s.
3.   First Event, Open Handicap, 100 yards.
4.   Throwing Cricket Ball. Prize £2 10s; entrance fee, 2s 6d.
5.   Running High Jump. Prize, £1; entrance, 2s 6d.
6.   Boy’s Race, under 14 years, 150 yards. 1st prize, 15s; 2nd prize, 5s; entrance 1s.
7.   Second Event Open Handicap, 200 yards.
8.   Hornpipe. Prize, £1; entrance, 2s 6d.
9.   Standing High Jump. Prize, £1; entrance, 2s 6d.
10.   Boy’s Race, under 10 years, 100 yards. 1st prize, 10s; 2nd prize, 5s; entrance, 1s.
11.   Third Event Open Handicap, 300 yards.
12.   Vaulting with Pole. Prize, £1; entrance, 2s 6d.
13.   Running Long Jump. Prize, £1; entrance, 2s 6d.
14.   Handicap Hurdle Race, 400 yards, 6 hurdles, 3ft 6in. 1st prize, £3; 2nd prize, £1; entrance fee, 5s.
15.   Running Hop, Step, and Jump. Prize, £1 10s; entrance 2s 6d.
16.   Committee Race, 100 yards, Entrance, 2s 6d.
17.   Greasy Pig. Prize, the Pig.
18.   Tilting in the Ring. 1st prize £3; 2nd prize, £1; entrance, 5s.
A Band will be in attendance.
Entrance, 1s; children, half-price. Traps, 2s 6d each, passengers, 1s.
Sports to commence at 11 o’clock sharp.
Entries for the Open Handicap and Handicap Hurdle Race to be sent to the Secretary stating colors on or before Saturday, December 22nd.
J. L. McILROY,
Hon. Sec.

GOOD TEMPLAR FETE.
TO BE HELD AT
HASTINGS,
In the Show Yards, kindly lent by T. BISHOP, Esq.,
ON JANUARY 1st, 1878.

PROGRAMME –
(To commence at 11 a.m.)
1st.   Maiden Race, 100 yards – First prize, £1; second prize, 10s. Entrance, 2s 6d.
2.   Throwing the Cricket Ball – First prize, £1 10s. Entrance, 2s 6d.
3.   Running Hop, Step, and Jump – First prize, £1; second prize, 10s. Entrance, 2s 6d.
4.   Open Handicap, one event, 600 yards – First prize £3; second prize, £1. Entrance, 2s 6d.
5.   Vaulting with Pole – First prize, £1. Entrance, 2s 6d.
6.   Boys’ Race, under 14 years, 150 yards – First prize, 15s; second prize, 10s; third prize, 5s. Entrance 1s.
7.   Standing High Jump – First prize, £1, Entrance fee, 2s 6d.
8.   Hurdle Race, 300 yards, six hurdles, 3ft. 6in. – First prize, £1 10s; second prize, 10s. Entrance 3s
9.   Throwing Heavy Hammer – Prize, £1. Entrance 3s
10.   Good Templar (Compulsory) Handicap, distance 300 yards. First prize, £1 5s; second prize, 10s. Entrance, 1s.
11.   Catching the Bellman, open to all comers – prize, £2. Entrance, 2s 6d.
12.   Boys’ Race, under ten years, distance, 100 yards – First prize, 10s; second prize, 5s; third prize, 2s 6d. Entrance, 1s.
Entrance for Handicap, 600 yards to be sent to Mr Geo. Boggs, Dickens-street, on or before the 22nd December, 1877.
The Artillery Band will be in attendance
Admission at Gate, 1s.
ROBERT P. BRYDONE,
Secretary.

APPLICATIONS for the office of VALUER for the County of WAIPAWA will be received at the County Council Office, Waipawa, on or before TUESDAY, the 8th January, 1878.
Addressed to
JOHN MACKERSEY,
Chairman.
County Council Office, December 14, 1877.

FOR SALE,
THE LEASE and Goodwill of the well-known OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, Auckland, on account of the Proprietor leaving the Colony.
LEASE Seven years to run, at low rental.
This Hotel is doing one of the largest trades in the Colony, and is thoroughly established.
The purchaser will not be required to take the collection of Curios and Pictures.
For further particulars, apply to
J.M. and J. MOWBRAY,
Land Agents, Auckland.
Or to the Proprietor,
EDWARD PERKINS.

WANTED KNOWN – The price of “Wanted” Advertisements in the DAILY TELEGRAPH is at the rate of ONE SHILLING per insertion for 20 words.

M.R. MILLER,
STOCK AND STATION AGENT
HAS FOR SALE,
SHEEP STATIONS
of various extent, and
FREEHOLD PROPERTIES,
Stocked and Unstocked, in the Provinces of Auckland, Hawke’s Bay, Wellington. Canterbury, and Otago.
For particulars, apply at the office, Browning-street, Napier.
RAMS FOR SALE.
LINCOLN
Lincoln-Leicester
Leicester
Cotswold
Merinoes,
All First-class Flocks.
STORE SHEEP. – Various Lots of Store Merinos Ewes and Wedders for Sale.

NOTICE.
TO
THE READING PUBLIC!
COLLEDGE & CRAIG.
DEALERS IN
BOOKS,
RARE AND RACY, RELIGIOUS AND ROMANTIC
HASTINGS-STREET,
Napier.

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS.
NAPIER – TAKAPAU.
TIME TABLE.
DOWN.
WEEK DAYS.   SUNDAYS.
A.M.*   A.M. +   A.M.   P.M.   P.M.
Spit, depart   7.40   11.0   3.40
Napier arrive   7.50   11.10   3.50
Napier depart   6.45   7.55   11.30   4.10   2.30
Farndon depart   7.10   8.20   11.55   4.35   2.55
p.m.
Hastings, depart   7.35   8.45   12.20   5.0   3.20
Paki Paki arrive   9.5   5.18
Paki Paki depart   7.53   9.13   5.20
Te Aute arrive   8.32
Te Aute depart   8.35   9.55   6.5
Kaikora depart   9.15   10.35   6.45
Waipawa, depart   9.35   11.15   7.25
Waipukurau arrive   9.55   11.15
Waipukurau depart   10.0   11.30
p.m.
Takapau, arrive   10.50   12.20
* On Monday and Thursday only.
+ On Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday.
UP.
WEEK DAYS.   SUNDAYS.
A.M.   A.M.   P.M.   P.M.   P.M.
Takapau, depart   2.20
Waipukurau, dep.   7.10   3.15
Waipawa, depart   7.30   3.35
Kaikora, depart   7.50   3.55
Te Aute arrive   8.13
Te Aute depart   8.33   4.35
Paki Paki, arrive   9.10   5.15
Paki Paki, depart   9.12   5.22
Hastings, depart   9.32   1.0   5.42   5.20
Farndon, depart   9.57   1.25   6.7   5.45
Napier arrive   10.22   1.50   6.32   6.10
Napier depart   7.20   10.25   3.0
Spit, arrive   7.30   10.35   3.10
*Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday only.
Passengers are requested not to enter or leave the carriages while in motion.
Season tickets issued to and from all Station. Apply to the Manager.
To ensure despatch, Parcels should be booked fifteen minutes before the starting of the Train.
W.J. MILLER,
General Manager.

JUST LANDED AND OPENED OUT –
3 WOOD’S COMBINED REAPERS AND BINDERS, (complete)
Nicholson’s, Lennan’s Combined Reapers and Mowers, double speed
Tysack’s Scythes
Harvesting Tools of all kinds
Hand Corn Mills.
H. WILLIAMS.
JUST LANDED,
Ex “Mataura,” from London –
3 tons Sheet Zinc, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
2 tons Ewbank Patent Nails
1 ton Ewbank Patent Spikes
2 tons Floor Brads
1 ton Horse Shoes
1 ton Fencing Staples
2 tons Hoop Iron, 1 ¼, 1 ¾ in.
¼ ton Cooper’s Rivets
1 cask Norfolk Latches, Tower Bolts, [?]
Furniture, Finger Plates, etc.
1 cask 6 and 7 in Real Patent Rim Locks
1 case Carpenters’ Rim Locks, Bow [?]
Dead, Plate, Mortice, Half [?]
bitted Mortice Sash, [?]
2 casks Nettlefeld’s [?]
Brass
2 cases E.P. [?]
[? damaged, illegible original]
20 cases General Ironmongery.
H. WILLIAMS,
Furnishing Ironmonger,
Hastings-street.
JUST LANDED,
Ex “Lochnagar,” –
15 Garton and King’s celebrated Cook Stoves, 2ft 9in and 3ft
5 tons Wire Nails, 1 ½ to 6in.
H. WILLIAMS,
Cheap Hardware House,
Napier.
TO ARRIVE,
Ex “Hurunui”
Perforated Zinc, Wire Netting, Oval Tubs, Buckets, Tee, Butt, and Chest Hinges, Brass Cocks, all sizes, Grubbing and other Hoes, Copper and Brass Wire, Counter and Provision Scales.
10 tons Corrugated Iron, 5 to 6ft.
TO ARRIVE,
Ex “Renfrewshire,” and “Celestial Queen” –
Carpenter’s Tools, from Mathieson’s, Sorby’s, Ward and Payne’s, Atkin’s and other good makers.
Gilpin’s Augers, Stubbs and Turner’s Files, Horse Rasps, &c.
Curtis and Harvey’s Sporting Powder
Westley Richards’ Breechloading Central-Fire Guns, Chokebore Guns
Tisdall’s Single and Double-Barrel Muzzle-Loaders
Shot and Powder Flasks and Sportsmen requisites of every description.
Snider Carbines and Ammunition
Hornsby’s Ploughs, Single and Double Furrow, Plough Fittings, &c.
H. WILLIAMS.
General Ironmonger,
Hastings-street.
ON HAND,
Ex “Helen Denny,” and other late arrivals –
Corrugated Iron, 6 to 9ft.
Oils – Neatsfoot, Colza, Castor, Kerosene
Stockholm Tar
Axles – Dray, Cart, and Buggy
Springs – Elliptic Buggy and Cart, Sofa and Mattrass [Mattress] Springs
Bolts – Coash, Carriage, and Engineers’.
FURNISHING IRONMONGERY,
Comprising –
Copper and Enamelled Furnace Pans, Washing Machines, Brass Muslin Pans, Knife Machines, Mangles, Scales and Weights, Oval Boilers, Pots, Kettles, Frying Pans, Sad Irons, Charcoal and Box Irons, Brush-ware, Buckets, Tubs, Cutlery, Enamelled Saucepans and Dishes, Mugs, Knife Polish, Knife-Boards, Bedsteads, &c.
H. WILLIAMS,
FURNISHING IRONMONGER,
Hastings-street.

WANTED FOR FENCING,
TENDERS for about 3 miles Boundary Fencing, between Tutira and Moeangiangi, to Split posts (timber on ground), and Erect Posts, 5ft. and 6 Wires, (wire & staples laid on the ground); also about 4 miles Subdivision. Posts and material found, for Splitting Posts and Erecting, on Tutira Station.
Apply to
GEO. MERRIT,
Clive.
Or to
STUART AND MERRIT,
Tutira Station.

ANNUAL RAM FAIR.
THE ANNUAL RAM FAIR under the auspices of the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Society, will be held at the Society’s Yards, HASTINGS, ON THURSDAY 7th FEBRUARY, 1878.
By order of
THE COMMITTEE.

[2]   THE WEEKLY MERCURY

DIRECT TELEGRAM FROM EUROPE.
[From our Own Correspondent]
England Determines to Mediate.
Situation Most Critical.
The Worst Feared.
LONDON.
YESTERDAY, December 21.
England has declared her determination to mediate at once. England is reported to have purchased the Turkish fleet, and ordered all war vessels to get ready for sea.
The situation is most critical, and the worst is feared.

England Declined to Mediate.
We received the following cablegram from our own correspondent at 4.40 p.m. on Saturday:-
LONDON, December 21.
Correction – England has declined to mediate between Russia and Turkey.

[…]

INTERPROVINCIAL.
[FROM THE PRESS AGENCY.]
WELLINGTON.

[…]

THE NEXT CENSUS.
The Gazette just issued notifies in a proclamation that the census of the colony shall be taken on the 4th of March, 1878.

[…]

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   3

[…]

AUCKLAND.
PASSENGERS PER TAUPO.
December 21.
The Taupo sailed for the South yesterday afternoon. Passengers for Napier – Messrs Watson, Hennelly, Teasdale, and Miss Greenville.

[…]

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

CAUSES OF COMMERCIAL DECLINE.
SIR, – Reverting to this subject, I come now to the leading cause of commercial depression – one before which those I have already mentioned appear insignificant, and to which, indeed, they are in a great degree attributable.
Since writing my last, I have noticed that a good authority – the Economist, in a late issue, in suggesting a remedy for the falling-off of trade, takes very similar grounds to those which I have already indicated. It says:- “The means of consumers can only be augmented by the operation together, in pairs, or singly, of three causes – (1) greater frugality, harder work, and more invention; (2) unusual productiveness of the seasons; (3) the accumulation of ordinary savings over a considerable period of years.   We attach more consequence to the first of these conditions.”  “Harder work,” I may add, should not be taken to apply to the industrious members of the community who do their full share – often much more, already; nor is such a construction intended by the writer. Professor Price, in the Contemporary Review, says:- “That cause is one, and one only:- over-spending, over-consuming, destroying more wealth than is reproduced, and its necessary consequence, poverty. This is the real fons mali” [fons et origo mali: source and origin of evil].
The question then arises: What is the main cause of this over-spending, and destruction of wealth? – and the true answer, I maintain, is not “free-trade,” but “the liquor traffic.”
In the year 1858, the expenditure on intoxicating liquor in the United Kingdom was £91,000,000; in 1866 it reached £114,000,000; and in 1876 it had increased to £147,000,000.
These figures merely represent the direct expenditure in liquor. The indirect damage to the country is the loss of time of skilled workmen, in accidents, disease, and premature death; as well as from consequent crime and repressive measures; and pauperism and its relief – is at the very lowest estimate equal to the direct outlay; and the result remains, that after making full allowance for revenue contributed, the amount yearly absorbed by the liquor traffic equals the entire annual export of British manufactures.
It is a notorious fact that the liquor traffic employs less labor for the capital absorbed than any other branch of trade; but the extent of the difference may not be generally known. The proportion is as two to fifteen. It is thus an organisation which, to an extent unapproached by any other, swallows up the wealth of the many for the aggrandisement of the few.
Concurrent with the increasing amount spent in liquor is the steady growth of pauperism. The number of persons annually applying for relief in recent years (as shown by Mr. Dudley Baxter, in his work on “National Income”), being about one in ten of the whole population. And this result, which is taken from official records, makes no account of the large number who, while making no direct appeal to the State, are a burden upon their friends, or private charitable institutions.
There is thus presented the painful spectacle of a country, the wealthiest on the face of the earth, with immense undeveloped resources, and every facility for their development, in a state of commercial stagnation. On the one hand are its warehouses overstocked with the necessaries and comforts of life, for which the manufacturers are vainly seeking a profitable market, while on the other hand is a large and increasing section of the population in dire and urgent need of these very articles, but unable to obtain them – yet at the same time contributing their full share to the support of that business which, at its present rate of increase, threatens in time to absorb the whole of the available wealth of the country, and starve every reproductive industry out of the field.
If half the amount swallowed up in the insatiable vortex of the liquor traffic – an amount contributed entirely by the productive classes, and sad to say, mainly by the poorest section – were diverted to the legitimate industries of the country, few need remain idle, and there would be little complaint of dullness of trade.
The figures I have quoted are mainly from those given by Mr Hoyle, who derives them from official returns, and in every instance states his authority. No one giving careful consideration to the facts he has collected, regarding the liquor trade in its influence on national prosperity need look further for the principal cause of commercial stagnation.
It is only when the magnitude of the evils arising from the liquor traffic are recognised in their commercial, industrial, and economic aspects, that any practical measure may be expected to be taken for their remedy. So long as the subject is treated on purely moral and social grounds, it will be considered a question which statesmen can afford to ignore.
The battle has to be fought between England’s manufacturing industries and her liquor trade. The latter, like a vast cancer, steadily increases in bulk and malignity, while the former pines under its influence, and must inevitably perish if swift and decisive measures are not taken to remove the parasite growth. To secure this end, the requisite power need only to be placed in the hands of the people. They may be trusted to use it aright, and to accomplish in a few years the task which centuries of legislation have failed to perform. We shall then have few complaints of bad trade; and the prosperous workman will find his hands too full under an enlightened free-trade policy to sigh for a return of the dark ages of “protective duties.”
Your correspondent “J. McDougal” takes exception to portions of my former letter, but does not dispute its principal contention, that commercial depression is not owing to a free-trade policy. It was scarcely fair, in quoting my words, to omit qualifying expressions; and his statement that I trace the causes of bad trade “to that troublesome individual – the man who labors for his living” – is the reverse of correct. If I were replying to your correspondent, I would support my reference to the baneful effects of trade unions; but the subject lies outside the main question. He has mistaken the drift of my first communication which professed to be merely preliminary, and intended to evoke discussion on an important subject, touched on very lightly by yourself in a recent leading article. – I am, &c.,
R. COUPLAND HARDING.
Napier, 19th December, 1877.

COUNTY VOTING.
SIR, – I think there must be an error in the telegraphic report of that part of Sir George Grey’s speech at Auckland having reference to County voting. The Premier is reported to have said, “Counties were broken up into ridings, and the law made it possible that many men had no vote at all; also that many had one vote only, while others had as many as forty-five votes.” For “forty-five” I think should be read “four or five,” because by the Counties Act, clause 41, the highest number of votes an elector can have in any one riding is five. Property of the value of less than £50 gives the owner one vote; of £50 but less than £100, two votes; of £100 but less than £150, three votes; of £150 but less than £350, four votes; of £350 and upwards, five votes.
Sir George Grey’s policy of manhood suffrage will give the runholder’s shepherd of one year’s standing a vote, and the storekeeper’s clerk the same power, both of whom may not have a shilling stake in the country, or an iota of interest in its welfare present or future, beyond the weekly wage they receive as long as they are employed within its boundaries. I therefore do not think that the present voting qualifications are inconsistent with good local administration, more especially as it is quite within the power of any working man, or clerk, in the country, to save in twelve months sufficient to buy a property that would entitle him to one vote. Neither can it be said that the five votes of a man possessing property of the value of £80,000 is out of all proportion to the one vote given to property of £50 value. If there be any injustice it is on the other side. – I am, &c.,
A. VOTER.
Waipawa, December 20, 1877.

SIR G. GREY’S RECEPTION IN AUCKLAND.
SIR, – I enclose you an extract from an Auckland paper re the above. As one of the Napier Artillery Volunteers, I beg to deny that members of the Battery ever wished to have anything to do with turning out, as they are fully aware that Volunteers never mix in politics. I have reason to believe that if anyone applied to the Defence Minister for us to turn out, it must have been either Messrs. J. McSweeny or H.T.H. Knight, on behalf of the people of Napier. I am, &c.,
NEUTRALITY.

The following telegram was read, which had been sent in reply to a telegram forwarded by the secretary to Mr. Sheehan, on Monday:- “Regret much myself being absent from demonstration, but impossible to attend. J.C. Brown is passenger with Sir George Grey. You can give him the honors meant for me. – JOHN SHEEHAN.” It was stated that Major Lusk had been in communication with the Defence Minister as to what part the Volunteers would be permitted to take as a body in the reception. The following reply had been received:- “It would be contrary to official etiquette to do what Auckland people require, and I don’t think Sir G. Grey would like it. A similar request was refused from Napier at his request. – JOHN SHEEHAN.

[…]

Why is chess a more moral game than cards? – In chess you have two bishops; in cards, four knaves.
When Apollo dipped the god Pan into the sea, what did he come out? – A dripping pan.
When does a shilling lose all its value? – When compared with a crown it is worth less.
What is the difference between Noah’s ark and an archbishop? – One was a high ark and the other is a hierarch (higher ark).

4  THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

[…]

In an English contemporary it is stated that, so great is the feeling of alarm in the country among intending emigrants and their friends of having to face a voyage down the Channel, that the Agent-General of this colony, has found it necessary to intimate, through the columns of the English Press, “that those who receive free or assisted passages to New Zealand will sail in vessels which embark their passengers either at Plymouth or on the Clyde, and thus escape the dangers attendant on the passage down the Channel.”

It is customary at the fall of the season, when people have purchased what they require, for Drapers to hold cheap Clearing Sales, but such is not our intention. On the contrary, in order to give the inhabitants of Napier and surrounding districts an opportunity of obtaining what they really want, we have selected this most festive season of the year to hold our Annual Clearing Sale. A perusal of our advertising column will carry home the fact that we are in earnest. – COMBS & CO. – [ADVT.]

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

The new time table for the departure of the San Francisco steamers from Auckland has now been issued. The next outward mail will leave on the 8th of January, instead of the 16th, thus making an interval of three weeks. After the 8th of January the departures will be at the regular four-weekly intervals.

The Waste Lands Board met on Thursday, the following members being present:- The Commissioner of Crown Lands, Messrs Newton and Kennedy, and Colonel Lambert. A communication from the Secretary of Crown Lands informed the Board of the reservation of 13,600 acres as educational reserves.  In reply to an application from Mr Harwood, of Waipawa, for the appointment of Inspector of deferred payments settlements, the Board agreed to demand the terms under which Mr Harwood would act, and if satisfactory to recommend his appointment to the Government. Four acres for a burial ground at Ormondville, and a similar area for a school site, were set apart. The following applications were then granted:- From Messrs. J. and T. Holden, for 100 acres in the Whakarara [ Wakarara ] district; from Messrs. M.R. Miller and H. Connel, for 600 acres on Mr Taylor’s run in the Otumatahi block; from Mr M.R. Miller, for 600 acres in the same block; from Mr William Common, for 600 acres also in the same block. Mr Duff’s application for 20 acres in the Whakarara district was refused. The Board then adjourned.

In reply to a correspondent, we may state that the effect of the new land laws in Hawke’s Bay will be the raising of the price of rural lands open to selection from ten shillings to £2 per acre.

At Messrs Routledge, Kennedy and Co.’s sale on Friday, two tons of Canterbury bacon and hams were disposed of, and brought from 7½ d to 10d per lb; onions, 4d to 4½ d per lb. A quantity of furniture was also sold, which realised fair prices.

We are given to understand that the members representing the Napier District in the House of Representatives will address their constituents in the Oddfellows’ Hall, shortly after the holiday season is over.

It is so long since the legitimate drama has been represented in Napier, that the arrival of Mr Wheatleigh and company from the South will be hailed with pleasure by the theatre-going public. Mr Wheatleigh comes here under most favorable circumstances, and his own reputation, combined with the former, should ensure to him a most successful season. The first performance of the company was given on Boxing night, on which occasion the Oddfellows Hall was opened as the Theatre Royal, Napier. This new theatre is nearly completed, and when finished will be handsome and commodious, and an ornament to the town.

[…]

A remarkable specimen of fine engraving reached Sydney by the last Californian steamer: It is the Lord’s Prayer engraved with a diamond on glass, and covering a space of not more than 1,000th part of a square inch. It is probably one of the most minute specimens of calligraphy in the world, and can only be made legible by the aid of a very powerful microscope.

Messrs. Neal and Close’s tender for the supply of the Immigration Department, Napier, being the lowest, was accepted, as was also Mr. Palmer’s for the cartage.

Intending subscribers to Mr. Jacob’s art-union are reminded that early application should be made for tickets, as the list is fast filling up. The prizes are not only intrinsically valuable but they exhibit the art and ingenuity that have been brought to bear in the present day in the manufacture of toys.

The Hon. Col. Whitmore, Colonial Secretary, was a passenger to Napier by the Wanaka on Friday. Colonel Whitmore proceeded to Clive Grange, accompanied by the Hon. J. N. Wilson, on Saturday.

The prizes in Messrs Langley and Newman’s art union, now exhibited in their show rooms, Emerson street, are well worthy [of] inspection. They consist, for the most part, of furniture, such as suites for dining rooms, chests of drawers, tables, &c., all made in their own factory, exhibiting that elegance of design and admirable workmanship for which Messrs. Langley and Newman have such a well deserved reputation.

The rain that fell in Napier on Friday was but the tail end of a furious thunder storm, the centre of which appeared to be in the neighbourhood of Paki Paki [ Pakipaki ], where the rain fell in torrents.

A Bazaar was held on the 20th instant in the Town Hall, Waipukurau, in aid of the building fund of the English Church. The stalls which were provided with useful and ornamental articles, were presided over by the ladies of Waipukurau, and the result is extremely satisfactory, the sum realized being close upon £20. Stalls – Fancy work, Mrs Sherman and Mrs Douglas; Cigar saloon, Miss Russell, Miss Begg, and Mrs Drower; Fancy stall, Miss Herbert and Miss Corigan; Fancy goods, Miss Hayes, and Mrs Bornaird; Christmas Tree, Mrs Smith, Mrs Hash, and Miss Hutton. The presiding ladies were ably assisted by several young ladies and gentlemen, also residents of Waipukurau.

The Theatre Royal, late Oddfellows’ Hall, was opened, although not completed, on Boxing night, when Mr Wheatleigh’s company made their first appearance at Napier. The carpenters work will be entirely finished, as well as the stage appointments. The audience will therefore have the full benefit of the alterations so far as comfort and accommodation for witnessing the stage representations, the improvements being mainly with the object of securing increased size, modes of entrance and exit, stage room, and placing every one on a level of equality with respect to seeing the theatrical representation. The decorations of the dress circle and hall will be proceeded with as soon as the theatre is disengaged. Mr Holmes has been employed for some weeks in completing entirely new scenery, and the public will have an opportunity of appreciating this well known scenic artist’s conceptions and workmanship on Boxing night.

At a meeting of the Napier Artillery Volunteers, held on Friday, Mr Pell, late of Dunedin, and a gentleman who has for many years taken an interest in Volunteery, was elected a Lieutenant of the Battery.

Members of the Ancient Order of Foresters will be interested in the following:- “The annual meeting of the Wellington District of the Ancient Order of Foresters was held at the District Chambers, Foresters Arms Hotel, Wellington, recently, D.C.R. E. Tolly presiding. Besides the district officers and delegates from the City Courts, there were delegates present from Napier, Wairarapa, Blenheim, and Palmerston North. The auditors’ report and balance-sheet as read by P.C.R. Brother F. Cooper, one of the auditors, shows an increase of 150 members and £257 7s 1d to the district funds.  The following officers were installed in their respective offices for the ensuing year:- D.C.R., Brother J.T., Bovis; D.S.C.R., T.H. McCanley; D.T., A, Whitford; D.B., J. Birch; Secretary, A.V. Knapp; Auditors, P.C.R., F. Cooper, P.C.R., A. Martin; and P.C.R., A. Jack; Trustees, P.D.C.R., J. Hammond, P.C.R., W. Freeman, and P.C.R., T. Foley. The usual vote of thanks was accorded to the retiring officers.”

The following semi-official statement appears in the Post of Thursday:- “As contradictory reports have been published with regard to the movements of Ministers we have to-day made enquiries into the matter, and find that the Hon. Mr. Sheehan will leave for Auckland direct by the steamer [for] Wellington to-morrow. He will remain there for about a week, and will then proceed to Tauranga and Poverty Bay on official business. After leaving Poverty Bay his destination will be Napier, where he has some private affairs to look after. He will return to Wellington early in January.  Sir George Grey will not accompany Mr. Sheehan, as has been erroneously stated. He will, as we stated some time ago, make Taranaki his first port of call after leaving Auckland.”

[…]

In the Resident Magistrate’s Court on Saturday, the man Lynch was brought up, charged with having stolen a meerschaum pipe, some stamps, and a coat from the Sheep Inspector’s room in the Government buildings early on the morning of Thursday last. Mr Mahon, the clerk of the Armed Constabulary in the Hawke’s Bay district, gave evidence to the effect of having found the prisoner in Mr Peacock’s room, and on questioning him he stated that he was sent there by the Inspector. He afterwards saw the prisoner throw away the coat. The prisoner here stated he was guilty of stealing the meerschaum pipe, as he believed it had been found. The Inspector of Police stated that Lynch had come from Australia in a coal vessel, and ever since could not keep his hands from picking and stealing. His Worship (Mr Beetham) sentenced the prisoner to three months imprisonment with hard labor. – Charles Talbot and M. Duner both pleaded guilty to having imbibed a glass too much yesterday, and were fined 5s or 24 hours imprisonment.

Mr Wheatleigh and Company opened the new Theatre Royal on Boxing night with the pieces “Kerry” and “Baby.” The Otago Daily Times, in its criticism of the piece when played at Dunedin, remarked:- “Kerry” and “Baby,” two plays new to the Dunedin public, were produced at the Princess Theatre last night. “Kerry,” or “Night and Morning,” is a one-act drama by Boucicault, and is full of touching pathos. Mr Charles Wheatleigh’s representation of the faithful servant was in every respect excellent. The part is one in which only an actor of great dramatic ability could succeed and when we say Mr Wheatleigh’s Kerry was a success, we accord him praise to which he is fully entitled. Miss Tilly Andrews made a capital Blanche, and the feeling she worked into the part could not fail to meet with approbation. The other characters, which were secondary ones, were well represented. The comedy of “Baby” may fairly lay claim to be the best of its class ever produced in Dunedin. From first to last it is brimful of sparkling humour. Mr Wheatleigh’s acting in the role of Mr Tracy Coach (Baby’s tutor) is well worth witnessing. Willie S. Paul or the “Baby,” as he is called within his paternal abode, was played by Mr C. Verner, who proved himself to be possessed of more than ordinary ability as a comedian. Miss Daley’s representation of Mary Grafton was lively and vivacious, and the same may be said of Miss Henderson’s Madame Amelia. Mrs Earle played the over-indulgent mamma (Mrs St. Paul) in a realistic manner, though she had not a great deal to do in the character.  Mr Charles Aitken was the part allotted to Mr H. Simmonds, and he carried it through with a good deal of skill. The remainder of the caste was well filled by other members of the company.

It Must Succeed. – Please keep your eyes constantly on our advertisement in the first page. – LEONARD & CO. – [ADVT.]

5. THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

Messrs Large and Townley’s art union will be drawn for on New Year’s eve, at their show-room, Regent-street. A few tickets still remain unsold. For the prize list we refer our readers to our advertising columns.

[…]

In consequence of the difference existing between the time keeping of clocks and watches, several people, intending passengers to town by the train, were left behind at Farndon on Sunday. The disappointed ones say the train left Farndon a quarter of an hour before the proper time; the Railway officials hold a different opinion.

We learn from the Wairoa Free Press that Mr H.J. Williams has resigned the editorship of that journal.

His Worship the Mayor has received a telegram from the Under-Secretary informing him that, in consequence of the Charitable Institutions Bill not having passed, all hospitals will be maintained as formerly, with the exception that, instead of looking for support from the Provincial Government, it will be found by the General Government.

The ceremony of the installation of the officers of the Masonic Lodges of Napier took place on Thursday last, St. John’s Day. The Victoria Lodge, E.C., held its meeting in the afternoon, when Bro. Batham was installed W.M. by Bro. P.M. Kennedy. The members of Scinde Lodge assembled at 7.30 p.m., when Bro. P.M. Price installed Bro. Dransfield, W.M. for the ensuing year.

Mr. Conroy, of Hastings-street, had a splendid show of Christmas meat on Monday. Two sheep from Mr Tanner’s farm are on view, weighing respectively 135 and 141 lbs; also, a bullock from the station of the Rev. S. Williams, and bred by Mr Lyons, weighing 9 cwt 72 lbs. It is excellent beef. There is also a capital exhibit of lamb, suckling pigs, &c.

The Assam, with the Suez mails for Australia, left Galle on the 15th instant. She will probably arrive at Adelaide on Monday next.

The Poverty Bay Herald states that Mr. Ratcliffe, the acting secretary of the Poverty Bay Cricket Club, has received a letter from Mr. Campbell of the Napier Cricket Club stating that in answer to his letter, he (Mr Campbell) has deferred stating when his Club could play Poverty Bay as they were wanting to know when the Australian team would visit Napier. Mr. Campbell says he now learns that the Australians will reach Napier about the beginning of February. The Napier Club wish our men to play them about the same date, in order that the players selected from this district to take part in the match with the Australians may be upon the spot. We think this arrangement a very excellent one, and no doubt our men will fall in with it.

[…]

Mr McCartney, the proprietor of the Greenmeadows Hotel, Taradale, has recently had fitted up a billiard-room, and imported from Melbourne one of Alcock’s prize tables.

We are glad to correct an error that appeared in our report of the bazaar, that was held at Waipukurau the other day. We stated that the proceeds of the bazaar amounted to nearly £20, whereas we should have said the amount taken was nearly £120.

The Fire Brigade met at 7.30 on Thursday evening last for practice. A red and white flag is now hoisted on the day on which a practice will be held. Red uppermost signifies that helmets are to be worn, and white uppermost that fatigue caps are the order of the day.

[…]

We learn that the Postal authorities have arranged that the Taupo mail coaches will leave Napier in future on Wednesdays instead of Tuesdays. This alteration has been made so as to dovetail in with the Wellington line of coaches. As the down coaches will arrive on Saturday evenings, passengers will thus be enabled to leave for Wellington on the following Monday morning.

On Wednesday, 4 inebrates [inebriates] who had been found drunk on Christmas Eve, and had spent their Christmas in the lock-up were brought before Mr Beetham. His Worship after admonishing them as to their conduct, discharged them all. They left the Court, and in their joy at escaping so easily wished His Worship “A Merry Christmas.”

We learn from the Press Agency that a portion of the land line north of Powell’s Creek has been down since the evening of Monday last, and consequently no cable-grams can be forwarded until communication is restored. This is very tantalising at the present time, when it is impossible to say, what important event a day may bring forth.

[…]

It may interest our Volunteers to know that their share of the division of the prize money for district firing is as follows:- Adults, £6 5s; Cadets, £1 15s.

Midnight mass was celebrated at St. Mary’s Church on Christmas Eve. A large number of people attended, the Church being crowded. The Rev Father Forest celebrated mass, the Rev Father Kerrigan preaching an able and forcible sermon suitable to the occasion. The choir rendered the singing incidental to the mass very nicely, the “Sanctus” especially being well gone through.

Mr J.E. Brown, the member for Ashley, denies by telegram that he has formally severed his connections with the Grey party. That appears to be quite understood. On the other hand, it is said that Mr Rowe has waited on Sir G. Grey, and given the Premier a promise to support his measures.

[…]

The Marlborough Press states that fears are entertained in Blenheim that it is Mr Collie who came to grief in the Taupo country, and not Mr Connell, and promises its readers to search the Napier papers so as to put an end to all doubt. We may therefore inform our contemporary that Mr Collie is in Napier, and hopes to spend a “Happy New Year.”

Mr Thomas Morrison’s Annual Art Union passed off successfully on Christmas Eve. The winners of the three chief prizes were, Mr W. Miller, Mr Scott, and Mr Kelsale.

[…]

Mr G.H. Swan, with his accustomed liberality, entertained his employees, their wives and families, at the White Swan Brewery on Christmas Day. The malt-house, in which the entertainment took place, was most elegantly decorated for the occasion with evergreens, flowers, and flags, a most ruralised entrance being artistically improvised by an arrangement of hogsheads and shrubs, so that the guests passed through a perfectly formed bower to the dining and ball rooms. A large number sat down to a most sumptuous dinner, Mr and Mrs Swan doing the honors, and in the evening the ball-room was crowded with guests who kept up the festivities of the season till the small hours of Boxing-day.

Barlow’s Circus broke camp on Wednesday at Waipawa, and the troupe is now on its way to Napier.

A serious accident happened on Wednesday at Waipawa to a man in the employ of Mr Joseph Price, whose name we have been unable to learn. It would appear that the man, with four others, were on horseback, and were galloping through the township. By some means, he fell off his horse, and when on the ground, the animal kicked him in the forehead. Dr. Todd was in immediate attendance, and had him removed to an hotel, where he still lies in an unconscious state. It is feared that the blow has caused a concussion of the brain.

The Palmerston coach with the overland passengers from Wellington met with an ugly accident on Christmas morning, as it was approaching Takapau. About a mile and a half from the railway station the horses shied at a gate lying by the side of the road, and the coach capsized. By good chance no one was hurt beyond a bruise or two, and the horses were secured by the pluck of the driver, Mr Jones, who, though thrown over the splash board, held on to the reins. Amongst the passengers was the Hon. H. R. Russell, who escaped without any injury.

We have received a specimen of the plant thistle from Mr R.W. Williams, of West Clive, who finding it growing in one of his paddocks, and being struck with the difference of its appearance to that of the common thistle, cut it down, and brought it to this office. The plant has longer, and stronger spikes both on the bulb of the flower and on the leaf than are ordinarily to be seen, but in Napier this description of thistle is common. We imagine it is only a variety of the Scotch thistle.

In the Resident Magistrate’s Court on Thursday, two individuals who had been making themselves overmerry on Boxing Day pleaded guilty to the charge, and were each fined 5s and costs, or the usual alternative of 24 hours imprisonment. William Murphy was brought up on a charge of lunacy. Murphy informed the Court he had been suffering from the effects of over-indulgence in liquor, but was quite well now, and was desirous of going back to his work. Dr. DeLisle informed the Court that he examined Murphy on Wednesday, found him equally as sane as either himself or His Worship. If he kept from drink, he would be all right, but if he imbibed more alcohol he would probably not survive from its effects. As it was necessary that a proper certificate should be obtained, the man was remanded until next day.

We learn from Melbourne of a melancholy accident which occurred at Melbourne on Sunday the 16th instant. The full particulars are not to hand, but from what we can learn it would appear that on the evening of the day named a severe gale was blowing, during which a chimney of a house tenanted by Mr Marks, a chemist, was blown down; the bricks smashed through the roof, and some fell into Mr Marks’ bed-room, where there lay asleep on the bed at the time Mrs Marks, and her adopted child. Mr Marks was absent from home at the time of the accident. Both Mrs Marks and the child were killed by the fall of bricks. The unfortunate lady is a sister of the wife of Mr D. Levi, of Hastings-street, Napier. The fatal accident, as may be supposed, caused no small sensation in Melbourne, as the deceased lady had a large circle of friends, by whom she was held in high estimation.

6  THE WEEKLY MERCURY

We learn that the tender of the Manager of the DAILY TELEGRAPH for advertising for the Hawke’s Bay County has been accepted, and that Messrs. Dinwiddie, Morrison and Co. were the successful tenderers for the general printing.

We take the following from the Post of Friday last:- “The quarterly communication of the District Grand Lodge of Freemasons for the North Island of New Zealand, E.C., as held last evening at the Masonic Hall, Boulcott-street, the V.W. D.D.G.M. Bro. C.J. Toxward presiding. The principal business was the nomination of a District Grant Master, as a successor to the late Bro. Sir Donald McLean, and Bro. W.S. Moorhouse, M.H.R., was nominated as District Grant Master accordingly.”

To the Editor: Sir, – I am the father of a large family, and being a poor man, I took two of my lads to the Theatre last night to see the great Wheatleigh. I shall say nothing about the little rowdyism that was manifested, it being Boxing Night.  When the piece of “Baby” was on there were four live babies making such a howl altogether in concert as to prevent any person from hearing the play. Would you suggest to the management to place a guinea a head admission on these youthful sucklings? It is done so in other places, and why not in Napier? I have no objection to their infantile music at home, but when I pay to listen to a performance, especially such a one as “Baby,” I do object to the other babies joining in concert.
I am, &c., PATERFAMALIAS.

On Wednesday a cricket match was played between the Star (Napier) and the Waipawa Cricket Club. The Star, who arrived by train, found that only nine of the Waipawa team could be mustered. They very generously at once agreed to play nine against nine, and succeeded in winning the game by five wickets and twenty runs. Messrs McIntosh and Wood made a good stand, but the remainder of the Waipawa side made but a poor show.

It was notified to the Sunday School scholars of St. John the Evangelist on Sunday last that their annual school treat would take place yesterday, and they therefore proceeded to Farndon by the mid-day train to enjoy their picnic.

A Cricket match took place on Wednesday at Waipukurau between an eleven of the Napier Cricket Club and a similar number of the Waipukurau Club. The day was beautifully fine, and a capital game was played. The match eventuated in the Napier men winning by eight runs.

[…]

Says the Hew Zealand Herald: – “That ladies are ornamental, is an axiom admitted on all hands. That they are useful, too, was admitted by the fortunate escorts of ladies who graced by their presence the Theatre when Sir George Grey harangued them on Wednesday night. To the repeated question, “Can I go upstairs?” the answer was obdurately returned, “Have you a lady with you?”  If not, it was emphatically a case of “no go”. One gentleman, who wished to hear, but objected to the crush, proposed that he should take up the lady depicted in red and black at the door of Theatre. The answer was that she was not a lady. What is the definition of one, that is of this period?”

Writing on the subject of the new Lands Act, the Thames Advertiser, in a leading article, says:- “There can be no doubt that the rise in the price of land will keep back settlement and preclude numbers of working men who are seeking for lands from obtaining freeholds for themselves and families to settle down upon. We have no lands worth £2 per acre to offer, and expect none to be opened. The Auckland Board recently attempted to raise the price of land when they offered a block at the Wairoa (East Coast), but those confiscated lands were put up at such a price that the result was not a single offer was forthcoming at the time of sale, and it may be taken as a sample of the result in general to be expected from the absurd and conflicting legislation of the session just closed.”

[…]

In our advertising columns will be found the Railway Time Table as fixed by the General Manager for New Year’s Day races and sports.

We call attention to an advertisement in from which it will be seen that persons desirous of obtaining servants to arrive per Renfrewshire should make their application in writing to the Immigration officer, and thus secure priority of choice.

We learn that three lads are missing at Port Ahuriri, who by some means have got adrift in a boat. Two of the lads are sons of Mr Denholm, and the other is a youngster named Brown. Two boats are out in search, in one of which are Messrs. Guthridge and McKenzie, and in the other Messrs Wilkie and Keeble. It is to be hoped before night the efforts of the rescuing parties will be rewarded by finding the lads all right. – Daily Telegraph, Dec. 28th.

[…]

INTERPROVINCIAL.

[…]

WELLINGTON.
December 27.
Steps are being taken, to form a company for laying a tramway through the city.

AUCKLAND.

[…]

THE NATIVE MINISTER.
The Hon J. Sheehan has received a telegram from the chief Toha inviting him to visit the Ngatikahungunu [ Ngati Kahungungu ] tribes.

[…]

HAVELOCK RACES.
THE annual races at Havelock were run on Boxing day, and afforded an attraction not only to country settlers of the surrounding districts, but also to Napier residents. The day was all that could be desired by holiday makers, and a large assemblage of these had gathered on the course by mid-day. Vehicles in Napier failing to supply the demand on their services, a large proportion of those who left town proceeded to Havelock by train to Hastings, and a good business must have been done between the two townships in the conveyance of passengers to and from the railway station. The course itself was not in anything like good condition, being apparently, in much the same state as it was when it came out of nature’s hands. To the fastidious and carping this might have offered an occasion for uncomplimentary comment, but to those who went to see horses run on their merits, to enjoy the heat of the sun, and escape from the monotony of home, office, or shop, the roughness of the course was of little moment. There was no grand stand, nor was one wanted, and an empty case served the Judge as vantage ground. This was placed in the weighing yard, which itself bore evidence of how much can be done when there is a will. The Committee are to be congratulated on their management. They were appointed to get up races, and they provided an excellent day’s sport at the least possible expense, thus securing a considerable sum of money to be run for.
Mr F. Sutton, M.H.R., was Judge, and Mr J. Price starter.
The first on the programme was the HURDLE RACE of 20 sovs; about two miles, over six hurdles 3ft 6in high; open to all horses; entrance, £2; welter weights.  For this there was three entries
Mr W. Broughton’s Hapi (Peebles) 1
Mr Hickey’s Rowdy (Cooper) 2
Mr G. Smith’s Dunrobin (Brimmer) 3
Rowdy took the lead and kept it till the fourth hurdle was neared, which was jumped by Rowdy and Hapi almost simultaneously; Dunrobin baulking at the hurdles more than once was clean out of the race at the fourth flight. From the fifth hurdle to the finish there was a good race between the other two, Hapi passing the stand a winner by a length and a half.
For the Hack Hurdle Race there were five entries.
Mr Hart’s Pumice   1
Mr G. Smith’s Yankee Grab   0
Mr Anderson’s Dandy   0
Mr Rameheima’s Mata Wahine   0
Mr McGee’s Ace of Spaces   0
This was an easy race for Ace of Spades, who took the lead, and cantered in at his leisure, the other horses being nowhere. Pumice came in second, and his owner at once lodged a protest against the Ace, that horse having been trained and entered under a wrong name. The protest was sustained, and Pumice took the money.
MAIDEN PLATE, 20 sovs; one mile and a half; open to all horses that have never won an advertised race of more than £10; entrance, £2; weights for age.
Mr G. Smith’s Sybil (Warren)   1
Mr Hone Rutahi’s Pukuri (Gooseman)   2
Mr W. Heslop’s Crazy Jane (Pell)   3
Four horses had been entered for this race but Pakowhai did not come to the post. A good start was effected. Pukuri getting the lead closely followed by Sybil. At the mile Sybil collared the Maori, and kept the lead till the end. Crazy Jane made an ineffectual attempt for second place towards the finish, but Pukuri easily held his advantage.
TROTTING MATCH, 5 sovs., and entrances added; three times round the course; catch weights; entrance, £2.
Mr W. Couper’s Ned   1
Mr Jas. Couper’s Little John   2
Mr G. Smith’s Tommy Dodd   3
This was one of the most interesting races of the day. Mr W. Couper’s grey pony Ned, though much the slowest trotter of the three, from start to finish kept the even tenor of his way, disturbed by nothing. He was never passed, and came in the winner, offering an example of what perseverance can do. The other two continually lost ground by breaking, which they always did when they got alongside of each other.
HAVELOCK HANDICAP, 50 sovs.; two miles; nomination, £1; acceptance, £3; top weight, 10st; weights to be declared on December 15, acceptances on the day of the races in the weighing-yard.
Mr G. Smith’s Sybil, 6st 4lb (Native)   1
Mr R. Farmer’s Hgaro, 9st 4lb (Warren)   2
Mr H. Hickey’s Maori Weed, 10st (Gooseman)   3
Mr Paremena’s Tare, 9st.   4
Mr W. Beamish’s Bossilia, 8st 9lbs   0
Mr W. Heslop’s Ad Valorem, 6st 4lbs   0
Mr Stewart’s Tamatia, 6st 2lb   0
This was of course the principal event and created the greatest interest. Bossilia jumped off with the lead, but before half a mile had been covered, Ngaro took first place, and, hard held, kept it against Sybil. The match was entirely between those two, Maori Weed and Tare having a race of their own some distance behind and the others being nowhere. Just before the finish, Ngaro met with an accident, getting his hind leg severely cut above the pastern, this enable Sybil to win the race.
HACK RACE, 10 sovs.; one mile; entrance £1; catch weights.
Six entries; won by Mable May easily.
RAILWAY STAKES, 20 sovs; one mile; entrance £2; weights for age.
Mr Paremena’s Tare (Peebles)   1
Mr W. Broughton’s Never Miss (Brimmer)   2
Mr Hamuera’s Hinena   3
Mr Heslop’s Queen of the Meadows   0
Ngaro and Maori Weed had also been entered, but were scratched, leaving a field of four. This was a capital race between Tare and Never Miss, and was won by the former by about a length and a half.
The Consolation Handicap of £15 brought the day’s sport to a close.  This was won by Never Miss.

WAIPAWA CALEDONIAN SPORTS
THE above sports (which have now become an annual event in Waipawa) came off on Wednesday, in a paddock kindly placed at the disposal of the Committee by Mr Collins. There was a large number of persons on the ground, the day being very fine, but extremely warm. Altogether there were 23 events, which were got through spiritedly, the Committee being untiring in their efforts to make the annual gathering a success, which, no doubt, in every respect it proved to be. There was some very keen competition for the different events, in the foot racing especially, some of them proving very exciting, and resulting in very close contests. The Committee deserve great credit for the energetic manner in which they carried out the programme, every event passing off without the slightest hitch. The following is the programme: –
THROWING THE HEAVY HAMMER (22 lbs.) Prizes, £3 and £1 10s; 3 entries. – 1st

THE WEEKLY MERCURY   7

prize, Alexander Peebles, 54ft 9in; 3nd prize, J. O’Callaghan, 49ft 7in.
PUTTING HEAVY STONE (22lbs)
Prizes, £3 and £1 10s; 5 entries. – 1st prize, J. O’Callaghan, 27ft 9in; 2nd prize, R. McKay, 27ft 4in.
BEST BAGPIPE PLAYER.
Prizes, £4 and £1 10s; 4 entries. – 1st prize, Cl Finlayson; 2nd prize, M. McKay.
MAIDEN RACE (300 YDS)
Prizes, £2 10s and £1; 10 entries. – 1st prize, J. Hodge; 2nd prize, E. Browne. Won by a yard.
THROWING THE LIGHT HAMMER (16lbs)
Prizes, £2 10s and £1; 8 entries. – 1st prize, Alex Peebles, 82ft 11in; 2nd prize, J. O’Callaghan, 78ft 9in.
PUTTING THE LIGHT STONE (16 lbs)
Prizes, £2 and £1; 11 entries. – 1st prize, J. O’Callaghan, 41ft; 2nd prize, A. Peebles, 37ft 4in.
MEN’S FOOT RACE (400 yards)
Prizes, £3 10s and £1 10s; 5 entries. – 1st prize, Ridings; 2nd prize, Lambert. This was a very good race, Lambert came up splendidly at the finish, being only a yard from Tidings.
HOP, STEP, AND LEAP.
Prizes, £2 10s and £1; 9 entries. – 1st prize, Hone, 36ft 11in; 2nd prize, B. Dennehay, 36ft 9in.
BOYS’ (UNDER 14 YEARS) FOOT RACE (300 yards).
Prizes £2 and £1; 7 entries. – 1st prize P. McGreevy; 2nd prize, H. Fletcher. Young McGreevy got away with the start and kept it all the way, winning easily.
DANCING HIGHLAND FLING.
Prizes £3 and £1; 4 entries. – 1st prize, G. Gillies,; 2nd prize, W. Stuart.
RUNNING HIGH LEAP.
Prizes, £3 and £1; 4 entries. – McKay and Skeet, equal. It was agreed in this case to divide the money.
MEN’S HANDICAP FOOT RACE (600 yards)
Prizes, £7 and £3; 5 entries. – 1st, Millar (10 yds.); 2nd, Lambert (scratch); 3rd Willis (5 yds). This race resulted in an easy win for Millar, who got the start, and maintained it throughout, Lambert coming in second, and Willis third.
VAULTING.
Prizes, £3 10s and £1 10s; 7 entries. – 1st prize, Nicoll; 8ft 8in; 2nd prize, A. Dewes, 8ft 8in.  This was very ably contested, and resulted as above, Dewes in vaulting off for second place, clearing the same height as Nicoll, who won the first prize.
MEN’S HURDLE RACE (500 yards.)
Prizes, £4 and £1 10s; 5 entries. – 1st prize, Hodge: 2nd prize, Peters. A capital race, which at the finish was very close between Peters and Hodge, only a yard separating them.
BOYS’ (UNDER 14 YEARS) HURDLE RACE (300 yards).
Prizes £2 and £1; 3 entries. – 1st prize, P. McGreevy; 2nd prize, H. Fletcher.
RUNNING LONG LEAP.
Prizes, £2 10s and £1; 5 entries. – 1st prize, Karanama; 2nd prize, J. Peebles.
DANCING LIVERPOOL HORNPIPE.
Prizes, £3 and £1; 5 entries. – 1st prize, D. Murane; 2nd prize, P. O’Shannessy.
WALKING MATCH (900 yards).
Prizes £4 and £1 10s; 5 entries. – 1st prize, Hodge; 2nd prize, Willis. Won easily.
DANCING IRISH JIG.
Prizes, £3 and £1; 5 entries. – 1st prize, D. Murane; 2nd prize, D. Maroney.
STANDING HIGH LEAP.
Prizes, £2 and £1; 6 entries. – 1st prize, Karanama, 4ft 3 in; 2nd prize, McAneny, 4ft 3in. in leaping off with a third competitor McAneny reached the same height as the winner of the first prize.
THREE-LEGGED RACE (150 yards).
Prizes, £2 and £1; 4 entries. – 1st prize, Miller and Peters; 2nd prize, O’Shannessy and Groome.
BOYS’ (UNDER 10 YEARS) FOOT RACE (200 yards).
Prizes, £1 and 10s; 8 entries. – 1st prize, W. Watts; 2nd prize, W. Wells.
MEN’S (OVER 40 YEARS) RACE (300 yards).
Prizes, £3 10s and £1: 3 entries – 1st prize, Gillies; 2nd prize, McBain.
For the Waipawa Cup, which was run in heats, 100, 200, and 300 yard, there were six entries. The race resulted thus:- Ridings, first prize, £6, 13 points; Browne, second prize, £2, 11 points, Lambert, third, 3 points.

THEATRE ROYAL.
The Oddfellows’ Hall was reopened on Wednesday in its new character and name by Mr. C. Wheatleigh and his talented company, and we were glad to see on the occasion so large an audience that before the alterations and additions could not have been accommodated in the building. On a previous occasion we described these alterations and improvements, that have now converted the old Hall into as commodious a theatre as will answer every purpose for some years.
On the curtain rising, the National Anthem was sun by the full strength of the company; the audience stood during its performance, and loudly applauded on its conclusion. After a short interval the performance of Boucicault’s touching drama of “Night and Morning” was begun. Mr Wheatleigh took the part of the faithful family butler, Kerry, and most feelingly portrayed the character of the old and affectionate Irish servant. The piece we have already described. Miss Tilley Andrews, as the supposed widow, was very real in her acting, and so also was Miss Clara Henderson in the character of Desmond’s sister. Messrs. ? Verner, Alexander, and H. Simmonds, respectively as Desmond, Capt. Coldham, and Dr. Millish, sustained their parts well and effectively, and the curtain fell on the happy re-union of husband and wife amidst a round of genuine applause.
The three-act comedy of “The Baby” followed and this racy production kept the audience heartily amused for the rest of the evening. It must be seen to be appreciated.

EAST COAST.
(Wairoa Free Press correspondent.)
The few remaining scabby sheep on the south side of the Waiapu river are being rapidly killed off, and this side at least will be soon clear of this pest which has been such a drawback to the settlement of the East Coast lands.
The coast looks splendid, and negotiations are now going on for the lease or purchase of several blocks of this country from the natives, but the owners of most of these blocks are so numerous, and they have generally such an exaggerated idea of the value of the land, that it is only at the expenditure of much time, trouble, and capital, that you can hope to obtain a clear title to a piece of land. The difficulties are very considerably enhanced by the unnecessarily stringent requirements of the Native Lands Act, 1873, which prescribes that all signatures to deeds affecting the disposal of Native lands, must be signed in the presence of a Resident Magistrate or Judge of the Native Lands Court and a licensed Native Interpreter. The difficulty of getting aged grantees (living at out-of-the way kiangas) in the presence of a Resident Magistrate may be easily imagined. Owing to the unworkable nature of this clause deeds often remain incomplete for a great length of time. In spite however of these drawbacks the available country is being eagerly competed for, though much of it is in a very rough state, it will speedily improve when it passes into the hands of European settlers.

[…]

NOTICE.
PERSONS desirous of nominating relatives or friends in Great Britain for passages to New Zealand are informed that the Monthly List will be closed on the 2nd January, 1878.
Nominated Immigrants on arrival in the Colony may join their friends immediately after inspection, and will not be required to go into the Depot.
Full particulars and Forms can be obtained from the Immigration Officer, Napier.
G.T. FANNIN,
Immigration Officer.

SPECIAL VALUES
offered by
BLYTHE & CO.
CHILDREN’S COSTUMES.
SHAPES – Princess and Jacket Body.
MATERIAL – Tasso, Holland, and Diaper.
SIZE – Children 2 to 7 years of age.
PRICE – 4s 6d to 5s 6d.
CHILDREN’S HOLLAND JACKETS,
2s 6d and 3s 6d. each.
CHILDREN’S SUN HATS, 1s. each.
LADIES PIQUE DRESSES (Slightly soiled) 12s 6d each
LADIES’ WHITE SKIRTS, TUCKED AND EMBROIDERED, 4s 11d each.
LADIES’ MUSLING [MUSLIN] SKIRTS, Fluted, Tucked, Trimmed, 5s 6d up.
LADIES’ POPLIN SKIRTS, Trimmed, 4s 11d.
STRAW GOODS.
An extensive purchase of CHILDREN’S, GIRL’S, AND LADIES’ Straw Hats, newest Shapes, at Greatly reduced prices.
1,000 to choose from.
Prices – 6d, 1s, 1s 6d, 2s, 2s 6d and 3s 6d.
BOY’S RUM PUMS, 6d each.
MILLINERY PROPORTIONALLY CHEAP.
CHEAP PARACHUTES AND UMBRELLAS.
BLYTHE & CO.

8. THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

Shipping Intelligence.

PORT AHURIRI
ARRIVALS.
December.
20 – Manaia, p.s., from Wairoa via Mohaka. Passengers – Messrs Maney, Steed, Langley, and 2 natives.
20 – Kiwi, s.s., from Wellington via the Coast.
21 – Wanaka, s.s., from Southern Ports. Passengers – Hon. Colonel Whitmore, Messrs Elder, Gair, Mabeus, T. Sims, J.C. Churton, C. Brandon, J. Menzies, G. Ormond, Miss Wadsworth, Miss E. Greenwood, Mr and Mrs Way, Mrs Reid, Mr and Mrs Hart, Miss Drummell, Mr and Mrs Wadsworth, Master Buller, Mr and Mrs Austin, and Masters Harding (2).
23 – Taupo, s.s., from Poverty Bay, Tauranga, and Auckland. Passengers – Misses Field, Burns, McKenzie, and Greenville, Messrs Watson, Teasdale, Ellison, Hill, Parker, and Thomson.
23 – Fairy, s.s., from Nuhaka and the Mahia.
23 – Southern Cross, s.s., from Auckland.
25 – Rangatira, s.s., from Poverty Bay. Passengers – Miss Roberts, Rev. Mr Berry, Messrs Grey, Fisher, Brown, Dempsey, and 4 steerage.

DEPARTURES.
December.
20 – Rangatira, s.s., for Gisborne. Passengers – Mrs Brown, Rev. Mr Root, Miss Robinson, Messrs Levien, Skipworth, Lawrence, Roskruge, Parker, Kennedy, and several natives.
21 – Tauranga, schooner, for Dunedin via Pelorus Sound.
21 – Kiwi, s.s., for Wellington via Blackhead. One passenger.
21 – Fairy, s.s., for Mohaka and Mahia. Passengers – Messrs Walker and Lloyd.
21 – Wanaka, s.s., for the North. Passengers – Misses Clark and Wilson, Messrs Williams (3), Sinden, Pugh, Vesty, Shepherd, Wilson, Platford, Gibbons, Bushnell, Hamlin, Grace, Hill, Buttle, Floyd, and Mrs Hill and child.
22 – Lochnagar, barque, for London.
22 – Rangatira, s.s., for Wellington. Passengers – Mesdames Smith and Midgway, Dr. Hamilton, Messrs Elder, White, McDonald, Common, O’Hanlon, Walker, McCarthy, and Wilson.
23 – Silver Cloud, three-masted schooner, for Newcastle, N.S.W. Passengers – Mr and Mrs Catherall and family.
23 – Taupo, s.s., for Wellington and Southern Ports. Passengers – Captain W.R. Russell, M.H.R., Mr Carrington, M.H.R., Messrs Knorpp, Baskow, Barnes, Davies, Elston, Barry, Wright, Best, Cameron, and Faulkner (2).

The p.s. Manaia returned from Wairoa via Mohaka on Thursday morning. Her principal cargo was wool for Murray, Common and Co.
The s.s. Kiwi has been away from Napier for a fortnight, during which time she has been landing stores and picking up wool. She arrived in Napier on Thursday.
The barque Lochnagar, Captain Kelly, cleared on Friday at the Customs. Through the kindness of the agents, Kinross and Co., we have been permitted to see her manifest, and find she has the following cargo on board:- 2129 bales wool, valued at £40,033 15s 8d; 10 bales skins, valued at £114 15s; 19 casks tallow, valued at £240; 1 case curios, valued at £25; total value, £40,413 10s 9d, all shipped by Kinross and Co.
The N.Z.S.S. Co.’s s.s. Rangatira, Captain Evans, left on Thursday for Poverty Bay. She had a quantity of horses for Gisborne, and she took on board about 200 sacks of maize for Wellington.
Our readers will be glad to learn that Captain A. Kennedy has been permanently appointed to the s.s. Taranaki.
We are glad to hear that the Hawea has been well patronised for her trip to the Sounds during the Christmas holidays, and that Captain Malcolm will have temporary command.
The s.s. Rangatira arrived at Gisborne from Napier, at 7 o’clock on Friday.
The s.s. Wanaka arrived in the Bay on Friday, about 2 o’clock, from Southern Ports. She had a large number of passengers, but very little cargo for this port.
The barque Lochnagar got under weigh on Saturday last, at 1.30 p.m., and with the wind then blowing soon had a good offing. We wish she may make a good passage.
The s.s. Taupo, Capt Carey, arrived early on Sunday morning, and was promptly tendered by the Bella and passengers landed. The outward ones left at 10.30 p.m., and the steamer left immediately.
The s.s. Fairy returned from Nukaha on Sunday, having been unsuccessful in landing the whole of her cargo in consequence of an accident to one of the boat’s crew. It appears that the boat was partially full of cargo and laying aground, and William Neal was holding a painter to prevent the boat going out, when suddenly a sea broke under the boat and lifted her ashore knocking down Neal, and it is believed his leg is broken. Capt. Campbell immediately had the man brought on board and bore up for Napier. The unfortunate man was immediately taken to the Hospital.
The s.s. Southern Cross, Captain Holmes, arrived in the Bay at 3 p.m. on Sunday, and was brought inside at 6 o’clock. The principal of her cargo this trip are the masts, yards, rope and rigging for the Mary Wadley.
The Silver Cloud left on Sunday, having been towed out from the breastwork by the Sir Donald.
We have been shown a private telegram which informs us that the schooner Isabella Pratt, Capt. Cross, made the run from here to Oamaru in three days and four hours. She must have been favored with good winds, and as our American friends would say, “She has travelled, you bet.”
The schooner Opotiki is now at Kaiapoi, having gone down with a load of white pine timber from Poverty Bay.
The New Zealand Times says:- “The Pacific Slope has cleared for Shanghai from Hokianga with a cargo of 810,000 feet kauri timber. She has an immense deck cargo, the logs being piled up to a height of twelve feet. Captain Harrington expects to make the run in 35 days; but it is to be hoped that he will have fine weather, for should any of the deck logs get adrift, he will certainly never see China.” The above is an instance in which Mr Plimsoll or some of his friends should interfere.
The Crownthorpe, which vessel will follow the Langstone, is, from all we can learn, a splendid piece of naval architecture and a splendid sailer. From Lloyd’s Register we find she is iron, and was built at Sunderland in 1873, and classed 100 A1. She has turned her Wellington cargo out in excellent condition. She is a chartered ship and now sails under the N.Z.S. Co.’s flag.
The s.s. Rangatira returned from Poverty Bay at 5 o’clock on Saturday, and left again at 12.30. She brought from Poverty Bay 48 bales of dumped wool for Watt Brothers, which were transhipped to the Langstone. Capt. Evans reports fine weather up and down the coast.
The s.s. Southern Cross, Capt. Holmes, left Auckland on Friday at 5 p.m., for Napier direct.
The s.s. Wanaka, Captain McGillvray, anchored in the Bay at 2 o’clock on Friday, and was immediately waited upon by the Bella, and the passengers landed of which there were a large number, amongst whom we noticed the Hon. Col. Whitmore and the Wheatleigh troupe. Her cargo was lightered by the Sir Donald. The Wanaka steamed for the North at 6 p.m. We notice that Mr Pringle, late purser of the Rotorua, is now attached to the Wanaka, and Mr. Hart is removed to the Rotorua.
Considerable speculation has taken place at the Spit recently as to the passages of our present season’s homeward bound ships, and several sums of money have been staked upon the result of their respective voyages.
The Mohaka steamer left the Thames on Saturday, at 9 o’clock, for Napier direct.
The s.s. Wanaka is expected here next Sunday, and should the inward mail steamer arrive in Auckland at her due date, of which there is not much doubt, our mails will be transhipped to the Wanaka, and brought down at once.
The s.s. Rangatira is detained in Wellington till Sunday next. In the mean time she is going on to the Slip. On Wednesday next she will leave for Poverty Bay, when excursion tickets will be issued to Gisborne and back, available for a week, at single fare.
During the detention of the s.s. Southern Cross, she is being repainted, her masts scraped, and her rigging overhauled.
During Christmas Day and Boxing Day the vessels at the port were gaily decorated with bunting and evergreens.
The repairs to the Mary Wadley are being rapidly proceeded with. The new foremast stepped on Thursday.

[…]

POST OFFICE NOTICE.
MAILS CLOSE
For Auckland, per Southern Cross, on Saturday, at 10 a.m.
For Fiji, Sandwich Islands, America, West Indies, the United Kingdom, Continent of Europe, &c., via San Francisco, on Saturday, the 5th of January, 1878, at 9 p.m.
Money Orders and Registered Letters will close at 5 p.m.  Book packets and newspapers at 8 p.m.
For Tauranga, Auckland, &c., via Taupo, by coach, every Tuesday, at 4.30 p.m.
For Clive, Hastings, Havelock, Te Aute, Kaikora, Waipawa, Waipukurau, and Takapau, on Mondays and Thursdays, at 5.30 p.m.: on other days of the week, at 6.30 a.m.
For Norsewood, Danevirk [ Dannevirke ], Tahoraite [ Tahoraiti ], Woodville, Masterton, Greytown, Foxton, Palmerton, Wanganui, Taranaki, Wellington, and Southern Provinces, on Mondays and Thursdays, at 5.30 a.m.
For Motuotaria, Wallingford, and Porangahau, on Mondays and Thursdays, at 5.30 a.m.
For Wainui and Castle Point, on Mondays, at 5.30 a.m.
J. GRUBB.
Chief Postmaster.

BIRTH.
HASTINGS. – At Napier, on December 21, 1877, the wife of W.G. Hastings, of a son. – West Australian papers please copy.

MARRIAGE.
POLLEN – BOURKE. – At Holy Trinity Church, Gisborne, on the 18th December, by the Rev. E. Williams, Henry Pollen, B.A., M.D. of Dublin, to Katherine J. Bourke, second daughter of Peter Bourke, Esq., Gisborne, formerly of County Mayo, Ireland.

DEATH.
PALMER. – At Battery Road, Napier, on the 23rd December, Charles, infant son of Mr Arthur Palmer, aged five months.

[…]

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS.
WELLINGTON-MASTERTON RAILWAY.
FEATHERSTON STATION CONTRACT (FORMATION AND BUILDING).
LENGTH ABOUT 1 MILE 12 CHAINS.
Public Works Office,
Wellington, 20th December, 1877.
WRITTEN TENDERS will be received at this office up to NOON on WEDNESDAY, the 23rd day of January, 1878, for the above contract. They must be addressed to the Hon. the Minister for Public Works, Wellington, and marked outside “Tender for Featherston Station Contract.”  Plans and specifications may be seen at the Public Works Offices, Wellington, Wanganui, Waipukurau, and Foxton. Telegraphic tenders, similarly addressed and marked, will be received if presented at any Telegraph Office by Noon of the same date, provided that written tenders in due form are lodged at a District or Resident Engineer’s Office by the same hour, and accompanied by a cheque on some bank in the town where the tender is lodged; such cheque to be specially marked by a banker as good for twenty-one days, and to be in favour of the Receiver-General’s Deposit Account only, and not to bearer or order. The lowest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted.
By command.
JOHN CARRUTHERS,
Engineer-in-Chief.
N.B. – Plans for this Contract can be purchased at the above offices.

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS.
NAPIER SECTION.
NEW YEAR’S DAY.
ON TUESDAY, January 1st, 1878, the ordinary Time-table will be suspended, and trains will run as follows, viz.:-
SOUTH.   A.M.   A.M.   A.M.   P.M.
Spit dep. 7.40   11.0
Napier dep.   7.55   10.30   11.30   4.30
Farndon dep.   8.20   10.55   11.55   4.55
Hastings dep.   8.45   11.25   12.20   5.20
Paki Paki dep.   9.13   11.45   5.41
Te Aute dep.   9.50   12.20pm   6.15
Kaikora dep.   10.30   12.55pm   6.50
Waipawa dep.   10.50   7.10
Waipukurau dep.   11.15   7.30
Takapau arr.   12.0
NORTH.   .M.   A.M.   A.M.   P.M.   P.M.
Takapau dep.   5.30
Waipukurau dep   7.10   6.10
Waipawa dep.   7.30   6.30
Kaikora dep   7.50   4.30   7.0
Te Aute dep.   8.33   5.5   7.35
Paki Paki dep.   9.12   5.40   8.10
Hastings dep.   .32   3.30   6.0   8.30
Farndon dep.   9.57   3.53   6.25   8.55
Napier arr.   7.20   10.23   4.16   6.50   9.10
Spit arr.   7.30   10.35
Single Fares for the Double Journey between all Stations.
All tickets also available for return on the following day.
W.J. MILLER.
General Manager.
Napier, December 27, 1877.

ARTIFICIAL TEETH.
MR R.C. WILSON
SURGEON AND MECHANICAL DENTIST.

[…]

The Weekly Mercury
AND
HAWKE’S BAY ADVERTISER.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1877.

A LETTER appeared in this journal, the other day, signed “Voter”, in which the writer expressed the thought that the report of Sir George Grey’s speech at Auckland, as telegraphed, could not have been correct. With respect to County voting, Sir George was reported to have said in effect, that as the law stood now one man might have forty-five votes, while another had no vote at all. Our correspondent thought that the word “forty-five” should have read “four or five.” The Auckland papers that arrived by the Taupo enable us to reply to our correspondent, and to give Sir George Grey’s own words. He said, supposing a County to be divided into nine Ridings, “a great mass of the people in the county have only one vote each, but by the system of plurality of voting which  has been created – of individuals being allowed, in proportion to their property, to have five votes to one, it is possible that a single man in a County may have forty-five votes at his command; that is, forty-five votes given from his own proper person, while the majority of the County have only one vote.”  This is perfectly true; in a County divided into nine Ridings, a person owning property in all of them, of above the value of £350, would be entitled to five votes in each Riding. This is of course an extreme case, and it was put by Sir George to illustrate the influence that property can exercise at County elections. Sir George Grey’s argument was this:- A great part of public expenditure is to be conducted by the Counties; the Counties have large powers of local taxation, and they also receive large subsidies from the public revenue;  the public revenue being raised by taxes, levied by the General Government through the Customs on every individual in the County, it follows every person should have an equal voice in the election of those who have the spending of the money. It will be seen that Sir George supplies the answer to his argument. The revenue of a County is derived from two

THE WEEKLY MERCURY.   9

sources, viz, from local taxation, and from General Government subsidy. The subsidy, however, can in no case exceed the amount raised by a shilling rate. The local taxation is levied solely on property, therefore, according to Sir G. Grey’s own showing, property owners only should have a voice in the disposition of the revenue so raised. Property being of unequal values, owners should have votes according to valuation. At present the lowest has one, the highest five. If therefore every man is to have a vote to give him a voice in the disposition of the General Government subsidy, the owner of property to the value of £350 and over should have six votes, that is to say, one for his manhood, and five for his property. We do not think the alteration would be any improvement on the present system.

NOTWITHSTANDING the apparently anxious desire on the part of the Government to place increased power in the hands of the people, there is not wanting evidence to show that the Ministry are resolved if possible to strengthen their own hands. We have all heard the Premier express the wish to see the day when the General Assembly shall truly represent the people, yet we have seen him endeavor to ignore the General Assembly, and to place himself above, and beyond its control. He would gladly give the people the shadow so long as he himself could grasp the substance. Nothing could be clearer evidence of this than his action with regard to the Lands Bill, and of his expressed opinion than [that] the Queen’s representative should be the servant of the Premier. Grant Sir George Grey all that he wants, and the people may have all that they please. Place the Governor in the position the Premier would have him, and then the General Assembly may pass what Acts it likes, but it would rest with the Ministry to say what should, or what should not, become law. With a person of the character of Sir George Grey at the head of affairs, it behoves the people to closely watch any attempt that may be made to infringe upon their real liberties. It will not do for them to accept the barren gift of manhood suffrage to send representatives to Parliament, if they allow the Ministry to be irresponsible. Our Constitution provides for responsible government, but Sir George Grey would over-ride the Constitution and make Ministers responsible to no one. Let us contrast the Premier’s actions with his words. He said recently at Auckland:- “The only way was to create a real responsible system of government; to compel the Governor to take the advice of his advisers – to make those advisers the real governors of the colony.” Now for his actions:- Just before the formal prorogation Sir George Grey advised the Governor to veto the Lands Bill, which had not been sent up for the Governor’s assent with the other Bills. The Governor refused point-blank to take such an unconstitutional step; the Government themselves having carried the Bill through both Houses without a hint, while Parliament was assembled, that they intended to prevent the Bill becoming law. This then, we take it, is Sir George Grey’s notion of “a real responsible system of government,” one which would enable him in defiance of a majority in the House to remain in power, and which would enable him to compel the Governor to veto Bills passed unanimously by Parliament. Every tree is known by its fruit; till now we have had fair words from the Premier and his colleagues, but their actions have in no instance borne out other than that they would if possible place themselves above all responsibility.

THE position of the Napier Hospital is not singular; it is not the only institution of its kind that, in the matter of maintenance, is like Mahomet’s coffin; neither on Earth or in Heaven. The other day the Secretary to the Hospital Board having advertised for tenders for the annual supplies, the Board was hurriedly called together to ascertain whether it had any powers, when the discovery was made that if it had, nobody could say what they were. The Wanganui Hospital, since abolition of provincialism, has been supported by the Borough, but while the Government recognised the cost of its maintenance, nothing definite was decided.  Under these circumstances, we learn from the Wanganui Chronicle, the Mayor felt in somewhat of a quandary as to calling for tenders for Hospital supplies for the ensuing year. To solve the difficulty, he telegraphed to the Government on the 27th ultimo for information as to what he should do in the matter; to which an answer was received by telegram from Mr. G. S. Cooper, the Under-Secretary, stating that he “would be very glad if the Council would invite tenders for Hospital supplies.” His Worship, however, was not so innocent as to be entrapped by instructions so vague as the above, and further telegraphed on the 1st instant, – “Do you mean that Council calls for tenders on behalf of Government?” Then comes this extraordinary reply from Mr. Cooper, on the same date:- “I thought City Council was carrying on Hospital service by means of endowments, public subscriptions, and Government subsidies, and therefore concurred in proposal to call for tenders. If Council intend to give up management, they should I think give notice.  In any case, contracts being necessary to protect public interests, it will be advisable that Council should make the, and Government can take them over afterwards if so arranged.” Here, says our Wanganui contemporary, the principal Under-Secretary for the colony actually confesses his complete ignorance as to who is responsible for the maintenance of hospitals; and further suggesting that if the Council intend to give up the management, they should give notice. Is this how the matter stands, then? Are there no clearly defined duties for local institutions? Is everything optional with them? We rather think the Wanganui Council will be likely to take the hint, and that many more bodies will follow suit, if there is any danger of the Government being backward in advancing the money for assistance. Let us hope that immediate steps will be taken to place these institutions on a more satisfactory basis.

[…]

SIR GEORGE GREY, in his speech to the people of Auckland on Wednesday evening, stated:- “In years gone by he had made up his mind that Auckland was destined to be the Empress of the Southern Seas. Her position was better than any other. He was at one time Governor of New Caledonia and the Loyalty Islands, and he received offers from Fiji, Samoa, and other islands to be taken into the colony of New Zealand. It seemed to him that the great federation notion of the Pacific Islands could have been perfected with a Government resembling the late provincial system. They would have sent out their own Lieut.-Governors, and had a magnificent opening for young men, who were nearly all splendid sailors. This scheme was spoilt by the opening of the Crimean war, and the ceding of New Caledonia and the Loyalty Islands to France.” It is a strange fact there is no official record in the colony of any such scheme ever being in existence. Curiously enough, too, Sir George Grey left the colony and ceased to be Governor on the last day of December, 1853, and war was not declared between Russia and England until the 28th of March, 1854. How the Crimean war could have affected any scheme Sir George Grey had in hand when Governor of New Zealand is a puzzler. To argue after our contemporary’s style, when he apologises for Sir George’s statement anent his visit to Napier, when he says, “If it was not a Hawke’s Bay block, it was a block in some other part of the country,” so we may, we presume, say in this instance, Sir George was probably referring to obtaining for the British Government the Transvaal Republic when Governor at the Cape of Good Hope, and not with respect for obtaining for Great Britain the Fiji, Samoan, and other islands.

[…]

THE following amendment to the Counties Act was moved in the House by Mr Rees, who had charge of the Counties Act Amendment Bill, and was carrying it through for the Government: – “And the Governor in like manner may within the limits aforesaid, from time to time, increase or decrease the number of members to be elected for every Riding, or may apportion afresh the number of members to be elected for each Riding.” Taken in connection with Sir G. Grey’s liberal professions, the above proposed amendment to the Act furnishes another instance of the absence of consistency in Ministerial words and actions. The amendment, however, was strongly opposed by the Hawke’s Bay members, and by the Opposition, and on a division it was lost. The County Councils consequently retain their power to redistribute the representation of the Ridings. The proposal was, all the same, a bold attempt to take away a portion of the liberty enjoyed by County Councils, and to place the power now enjoyed by them in the hands of the Governor, in other words, in the hands of the Ministry. There are some people, and we regret to notice it, who regard all opposition to Sir George Grey as presumptuous wickedness; they have set him up as their political God, and they expect all to fall down and worship at their bidding. We have too much reason to know the value of opposition to add ourselves to the number of Ministerial worshippers. We have also very good reasons for not placing our faith in the Government, the chief of which is that their actions belie their words. There is an old adage that says “smooth words butter no parsnips.” If our readers will take the trouble to compare the amount of honied [honeyed] words with the quantity of solid butter they have had since Sir George Grey has been in power, they will be easily able to account for the dryness of their parsnips.

[…]

RESIDENT MAGISTRATE’S COURT
FRIDAY DECEMBER 21.
(Before His Worship, R. Beetham, Esq., R.M.)

LUNACY.
Thos. B. McVay was brought up on the above charge. After some questions had been put to him by the Magistrate, His Worship remanded him for medical examination.

DRUNK.
Edmund Murphy pleaded guilty to being drunk in a public street at Clive yesterday, and was fined 5s or 24 hours imprisonment.

LARCENY.
James Lynch was charged with stealing a pipe and stamps, the property of Mr Gavin Peacock. Prisoner pleaded not guilty. At the request of Sergeant White, the case was remanded until tomorrow, so as to permit of the attendance of Mr Peacock.

CIVIL CASES.
Le Quesne v. Cooper (Havelock). – Claim £83. Mr Lascelles asked the Court to adjourn the case until the 11th January. In the meantime, he hoped that, with the assistance of Mr Cotterill, who was the solicitor for the plaintiff, he would be enabled to settle the matter satisfactorily out of Court. His Worship adjourned the case until the 11th January.
H. Allen v. Thos. Peddie. – Claim £100. Mr Cornford appeared for the defendant; the plaintiff was unrepresented by council. The Clerk of the Court asked for the fees £1. Plaintiff stated that he had not the money on him, but could get it in half-an-hour. The Clerk said the case could not be gone on with unless the Court fees were paid. Mr Cornford said he would prove to His Worship that there was no necessity for adjourning the case so as to allow defendant to get the money, as he would prove conclusively that the case was beyond the jurisdiction of the Court. The learned counsel then stated the facts of the case from which it appeared that the plaintiff had taken an action to recover the sum of £294 14s 3d in the Supreme Court, and that, so far as he (Mr Cornford) knew, the case was still before the Supreme Court. Mr Cornford then contended that the Court had no power to hear a set-off above its jurisdiction, and quoted several legal authorities in support of his arguments. His Worship agreed with Mr Cornford, that the case was beyond his jurisdiction, and ordered it to be struck out.
Henry Allen v Thos Peddie. – Claim £100. This was an action for a breach of contract. The plaintiff not being able to pay the costs of hearing, His Worship said he could not proceed with the case. Mr Cornford applied for Solicitor’s costs, £3 3s, and Mr Peddie’s expenses for attending the Court. Prior to granting the request of Mr Cornford, His Worship asked plaintiff what he intended doing. Plaintiff replied, “I am not prepared to go on.” Mr Cornford said he would not ask for costs were he not sure the cases brought against his client were unfounded and trumpery. The case was struck out, and His Worship granted costs, £3 13s.
This concluded the business.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 24.

DRUNKENNESS.
Michael Dunner was charged with being drunk at Port Ahuriri on Saturday last. The accused said, after being let out of the Court on Saturday, he took a glass of beer, and having no breakfast it overcame him. Fined 10s., or 48 hours imprisonment.
Fred Bosh, the itinerant fiddler, was brought up on a similar charge, and was mulCted in a similar sum.

CLIVE INEBRATES [INEBRIATES].
Dennis Crowley and James Allen, who had been let out on bail, having picked up drunk on Saturday by Constable Motley, had their bail money, 20s each, forfeited.

SLEEPING AT THE MILLS.
John Hamilton was charged on information with being found illegally on the premises of Mr Ben Johnson, at Port Ahuriri, at four o’clock this morning.
In reply to the Bench, Hamilton stated he was drunk, and was not aware how he got there.
Constable Harvey deposed as to finding Hamilton sleeping on the shavings at Mr Johnson’s saw mills.
Mr Johnson stated that this was the fourth case that had been before the Court of a similar nature. The mills were valuable property, and if a fire occurred he would lose considerable property, and hoped His Worship would make an example of this case.
In reply to questions from the Court,

10   THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

Mr Johnson said the mills were not enclosed.
His Worship then read the Vagrant Act, and said he could not convict the prisoner under it, as the mills were not enclosed. Plaintiff could take a civil action if he desired. If he neglected to fence in his property, the risk was his own. His Worship dismissed the case, warning Hamilton as to his future conduct.

ASSAULT.
John Cleary was charged with having on Saturday afternoon assaulted Fredrick Wells, the landlord of the Exchange Hotel. From the evidence of the plaintiff and others, it appeared that Cleary on Saturday afternoon was sparring in the street with one Edward Haynes, in front of the Hotel. Mr Wells remonstrated with Mr Haynes, whereupon defendant made a rush at the complainant in to the Hotel. After a struggle he was put out of the hotel, but before he was ejected he managed to break two panes of glass, estimated to be worth £4.  Defendant then went into the bar, and after using violent and insulting language threw a pint pot at Mr Wells, which however missed him. At length after some difficulty, he was got out of the house.
The other case was for malicous [malicious] injury to property by the breaking of the windows, in which the same evidence was taken.
The defendant said he was drunk and did not know what happened.
His Worship remarked if the defendant chose to get into such a state of drunkenness, he must be taught a lesson. For the assault he would find him 20s, and costs £3 4s, to be paid forthwith, or be imprisoned for 14 days. For malicious injury to property 10s, and costs 9s, and also ordered defendant to pay £4 for the damage done. This money also to be paid forthwith, or 14 days imprisonment with hard labor.
Mr Lee appeared for Mr. Wells.

ASSAULTING A YOUTH.
Phillip Leyland was charged on information that he did unlawfully assault and beat, on the 18th December, one George Fred. Hardy, a lad eleven years of age, the son of Mr. Hardy, schoolmaster of Clive.
Mr. Lascelles appeared for plaintiff, and Mr. Lee for defendant.
Mr Lascelles called the complainant, who deposed that he was riding on a horse, and going from East to West Clive on Tuesday last. He met defendant, who caught hold of his horse, and thrashed him with a whip. He beat him twice. Mary Wilson and Effie Hicks were with him.
By Mr Lee: When defendant met him, he said, “What did you call my mother names for? I’ll thrash you.” Leyland lived close to his father’s school. There was a quarrel among the lads that morning, and Mrs Leyland came out and ordered the lads away. She came out with a long stick. The other boys called her names, but he (the plaintiff) did not speak, as he was away. There were marks on him when he got home. He told defendant he would tell his father.
S. W. Hardy, the father of the lad gave evidence to the effect that Mrs Leyland had come to him and complained about the lads, but she was so excited that he did not know what she said. He was fishing when his son galloped up to him between three and four on Tuesday afternoon, and complained of his being beaten by defendant. The lad was crying. He saw the defendant, and asked him his reasons for the assault. He replied, “The young swine, I will cut his liver out.” His son was trembling, and had never since been the same lad. His son was slightly marked.
By Mr Lee: His son bore an exceptionally good character for civility.
Effie Hicks, a girl ten years old, and Mary Wilson, eleven years, both testified as having witnessed the assault on complainant by defendant.
Phillip Leyland, the defendant, stated to the Court that when he came home at noon on Tuesday from work, his mother told him that Hardy’s boys had insulted her. At half-past four the same afternoon he met complainant, and struck him three or four times with a whip he had in his left hand.
By Mr Lascelles: He did not know of his own knowledge that his mother had been insulted by plaintiff.
His Worship said the assault was a most unjustifiable one. The defendant had rendered himself liable to a heavy punishment, and had the assault been proved to have one of a more severe nature, he would not have given defendant the option of a fine, but sent him to prison. His Worship fined the defendant £5, and costs £2 7s 9d, to be paid immediately, or in default thereof one month’s imprisonment.

MONEY STEALING.
John Bright, who was charged with stealing £19 from Ernest Jorgenson on the 13th of December, was again brought up.
Mr Lascelles stated that he had no further evidence to bring forward, as his witness was in Wellington.
His Worship did not think the evidence already adduced sufficient to convict, and therefore discharged the prisoner.

CHRISTMAS SERVICE AT ST. JOHN’S.
[BY A VISITOR.]
STROLLING along, a stranger found himself at the open doors of St. John’s Church, Napier;  hesitatingly, he entered the building, and was greeted by a sign as unexpected as pleasing. Groups of the fairest of girls were studded about, intent on decorating the church for the morrow’s Morning Service, Christmas Day. Each group had its one or two cavaliers, who seemed to have enough to do in carrying out the instructions of their fair directors. Nimbly, and expertly, the daintiest of fingers transformed raw material into appropriate emblems and symbols of our Church, and readily did the gentlemen place them where they were ordered. Matrons stood here and there keeping vigil over all. Wreaths of evergreens and flowers passed from hand to hand; bare columns found themselves framed in the graceful microcarpa [macrocarpa] its dark green, brightened by studs of scarlet geraniums. Holly, with its glaring berries, wrapped itself round the gas-burners, whilst nestling in the cap of evergreens lilies of the purest white did silent homage at the Altar and Communion rails. Over the main entrance within the church was seen a scarlet crescent with the words, “The Lord our Righteousness.” Above the vestry door, on a stretch of white ground fringed with evergreens and flowers, was read, “Behold by King Cometh.” To the left was placed another crescent containing, “The Word was made Flesh.” Both crescents were relieved by ovals of blue ground, the right one bearing “Thou shalt call His name Jesus,” and that to the left, “Hosannah to the Son of David.” On either side of the pulpit and reading desk, were purple oval shields; the one reading, “Unto us a Son is Given;” the other “Unto us a Child is Born,” and “God with us,” met the eye as it turned to the organ. The Rev. H. W. St. Hill performed the service, assisted by the Ven. Archdeacon Williams, and the sermon, an able and excellent exposition of the text, taken from 1st chapter Matthew, 23rd verse, was preached by the Bishop of Waiapu. Possibly some of the severer minded might have thought the two evergreen crosses in front within the chancel were misplaced. Could such be aware of the innocency [innocence?] of intent with which they were prepared and placed there; could they have seen the gentle hands of the young and bright faces ignorant of everything appertaining to religious controversy, unconscious of all, save that of the tasteful and beautiful, almost giving life to rough wood; high principled as their feelings are, one cannot but think slight cause of complaint would such have at the emblem of our faith meeting their gaze at every point of the compass.

[…]

SELECT POETRY.

A CHRISTMAS SONG.
The merry bells are ringing across the silent plain,
Hope in each heart is spring now Christmas comes again.
Oh, welcome merry Christmas! Our blithest, sweetest lays
Of gratitude and gladness we carol in thy praise.
‘Tis Christmas brings the meeting of hearts whose love we prize,
The words of pleasant greeting, the fondly beaming eyes,
The assurance of affection that time can ne’er destroy,
The presence of our dear ones to share our Christmas joy.
We hear the anthems pealing, and join the sacred strain
While tides of softened feeling flow o’er each anxious train;
Time brings his freight of shadows to ev’ry human soul,
But Christmas points us onward to reach the cloudless goal.
The sorrows and the trials, the dangers of the way,
The nameless self-denials and cares of ev’ry day
Are by his presence banished; for who hath time to sigh
And brook o’er selfish trouble, when Christmas draweth nigh?
Yet often as we journey we think the world is drear,
The path is steep and thorny, our spirits sink with fear;
Oh, then breaks forth the sunshine we sought so long in vain,
And Christmas finds us singing our grateful songs again!
‘Tis darkest ere the dawning, and, when despair is nigh,
How oft the golden morning has broken through the sky!
And hearts that bowed in sadness have cast their doubts away
Because unlooked for blessings have come with Christmas Day.
And so, whilst we are trimming our holly wreath to-night
Where loving eyes are shining and smiles are beaming bright,
We think of those who sorrow for friends no longer near
And ask for Christmas gladness their stricken hearts to cheer.
Sweet childish voices, singing, repeat the joyful lay
That angel bands came bringing the first glad Christmas Day;
Our gladdest, warmest welcome, our hearts best gifts we bring
To celebrate the coming of Christmas as our king!
S.J.

[…]

11. THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

[…]

12. THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

[…]

13. THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY’S SHOW.
The flower, forest, and vegetable show of the Southern District Horticultural Society, held on the 20th inst., at the Town Hall, Waipukurau, was a decided success, all the exhibits being most meritorious.  The attendance was good, most of the settlers of the surrounding districts, together with visitors from various places, putting in an appearance. A large quantity of plants, &c., were sent in for exhibition only, which were well worthy of notice, being equal in every way to those sent in for competition.
The Autumn Show will be held in Waipawa in the month of March, when it is expected that the exhibition will be superior to any ever held in Hawke’s Bay.

PRIZE LIST.
POT PLANTS.
Collection Greenhouse plants, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
(Single specimen) Cactus, 1st prize, John Harding.
Collection Fuchsias, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
Fuchsia single specimen, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
6 Pelargoniums, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
6 Cottage Window Plants, 1st prize, Miss Rosa Williams.

CUT FLOWERS.
6 Carnations, 1st prize, W. Scott, Esq.
6 Picotees, 1st prize, W. Scott, Esq.; 2nd prize, W. Scott, Esq.
3 Picotees, 1st prize, W. Scott, Esq.; 2nd prize, W. Scott, Esq.
2 Button-hole Bouquets, 1st prize, W. Scott, Esq.; 2nd prize, Sturm and Sons.
1 Collection Antirrhinums, 1st prize, w. Scott, Esq.
1 Bridal Bouquet, 1st prize, Miss M. Sturm; 2nd prize, Mrs. R.C. Sturm.
6 Roses, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
Best Collection Picotees, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
12 Carnations, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
1 Hand Bouquet, 1st prize, Miss M. Sturm; 2nd prize, Mrs R.C. Sturm.
1 Table Bouquet, 1st prize, Mrs R.C. Sturm.
Collection Roses, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
3 Roses, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
6 Hollyhocks, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.

FRUITS.
Black Currants, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell; 2nd prize, W. Scott, Esq.
Gooseberries, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell; 2nd prize, Mrs E. Collins; extra prize, Sturm and Sons.
Collection of Fruit, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
Red Currants, 1st prize, W. Scott, Esq.; 2nd prize, Hon. H.R., Russell.
1 Dish Plums, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
Dish Cherries, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
Collection Gooseberries, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.
Dish Strawberries, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.

VEGETABLES.
Brace Cucumbers, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell; 2nd prize, Hon, H.R. Russell.
Broad Beans, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
Collection Peas, 1st prize, John Harding, Esq.; 2nd prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
French Beans, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
Dish of Peas, 1st prize, John Harding, Esq.; 2nd prize, Hon. H.R., Russell.
Long Radishes, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
Turnip Radishes, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
Onions, 1st prize, Wm. Scott, Esq.; 2nd prize, John Harding, Esq.; 3rd prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
6 Turnips, 1st prize, Wm. Scott, Esq.; 2nd prize, B. Kemp, Esq.
12 Round Potatoes, 1st prize, John Harding, Esq.; 2nd prize, Wm. Scott, Esq.
Kidney potatoes, 1st prize, John Harding, Esq.
Carrots, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell; 2nd prize, John Harding, Esq.
3 Cabbages, 1st and extra prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
3 Lettuces, 1st prize, Hon. R. Russell; 2nd prize, John Harding, Esq.
Collections of Vegetables, 1st prize, Hon. H.R. Russell.
Asparagus, 1st prize, Sturm and Sons.

“It seems to me I have seen your physiognomy somewhere before,” said a swell to a stranger whom he met the other day; “but I cannot imagine where.” – “Very likely,” replied the other; “I have been a warder of a prison for the last twenty years.”

A woman applied for a situation as a cab-driver, being asked if she could manage mules, scornfully replied – “Of course I can – I’ve had two husbands.”

The proposition to introduce ladies as railway conductors is objected to in view of the fact that “their trains are always behind.”

ST. JOSEPH’S CONVENT SCHOOLS.
A very interesting gathering took place on Thursday evening at the new School-room, St. Joseph’s Providence, on the occasion of the distribution of prizes to the pupils of the above schools. A carefully selected and well-executed musical entertainment preceded the distribution. Our limited space prevents our giving the full programme, but we cannot avoid mentioning “Mozart’s Gloria” by the pupils of the Select School; “Pussy’s Tea Party” by a band of very small children; the “A.B.C” by Miss Reed and Miss Boylin; “The Blind Girl to her Harp” by Miss Reed, which was a perfect treat; “Echos du Sanctuaire” by the pupils of the Select School; and “We Wish you a Merry Christmas” by the native children. The schools certainly contain some charming voices, and the training, both vocal and instrumental, was very careful. The Rev. Father Forest, V.G., distributed the prizes to the European children, and Father Reignier to the native children. It must have been a source of great pleasure to the Clergy and Sisters to see the way in which their labors were appreciated by their pupils, and their visitor, Mr G.E. Lee, by request of Father Forest, made a short address to the children, and the evening wound up with “God Save the Queen.”

LADIES SCHOOL.
A special prize (presented by his Worship the Mayor) was awarded to Miss Alice Corry, as first prize for fancy work and general advancement.
Good Conduct – Miss A. Maney.
Politeness – Miss A. Murray.
Good Conduct – Miss J. Jarman, Miss M. Nesbitt, Miss Hedley, Miss M. Burton, Miss A. Taylor, Miss Pearcy, Miss L. Taylor, Miss M. Harman, Miss Henn.

FIRST CLASS.
History – Miss Boylan.
Composition – Miss Carroll.
General Knowledge – Miss E. Maney.
Application – Miss Keenan.

SECOND DIVISION.
History – Miss Yates.
Composition – Miss Taylor.
Writing – First prize, Miss N., Boylan; second prize, Miss Graham.
Arithmetic – First prize, Miss Frame; second prize, Miss Nesbitt.
Grammar – First prize, Miss N. Boylan; second prize, Miss Hayden.
Good Conduct – Miss Hameling.
Application – Miss Peters.

SECOND CLASS.
History – Miss Young.
Geography – Miss Hedley.
Grammar – Miss Annie Taylor.
Writing – First prize, Miss Jarman; second prize, Miss M. Nesbitt.
Arithmetic – First prize, Miss A. Maney; second prize, Miss M. Hayden.
Politeness – Miss Nelly Taylor.

THIRD CLASS.
Reading – Miss Barry
Geography – Miss Sarah Smith.
Writing – First prize, Miss Burton; second prize, Miss M. Smith.
Arithmetic – First prize, Miss Hammond; second prize, Miss Jackson.
Application – Miss M. Harman.

FOURTH CLASS.
Reading – Miss J. Boylan.
Geography – Miss Elliott.
Arithmetic – Miss N. Hayden.
Writing – First prize, Miss Pearcey; second prize, Miss Lizzie Taylor.
Application – Miss Henn.
Politeness – Miss E. Nesbitt.
Regular attendance – Miss M. Harman, Miss N. Hayden, Miss Henn.
French – First prize, Miss E. Maney; second prize, Miss Murray; third prize Miss Keenan.
Drawing – First prize, Miss Corry; second prize, Miss Keenan.
Music – First prize, Miss Boylan; second prize, Miss E. Maney.
Singing – Miss Reed.
Fancy Work – First prize, Miss Reed; second prize, Miss A. Maney; third price, Miss Keenan/
Religious Instruction – First prize, Miss Annie Maney, second prize, Miss Harman; third prize, Miss E. Hedley.

PARISH SCHOOL.

FIRST CLASS.
(Presented by the Very Rev. Father Forest.)
Good Conduct. – First prize, M. Barry.
Religious Instruction. – First prize, E. Douglas.
(Presented by Mr Colenso.)
Writing. – First prize, E. Allen.
Grammar and Composition – First prize, C. Browne.
Singing and Geography – First prize, E. Douglas.
Fancy Work and Arithmetic – First prize, C. Browne; second prize, arithmetic, M.E. Connors.

SECOND CLASS.
Regular Attendance and Arithmetic. – First prize, E. Barry.
Reading and Geography. – First prize, M. Monaghan.
General Knowledge. – First prize, L. Belshaw; second prize, E. Hawker.
Arithmetic. – Second prize, M. Cunningham.
Writing. – Second prize, K. Brophy.
Religious Instruction. – Second prize, M. Allen.

THIRD CLASS.
Good Conduct. – Third prize, M. Andrews, fourth prize, K. O’Bourke.
Regular Attendance and Writing. – Second prize, E. Barker; third prize, E. Dryberg.
Reading.- First prize, C. McHugh.
Arithmetic. – First prize, E. Tier.

FOURTH CLASS.
Reading and Writing. – First prize, C. Briggs; second prize, W. Tannion; third prize, E. Dowling; fourth prize, W. Williams; E. Burns, M. Purcell, J. Laundy.

PROVIDENCE.
General Good Conduct. – Kate Poara, Jane Tepune, Jane Petera Atarata, Mary Walker, Emma Te Hiki, Mary Alice Kate, M. Catherine Te Puni.
Fancy Needlework (presented by Mr Blythe.) – Hannah Sturley.
Housekeeping and Plain Sewing. – Mary Walker.
General Progress and Fancy Work. – Jane Tepuni.
Application (presented by Mr Colenso.) – Julie Borell, Jane Petera, Kate Paora, Mary Arapera, Mary A. Hale, Atarata.
Regularity (presented by Mr Colenso.) – Julie Borell, Pinia Pinipe, Mary Lewis, Mary Te Kihi.
Reading (presented by Mr Colenso.) – Ellen Beattie, Julie Borell, Mary Te Kihi, Lydia Keria, M.A. Hale, Emma Te Hiki, Margaret Allen, Kieita Ropia, Sara, Emily Walker, Horianua, Elizabeth Sillen.
Writing. – Magdalen Arakatera, Jane Tepuni, Mary Lewis, Mary Arapera, Mary Walker Henerite.
Arithmetic (presented by Mr Colenso.) – Jane Petera, Julie Borell, Mary Arpera, Mary Lewis, Agness, Sarah.
Geography (presented by Mr Colenso.) – Magdalen Aratratera, Ellen Beattie, Pina Pinipe, Lydia Keria.

ST. MARY’S SCHOOL, MEANEE [MEEANEE].
THE yearly examination of the above school, which is under the management of Mr B. Hamill, was held on Friday. The examination was held in the presence of Father Reignier and several of the pupils, who expressed their pleasure at the general advancement of the school. The average attendance at the school is sixty, thirty of whom are boarders.
The following pupils carried off the principal prizes:-
Fifth, or Highest Class.- 1st prizes: James Joseph Hamill, Richard Maney, Henry McGreevy (Waipawa), Andrew Maney, James Neagle.
Second Draft of Fifth Class. – First prizes: P. McGreevy, Stephen McGreevy, John Larner, and William Bennett. The above scholars are boarders and sons of Waipawa settlers. Benjamin Jeffares, of Taradale, also carried off a first prize. A special prize was given for history, which was taken by Frank Maney.
Fourth Class – First prizes: Fred Hansen, and Daniel Hamill.
Third Class. – First prizes: John Baker, John Lorrigan, and William Lorrigan.
Second Class. – John Barry, and John Alpin.
Several other scholars took prizes, but want of space precludes a full list.
Girls’ Department. – First prizes: Theresa Hawkins, Anne Hawkins, Mary Hamill, Catherine Cleary, Margaret Cleary, Jane Luckie, and Maggie Hamill.
At the close of the examination, there was a competition for a special prize given by Mr Barry, of Taradale, for arithmetic, which was won by Richard Maney. The school then broke up for the holidays, the scholars giving three cheers for Father Reignier and Mr and Mrs Hamill.
We are requested by the teacher, (Mr Hamill,) to tender his thanks to Mr Colenso, the Inspector of Schools, for the valuable books presented by him as prizes for the scholars after his last examination held about three months ago.
We have recently had an opportunity of inspecting this school establishment, and were surprised to notice the great increase in the number of boarder pupils. Last year there were but twelve, and now owing to the knowledge that parents and guardians have of the excellence of the school under Mr and Mrs Hamill’s management the number has increased to upwards of thirty. Owing to this it gives us pleasure to state that the Rev. Father Reignier purposes enlarging the premises so as to give increased accommodation for more pupils, and we believe by next year, notwithstanding the many disadvantages the school will have to encounter through the withdrawal of the Government subsidy it will receive increased support from the public, and more especially from country settlers, who will find the children left in charge of Mr and Mrs Hamill well cared for, not only with respect to education, but as regards their general comfort.

[…]

14  THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
9,400 ACRES VERY RICH LAND, partially improved, about twelve miles from Gisborne, for Sale or Lease, with
6,000 Sheep, few Cattle, and all working improvements.
1,200 acres richest alluvial land, Karamu plains, fenced and subdivided.
25,000 acres Leasehold, good title, low rent, and
112 acres Freehold, near Gisborne, with
20,000 Sheep, and all necessary working improvements; the run divided into nine paddocks, all well watered and grassed.
11,000 acres Freehold, partially sown, all fenced and subdivided, good and substantial improvements, good road, within 30 miles of Napier.
11,000 Sheep, a few Cattle, and Horses
600 acres Lease, with right of purchase, within 12 miles of Napier; fenced and subdivided, comfortable house, shed, &c., with
800 Sheep, a few Cattle, etc.
8,800 acres Leasehold, title good, rent moderate, excellent land, near Tologa [ Tolaga ] Bay, with
3,000 Sheep, improvements, good house, shed, and yards
11,000 acres Leasehold, good title, agricultural and pastoral land, Poverty Bay, a few improvements, with
3,000 Sheep, and a few Cattle
1,600 acres Leasehold, Poverty Bay
1,200 acres Freehold, improved rich land, Opotiki
340 acres Freehold, Mahia Peninsula
400 acres Patea District
750 acres, fenced and improved, Mongonui.
4,030 acres Freehold, good improvements, near Masterton
2,000 acres, agricultural Freehold, Thames Valley
10,000 acres Freehold, pastoral land, with few improvements, Thames Valley
600 acres, in sections, at Woodville
40 acres Freehold, highly improved, at Havelock
3,000 acres Freehold, good agricultural and Pastoral land near Wairoa, considerable improvement, with
800 Sheep and 100 head Cattle
900 acres Freehold, near Wairoa.
4,000 acres Freehold near Wairoa, part improved, good house and woolshed, yards, etc. with
3,000 Sheep, a few Cattle and Horses
SHEEP FOR SALE.
Pure Merino Rams bred by H.W.P. Smith
Pure Merino Rams bred by D. McLean
Pure Merino Rams bred by Hon. H.R. Russell
Pure Merino Rams bred by Rich & Shrimpton
Pure Merino Rams bred by Hugh Campbell
Pure Merino Rams bred by D. Gollan
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by T. Kirkman
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by Dudding
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by H. Sladden
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by W. Marcroft
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by P. Threlkeld
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by Jackson & Russell
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by Joseph May
Pure Lincoln Rams bred by Sutton Brothers
Pure Leicester Rams bred by B. McLean
Cotswolds Rams bred by G.D. Hamilton
240 Pure Merino Stud Ewes, Rich & Shrimpton
209 Pure Lincoln Stud Ewes, H. Sladen
500 cross-bred wedders Fat
200 cross-bred wedders Fat
200 cross-bred wedders Fat
1,200 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 6 tooth, immediate delivery
1,500 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 8 tooth, immediate delivery
2,000 cross-bred Wedders, stores, mixed immediate delivery
360 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 4-tooth, immediate delivery
1,200 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 4-tooth, immediate delivery
1,800 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 2-tooth, immediate delivery
1,000 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 6-tooth, immediate delivery
400 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 2-tooth, immediate delivery
2,000 cross-bred Wedders, stores, 8-tooth, immediate delivery
1,500 ⅞ and ¾ bred Wedders, 6-tooth and upwards, immediate delivery
3,000 ¾ bred Wedders, 6-tooth and upwards, Culls, immediate delivery
2,000 cross-bred Wedders, 6 0 tooth and upwards, Culls, immediate delivery
1,000 cross-bred Wedders, 6-tooth and upwards, immediate delivery
2,000 Merino Wedders, stores, 6-tooth, immediate delivery
300 Merino Wedders, store, 6-tooth, immediate delivery
1,000 Merino Wedders, store, 2 and 4-tooth, immediate delivery
1,000 Merino Wedders, store, 6 and 8-tooth, immediate delivery
3,000 Merino Wedders, stores, 8-tooth, immediate delivery
2,500 Merino Ewes, mixed ages, delivery in February
2,000 Merino Ewes, 8-tooth, delivery Feb.
4,000 Merino Ewes, Culls, delivery in March
1,100 Lambs, cross-bred, delivery in February
200 Pure Lincoln Ewes, aged, delivery in February
150 cross-bred Ewes, 2-tooth, delivery in February
1,500-tooth Ewes, out of ⅞ – Lincoln, delivery in March
1,500 8-tooth Ewes, out of ⅞ Lincoln, delivery in March
500 ¾ bred Ewes, mixed ages, with 90 per cent. Lambs given in, immediate delivery
1,500 cross-bred Cull Ewes, delivery February
3,000 cross-bred Cull Ewes, delivery February
1,000 ¾ – bred Costwold [Cotswold] Ewe Hoggets
4,500 ⅞ and ¾ bred Ewes, 2, 4, 6, and full, delivery in February
SHEEP WANTED TO PURCHASE.
500 not under ⅞ Lincoln 2-tooth Ewes
2,000 Lambs, mixed sexes, Merino
3,000 Merino Wedders, 2 and 4-tooth
3,000 Merino Ewes, 2 and 4-tooth
5,000 Merino Ewes, 2, 4, and 6-tooth or
6,000 equal proportions, 2, 4, 6, and 8-tooth
M.R. MILLER,
Stock and Station Agent.

WOODVILLE.
FOR SALE,
REMAINDER of Lease and Stock-in-Trade of a GENERAL STORE, in a commanding position.
M.R. MILLER.

RURAL SECTIONS, WOODVILLE.
On Deferred Payments.
For particulars, apply to
M.R. MILLER.

MR JENSEN,
JEWELLER and WATCHMAKER,
EMERSON-STREET,
BEGS to inform the Public, that from the 1st January, 1878, the business will be carried on under the name of JENSEN & CO.
The Shop now occupied by Mr RIDER will be added to the Jewellery Business, in order to make room for a large and well-selected Stock direct from the Home Manufacturers.
By entering into Partnership, a large Cash-capital has been introduced into the new firm, which will enable it to offer the Public a large variety in every branch of the Business at prices far below the present ruling in Napier.

WAIPAWA.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1878.
IN THE ESTATE OF SAMUEL ROBERTS,
(deceased.)
MR J.J. TYE,
Has been instructed by the Trustees in the above Estate, to sell by Public Auction, at the deceased’s farm, on the Waipawa River,
ON TUESDAY, 8th JANUARY, 1878,
128 ACRES LAND, being portion of Block 88, in the Homewood Estate (subject to a Mortgage of £524 for a term of years expiring on the 1st April 1881, bearing interest at £6 10s per cent. per annum.)
And
11 ACRES, being Section 10, Tukuwaru Bush.
The above 139 acres will be sold in one lot, and is subdivided in several Paddocks, 60 acres of which are under cultivation, the remainder being well-grassed.
There is a good 4-Roomed Dwelling-House, together with Stables, Barns, Cowsheds, Yards, and all the necessary requirements for carrying on a first-rate Dairy.
Also,
33 Head mixed Cattle
300 Sheep
80 Pigs
8 Horses
Dray, Spring Carts, Harness
Farming Implements, Dairy Utensils. etc., etc., etc.
Sale at 11 o’clock.
J.J. TYE
Auctioneer
For further particulars and conditions of sale, etc., apply to
G.E. SAINSBURY,
Solicitor, Napier.
Or to the Auctioneer, Waipawa.

PRELIMINARY NOTICE.
Mr J.J. TYE will hold his usual Sale of Stock at the Railway Sale Yards, Waipukurau, on FRIDAY, 8th February, 1878, when he will offer a large number of CATTLE, HORSES, and SHEEP, including Longwool and Merino Rams and Ewes, by the best breeder.
JOSEPH J. TYE,
Auctioneer.

PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
520 ACRES FREEHOLD and 60 ACRES LEASEHOLD, Ruataniwha, with 500 Sheep, also Cattle, Horses, &c.
14,000 acres Freehold Land, improved, with
10,000 Sheep, and Cattle, Horses, &c.
105 Acres Freehold, Waipawa River, with 2-roomed Cottage thereon
110 Acres Agricultural Land, leasehold, on the Homewood Estate, with Stock, Implements, &c.
Sections at Richmond Park, Waipawa Bush &c.
RAMS FOR SALE –
50 Lincoln Rams 2-tooth, bred by the Hon. H.R. Russell.
75 Lincoln Rams, 2, 4, 6, and 8-tooth, bred by R.P. Russell, Esq.
12 Lincoln Rams, 2-tooth, bred by F.H. Drower, Esq.
170 Merino Rams, 2-tooth, and
40 Merino Rams, 4-tooth, bred by the Hon. H.R. Russell
34 Merino Rams, 2-tooth, and
38 Merino Rams, 4, 6, and 8-tooth, bred by D. Gollan, Esq.
10 Merino Rams, bred by Thomas Hedlam, Esq., Egleston, Tasmania.
SHEEP FOR SALE
2000 cross-bred Ewes, 8-tooth, delivery in February
1000 cross-bred Wethers, 2-tooth
1400 cross-bred Wethers, 4-tooth
2000 Merino Ewes, full mouthed, delivery in February
1000 Merino Ewes, 4 and 6-tooth, delivery in February
500 cross-bred Ewes, 2-tooth, delivery in February
1000 Merino Wethers, full-mouthed
1500 Merino Wethers, full-mouthed, immediate delivery
1000 Merino Wethers, 2, 4, 6, and 8-tooth, delivery in February
700 cross-bred Wethers, 6, and 8-tooth, delivery immediately
500 cross-bred Ewes, 2-tooth, delivery in February
700 cross-bred Ewes, 8-tooth, delivery in February
500 cross-bred Lambs, delivery in February
1000 cross-bred Lambs, delivery in February
250 cross-bred Ewes, 2 and 4-tooth, delivery in February
JOSEPH J. TYE,
Stock and Station Agent,
Waipawa.

WAIPAWA COACH FACTORY.
(NEXT RATHBONE’S STORE.)
F. SHANLY
MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS OF
DOG CARTS,
BUGGIES, AND
CARRIAGES.
Repairs, Painting, &c., executed with despatch.
Estimates furnished and designs made.

FARNDON SALE YARDS.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 4, 1878.
At 2 o’clock sharp.
BANNER & LIDDLE
Will hold, on the above date, the third of their monthly series of Cattle Sales at the Farndon Sale Yards, when they will sell, under instructions from the Public Trustee, the whole of the property of the late Duncan Galbraith, consisting of –
THE GOODWILL of the LEASE (EXPIRING 7TH May, 1878) of HOUSE and 70 acres LAND at Clive; rent £110 per annum.
The Goodwill of the Lease (expiring 26th April, 1879) of about 650 acres Land at Rokawa [ Raukawa ] Te Aute; rent, £200 per annum.
A quantity of Fencing Posts and Tools at Rokawa [ Raukawa ].
37 head Mixed Cattle
500 Sheep (Merino Wethers)
1 Grey Horse
1 Bay Horse
1 Spring Cart and Harness
Tarpaulin, Grindstone, and a few articles of Furniture
Fencing Tools, &c.
Also,
About 50 head Mixed Cattle, further particulars of which will be duly advised.
Entries will be received up to the morning of the sale by Mr Scott, Farndon Hotel, or by the Auctioneers,
BANNER AND LIDDLE.

UNION FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND.
CAPITAL – £2,000,000.
HEAD OFFICE – CHRISTCHURCH.
THIS Company are now prepared to insure at Current Rates against Loss by Fire on Houses, Stores, Furniture, Stock-in-Trade, and all descriptions of Property.
We would call particular attention to the amount of capital, which is double that of any other Colonial Office, and is not exceeded by any Fire and Marine Insurance Office in the world.
Insurances effected with open or valued policies on Wool from sheep’s back, wool-sheds, or shipping port to London.
Risks accepted on Vessels and Cargoes to or from any port to the United Kingdom, America, or the Colonies.
Forms of proposal and any information can be obtained from the
SUB AGENTS –
H. MONTEITH, Waipukurau
W. RATHBONE, Waipawa
S. STONE, Havelock.
J. BARRY, Taradale
W. MALONEY, Wairoa
Or from
BANNER & LIDDLE.
Agents for Hawke’s Bay.

AUSTRALIAN MUTUAL PROVIDENT SOCIETY.
FOR MUTUAL LIFE ASSURANCE, &c.
NEW ZEALAND BRANCH: Head Office, Wellington.
It is found in the course of business that mistakes frequently occur, in consequence of the similarity of title assumed by some of the new Life Offices recently established in the Australian Colonies.
The public are requested to note that the AUSTRALIAN MUTUAL PROVIDENT SOCIETY is the correct designation of the oldest Mutual Life Office in Australia.
PRESENT ANNUAL REVENUE exceeds   £470,000
ACCUMULATED FUNDS exceed   £2,000,000.
The New business for the year 1876 was 4549 proposals accepted and completed, assuring £1,652,575, and producing a new annual revenue of £56,300.
Persons assuring with this office share the whole profits, and a bonus is declared every fifth year.
EDWARD W. LOWE,
Resident Secretary
Agent for Hawke’s Bay.
BANNER & LIDDLE.

BANNER AND LIDDLE
GRAIN, WINE, AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Auctioneers, Accountants, Sharebrokers,
CUSTOM-HOUSE AGENTS, &c.,
TENNYSON-STREET, NAPIER.
And Waghorne-street, Port Ahuriri.
Auctions held in town and country. Customs Entries passed. Free and Bonded Goods stored.
AGENTS FOR
Union Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of New Zealand.
Australian Mutual Provident Life Assurance Society
New Zealand Trade Protection Society
Reuter’s Telegram Agency
Oriental Telegram Agency
Rubber Stamps
Curator of Intestate Estates.

SPRING DRAPERY, MILLINERY, &c., &c., &c.
NEWTON, IRVINE & Co. are now shewing a large assortment of Spring Goods in all the latest styles, and invite inspection.

FOR SALE,
2,000 CROSS-BRED WETHERS, 2, 4, and 6-tooth
900 cross-bred Wethers, 2 and 4-tooth
4000 cross-bred Ewes, full mouthed
600 cross-bred Ewes, 2, and 4-tooth
500 cross-bred Ewes, 2, 4, and 6-tooth
1000 ¾ and 7/8-bred Ewes, from full-mouthed downwards, in equal proportions, to be sold in lots to suit purchasers
80 highly-bred Merino Rams, 2, 4, and 6-tooth
200 highly-bred Cotswold Rams, 2 and 4-tooth
Draught Colts
Mares from imported Victorian stock.
Also
FOUR-ROOMED COTTAGE with Garden, Abbotsford.
SECTIONS in Richmond Park, Waipawa Bush, &c.
WILLIAM L. COWARD,
Stock, Station, and Land Agent.

WILLIAM L. COWARD,
AUCTIONEER AND ACCOUNTANT,
STOCK, STATION, LAND, AND
COMMISSION AGENT,
WAIPAWA.
AGENCIES –
Government Life Insurance
New Zealand Fire Insurance Company.

SHEEP FOR SALE.
3.000 MERINO EWES, 2 and 4-tooth, and full-mouthed.
1000 Cross-bred Wethers, 2-tooth to full-mouthed.
2300 Cross-bred Ewes, various ages and lots
1000 Cross-bred Wethers, various ages and lots
H. MONTEITH,
Auctioneer, etc., Waipukurau.

FOR SALE,
4-ROOMED COTTAGE with ¼ acre Section, Kaikora Township.
5-Roomed Cottage and Section, White Road, Napier.
Apply to
H. MONTEITH.
Waipukurau.

PRELIMINARY NOTICE.
LAND ON DEFERRED PAYMENT.
TERMS: –
One-sixth Cash (three shillings and four pence in the pound), the remainder, at the end of 7 or 14 years, at 6 per cent. interest.
10.000 ACRES of the Arlington Estate, on the Main Road from Waipukurau to Porangahau, and not far from the Waipukurau Railway Station, are now being laid out in blocks of about 500 acres downwards.
This land is of excellent quality, and well suitable for agricultural and pastoral purposes, being all clear and ready for the plough.
It is pretty certain that in a very short time the Railway will branch off from between the head of Lake Hatuma and Mr Purvis Russell’s Woolshed going through the centre of this property to Porangahau, and other places to the southward.
There are about four miles of frontage to the main road, being laid off in about 40-acre sections, and a beautifully situated township named Wanstead within a few minutes walk of where there will be a station on the above railway line. There will be ample reserves for savings bank, post office, and telegraph station, schools, churches, reading-room, etc., with all the streets 99 feet wide, thereby allowing abundance of room for traffic, and rows of ornamental trees, refreshing to the eye and shelter from the sun.
The sale will take place about the middle of February, of which due notice will be given, and plans issued; also, of when the Land will be open for inspection.

CITY DINING-ROOMS
AND
PUBLIC BATHS,
HASTINGS-STREET, NAPIER,
Opposite Holt’s Timber Yard.
THE inhabitants of Napier and surrounding districts and visitors will find the above establishment replete with all the comforts of home. Cleanliness, civility, and moderate charges guaranteed.
First-class accommodation for boarders, and excellent table.
Meals at all hours.
Breakfast in time for early trains.
Catering for public dinners.
Teas and suppers on the shortest notice.
N.B. – Hot and Cold Baths, 1s. Open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

STANDARD INSURANCE COMPANY.
FIRE AND MARINE
Capital: One Million Sterling.
Head Office: Princes-street, Dunedin.
LOSSES by FIRE insured against on Stores, Warehouses, Swelling houses, &c., at current rates.
The Company will also take risks on Wool, and all kinds of merchandise on Land or at Sea, and either on valued or open policies, on the most favourable terms.
Particular attention is drawn to the fact that by provision in the Articles of Association, insurers will participate in the profits of the Company.
Agent for Napier,
S. R. DRANSFIELD.

W.K. McLEAN,
AUCTIONEER
PROFESSIONAL ACCOUNTANT,
AUDITOR AND LIQUIDATOR
AGENT FOR
GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE AND ANNUITIES.
HASTINGS-STREET, NAPIER.

15. THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

FARNDON HOTEL,
Opposite the Railway Station,
WEST CLIVE.
The above large and spacious hotel has just been taken over by J.R. Scott (late proprietor of the Kaikora Hotel), who has spared no expense in providing First-class Accommodation. It is situated close by the Railway Station, West Clive.
Travellers and Visitors will find that this Hotel affords every comfort.
Large Bath Rooms attached to the premises. Private Rooms for Families.
Good Stabling and Paddocks for travelling stock.
Wines, Spirits, and Malt Liquors, of the best qualities, only kept.
A large Billiard Room on the Premises, fitted up with one of Alcock’s best Billiard Tables.
J. R. SCOTT   Proprietor.

STAR HOTEL,
ALBERT STREET, AUCKLAND.
VISITORS to Auckland will find the above a Commodious Family and Commercial Hotel, having every convenience.
Suites of Private Apartments.
Hot and Cold Plunge and Shower Baths.
Billiard Room.
Night Porter in attendance.
R. J. DAVIDSON  Proprietor.,
Napier Daily Telegraph filed.

GREENMEADOWS’ HOTEL
TARADALE.
ARTHUR McCARTNEY, Proprietor.
A. McC. has much pleasure in informing his numerous friends in town and country, that he has taken the above well-known Hotel. The House is replete with every comfort and convenience, and is equal to any in the country.
The Proprietor will earnestly endeavor to give every satisfaction to those who may kindly favor him with their patronage, and they may depend upon being supplied with every article of consumption of the very best quality.
A splendid Paddock for the convenience of visitors from the country.
Good stabling.  Charges strictly Moderate.
An excellent Billiard Room, fitted with one of Alcock’s Prize Tables, which has just been imported from Melbourne, has been added to the Hotel. The room is equal to any in the province, it having just been papered and painted.

PROVINCIAL H OTEL,
CLIVE SQUARE.
[Illegible copy – damage to original.]

KAIKORA
RAILWAY HOTEL.
DUNCAN MUNDELL.
Proprietor.
The above Hotel is newly opened, and situated close to the Railway Station; it is replete with every
COMFORT AND CONVENIENCE
No expense has been spared by the Proprietor to make this Hotel Comfortable and deserving of Public Support.
Excursionists by the Trains will find every Convenience.
PRIVATE ROOMS FOR FAMILIES.
Good Paddocks and Stabling for Travelling Stock.
WINES, SPIRITS, AND MALT LIQUORS of the Best Brands kept.

FORESTERS’ ARMS HOTEL.
SHAKESPEARE ROAD.
M. HAYDEN   PROPRIETOR.
Every accommodation for Visitors and Travellers.
WINES, SPIRITS, AND MALT LIQUORS
Always of the best Quality.
Dinner at 12 and 1 o’clock.
M. HAYDEN.

VICTORIA HOTEL.
WHITE ROAD.
THE Undersigned begs to inform his friends and the public that he has now entered into possession of the above well-known Hotel. Having had considerable experience in hotel business, he trusts by civility and attention to merit a fair share of patronage.
Only the best brands of Ales, Wines, and Spirits kept.
All the conveniences of a first-class Hotel can be obtained at this establishment.
J. PARKER,
Proprietor.

RAILWAY HOTEL
PORT AHURIRI.
THE undersigned begs to inform his friends and the public that he has just opened the above splendid, new, and commodious Hotel, at Port Ahuriri, near the Railway Station. This Hotel is replete with every accommodation and convenience, and every effort will be made to meet the requirements of customers.
Splendid Ales, Beers, Wines, and Spirits always on Hand.
A Table D’Hote daily.
Splendid Accommodation for Travellers and Families.
JOHN YOUNG,
Proprietor.

PATANGATA HOTEL.
TRAVELLERS and others are informed that Mr. Mullender has now obtained a license for the above Hotel. Mr. Mullender has for many years had considerable experience as a Publican, and is therefore prepared to meet all requirements.
Ales, Wines, and Spirits of the very best brands, are always obtainable.
Good Paddocks, and Stabling.
G. MULLENDER
Proprietor.

SHAMROCK HOTEL
CORNER OF CHILDERS AND LOWE STREET,
GISBORNE – POVERTY BAY.
Three minutes walk from the Wharf.
ALFRED WALKER,
Proprietor.

CLARENDON HOTEL,
NAPIER.
(Late W. Britten.)
OPPOSITE TELEGRAPH AND POST OFFICES.
THOS. PEDDIE   Proprietor.

NEW ZEALAND RAILWAYS.
NAPIER-MANAWATU RAILWAY.
PAPATU BRIDGE CONTRACT.
Public Works Office,
Wellington 14th November, 1877.
WRITTEN TENDERS will be received at this office up to NOON on WEDNESDAY, the 2nd January, 1878, for the above contract. They must be addressed to the Hon. the Minister for Public Works, Wellington, and marked outside, “Tender for Papatu Bridge Contract, Permanent Way.” Plans and Specifications may be seen at the Public Works Offices, Auckland, Wanganui, Christchurch, Foxton, Wellington, Dunedin, Invercargill, the Survey Office Nelson, and at the Post Office Napier. Telegraphic Tenders similarly addressed and marked, will be received if presented at any Telegraphic Office by NOON of the same date, provided that written tenders in due form are lodged at a District or Resident Engineer’s Office by the same hour, and accompanied by a cheque on some bank in the town where the tender is lodged; such cheque to be specially marked by a banker as good for twenty-one days, and to be in favor of the Receiver-General’s Deposit Account only, and not to bearer or order. The lowest or any tender will not necessarily be accepted.
By command,
JOHN CARRUTHERS,
Engineer-in-Chief.
N.B. – Plans for this contract can be purchased at the above offices.

BOROUGH OF NAPIER.
TENDERS are invited for the purchase of 5 ½ tons (more or less) of LEAD SERVICE PIPES for Waterworks purposes. Sizes 1 inch, weight per yard, 16 lbs; ¾ inch, 11lbs [?] 1 lbs per yard; upset price, £26 per [ton?]
Also, for an improved TESTING APPARATUS, with circular Iron Tank, 1 ½ inch gun metal Plunger Pump, Safety Valve and lever Stock Cock, Pressure Guage [Gauge] and short length of flexible Injection Pipe; with fittings complete, adapted for ?testing pipes and boilers up to 2000lbs per square inch. Upset price, £27. The above are surplus stores of the Water Works Plant.
Tenders will be receivable at the Town Clerk’s Office, up to Noon of FRIDAY, the 28th December, 1877.
The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
Further information can be obtained on application to the undersigned.
By order,
M. N. BOWER,
Town Clerk.
Town Clerk’s Office,
Nov. 23rd, 1877.

MRS BRENTON’S
PRIVATE BOARDING HOUSE,
BLAIR COTTAGE,
CARLYLE-STREET.

Kinross & Co.
TO ARRIVE PER “ADAMANT,” FROM LONDON.
50 CASES containing 100 half Chests Fine TEA.
13[?] Cases containing 52 quarter chests Fine Tea
200 cases Prices’ Belmont Sperm Candles
374 cases Crosse and Blackwell’s, and Morton’s Oilmens Stores
50 casks Crushed Loaf Sugar
10 casks Soda Chrystals
10 cases Keiler’s Confectionery
11 cases Keiler’s Dundee Marmalade
4 cases Wotherspoon’s Confectionery
1 case Stencil Inks
1 case Ink Powders
1 case Williams’ Butchers Knives, Choppers, etc.
1 case Blumberg’s Perfumes
60 drums Linseed Oil
6 ½ barrels Stockholm Tar
20 cases 5 and 10lbs tins Liquid Paint
3 tons White Lead, Nos. 1 and 2
2 cases Lockwood’s Cuttlery
4 bales 8/4 Grey Calico
2 cases Woolen [Woollen] Shirts
1 case Lambs Wool Shirts
1 case Shawls
1 case Hosiery
2 cases Sundry Drapery
200 cases Hennessy’s Brandy, 1 star*
10 cases Hennessy’s Brandy, 2 stars**
100 cases Booth’s Old Tom
50 cases Red Heart Jamaica Rum
6 ¼-casks Jamaica Rum
16 ¼-casks Campbelton’s Whisky
4 octaves Jura Whisky
10 cases Geisler’s Best Creaming Champagne
6 ¼-casks best Golden Sherry, Duff, Gordon & Co
2 ¼-casks Brown Sherry, Duff, Gordon & Co
6 ¼-casks Amontillado, Duff, Gordon & Co
KINROSS & CO.

PER “RENFREWSHIRE,” FROM LONDON.
20 BALES WOOLPACKS, 10 ½ lbs., loose tops, 27 x 50.
20 bales Woolpacks 8lbs, loose tops, 27 x 42
6 bales Quarter Packs
2 bales Sheets for Wool Scouring
1 bale Seaming Twine
1 case Stubb’s Files
10 bundles Socket Spades
1 case Sorby’s Scythes and Hooks
1 case Sorby’s Handsaws
2 casks Ruddle
4 cases Bath Bricks
1 case Rimmel’s Perfumery
15 cases Roederer’s Carte Blanche Champagne
10 cases Denihard’s Moselle
20 cases very old Jamieson’s Whisky
100 cases Hennessy’s Brandy
16 ¼-casks Kopkes Port Wine.
KINROSS & CO.

JUST RECEIVED
EX “MATAURA,” FROM LONDON.
6 TONS McDOUGALL’S SHEEP DIP.
KINROSS & CO.

NOW LANDING
EX “LOCHNAGAR,” FROM LONDON.
25 TONS FENCING WIRE, No. 6, Johnson’s B.B., annealed.
25 tons Fencing Wire, No. 8, Johnson’s B.B., annealed
150 kegs McDougall’s Sheep Dip, 50lb each
5 kegs McDougall’s Sheep Dip, 100 lbs each
12 cases 3-crown Corrugated Iron, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 feet
5 kegs Galvanised Screws
2 kegs Lead Washers
6 doz Parkes’ Socket Spades
4 bales Tarpaulins, assorted sizes
2 bales Flour Bags, 100lbs and 50lbs
30 cases Currants
30 cases Eleme Raisins
40 casks Guiness’ Stout, bottled by Burke, quarts
30 casks Guiness’ Stout, bottled by Burke, pints
30 casks Ind Coope’s Ale, quarts
50 casks Ind Cooper’s Ale, pints
KINROSS & CO.

[Illegible copy – damage to original.]

PER STEAMER “HANKOW” FROM LONDON,
NOW AT MELBOURNE.
3000 QR. SIZE WOOL PACKS.
KINROSS & CO.

TO ARRIVE PER “C. A. LITTLEFIELD,” FROM NEW YORK.
30 CASES TWIST TOBACCO, St. Andrew’s
20 quarter Tierces Tobacco, St. Andrew’s
KINROSS & CO.

JUST RECEIVED PER “CITY OF SYDNEY,” FROM SAN FRANCISCO.
6 CASES LAWN MOWERS, 16 to 20 inches.
6 Post Hole Borers
2 Windmill Pumps with Gear complete.
KINROSS & CO.

BOOTS! BOOTS! BOOTS!
W. TUCKWELL.
In returning thanks to his friends and the inhabitants of Napier and surrounding districts for the very liberal support accorded him for the last three years, begs to inform them that he has just received and opened up his first summer shipment of Ladies’ Gents, and Children’s Boots and shoes of every description from the English, French, and Colonial Manufacturers, at prices that defy competition.
Ladies E.S. Kid Boots, from 6s.
Men’s E.S. Boots, from 13s 6d.
W.T. would call particular attention to his Bespoke Department. As all orders receive his personal attention, perfect fit and despatch may be relied upon.
Note the address: –
WILLIAM TUCKWELL,
Boot Manufacturer,
Hastings-street.

Bennett & Johnson’s Notices.

NOTICE.
D. W. BENNETT begs to announce to his clients and the public generally that he has taken into partnership Mr R. BROOKING, who, for the past 11 years, has been in the office of E. Lyndon, Esq., Land and Estate Agent. The present firm of BENNETT and JOHNSON will, from the 1st day of January, 1878, be carried on under the name of BENNETT and BROOKING.
Napier, November 21, 1877.

BENNETT AND JOHNSON,
HOUSE, LAND, ESTATE, AND GENERAL COMMISSION AGENTS,
ACCOUNTANTS, SHAREBROKERS,
HASTINGS-STREET.

TO LEND,
£700 TO £1000
About the 1st of December. Good freehold security required.
BENNETT AND JOHNSON.

TO LET OR FOR SALE,
SHOP and DWELLING-HOUSE with Section, 36 x 82 ½ feet, situated on the White Road, near the Napier Hotel, and lately occupied by Mr. C. Mogridge. The Building consists of eight large rooms, and is suitable for a Store or Boarding-house.
The above is to let at a low rent, or for sale on easy terms.
Apply to
BENNETT and JOHNSON.

FOR SALE,
TOWN SECTION No. 162, in part 33 x 85 ½ feet, Emerson-street, Opposite the Star Hotel.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

FOR SALE,
A TWO-ROOMED COTTAGE on the White-road, near the Railway Crossing. Price low, and terms easy.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

MR. CHARLES WINKELMAN, Collector for the firm of Bennett & Johnson, is authorised to Collect all accounts due to me.
J. MURRAY GIBBES, M.B.

BENNETT & JOHNSON’S LIST
Of
PROPERTIES FOR SALE.
FREEHOLD.
HOUSES FOR SALE.
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, 66 x 132, Shakespeare-road.
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, upwards of half-an-acre, Coote-road, house well finished.
6 Roomed Cottage and Section, ½ acre, Milton-road. Grounds planted with fruit and other trees.
5 Roomed Cottage and Section, ½ acre, over-looking Milton-road. Grounds laid out. House nearly new.
5 Roomed Cottage and Section, opposite Garry’s foundry and facing the sea.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, White-road, near the Maori Club. Price £160.
4 Roomed Cottage and Section, one-eighth of an acre, Milton-road
3 Roomed Cottage and Section, 23 by 80 Beach Road.
3 Roomed Cottage and Section, one-eighth of an acre, Shakespeare-road.
2 Two-Roomed Cottages and Sections, White-road, near the Maori Club. Price £90 each.
? Roomed Cottage and Section, 21 x 66, Port Ahuriri.
2 Roomed Cottage with 1 acre land laid out as an orchard, at Puketapu.
LAND FOR SALE
186 ACRES Waikato District, Province of Auckland
80 acres, County Mongonui, Province of Auckland
40 acres, Danevirk [ Dannevirke ], Hawke’s Bay
40 acres, Woodville, Hawke’s Bay
40 acres, Wairoa, Hawke’s Bay
37 acres Te Whaku, Hawke’s Bay
Town Section, 296 in White-road
Town Section, 303 in White-road.
Town Section, 312 in White-road.

[Illegible copy, damage to original]

Town Section 41 in Hyderabad-road
Town Section, 353 in Dickens-street
Town Section, 377 in Munroe-street near Railway
Town Section, 382 in Munroe-street
Town Section, 223 in Thackeray-street
Sections in Woodville, Hampden, and Waipawa.
Numerous other Town and Country Properties for Sale or Lease.
BENNETT & JOHNSON.

CLIFTON HOUSE,
OPPOSITE RESERVOIR, CAMERON ROAD,
EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENT
FOR
YOUNG LADIES.
Conducted by Mrs Dugleby and Miss Neale.
The above will be opened on the 21st January, 1878.
The course of instruction will comprise: –
English, in all its branchesFrench
Music
Drawing
Flower painting, &c.

ICE DRINKS!
ICE DRINKS!!
ICE DRINKS!!!
AT THE CRITERION HOTEL.

16. THE WEEKLY MERCURY.

GRANT’S MAIL COACHES
LEAVE Havelock for Hastings Railway Station in connection with the Train as follows: –
Depart   Arrive   Retrn
Havelock   9 a.m.   Hastings   9.30   9.35
Havelock  11.45 a.m.  Hastings  12.15   12.25
Havelock   4.30 p.m.   Hastings   5 p.m.   5.5
An open Express Waggon leaves Havelock daily for goods as required.
Coach can be hired to meet any train that is not met in the ordinary time table for 3s for one or three passengers, above three, the ordinary fare of 1s each.
Fares 1s each way.
General goods, 8s per ton.
Timber, 1s per hundred feet.
Shingles, 1s per thousand.
Ladies’ and Gents’ saddle horses, 7s 6d per day.
Single seated Buggies, 15s per day.
Double seated Buggies   20s per day.
Horses broken to single and double harness.
Horses bought or sold on commission.
Saddle horses, Buggies or Coaches can be had to meet any train at Hastings by telegraphing to G. Grant, Hastings.
GEO. GRANT.

V. R.
ON and after TUESDAY, 5th December, Four-horse Coaches will leave Napier weekly for Taupo, Rotorua, and Tauranga, leaving Napier every TUESDAY MORNING, arriving at Tauranga on FRIDAY; leaving Tauranga every TUESDAY, arriving at Napier on FRIDAYS.
Fares:
Taupo   £2 10s
Tauranga  £5 0s
A. PETERS.
Booking Office at Clarendon Hotel.

COBB & CO.’S
TELEGRAPH LINE OF COACHES.
LEAVE Takapau every Monday and Thursday mornings for Palmerston and the Wairarapa, for the arrival of the 6.45 train from Napier, returning every Tuesday and Friday.
HASTWELL, MACARA & CO.,
Proprietors.
H. P. COHEN.
Agent.

RYMER’S
NAPIER AND TARADALE ROYAL MAIL COACHES.
TIME TABLE.
FROM TARADALE –
1st   ½ past 8 o’clock, New Road.
2nd   ¼ to 9 o’clock, via Meanee
3rd   11 o’clock, New Road
4th   ¼ to 2 o’clock, via Meanee
FROM NAPIER –
1st    10 o’clock,  [Newton’s?] Corner, New Road
2nd   [?] o’clock, via Meanee
3rd   ½ past 2 o’clock, New Road
4th   4 o’clock, via Meanee
The Puketapu Coach leaves Napier every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday mornings at 11 o’clock, departing from Puketapu the same days, at 1 o’clock.
Special Coaches, Buggies, and Saddle Horses can be had at Taradale, at any time.
G. RYMER

D. COTTON,
LIVERY AND BAIT STABLES
PORT AHURIRI.
ALL KINDS OF VEHICLES ON HIRE.
Passengers called for in time for outgoing steamers.
D.C. has continually Busses running between Port Ahuriri and Napier.
D. COTTON.

HAVELOCK EXPRESS.
WILL run on and after December 1st, from Havelock to Napier with Goods and Passengers, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Saturdays.
The Coach will start at Napier from the Repository, Hastings-street.
W. GOODWIN,
Proprietor.

ROYAL MAIL COACHES between PETANE and the WESTERN SPIT will run Daily on and after this date-
Leaving Petane at 8 o’clock a.m. and 1 p.m.
Leaving Ferry Hotel, Spit, at 11 o’clock a.m. and 4 p.m.
Fares, 2s 6d each way.
Booking office, Clarendon Hotel.
W. VILLERS,
Proprietor.
August 30, 1877.

HAVELOCK EXPRESS
GOODS and Passengers carried to all parts of the District, at the lowest rates.
Will run to Napier every SATURDAY, and when required.
W.H. SIMPSON,
Havelock.
Poultry, Eggs, and all Farm Produce bought.

TO STAND THIS SEASON
AT
THE EMPIRE STABLES, WAIPAWA.
THE superior thoroughbred Entire “HERCULES,”
Bred by Mr Murphy, of Spring Creek, and raced by Mr Redwood.
Got by Ravensworth, dam Plover, by Sir Hercules, Ravensworth by Touchstone, Fair Jean by Verulum, Fair Helen by Pantaloon.
Hercules is a bay horse, 6 years old, and stands 15 ¾ hands high, combines the best of blood, with good bone and immense power, and was one of the best weight-carriers of his day. Hercules won the Hawke’s Bay Stakes in 1876.
Plover, the dam of Hercules, is also dam of Malvina, who ran so successfully during the seasons of 1872 and 1873.
Hercules made a splendid season last year in the Marlborough district, with great satisfaction to the public, and is a sure foal getter.
Terms – Six guineas each mare, and five shillings for groom. Two or more by arrangement.
Good paddocks, but no responsibility. Mares to be paid for on delivery.
For further particulars, apply to
THOMAS BRINSON,
Groom-in-Charge.
Or, to
LEWIS EVANS.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT TAMUMU.
THE Thorough-bred Horse,
“ORLANDO,”
Orlando is a roan horse-bred in Auckland in 186?, by Joseph Hargreaves, Esq., by the imported horse Pacific, out of Refraction, by Cap-a-pie, her dam, Princess, by Grates (imported), grand-dam by Stride, great-grand-dam by Hector. Pacific by Flatcatcher, dam Disagreeable, by Agreeable, her dam by Sam out of Morel, by Sorcerer.
Refraction won nine races out of eleven in New South Wales, and Orlando’s performances are very good.
Terms: Four guineas each mare. A reduction will be made in the case of two or more mares, the property of the same owner.
Paddocks free till mares stinted, of which due notice will be given.
All mares to be paid for before removal.
Every care taken, but no responsibility.
All mares left at Mr Baker’s Empire Hotel, Waipawa, Mr. John Petit, Te Aute, and Mr. Charles Stuart, Havelock, will be forwarded free of charge.
J. PRICE,
Tamumu.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT GREEN HILL FARM, PUKETAPU.
THE pure-bred Clydesdale Draught Stallion
“YOUNG LORD GLASGOW.”
Terms: – Three Guineas; allowance will be made for two or more mares, the property of one owner.
First-class Paddocks provided for one month, after which 2s 6d per week will be charged.
Pedigree will be published in future advertisement.
For further particulars, apply to
JOHN BICKNELL.
Peketapu [ Puketapu ].

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT WAIPAWA.
THE Pure Clydesdale Horse
“CAMPSIE 3RD.”
Terms Three Guineas
First-class Paddocks provided free. Every care taken, but no responsibility.
All mares to be paid for and removed when stinted due notice of which will be given.
J. HAMMOND,
Groom in Charge.
Waipawa, Sept. 26, 1877.

THOROUGHBRED STALLION.
TO STAND THIS SEASON AT LONGLANDS, HAWKE’S BAY.
“PAPAPA” by Ravensworth, dam Waimea.
Terms – Eight Guineas.
An allowance will be made for two or more Mares, the property of one owner. First-class paddocks provided free, and every care taken, but no responsibility. All Mares to be paid for and removed when stinted, due notice of which will be given.
ROBERT FARMER.
Longlands, 28th August, 1877.

COTSWOLD RAMS.
THE Oakbourne Sale Sheep have been shorn and are open for selection they will be sold privately.
Apply, stating number required, and further particulars to the undersigned.
JOHN DAVIS CANNING,
Oakbourne.
16th October, 1877.

DUGDALE
This first-class pure-bred Clydesdale Sire will stand for the season at Hastings, where an excellent paddock, well-watered, belonging to J. N. Williams, Esq., has been secured.
Dugdale is a bright bay, standing over 16 ½ hands; thoroughly staunch in shaft and trace harness, and of a very tine temper. He was foaled in December 1871. Sire Black Prince, imported; dam Rose, by Cowder Lad, imported; granddam by Ben Lomond, imported; great-granddam, Bodie’s imported mare, the dam or Sir Benjamin.
PERFORMANCES –
When one year old he gained 2nd prize at Ballarat, 2nd at Smeaton, and 1st at Myrniong; when two years’ old, 2nd prize at the Grand National held in Melbourne, 1st at Ballarat, and 2nd at the Grand National held at Smeaton, 1st at Myrniong, 1st at Melton as the best entire of any age, and 1st for two-year-old colt. On account of the severe weather, and the horse’s long journey to the Show, he was placed 2nd at the Hawke’s Bay Agricultural and Pastoral Show in 1875. In 1876, at the same Show, he took the 1st prize in his class, also the Champion Prize and £50 Gold Cup as the best draught entire horse in the yard.
His foals are very promising, and he was sire of the 1st prize foal at the Foal Show and Ploughing Match in 1876, competing against a large field.
Dugdale will travel to Clive, Meanee [ Meeanee ], and Taradale every Wednesday, remaining at Taradale through the night, and returning to Hastings on Thursday.
Terms – Single mares, £6 6s, groom’s fee included; two or more mares subject to arrangement. Paddocks free.
Every care taken of mares, but no responsibility incurred.
Fees payable on the 1st February, 1878, to the order of John Davis Canning.
For further particulars, apply to
JOHN EVANS,
Goodwin’s Hotel,
Hastings.

THE SIRES OF THE SEASON.
“MUTE,” “JAV’LIN” “ARAB CHILD” and “SAMSON” will serve a limited number of broken in mares this Season at the Tuki Tuki Station.
MUTE by Fireworks dam Fenella own sister to Maribyrnong, Ferryman and half sister to King of the Ring.
Terms: For thoroughbred mares, classed A or B in Stud Book, 8 guineas each; for other mares 6 guineas each.
JAV’LIN by Yattendon dam Lilla, the dam of Alpaca, Commodore and Jessamine and grand dam of Llama, Ringwood, and Woodlands, the winner of the last Hawkesbury guineas and the Derby. (For performances see Turf Register.)
Terms: For thoroughbred mares, classed A or B in Stud Book, 8 guineas each; for other mares, 6 guineas each.
ARAB CHILD. – A pure Khylean, bred by the great Anazah [Anazzah or Anizah] tribe of Nedjd [Nejd] Arabia.
Terms: For thoroughbred Mares, classed A or B in Stud Book, eight guineas each; for other Mares, 5 guineas each.
SAMSON. – Pure bred Shetland pony. Imported by Alexander MacMaster, Esq., of Oamaru.
Terms: Three guineas each mare.
An allowance will be made for two or more mares the bona fide property of the same owner.
The owner of the above horses considers it is unnecessary to enlarge on their merits feeling perfectly assured that Breeders are quite competent to form their own judgment and send their mares to first-class horses only. An inspection of the above is invited at their owner’s stables any day in the week excepting Sunday. First-class paddocks provided free. Every care taken but no responsibility. All mares to be paid for and removed when stinted, due notice of which will be given. Any mares not proving in foal will be served at half price next season.
Mares left at Mr. Giblin’s Mangateretere West, on Fridays, and at Mr. Hugh Campbell’s, Poukawa, on Saturdays, will be forwarded free of charge.
For further particulars apply to Mr. John Ewart, Stud Groom, or to
ALLAN McLEAN,
Tuki Tuki Station.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT HAVELOCK.
THE THOROUGHBRED STALLION “TERENGA”
“TERENGA” is a rich chesnut rising, seven years old, was bred by Mr Redwood, is by Ravensworth dam Phoebe by Sir Hercules. Woodstock by Theorcam, Ravensworth by Touchstone dam Fair Jean by Verulam.
Terenga has proved himself a good horse, both on the turf and at the stud, he is a sure foal getter and his stock speak for themselves. A foal out of Hatred by Terenga won the first prize at the H.B.A. and P. Society’s Ploughing Match in 1876, and the same foal when a yearling took the first prize at the last H.B.A. and P. Society’s Show. A special prize of Five Pounds will be given at the forthcoming Show for the best yearling and five pounds for the best two-year old.
G.G. having procured good paddocks, owners of mares may rely on having their mares returned in good condition. Every care taken but no responsibility.
Terms: 5 guineas single mares, two or more belonging to same owner as agreement.
Fees to be paid and mares taken away when stinted, due notice of which will be given.
Terenga will travel to Clive on Wednesdays and to Hastings on Fridays.
For further particulars apply to
GEORGE GRANT,
Havelock.
Or to,
ROBERT GOSEMAN,
Man-in-Charge.

TO STAND THIS SEASON AT MARAEKAKAHU [ MARAEKAKAHO ] STATION.
THE pure Clydesdale Entire “DUKE,”
Got by the imported Clydesdale horse Matchless, dam by the imported Clydesdale horse Iron Duke, grand dam by the imported Clydesdale horse Cumberland, &c, &c.
Duke took the first prize at the H.B. P. and A. Show, in 1873, and is so thoroughly well known as a sure foal-getter, that further commend is unnecessary.
Only a limited number of mares can be taken besides his owner’s.
Terms: – £4 each mare. Two or more, the property of the same owner, £3 10s each.
Every care taken of mares, but no responsibility.
For further particulars, apply to
ARCHIBALD McLEAN, JUN.,
Maraekakaho.

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THE GREATEST WONDER OF MODERN TIMES!
HOLLOWAY’S PILLS
Persons suffering from weak or debilitated constitutions will discover that by the use of this wonderful medicine there is “Health for all.” The blood is the fountain of life, and its purity can be maintained by the use of these pills.
SIR SAMUEL BAKER,
in his work entitled “The Nile Tributaries in Abbyssinia,” says, “I ordered the dragoman Mahomet to inform the Fakey that I was a Doctor, and that I had the best medicines at the service of the sick, with advice gratis. In a short time I had many applicants, to whom I served out a quantity of Holloway’s Pills. These are most useful to an explorer, as possessing unmistakable purgative properties they create an undeniable effect upon the patient, which satisfies him of their value.”
SIMPLE, SAFE, AND CERTAIN!
HOLLOWAY’S OINTMENT
Is a certain remedy for bad legs, bad breasts, and ulcerations of all kinds. It acts miraculously in healing ulcerations, curing skin diseases, and in arresting and subduing all inflammations.
MR. J.T. COOPER,
in his account of his extraordinary travels in in China, published in 1871, says – “l had with me a quantity of Holloway’s Ointment.  I gave some to the people, and nothing could exceed their gratitude; and, in consequence, milk, fowls, butter, and horse feed poured in upon us until at last a teaspoonful of Ointment was worth a fowl and any quantity of peas, and the demand became so great that I was obliged to lock up the small remaining stock.”
Sold by all Chemists and Medicine Vendors throughout the World.
On the Label in the address, 533, Oxford-street, London, where alone they are manufactured.
BEWARE OF ALL COMPOUNDS STYLED
HOLLOWAY’S PILLS AND OINTMENT
With a “New York” Label.

[Advertisement]
PATENT OVAL
SAMSON FENCE WIRE
Patented throughout all the Colonies.
This is an entirely new article, and is fast superseding the old style. Five Wires weigh 10 cwt. per mile, and costing £12 10s, versus 17 cwt. ordinary wire costing £14 10s (the relative cost will be the same at the principal ports of Australasia) with the advantage of having 7 cwt. less to pay carriage for. Over 1000 tons sold by one firm last year, giving unbounded satisfaction. Send for full descriptive circular with innumerable testimonials from leading colonists, and judge for yourselves.
McLEAN BROS., and RIGG, Importers, and General Ironmongers, Melbourne.

THE
WEEKLY MERCURY
AND
Hawke’s Bay Advertiser

Notice to discontinue advertisements (unless where number of insertions is mentioned on original order) must be forwarded, in writing, addressed to the Manager.
Standing Advertisements for Three, Six or Twelve Months can be arranged for at a Liberal Discount.
TERMS OF ADVERTISING AS PER SCALE.

LIST OF AGENTS
NAPIER   COLLEDGE & CRAIG, Hastings-st
W. DENHOLM, Port Ahuriri
MEANEE – J.C. SPEEDY.
TARADALE – J. BARRY.
CLIVE – J. BECK.
HASTINGS – R. SOMERVILLE
HAVELOCK – S. STONE
KAIKORA – J. NICHOLSON
WAIPAWA   E. BIBBY
DUNCAN & CO.
WAIPUKURAU – MESSRS. SMITH & CO
WOODVILLE – MONTEITH AND FOUNTAIN [ FOUNTAINE ].
NORSEWOOD – A. LEVY.
WAIROA – T. PARKER

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION
£ s d.
Per Quarter, if paid in advance   0 6 6
Per Quarter, if booked   0 7
Per Annum, if paid in advance   1 6
Per Annum, if booked   1 10

Printed and published by EDWARD HENDERSON GRIGG, for the Proprietors, at the Mercury Office, Tennyson-street, Napier, Hawke’s Bay, New Zealand.
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 29, 1877.

Original digital file

HardingR741_Weeklymercurydecember291877.pdf

Date published

29 December 1877

Format of the original

Newspaper

Subjects

Tags

Accession number

741/1365/42725

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